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The Coalition's plan for real action on Australian Technical Colleges



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The Coalition’s plan for real action on

Australian Technical Colleges

T H E C O A L I T I O N ’ S P L A N F O R R E A L A C T I O N O N A u S T R A L I A N T E C H N I C A L C O L L E g E S 2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Coalition is committed to ensuring that all Australians have access to quality training to develop

valuable, real world skills.

This commitment goes hand in hand with our long held goal to ensure that all Australians who want a

job can get a job.

But young Australians are suffering poor employment prospects resulting from three years of Labor’s

reckless spending and broken promises.

In 2007, Labor promised 2,650 Trade Training Centres - one in every secondary school. Three years later

they have delivered 22. At the beginning of the 2010 school year, only one Trade Training Centre was

delivering qualifications.

The Coalition will end Labor’s Trades Training Centres failure. Our plan for skills will focus on providing

the facilities and resources needed to help young Australians to be prepared for work and gain the skills

they need.

The previous Coalition g

overnment established the highly successful Australian Technical Colleges

initiative. Prior to the last election 24 Australian Technical Colleges had been established and a significant

rollout of further Australian Technical Colleges was planned.

Labor abandoned these Colleges, replacing them with their weaker, smaller alternative.

The Coalition remains committed to Australian Technical Colleges.

A Coalition

g

overnment will restore the Australian Technical Colleges network.

If elected, we will:

1.

Establish

a national network of up to 30 new Australian Technical Colleges, in partnership with

industry, providing high quality training for apprentices and trainees, including those undertaking

school based apprenticeships

2.

Integrate

existing Trades Training Centres into the new Australian Technical Colleges Network

with a focus on increased quality technical training and industry partnerships

3.

R

e-connect the new Australian Technical Colleges network with the former Australian Technical

Colleges that were delivered through the former Coalition

g

overnment

T H E C O A L I T I O N ’ S P L A N F O R R E A L A C T I O N O N A u S T R A L I A N T E C H N I C A L C O L L E g E S 3

HOW LABOR HAS FAILED Labor has wasted the opportunity to provide real, meaningful skills access to Australians.

Labor has spent three years talking about skills and training but has done very little.

Australians simply can’t afford another three years of Labor.

The facts speak for themselves. About 40,000 people aged 15 to 17 years of age (nearly 5 per cent) are

not in education, training or work.1 Nearly one quarter of people aged 15 to 19 are currently looking for

full time work.2 These young people need help to get into full time employment.

Australia is facing a national skills shortage in traditional trades such as carpentry, welding, auto-electrics, motor mechanics, bricklaying and plumbing. 3 This is the product of a shrinking pool of job

seekers available to take job vacancies, major demographic changes and the ageing of the population.

Poor decision-making by the Labor g

overnment has exacerbated this situation. Labor has turned its

back on technical skills. It has no credible plan for addressing skills shortages.

Labor has failed to deliver practical training options for young people.

•

Despite

Labor’s promise of one Trades Training Centre (TTC) for every secondary school across

Australia only 22 are operational.

•

The

Productivity Places Programme failed to provide tangible employment outcomes, with

more than half of participants not finding a job. Only one in five jobseekers placed in work were

employed in a job relevant to the area of training received.4

•

Labor

unsuccessfully tried to scrap the tool kits and course fee assistance for rural and agricultural

apprentices introduced by the former Coalition

g

overnment.

•

Labor

rolled a number of payments into the Tools-for-your-Trade program, turning it from a

payment to purchase tools into a general incentive. This removed the opportunity for apprentices

and their employers to purchase the best tools for the job at the best possible price and has

resulted in many apprentices arriving at job sites without any tools at all.

1. Question on Notice from Addition Estimates, Senate Standing Committee on Education Employment and Workplace Relations, EW0980_10, asked on 10/02/2010, 2. Australian Bureau of Statistics, Labour Force, 6202.0 June 2010 3. National Skills Need List 4. National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Outcomes from the Productivity Places Program, 2009

T H E C O A L I T I O N ’ S P L A N F O R R E A L A C T I O N O N A u S T R A L I A N T E C H N I C A L C O L L E g E S 4

THE COALITION’S PLAN FOR AUSTRALIAN TECHNICAL COLLEGES The Coalition is committed to ensuring that young Australians have access to quality training facilities

so they can to develop the skills and experience needed to assist them in entering the workforce.

Young Australians deserve to have the option of quality technical education, delivered in a proper

training facility.

Our focus will be on providing the facilities and resources needed to help young Australians prepare for

work and gain the skills they need.

Our plan for real action involves the following initiatives;

1.

A

national network of up to 30 new Australian Technical Colleges, providing training for

apprentices and trainees, including those undertaking school based apprenticeships.

The Coalition will provide grants of up to $25 million towards the establishment of up to 30 new

Australian Technical Colleges, providing training for apprentices and trainees, including those

undertaking school based apprenticeships.

These Colleges will provide a valuable pathway for young Australians into technical and

vocational education. They will have an emphasis on real-world skill development, giving

students a unique and focussed opportunity to fast-track the completion of future trade training

and other necessary skills to develop a real career path.

Students at these Colleges will also undertake academic, information technology and business

courses. They will gain trade, entrepreneurial and business skills resulting in better employment

opportunities and the capacity to be self-employed in the future, or to go on to further education

and training.

Australian Technical Colleges will be established under a private-public partnership model

involving small, medium and large businesses; private and public training organisations and

education providers; and non-government and government schools.

Teaching staff will come from both industry and existing education systems.

All Colleges will be run autonomously by their principals and independent boards. Boards will

comprise representatives of local industry, community and education providers.

College locations will be selected based on a range of criteria including:

•

Levels of youth unemployment

•

Areas of skill shortage

•

Lack of quality training facilities in the surrounding area

T H E C O A L I T I O N ’ S P L A N F O R R E A L A C T I O N O N A u S T R A L I A N T E C H N I C A L C O L L E g E S 5

• Community and industr y needs

•

Support and involvement of local schools, businesses and industries

Australian

Technical Colleges will revolutionise vocational education and training, providing

clear pathways between schools and apprenticeships.

Students will have the opportunity to complete their high school education while undertaking

an apprenticeship and will provide a valuable link between education and industry. Academic

studies will be linked to the chosen work pathway of each student.

Priority will be given to high quality training in traditional trades where Australia is facing

medium to long term skills shortages.

2.

Integration of e

xisting Trades Training Centres into the new Australian Technical Colleges

Network

The Coalition’s network of Australian Technical Colleges will replace Trade Training Centres

introduced by Labor.

However, given that many schools across Australia have applied for funding for Trades Training

Centres in good faith, the Coalition will honour all funding commitments made in the first three

rounds of the Trades Training Centre programme.

The Coalition will seek to renegotiate contracts to integrate Trade Training Centres into the

Australian Technical Colleges network through an outreach programme.

An initial $15 million will be allocated to cover costs related to the integration of existing Trades

Training Centres into the new Australian Technical Colleges network.

3.

Connection with for

mer Australian Technical Colleges

24 Australian Technical Colleges had been established and a significant further rollout was

planned when Labor abandoned the programme following the 2007 election.

These Australian Technical Colleges were providing high quality training to thousands of young

Australians when Labor closed them down. As Education Minister, Julia g

illard personally took

this decision.

Many of these former Australian Technical Colleges continue to operate and remain committed

to equipping young Australians with the skills they need for a prosperous future.

Where possible, the Coalition will seek to integrate these institutions into the new Australian

Technical Colleges network.

The Coalition will commit $35 million towards the integration of these facilities into the new

Australian Technical Colleges network.

T H E C O A L I T I O N ’ S P L A N F O R R E A L A C T I O N O N A u S T R A L I A N T E C H N I C A L C O L L E g E S 6

Timing and Location of new Australian Technical Colleges

The Coalition will seek applications for the first round of Australian Technical Colleges within three

months of coming to office, with funding to commence in this financial year if possible. It is envisaged

that this first round will approve twelve applications.

Funding for the remaining Colleges will be made available progressively over the forward estimates to

support their establishment within the Coalition’s first term of government.

The final location of Australian Technical Colleges will be determined after detailed assessment and

will take into account the status of Trades Training Centre arrangements and the potential for smooth

integration of the current limited Trade Training Centres network with the new Australian Technical

Colleges network.

Subject to appropriate evaluation and assessment, first round locations will include the following

locations:

VIC

Melbourne - Western Suburbs Colac

SA

Adelaide u

pper Spencer

g

ulf

WA Peel Region

NSW

South Coast Central Coast Sydney - Western Suburbs

QLD

Central Queensland Tropical North Queensland

TAS Northern Tasmania

NT Darwin

T H E C O A L I T I O N ’ S P L A N F O R R E A L A C T I O N O N A u S T R A L I A N T E C H N I C A L C O L L E g E S 7

COSTINGS The Coalition will commit $740 million over the forward estimates for the establishment of the new

national Australian Technical Colleges network.

Funding profiles for each Australian Technical College will differ depending upon local circumstances.

For costings purposes, an allocation of $25 million has been made for each Australian Technical College,

including an initial $15 million grant, followed by additional funding of $3.3 million per year for at least

the next three years.

This funding will be provided from the nearly $30 billion in recurrent savings that have been identified

by the Coalition over the forward estimates.

These savings are a result of cutting Labor’s waste and mismanagement and redirecting funding from

inefficient and poorly performing Labor

g

overnment programmes.

2010-11 $M

2011-12 $M

2012-13 $M

2013-14 $M

TOTAL

Round one (12 ATCs) 180 40 40 40 300

Round two (18 ATCs) - 270 60 60 390

Integration of TTCs 5 10 - - 15

Connect with former ATCs 5 10 10 10 35

Authorised and printed by Brian Loughnane for the Liberal Party of Australia, Cnr Blackall and Macquarie Sts, BARTON ACT 2600.