Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of interview : ABC 24 with Lyndal Curtis: Prime Minister's Economic Forum; productivity; federal-state relations; confidence in Australia's strong economic fundamentals



Download PDFDownload PDF

13 June 2012 

Interview with Lyndal Curtis

ABC 24

SUBJECTS: Prime Minister's Economic Forum; productivity; federal‐state relations; confidence in 

Australia's strong economic fundamentals 

CURTIS:  

Wayne Swan joins us now. Mr Swan, welcome to ABC News 24. 

TREASURER:  

Good to be with you. Good to be in Brisbane. 

CURTIS: 

Glenn Stevens said he wouldn't give (inaudible) on how to lift productivity, he says the Productivity 

Commission has a list and to go and get that. Have you got that list?  

TREASURER: 

Well the Government's been working on productivity from day one because when you're talking 

about lifting productivity growth in the economy, it's not something that you can flick a switch 

overnight. The fact is a productivity agenda needs investment, skills, education and infrastructure. 

Many of those things take time.  

It's true there's been a structural decline in our productivity over the last decade but we shouldn't 

lose sight of the fact that in Australia our overall productivity level is high. We're in the top dozen 

countries in the world, we should set ourselves the objective of being in the top ten, and that's what 

I said last night.  

CURTIS: 

Glenn Stevens also said there are things on the Productivity Commission list which are not popular, 

which are politically hard to do, which are very difficult. Are you prepared to do more, whether it's 

difficult or not to increase productivity?  

TREASURER: 

We've had a constructive discussion about lifting productivity growth this morning. I think it was a 

pretty good discussion involving unions and business and the community sector.  

I think everybody agreed what we need to do is to be quite focused on the areas where we will, if 

you like, get the biggest bang for our buck. I think what was pretty clear coming out of the discussion 

today is that one of those areas most certainly is in the area of skills and education more broadly, 

which is an area where the government is also very active at the moment.  

But I don't want to pre‐judge the outcome of the discussions as we go through the day. It's a pretty 

frank discussion. I'm really pleased at the spirit in the room, because I think everybody in the room 

agrees that what we do need to emphasise is the underlying strength of our economy. The Governor 

said that this morning and I think it is true that people feel that glass is certainly more than half full 

when it comes to our economy. 

CURTIS: 

But you also have people in the room from big business who think one of the answers to the 

productivity challenge is to have more flexibility in workplace laws. You also have unions who say 

that flexibility already exists. How do you get them on the same page? 

TREASURER: 

We are actually having a very interesting discussion between the business community on the one 

hand and the union movement on the other. They all agree that we must be committed to lift 

productivity growth. There are differences of emphasis in that, but I think there is a lot more 

common ground there than many people would assume, and I think that might be one of the things 

that comes out of today. 

CURTIS: 

Glenn Stevens also said another thing you can look at tackling is federal‐state relations. He said it's 

very very hard to do. The Prime Minister last night talked about the impossibility of dealing with 

state taxes on property transactions. There would have to be a bit of give and take if you were going 

to ask the states to take away one of their sources of revenue. 

TREASURER: 

Well that's in the tax area, but the productivity agenda [goes]across federal‐state relations, across a 

whole host of regulatory areas and indeed just earlier this year we had a whole COAG centred 

around that and there are important reforms coming from that. The thing about productivity is that 

there's no rabbit you can just pull out of a hat; it does really rely on long‐term reform across a range 

of areas, which is also a point that the Governor made this morning. 

CURTIS: 

If we could go to that issue of taxes, if the Prime Minister wants the issue of state taxes on property 

transactions dealt with in order to help people move interstate if they want jobs, there'd have to be 

a trade‐off, wouldn't there, to replace that source of revenue? 

TREASURER: 

We are already working with the states in terms of property tax reform. There's a process already in 

train for that. It's one which I will be working with the state treasurers on over the months ahead. 

CURTIS: 

As you mentioned the Prime Minister last night urged business and other people at big forums to 

help become champions of the economic growth of the strong economy. But business also made the 

point that the danger signs from overseas are a real danger and are impacting on confidence. Is 

there any way to lift confidence while Europe hasn't sorted its problems out and the United States 

economy is still relatively weak? 

TREASURER: 

Yes there is, and that is to go back to the basic facts. The basic facts are we have come through the 

global financial crisis and the global recession in better shape than any other developed economy. 

We are now living with the after‐shock s of all of that and we're seeing that in Europe.  

People need to have confidence in the underlying strength of our economy, but also, and I think 

everybody in the room agrees on this, we need to understand that not everyone is in the fast lane of 

the mining boom and therefore we do need to find the means of spreading the opportunities of the 

mining boom more broadly around our community and that's what the last budget was about, that's 

what the SchoolKids Bonus is all about. 

CURTIS: 

Thank you very much for your time. 

TREASURER: 

Thank you.