Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of doorstop interview: Brisbane: 11 February 2012: PM visiting flood‐affected Queensland; interest rates; Joe Hockey's incompetence; Afghan Video; private health rebate



Download PDFDownload PDF

11 February 2012

Doorstop interview

Brisbane

SUBJECTS: PM Visiting Flood‐Affected Queensland, Interest Rates, Joe Hockey's Incompetence,  Afghan Video, Private Health Rebate  

TREASURER: 

There's just a couple of things I wanted to talk about today. I wanted to talk about the floods. As you 

are aware, the Prime Minister is in Western Queensland today, St George and Roma, out there 

seeing what the damage has been, talking to the volunteers, talking to our defence forces. It's been 

a pretty tough time for a lot of Queenslanders out there. So it's good to see the Prime Minister out 

there with local members today because all of us had memories of last year and I think our thoughts 

are with all of those who are affected by the floods at this time. 

Secondly, I'd just like to say a few things about interest rate decisions which have been taken by 

some of our major banks because I think it was a pretty cynical move by Westpac last night to make 

their announcement as the 6pm news was rolling and I think many people would be offended by 

that tactic. But more than that, I think the customers of ANZ and Westpac will be very unhappy with 

their banks and I think a lot of families this weekend will be sitting around the kitchen table 

wondering what they're going to do about it. And the fact is that the Government has put in place 

reforms in competition policy that do make it easier for people to have far greater choice when it 

comes to a financial provider. 

The fact is there are better deals around and if customers are unhappy with their financial 

institution, I urge them to take the time and think about changing because there are many better 

deals out there for customers should they wish to change their financial institution. 

I think the big banks rely on the fact that at the end of the day many people say ‘oh look it's just too 

difficult to move'. The fact is it has gotten easier to move in recent times and the big banks rely on 

the fact that people won't necessarily express their dissatisfaction by changing their account.  

So I'd urge all people to have a really good hard think and put a bit of time into examining all of the 

alternatives because when you look around there are better deals around that people can get than 

are on offer from the major banks.  

I also note that there has been some commentary from the Liberal Opposition including Mr Hockey 

who has had more positions on the banks than hot dinners. The fact is the Liberal Party opposed our 

competition reforms to the banking sector which have been so important. For example: they 

opposed our abolition of mortgage exit fees which are going to allow many people with mortgages 

the capacity to go down the road and get a better deal.  

And that was yet another example of the Liberals siding with the major banks over the interests of 

millions of Australian working families. Over to you. 

JOURNALIST: 

Do you expect more of the major banks to announce? 

TREASURER: 

Well, we'll just have to wait and see what they've got to say but the fact is that there are better 

deals available out there. I think the banks are feeling the hot breath, if you like, of competition and 

what we need is for people to sit down and have a good look and if they're unhappy go down the 

road and get a better deal. 

JOURNALIST: 

Do you think this could prompt another (inaudible)? 

TREASURER: 

I think that's entirely a matter for the customers. 

JOURNALIST: 

Does this confirm for you Treasurer, once and for all, that the big banks are just bastards? 

TREASURER: 

Well, there's no doubt that by their behaviour here, in pushing through an interest rate rise separate 

from any decision taken from the Reserve Bank, it indicates to me that they are out of touch with 

their customers, that they are treating their customers badly and that's why I say to their customers 

let them know what you think, but when you do please don't take it out on the staff. 

JOURNALIST: 

What would you say to the other two big banks if they are considering a rate rise? 

TREASURER: 

Well, the same that I have been saying for the past week. The fact is our major banks are very 

profitable. Their interest margins are back to where they were prior to the Global Financial Crisis. So 

give your customers a break. 

JOURNALIST: 

Surely the government could be doing something more. I mean, these guys are running a law onto 

themselves. 

TREASURER: 

Well, let's be very clear about where we are here. We have not in this country over the last 25, 30 

years regulated interest rates. The fact is that during the Global Financial Crisis there were big 

challenges to this country and the people of Australia provided a banking guarantee which 

supported our banking system in total: major banks, smaller banks, all of our deposit taking 

institutions. And we also, through that, put in place a guarantee which earned the taxpayers of 

Australia $5 billion because we provided that guarantee. But the people of Australia backed our big 

banks during that that period, not because they wanted to back the banks but because it was good 

for Australia. Now we're in a different situation. Our banks are highly profitable. Our banks have 

interest margins which are back to where they were prior to the Global Financial Crisis and in that 

environment the decisions of the banks are ones that I think their customers would be very, very 

unhappy with. 

JOURNALIST: 

Where does this place the Reserve Bank? They're happily flouting the Reserve Bank's movements 

(inaudible)? 

TREASURER: 

Well the Reserve Bank will take its decisions independent of all of these decisions. I'll just make this 

point â€ that there were two rate cuts at the end of last year of 50 basis points in total. If you're on a 

$300,000 mortgage now you are paying $3,000 a year less than you were paying prior to Labor 

coming to power. When the Liberals left power the cash rate was at 6.75 per cent. It's currently at 

4.25 per cent. So rates are down. People are getting a better deal but the fact is at the moment the 

banks are extremely profitable and their net interest margins are back where they were prior to the 

Global Financial Crisis and that's why I say that the banks should be thinking of their customers in 

this environment. 

JOURNALIST: 

Do you think this is a matter of greed? 

TREASURER: 

Well, the fact is that the banks have decided to prioritise their shareholders over their customers 

and their staff. 

JOURNALIST: 

(inaudible) Afghan soldier YouTube clip boasting about killing Australian soldiers. Do you have a 

comment on that? 

TREASURER: 

This is just diabolical â€ it demonstrates why the fight against terrorism is so important. 

JOURNALIST: 

Is it going to damage our relations with the Afghan troops and our troops? 

TREASURER: 

No I don't believe so. I think our troops understand the nature of the mission in that country. It is 

dangerous. They serve there in our national interest. These sorts of tactics are, if you like, part and 

parcel of the terrorists' plan to try and shake confidence and so on. We should treat it with the 

disdain that it deserves. 

JOURNALIST: 

Can you guarantee the 2.4 billion the government would save by changes to the Private Health 

Rebate will go directly into the health system? 

TREASURER: 

Well, we are putting massive increases into our health system and the fact is at the moment this 

proposal will ensure that our budget in health is sustainable over the longer term, because as you 

understand, we have an ageing population in this country and expenditure in health is increasing 

dramatically over time as we age. That's why this reform was first put forward in 2009 and why it's 

so important for the future. So we can maintain expenditure in our health system with an ageing 

population. Thanks very much. 

JOURNALIST: 

(inaudible) directly into the health system? 

TREASURER: 

We are putting a lot more money directly into the health system. Thanks very much.