Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of interview: Sky News with David Speers: 13 June 2012: Prime Minister's Economic Forum; productivity; Australia's economic fundamentals; industry policy



Download PDFDownload PDF

 

 

    13 June 2012 

Interview with David Speers

Sky News

SUBJECTS: Prime Minister's Economic Forum; productivity; Australia's economic fundamentals; 

industry policy  

SPEERS:      

We’re joined now live by Treasurer Wayne Swan.  Wayne Swan, thank you for your time Treasurer.  

The Reserve Bank Governor kicked off proceedings this morning with a speech about where the 

economy’s at and the central focus was the issue of productivity.  He said it’s been falling over the 

last six to eight years in particular.  Now he said productivity is the biggest challenge we face, 

boosting it is imperative to success.  What are you doing about this productivity challenge? 

TREASURER:       

Well I think I made the same point in my remarks last night David.  I made the point that there’s 

been a structural decline in productivity in Australia over a decade.  I also made the point that when 

it comes to overall productivity levels, we’re in the top dozen countries in the world.  But because of 

this structural decline in productivity growth, it’s imperative for us to attend to these matters, and 

we’ve been doing that from day one.  

Because when it comes to lifting productivity growth, there’s no one instantaneous thing that can be 

done.  What it does involve is long‐term investment in skills, in education, in infrastructure, that’s 

what it requires and that takes time to have an impact.  But the other point I think we shouldn't lose 

sight of is what the Governor said about the strength of our economy, about when it comes to the 

economy how the glass is more than half full, and how the prospects for Australia in this Asian 

Century are bright. 

SPEERS:      

Getting back to productivity though, he said in particular that governments need to go and look at 

the list of reforms recommended by the Productivity Commission and implement them. It was a 

pretty clear message there to the government.  Now the Productivity Commission, there are plenty 

of examples where various recommendations... 

TREASURER:       

No, I don't agree with that. I don't agree with that characterisation at all. The fact is the Government 

has been looking and working on issues of lifting productivity growth for a long period of time and 

I’m in agreement with the Governor. I’m in agreement that we need to continue to do that. The 

point is that when you’re trying to lift productivity growth levels, these are investments which take 

time, and we are doing that, and we have been working on a variety of levels â€ not just in skills, in 

education, in infrastructure, but also regulatory reform which is what the Governor also spoke about 

this morning. 

SPEERS:      

But he did say, when he’s asked what the answer is about lifting productivity, it’s to go and look at 

the list of things the Productivity Commission has recommended.  Now last week the Productivity 

Commission issues a report about industry assistance in particular and said that although it benefits 

generally the firms and industries that receive it, it typically imposes costs on other sectors of the 

economy.  Does the government have the right mix at the moment when it comes to industry 

assistance? Is too much being given to struggling sectors like manufacturing? 

TREASURER:       

No.   I do think we have the right mix when it comes to industry assistance, because the other point 

that the Governor and other people make is that we need a consensus in the community about how 

we deal with structural change in our economy.  And of course we need to have in place a range of 

programs that enable structural adjustment, that’s what the government has got in place.  

The Productivity Commission and many others are very vocal in this space and the Government is 

absolutely proud of what we’re doing in terms of industry assistance.  The bottom line here is to 

have internationally competitive industries and that is the case when it comes to motor vehicles for 

example. 

SPEERS:     

You don't think it has a distorting effect on the economy on other sectors, government assistance 

going into particular industries? 

TREASURER:       

I think when you look at levels of industry assistance in Australia and compare them for example to 

other countries around the world they are quite modest.  But they are important if we want to 

retain our community consensus about making our economy more competitive for the long‐term 

and lifting productivity growth.  

SPEERS:     

Now the Reserve Bank Governor on this whole structural adjustment we’re seeing in the economy 

made the interesting point that he made the other day as well.  That this really would have been 

happening without the mining boom anyway because we’ve seen a dramatic change in household 

behaviour - saving a lot more and spending less.  That is hurting sectors like retail and housing.   The 

Reserve Bank Governor clearly thinks this is a good thing that we are saving more in particular. Do 

you agree with that? 

TREASURER:       

Well of course it’s a good thing and I’ve said so on many occasions.  I’ve spoken about the cautious 

consumer, I’ve spoken about the wealth and income effect of the after‐shocks of the global financial 

crisis and clearly we are living with those after‐shocks. It is a good thing that we’ve got an elevated 

savings rate.  It’s also a very good thing that we’ve got strong consumption as well and that’s what 

we saw in the National Accounts last week â€ a very good combination of reasonably strong income 

growth, reasonably strong consumption, but also elevated savings and along with that contained 

inflation.  They are very good outcomes for Australia. 

SPEERS:     

And should those sectors like retail and housing get used to that?  The Governor seems to make it 

clear, as do you, that we’re not going to see any dramatic change in this any time soon. 

TREASURER:       

Well I think what the Governor was saying, what I’ve been saying, is that we’re not seeing 

consumption which is fuelled if you like by debt.  What we are seeing is an increased savings rate 

and that is very good for the economy.  But we are still seeing strong consumption, we're just not 

seeing a consumption boom the likes of which we had prior to 2007, which is not sustainable and 

that’s the point that the Governor made. 

SPEERS:     

I want to ask you if I can Treasurer about today’s decision by the Independent Pricing and Regulatory 

Tribunal in New South Wales on electricity prices for the coming financial year.  They’ve approved an 

18 per cent average increase across New South Wales.  They say half of that is due to the carbon tax. 

That would mean 9 per cent.  That seems to be in line with the Government’s forecasts. 

TREASURER:       

I’m sorry David, I haven’t seen it, I’ve been in this conference all morning.   I haven’t seen that 

decision so I don't think I can comment on it at the moment. I’ll go away and have a look at it. 

SPEERS:     

Alright.  But just finally then Treasurer, the summit itself, clearly you’re going to call this a success, 

but what are we going to see come out of this? Are we going to see any policy changes as a result of 

today’s meeting? 

TREASURER:       

What we’ve had is a very good and frank discussion about the challenges of the Asian Century and 

the opportunities that are there for Australia and what we need to do to further strengthen our 

economy, and that leads into a variety of things that the Government is doing.  

We’ve got the Asian Century White Paper coming up, we’ve got a Manufacturing Taskforce which 

has to produce a report in the not too distant future.  What we’re doing here is having the sort of 

intelligent, constructive discussion that governments ought to have as they go through policy‐

making and putting in place the settings for the future.  

We’ve just brought down a budget, we’ve also just had the best set of figures we’ve seen in a long 

time in terms of our recent quarterly national accounts.  It’s a timely thing to do to have an update 

with the business community, the union movement and the community more generally in terms of 

the non‐government organisations that are here.  It’s a sensible thing to do and the discussions have 

been pretty constructive so far. 

SPEERS:     

Treasurer Wayne Swan we thank you.