Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of interview: ABC Radio National with Fran Kelly: 20 March 2012: Minerals Resource Rent Tax; spreading the benefits of the mining boom; Queensland election



Download PDFDownload PDF

20 March 2012 

Interview with Fran Kelly

ABC Radio National

SUBJECTS: Minerals Resource Rent Tax; spreading the benefits of the mining boom; Queensland 

election 

Kelly: 

Treasurer welcome back to Breakfast. 

Treasurer: 

Good morning Fran. It's a historic day. 

Kelly: 

An historic day, you say, and a fair go for all, Treasurer, but what's gone through the Parliament is far 

removed really from either the super profits tax you first announced or Ken Henry envisaged. Do you 

concede the original package would have been better and fairer? 

Treasurer: 

Well, what has passed the Parliament is a resource rent tax. It is different in design from the original 

recommendation of Ken Henry but this is a measure of great substance and it will benefit this 

country for many years to come because it will enable us to spread the benefits of the mining boom 

right around our country to give a very big tax break to 2.7 million small businesses; to do a very 

significant boost to superannuation savings for 8 million Australian workers. For example, if you're a 

30 year old on average earnings it's an additional $100,000 when you retire. And it will enable us to 

invest in infrastructure in mining communities and that's just the beginning because, as you know, 

what we also want to do is to bring down company taxation across the board as well. 

Kelly: 

I want to get to all of those elements. Isn't the trouble though, Treasurer, the fact that this 

difference in design as you described it will mean there's $60 billion less raised over 10 years. That 

means $60 billion less to spread around? 

Treasurer: 

No it certainly doesn't and that figure is just grossly inaccurate. I know it is bandied around. 

Kelly: 

Well, how much less? How much less is your compromised tax? 

Treasurer: 

Well, we don't do those 10 year estimates. That is a figure that has been bandied around by all 

manner of people.  

Kelly: 

Your original estimate for the original tax did raise more money though. 

Treasurer: 

Over the forward estimates, it is broadly the same, a bit less because as you would be aware it 

depends on exchange rates, it depends on volumes and it does depend on prices. 

Kelly: 

How can it be the same Treasurer, when you cut the amount of tax the companies are paying? 

Treasurer: 

Well, this is a vastly different design from the original tax. Yes, there's a lower rate but the fact is 

that when you look at the exchange rates, when you look at prices and when you look at volumes, 

what we're raising over the forward estimates is not vastly different from what we originally forecast 

with the original tax. But it is true that it is a different tax, it's a better tax for the changes that were 

made when we got to sit down with the industry and consult about all of the details. But look what 

we ought to be talking about here is a once in a generation opportunity to pass a major reform 

which does enable us to spread the benefits of the mining boom right around our country and gives 

us the opportunity to deal with the challenges of a patchwork economy because not everybody is in 

the fast lane of the mining boom. 

Kelly: 

The polls show that people like this idea of a mining tax now but its popularity will rise and fall by the 

amount of revenue you do raise ultimately, and it is not a fixed revenue stream here. That's an issue 

isn't it? Because there are fixed costs that you're attributing to it. 

Treasurer: 

By definition it won't have a fixed revenue stream when it depends upon the exchange rate but it 

depends upon volumes and when it depends upon commodity prices but we've got to go back and 

look at why we decided we needed a resource rent tax. The fact is that we have a mining boom, we 

have a terms of trade now which are higher than they have historically been. We expect our terms 

of trade to be higher as we go forward. How do we capture those benefits so we spread them right 

around our economy and in particular do something to support those parts of the economy that 

aren't in the fast lane. That's why we talk about a patchwork economy. That's why it is so important 

that we provide a benefit to 2.7 million small businesses through the instant asset write off, that's 

why it's important that we boost our superannuation savings. Boosting the saving of Australian 

workers is one way in which every Australian worker can share in the bounty of the mining boom. 

Kelly: 

How do you as Treasurer, figure out though, the impact of this and therefore how much you have 

available to spend on these measures given, as you say, our exchange rate which is high at the 

moment, commodity prices which are softening at the moment. These things are real. Presumably 

they're already eroding the $10.6 billion estimate over the next three years. Now we have many of 

the miners saying that because of the tax breaks in this deal they're not actually expecting to pay up 

anything like that amount of money. How much confidence do you have in that forecast? 

Treasurer: 

Fran, we will see. I have great confidence in the forecasters that work with the Government from the 

Treasury. They're the same forecasters that worked with the previous government. We did revise 

down the revenues in our mid‐year budget update last November slightly, but of course the 

exchange rate moves around â€ it goes up, it goes down. Prices go up, they go down. Volumes go up, 

they go down. But what we do know Fran, and this is the whole reason for having a resource rent 

tax, is that this is the Asian Century. We need to make this the Australian Century in Asia, and that 

means we do need to capture some of the super profits of some of the super profitable companies 

and they will continue to flow because the resources sector will be strong on the growth of the 

middle classes in Asia and this is just not a China story. It's an Asia story across the board. It's about 

Indonesia, it's about Thailand, it's about South Korea. So what we know is the nature of our 

economy is changing. The nature of the economy on the globe is changing. There's a shift in weight 

from West to East that's coming our way. How do we maximise the opportunities from that and 

spread them around our country? That does mean a higher terms of trade and that does give us the 

opportunity over time to spread the benefits around our economy. 

Kelly: 

Treasurer, I do want to go to some of these measures to spread the wealth around. Just in terms of 

maximising the revenue from the super profits, and again I say I think there is broad support for that 

notion, but it's about the design of the tax that some people are querying. We have this notion now 

that under your revised tax agreement with the miners, the Government has agreed to refund any 

increase in state royalty payments and that effectively leaves you prone to, victim to gouging by 

state and territory governments, doesn't it? 

Treasurer: 

Let's be very clear, first of all, state and territory governments said that we couldn't put an additional 

tax on the mining industry, it wouldn't work, it couldn't be done but of course they then turned 

around and decided they would put up their royalties. Now it's simply not sustainable. Royalties are 

a very inefficient tax. The mining industry doesn't like the royalty regime. It penalises particularly 

those miners which aren't as profitable as others and also it impedes growth in the industry.  

Kelly: 

But no one loses under your revised tax because you just pay everybody. 

Treasurer: 

Well no we're not giving the green light for state governments to be constantly putting up their 

royalties. Two things we have said: those that are putting up their royalties will certainly not be in a 

position to receive the sort of funding that we've got in the infrastructure fund which flows from the 

resource rent tax because if they're taking away revenue, there's less revenue to the Commonwealth 

‐ point number one. Point number two: we have referred this question to the GST review which is 

being conducted at the moment. I mean you've had the absurd situation in Western Australia where 

Mr Barnett has put up royalties and it means that after the GST formula kicks in he will actually have 

less revenue as a consequence of putting up his royalties. So it's a complex area. 

Kelly: 

Can I quantify that because I think that's what people want to know. You're threatening the states 

basically to withhold some of this funding from the minerals, from the super profits tax, the mining 

tax, if they jack up their royalties. But can you quantify that if, for instance, New South Wales put up 

its mining royalties by $900 million which is what they've budgeted for, will $900 million be withheld 

from the infrastructure fund and the GST payments? 

Treasurer: 

Well, first of all we've not seen any of the detail of what they intend to do in New South Wales. 

They've booked a revenue from a tax that they haven't outlined to anybody so we don't know yet 

what New South Wales is doing. We know what they've done in Western Australia. We've just made 

the point that we are not in a position to allow them to do that and we will be taking actions to 

ensure that our revenue is protected so that we can continue to put in place a scheme which goes to 

small businesses in New South Wales and Western Australia.  

Kelly: 

So there's a dollar for dollar. For every dollar withdrawn from the royalties, you'll hold back? 

Treasurer: 

We have asked the GST review to look at this question. We'll receive their recommendations later in 

the year as to how we deal with this but the Premiers of New South Wales and Western Australia for 

example ought to be explaining, in terms of New South Wales the 800,000 small businesses in that 

state, why they oppose them getting a very significant small business tax break for example. You see 

there are benefits flowing from the revenue stream right across the country including in the state of 

New South Wales, including in Western Australia. 

Kelly: 

Let's just talk about some of those benefits which include the plan for a cut to the company tax rate. 

Now at the moment there's no way you're going to get a cut across the board to the company tax 

rate because the Greens and the Opposition are opposing it. The Greens will only support a cut to 

small business, small business company taxes. Is there any way, what's your bottom line here, would 

you allow a two tier company tax cut? 

Treasurer: 

Well, let's be very clear. We intend to fight tooth and nail to get this general company tax cut 

through which flows first of all to small businesses and then to all companies. The fact is that we 

have fought tooth and nail to get this package through over two years. I want to pay tribute to the 

very great work of the Prime Minister Julia Gillard who has fought every step of the way to get this 

package to the point where we've now got a revenue stream and we've got a taxation regime in 

place. And now we're going to fight to further spread the benefits right around our economy. And 

the whole time we've done that we've been opposed by Mr Abbott and the vested interests like 

Gina Rinehart and Clive Palmer in that endeavour. We're going to fight in the Senate against the 

Liberals who are simply the mouthpiece of Clive Palmer and Gina Rinehart to get this general 

company tax cut through because there's a very clear contrast now. We want a general company tax 

cut. They want a general company tax increase and the difference between our regime and there's 

will be 10 per cent. 

Kelly: 

So if they keep blocking it what will you do? Will you drop it all together, postpone it until you can 

get it through the Senate or would you allow a two tier company tax cut? 

Treasurer: 

Well, we are going to continue to fight for it because what we said we would do was in a staged way. 

First of all the 1 per cent cut would go to small businesses that were incorporated and then a year 

later it would go to all businesses and that's what we intend to do. We're going to fight to get that 

through. I think there's going to be an enormous amount of pressure here on the Liberal Party. The 

extraordinary and bizarre situation where the Liberal Party is fighting a tax cut for companies whilst 

at the same time proposing to increase taxes for all companies or a very large number of companies. 

Kelly: 

Treasurer, the mining tax will also help fund an increase in the superannuation guarantee from 9 per 

cent to 12 per cent over seven years, but I say help fund because in fact business will be paying for 

this, $20 billion annually once it's in. 

Treasurer: 

Well certainly the SG will be going up from 9 to 12 [per cent] and certainly there is a cost for 

business and that is one of the reasons why we have put in place company tax cuts, not the only 

reason, but the fact is there is also a cost to the budget from increasing the superannuation 

guarantee and that is also funded from the revenue stream from the MRRT. I mean this is going to 

be a very big boost to our national savings and that's a good thing, not just for those people who are 

retiring for their quality of life, and dignity in retirement, but also for the national economy; to 

increase our national savings pool at a time when we have massive needs for investment in our 

domestic economy. So it's a win â€ win situation. A win for the individuals but a win for the national 

economy. 

Kelly: 

Treasurer now the mining tax has passed through the Senate, would you describe this as your finest 

moment as Treasurer? 

Treasurer: 

Well, certainly it's an historic day for Australia and I think the big reforms in Australia have always 

been hard fought. This has been particularly difficult and we've lost a bit of political skin. But really, I 

went into politics to do the hard reforms and reforms like this are the reforms that make a 

difference for the long term. 

Kelly: 

And just finally Treasurer, talking of reforms, the latest polls suggest that Labor will be left with as 

few as 12 seats at this weekend's Queensland state election, not even enough to fill a front bench. 

What's your view on this and do you think this is just cyclical or something far more serious affecting 

the Labor Party and something that really only serious reform of your Party can address? 

Treasurer: 

Well, I think it's a very tough election. The Government has been in power for a number of terms 

and it's a reflection of what's actually happened in Queensland during that time, nothing more and 

nothing less. 

Kelly: 

No lesson in this for the Labor Party? 

Treasurer: 

There's always a lesson for the Labor Party in any election but this is an election which focuses 

particularly on Queensland and recent events there and recent elections there. 

Kelly: 

Treasurer, thank you very much for joining us. 

Treasurer: 

Thank you.