Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of press conference: Sydney: 10 February 2012: Statement of Monetary Policy; interest rates



Download PDFDownload PDF

10 February 2012 

Press conference

Sydney

SUBJECTS: Statement of Monetary Policy; interest rates 

TREASURER: 

I wanted to say a few things about the Reserve Bank Statement on Monetary Policy today. I also 

wanted to say something about the announcement from ANZ as well. 

Today's monetary policy statement confirms that despite the impact of global instability on our 

economy, our economic fundamentals are absolutely rock solid and it confirms we continue to 

outperform all economies in the developed world. The RBA forecasts are consistent with the 

Treasury forecasts. We have growth at trend and of course we have contained inflation. Now the 

statement also highlights the challenges facing Australia in the global economy. They still loom large, 

the challenges that come from Europe; notwithstanding the very significant actions that have been 

taken by the ECB in recent weeks that have bought some calm to global markets. So Europe is still a 

long way from solving its problems but we have seen some signs of hope. But of course Europe is 

still expected to enter a recession this year. 

So we know there are strong global headwinds in the global economy and that does produce 

pressures in our economy particularly the pressures that flow through our economy from a stronger 

dollar and those pressures do unsettle consumers. They do unsettle businesses and it does make life 

pretty tough for a number of sectors in our economy, particularly manufacturing and also tourism. 

And these headwinds impact particularly on our budget with global instability already ripping 

something like $140 billion from budget revenues. 

Now while global instability makes the economic management task harder, we are certainly 

determined to make the tough decisions to bring our budget back to surplus in 2012‐13. And here 

there is a really stark contrast with our political opponents who this week abandoned their 

commitment to come back to surplus. And why did they abandon their commitment to come back to 

surplus? Because they already have a $70 billion hole in their budget estimates before they make 

any further commitments. This is incompetence on a grand scale. They are simply incapable of the 

task of economic management in a modern economy.  

Now this government has a proven track record of fiscal discipline. We have the gold‐plated AAA 

rating from the major global rating agencies for the first time in our history, not something ever 

achieved under Peter Costello. 

Now we should understand that we've achieved all of these things. We have contained inflation, we 

have solid growth, we have low unemployment, and we have a huge pipeline of investment. So I 

think the message from the RBA today is a reminder to all of the doomsayers and naysayers that we 

do have a strong economy. We have low unemployment. We have bright economic prospects but 

we do understand that in this environment, particularly with what's going on globally there are also 

pressures in our economy in the sectors that I mentioned before.  

Now I just wanted to say a couple of things about the ANZ decision which I gather has just been 

announced. I think ANZ customers will be absolutely ropeable with the ANZ. The fact is that the 

major banks in this country are very profitable, their net interest margins are back to where they 

were prior to the global financial crisis. We do need a strong financial system. We do need profitable 

banks but what we need here is competition and what I say to Australians who are observing these 

decisions, this one from the ANZ, is you do have the capacity to walk down the road and get a better 

deal.  

The fact is that we have introduced new rules for competition, particularly the abolition of mortgage 

exit fees which will mean by the end of the year that 1 million households with mortgages will have 

those mortgages which won't have mortgage exit fees. So the capacity to get a better deal and go 

down the road if you're unhappy with your bank has been strengthened in our system. So the 

decision from the ANZ today is one which I think their customers will be rightly angry about and 

what they should do is look around and examine what other alternatives are available in the 

financial system. 

I think if you look at the various rates on offer you will see you can do a percentage point better by 

shopping around for mortgages at the moment.  

I'd also make this point. The cash rate, interest rate in Australia at the moment is 4.25 per cent. 

When we came to government it was 6.75 per cent. If you got a $300,000 mortgage today you are 

$3,000 better off per year on that mortgage compared to when the government came to power. So 

over to you. 

JOURNALIST: 

Why do you think they've done it? Did they expect maybe that the RBA would have a cut and they'd 

already planned this small increase? 

TREASURER: 

You'd have to go and ask them why they've taken this decision. The point I make is that our banks 

are very profitable. In fact their return on equity is the highest amongst their peers anywhere in the 

world. As I said earlier, their net interest margins are back to where they were prior to the global 

financial crisis. They've taken these decisions but I believe their customers ought to expect better 

and if they are unhappy with their financial institution they should go down the road and get a 

better deal. 

JOURNALIST: 

If these reforms are so effective why do you think we are seeing banks like the ANZ willing to move 

on rates and (inaudible) move on rates outside of the … 

TREASURER: 

Well, I'll make this point, the competition measures that we put in place at the end of the year 

before last were opposed bitterly by the banks. And we put them in place because we wanted to see 

greater competition. The truth of the matter is that for reasons that they can explain themselves, 

from time to time they decide that they want to give priority to their shareholders over their 

customers and over their staff. We don't dictate to banks what they do with their pricing or what 

they do with their staffing but what we can do as a government is put in place a competition 

framework that empowers their customers to move down the road and get a better deal if they're 

unhappy with their bank and that's what we've done. It's a very significant change in our outlook. 

JOURNALIST: 

Are you concerned that the other major banks will also follow ANZ's lead and push up their rates? 

TREASURER: 

Well, we'll have to wait and see what the other major banks do but my comments apply equally to 

anyone else who should take a decision such as this. I've been very consistent about this over a long 

period of time. We had two interest rate cuts at the end of last year, 50 basis points passed on in 

full, which have meant a significant benefit to a lot of people out there under financial pressure. And 

you might recall last December there was a very big community debate about all of this and the 

banks on that occasion didn't move. 

What I say to their customers is if you are unhappy with your bank let them know, take your 

business somewhere else. 

JOURNALIST: 

Do you regret giving them such a helping hand during the GFC when at the first opportunity they've 

taken the option of helping shareholders, not ordinary Australians. 

TREASURER: 

No, I don't regret doing what we did during the global financial crisis because what we did by 

guaranteeing the banks during the global financial crisis saved the jobs of hundreds of thousands of 

Australians. It was one of the most significant decisions taken in our economic history and it along 

with our fiscal stimulus supported this economy and has made this economy as strong as it is today. 

One of the consequences of coming through that period and the global instability and the global 

financial crisis is that our big banks have become stronger. That's why I then moved to put in place a 

competition framework so there could be vigorous competition from other sectors. Let me just run 

through what we've done. It is not just the abolition of mortgage exit fees that gives the customers 

the power to go down the road and get a better deal which they can get at many institutions. We've 

also boosted the lending capacity of smaller banks and credit unions significantly through our 

program of investment in residential mortgage‐backed securities. A program never seen in the 

history of this country and devoted exclusively to supporting the smaller banks and the credit unions 

who are now providing much more vigorous competition. That and many other measures have 

changed the outlook and given real choice to Australian consumers who may be unhappy 

particularly with the larger banks. 

JOURNALIST: 

We haven't seen an RMBS deal now for 6 ½ months. There's $6 billion left in the AOFM and given 

the global uncertainty it seems like no one wants to purchase the securities. Just given the 

headaches that are out there, is this a program (inaudible) somewhere else? 

TREASURER: 

No, not at all and I don't accept the premise of your question. The fact is that our investment in 

RMBS saved the superstructure of a whole industry and made viable a whole lot of smaller lenders 

who frankly would have hit the fence. The fact that they're in business and providing vigorous 

competition today is due to that investment in RMBS which is also not only giving greater 

competition but led to lower pricing through the system. So your characterisation of how that has 

rolled out is not true. And secondly we are continuing with the program and it continues to support 

a number of lenders out there who are providing great competition in our financial system. 

JOURNALIST: 

Would you walk if you were an ANZ customer today? 

TREASURER: 

Look if I was an angry ANZ customer I'd be going down the road and seeing where I could get a 

better deal. 

JOURNALIST: 

Mr Swan, just one last question. Do you have (inaudible)? 

TREASURER: 

Look those sorts of questions are ridiculous. Those sorts of stories are ridiculous and I'm not 

commenting on them. Thanks.