Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of doorstop interview: Canberra: 7 May 2012: A ‘fair go' Budget; tax relief for small business; Schoolkids Bonus; infrastructure; putting a price on carbon



Download PDFDownload PDF

 

 

7 May 2012 

Doorstop Interview

Canberra

SUBJECTS: A ‘fair go' Budget, tax relief for small business, Schoolkids Bonus, infrastructure, putting a 

price on carbon 

TREASURER:  

Tuesday night's budget will show that the Australian economy walks tall in the global economy but 

supports low and middle income earners at home. It will be a surplus budget but it will be a fair go 

budget as well, supporting low and middle income earners, particularly with the Schoolkids Bonus 

but also support for small business and the first steps in terms of the National Disability Insurance 

Scheme. It will also show that we in Australia have done so much better than many other countries 

around the world and what that means for Australia is that we can have confidence in our economic 

fundamentals and what we've seen overnight is a ringing endorsement, a ringing endorsement from 

the International Monetary Fund. This is what they've had to say: “We welcome the authority's 

commitment to return to a budget surplus by 2012‐13 to rebuild fiscal buffers putting Government 

finances in a stronger position to deal with shocks and long term pressures from an ageing 

population and rising health care costs." 

The other point I would make is that tax as a percentage of GDP or a share of the economy will be 

lower than in any year under the previous Liberal Government. Over to you. 

JOURNALIST:  

Mr Swan, (inaudible)? 

TREASURER:  

Well, what I've made very, very clear is that we will provide tax relief for small business. So in terms 

of the instant asset write off, that's proceeding from 1 July and yesterday I announced Loss Carry 

Back. Another measure which was recommended to us by the Business Tax Working Group. So we're 

supportive of providing tax relief to business and we're very serious in our engagement with the 

business community on tax matters, working through the Business Tax Working Group. 

JOURNALIST:  

But is this because of a 1 per cent cut that was promised as part of the MRRT? 

TREASURER:  

Well, that's a matter for Mr Abbott and the Liberals because, as you're aware, they've already said 

that they're vehemently opposed to that measure. So that's a matter for Mr Abbott and the Liberals 

to consider. 

JOURNALIST:  

Are you going to introduce the legislation to do it though? 

TREASURER: 

Well, what we're going to do is bring down the budget tomorrow night with all of the measures in it 

and you'll have to wait until tomorrow night to see all the measures in the budget. 

JOURNALIST:  

You've already promised this though. 

TREASURER:  

No, no I'm making a broader point. We'll be introducing legislation in terms of the measures that 

we've talked about and we will be there with Loss Carry Back but you'll have to wait for the full set 

of budget measures tomorrow night. 

JOURNALIST: 

So you plan to delay the corporate tax cut? 

TREASURER:  

No what I'm saying is that the matter of the corporate tax cut is entirely a matter for Mr Abbott and 

the Liberals. 

JOURNALIST: 

Mr Swan, what do you make of Access Economics modelling that you need to find $5 billion in 

savings to make the surplus sustainable? 

TREASURER:  

Well, we're going to bring our budget back to surplus and the details of how we come back to 

surplus will be there for people to see tomorrow night. 

JOURNALIST: 

Are the education payments concession for carbon tax could hit families come July 1. 

TREASURER: 

The fact is that the Schoolkids Bonus is there to assist families with cost of living pressures which 

flow particularly from education, and only Mr Abbott could be so negative as to take a wrecking ball 

to something as constructive as a Schoolkids Bonus.  

JOURNALIST: 

Why won't the federal government commit $2 billion for the North‐West Rail Link, and is it true that 

you've told the state government that it should just put more buses on instead? 

TREASURER: 

No, none of that is true. What we have done is make some very substantial commitments to 

infrastructure in New South Wales and we need the New South Wales government to come to the 

party. 

JOURNALIST: 

(Inaudible) surplus significant risks to economic growth, what's your reaction to that? 

TREASURER: 

Well my reaction is for example the analysis which is done by the IMF today, which I just read out to 

you before. The fact is we do need to come back to surplus as a buffer against uncertainty in the 

global economy. We need to come back to surplus because it provides the Reserve Bank maximum 

flexibility when it comes to the setting of interest rates. We've already seen rate cuts last week. 

JOURNALIST: 

Treasurer, on the carbon tax, would the government consider extending the floor price on the back 

of that Bloomberg report today saying that it could collapse? 

TREASURER: 

Well, I don't except the foundations of the Bloomberg report today. Thanks very much.