Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of doorstop interview: Adelaide: 17 May 2012: spreading the benefits of the boom; dental blitz; Olympic Dam; NDIS; Business Tax Working Group; Craig Thomson; Mr Hockey's threats against senior public servants; Europe



Download PDFDownload PDF

17 May 2012 

Doorstop Interview

Joint doorstop interview with the HON Penny Wong MP, Minister for Finance and Deregulation

Adelaide

SUBJECTS: Spreading the benefits of the boom, dental blitz, Olympic Dam, NDIS; Business Tax 

Working Group; Craig Thomson; Mr Hockey's threats against senior public servants; Europe 

TREASURER: 

It's great to be here at the Adelaide Dental Hospital with the Finance Minister, Penny Wong.  She, 

like myself, put a lot of work into this Budget and it's just satisfying to see here today what we can 

do to further to assist people with challenges when it comes to their oral health.  I will leave it to 

Penny to say a few words about that, but I want to talk generally about the Budget and its impact in 

South Australia because an essential objective of the Budget is to spread the benefits of the mining 

boom to every corner of our country and of course right across South Australia.  

There's a lot of people who don't feel like they're in the middle of a boom, they feel like it's 

somebody else's boom, but in this Budget we've found room to support families, to provide 

additional family payments from 1 July next year.  We've also found room for a Schoolkids Bonus to 

assist families with the cost of educating their kids.  This is going to be pretty important in June when 

those payments come through because when you try to buy a jumper or buy a calculator, these 

payments will really help a lot of families out there with something like 170,000 students who will be 

the beneficiaries of these payments.  

So here in South Australia, spreading the benefits of the boom, also to small business.  Something 

like 200,000 small businesses in South Australia will benefit from the $6,500 instant asset write‐off.  

That's going to be a big boost to small business in South Australia as well.  I might throw to Penny to 

talk a bit about the dental school. 

WONG:   

Thanks very much, Wayne.  Great to be here with you.  In this Budget we did make space in a pretty 

tight Budget for a number important areas of priority and one of them was dental care.  We 

understand that there is a waiting list in terms of public dental services and so there is an investment 

in the Budget of over $500 million for looking at waiting list blitz.  And today what we've been told is 

that additional funding will make a big dent into the waiting lists here at the Adelaide Dental 

Hospital, a big dent as a result of the investment by the Federal Government.  

I just want to make the point that's on top of a lot of other investments that the Federal 

Government is making here in South Australia.  We've effectively doubled the infrastructure spend 

per South Australian.  We've effectively doubled that.  That's an investment in this state, and of 

course on top of that are the things that the Treasurer has been talking about, the payments to 

families, low and middle‐income Australians, and of course the support for small business. Over to 

you.  

JOURNALIST:           

Treasurer, judging from the rhetoric here yesterday, one of those who don't feel they're in a boom is 

BHP.  Do you see those words as brinkmanship or is there a serious problem with their investment 

outlook particularly in relation to Olympic Dam here in South Australia?  

TREASURER:  

No, I certainly don't see it that way.  I read the speech from Mr Nasser ,who is a well‐respected 

businessman in this country and internationally.  He expressed his concerns about the uncertainty in 

the global outlook, and he talked a bit about the challenges of having such a strong investment 

pipeline.  And there are challenges, and that's why the Government, in this Budget in particular, is 

focusing on coming back to surplus.  Mr Nasser endorsed that commitment in his remarks 

yesterday.   

He did talk about the challenges of lifting productivity in our economy and the Government is 

absolutely focused on lifting productivity, on investing in skills and education more broadly and as 

Penny was saying before, investing in infrastructure.  So we see ourselves very much working with 

large companies to do everything we possibly can to enhance the environment where they will 

invest.   

BHP is a huge investor in Australia, and certainly from the Federal Government's perspective, we will 

do everything we possibly can to ensure that when they take their decision here in South Australia, 

it's a positive one for South Australia.  I know the South Australian Government shares that objective 

as well, but these are entirely a matter for the BHP board.  But I can tell you what, both the South 

Australian Government and the Federal Government have done everything we possibly can to 

encourage that project.  

JOURNALIST:           

But do you fear that BHP is now looking upon Australia as not being as friendly as it used to be for 

investment?  

TREASURER:  

No, I don't have those fears.  I think BHP will take its decisions in a commercial way, as it usually 

does.  It's a huge investor in Australia.  It has got a huge commitment here in South Australia 

through what it's already put into the Olympic Dam project, but of course they will assess their 

commercial opportunities and they will do that in the context of what is happening globally, as well 

as nationally.  I certainly will be doing everything I possibly can to encourage them to continue to 

invest right throughout the country as indeed they are.  

JOURNALIST:          

(Inaudible) National Disability Insurance Scheme, calling it a cruel hoax that the Federal Government 

is promising that they will be bringing forward the implementation of it.  What are your comments?  

TREASURER:  

Look, I was sickened by Mr Hockey's comments, to be frank.  We have put $1 billion on the table for 

the National Disability Insurance Scheme, a fundamental commitment to the first stage of the rollout 

of an overdue social reform for Australia, and this is a very big advance, and I was frankly 

gobsmacked by the attitude of Mr Hockey who effectively repudiated some of the earlier comments 

of his leader. 

The fact is this is something that has to get done in this country, to deliver some justice to 

Australians with disability.  We've got $1 billion dollars on the table.  It's stage one.  It's very 

important that we all work together, state governments, the Federal Government, and the 

community sector, to make this a reality.  I might just throw to Penny, and I bet she's got a couple of 

things she'd like to say. 

WONG:   

Well, the other thing I would say is this: Mr Hockey talks about a cruel hoax.  The cruel hoax is Tony 

Abbott telling Australians with a disability that he was going to be Dr Yes when it comes to the 

National Disability Insurance Scheme.  Well, Joe Hockey yesterday made it very clear that that was 

the hoax.  

JOURANLIST:          

(Inaudible)?  

TREASURER:  

Sorry, the Commonwealth has put $1 billion on the table, and of course the states are the dominant 

funders of disability right now, and we've said we will put $1 billion dollars on the table to rollout 

stage one and run a number of trials if you like, around the country in cooperation with the states.  It 

can't be done without the states, and as an article of faith, we have put $1 billion on the table for 

the first four years in the most difficult Budget outlook that we've faced in years.  

It's true the states also have a difficult outlook, but we've shown our commitment to the scheme by 

putting that money on the table, and we do want to sit down with the states to work together to do 

this, because it can't be done without the states.  To pretend that the states shouldn't be in it or 

don't want to be in it, that's not the way this thing will proceed.  We have to work with the states.   

We're putting money on the table.  The states have a big commitment.  We're working in an area 

where they're already spending money and we've got to sit down and work out how we will do that, 

but I fear what we are seeing here, particularly from the Liberal Party, is crab‐walking backwards 

from the commitment to this scheme, and I think a lot of people will be pretty appalled by that if 

that's what happens in terms of the Liberal Party and some state governments.  

JOURNALIST:  

(Inaudible)… raise the funds for the NDIS?  

TREASURER:  

Look, we've made it abundantly clear that we've got $1 billion on the table for stage one of the 

scheme.  As we go through stage one of the scheme, we'll learn a lot about its operation, about its 

structure, about arrangements with the states and the community sector.  Let's not put the cart 

before the horse.  The $1 billion is down, we now have to work with the states and the community 

sector to make this a reality so we can learn from the first stage as we go about constructing the 

scheme for the long term.  

JOURNALIST:  

Back on investor confidence, one of the recurring themes at the (inaudible) conference this week 

was that investors got the wobbles every time there were changes to fiscal and regulatory regimes in 

Australia and that included during negotiations over the mining tax.  How would you assure global 

investors that there is stable, long‐term fiscal security?  

TREASURER:  

There could be nothing which sends a clearer message to the world about the stability we have in 

Australia than returning our Budget to surplus and building those surpluses over the future.  There's 

no other developed economy doing that and that says our economic fundamentals are strong.   

We have had a process which we put in place at the request of the business community coming out 

of the Tax Forum last year, a Business Tax Working Group, that has gone away to look at how we can 

further reform the business tax system. They produced a report about those matters.  Now I'm 

hearing that some people in the business community don't want that process to continue.  We will 

sit down sensibly and talk to the business community about the future of tax reform in Australia, and 

we'll do it in a sensible way.  But there have been in recent months, all sorts of rumours circulated in 

the business community and elsewhere, about what may or may not happen. Well, none of those 

rumours happened in the Budget. That ought to be the answer to those who are concerned about 

those matters and they didn't come from the Government.  

For our part, what we want is a growing economy, and we have a strong and growing economy 

compared to other developed economies and economic settings which promote investments.  That's 

why we went for Loss Carry‐back in the Budget.  That will encourage investment in small business. 

The instant asset write‐off - that will encourage investment in small business.  We'll work with the 

business community on these matters, free of all of those rumours and so on which circulated about 

the future of tax policy.  We'll sit down and talk to them about these matters in a sensible way. 

That's what we always do and that's what we'll continue to do. 

JOURANLIST:  

Mr Nasser yesterday was highly critical of the high tax regime and our industrial relations. 

TREASURER:  

Well, you can take your interpretation.  I had a discussion with Mr Nasser the night before, a quite 

constructive discussion about Australia, where we're going, what we're doing, and I was pretty 

happy with the outcome of that conversation. 

JOURANLIST:  

Treasurer, do you agree with John Faulkner that the New South Wales ALP should disclose what 

money has been spent on Mr Thomson's legal fees? 

TREASURER: 

That's a matter for the New South Wales ALP.  

JOURNALIST: 

The Coalition (inaudible) slipperiness of Treasury's figures.  Are they getting ahead of themselves and 

is...  

TREASURER:  

I was somewhat surprised to see some of this commentary from the Liberal Party because Mr 

Parkinson served the former Liberal Government at very senior levels in the Treasury, as indeed did 

Dr Henry.  The fact is that there's no institution, or no individual, that the Coalition won't trash in 

their attempt to seize political power.  It's just being negative all the time.  Running down very senior 

and professional public servants has become their mode of operation over the last couple of years. 

 It's on a par with their talking down of the economy. It's on a par with Mr Abbott's Budget Reply 

where he pretended that the economy wasn't growing.  I mean they'll just do anything to talk down 

the economy, to talk down our institutions, because they haven't actually got anything positive to 

say.  

JOURANLIST:  

(Inaudible) some significant changes in Europe since you've handed down your Budget a few weeks 

ago.  Do you see there is any (inaudible) or any potential need for a Budget update?  

TREASURER:  

No, because in our Budget, if you actually have a look at the detail, we forecast a recession in 

Europe.  We forecast negative growth of three quarters of a per cent in Europe, and growth in 

Europe is not yet at that level at all.  You would have seen a couple of nights ago that growth in 

Europe was stalled, it wasn't negative.  But we've put into our forecasts an outlook for Europe which 

sees it as having a long and painful adjustment.  So we've already accounted for those outcomes in 

our forecasts, and therefore recent events in Europe do not have a dramatic impact on our forecasts 

or our outlook. 

JOURANLIST:  

Treasurer, you addressed Mr Nasser's concern about the tax regime, but maybe if you could address 

his comments about the industrial relations situation. 

TREASURER:  

Well, he has some concerns about industrial relations which he mentioned in his speech and that is 

why we have put in place a review of the Fair Work Act.  The business community said that they 

were looking for a review.  We think that's appropriate and we've put that in place.  

I tell you what we won't be doing. We won't be going down Mr Abbott's road of slashing wages and 

working conditions under the guise of pretending to do something about productivity.  We certainly 

won't be going down that road.  

JOURANLIST:  

(Inaudible)? 

TREASURER:  

I just said we're having a review of the Fair Work Act to look at all of the issues that have been raised 

by all of our players in our industrial relations system.  That's going on at the moment.  Thanks.