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General Interest Charge (Imposition) Bill 1998



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Bills Digest No. 112  1998-99

 

General Interest Charge (Imposition) Bill 1998

Warning:

This Digest was prepared for debate. It reflects the legislation as introduced and does not canvass subsequent amendments. This Digest does not have any official legal status. Other sources should be consulted to determine the subsequent official status of the Bill.

Contents

 

 

Passage History

General Interest Charge (Imposition) Bill 1998

Date Introduced:  10 December 1998

House:  House of Representatives

Portfolio: Treasury

Commencement: Upon the Royal Assent

Purpose

The purpose of the General Interest Charge (Imposition) Bill 1998 (the Bill) is to impose the proposed tax deductible general interest charge as a tax to the extent to which the charge cannot validly be imposed otherwise than as a tax.

Background

1. Taxation Laws Amendment Bill (No.5) 1998

Taxation Laws Amendment Bill (No.5) 1998, amongst other things, will implement a new regime governing the late payment of taxes (the general interest charge) from 1 July 1999.

The Bill a ccompanies Taxation Laws Amendment Bill (No.5) 1998 to formally impose the general interest charge if it cannot validly be imposed otherwise than as a tax.

2. Constitutional restrictions on federal income tax law create necessity for separate taxation Acts.

The Constitution contains a number of restrictions on the federal government's powers to levy and collect income tax.

2.1 Section 55 creates necessity for imposition Act to be separate from other legislation

One of these restrictions, in section 55 of th e Constitution provides that laws 'imposing taxation shall deal only with the imposition of taxation and any provision therein dealing with any other matter shall be of no effect.' It is for this reason that the Act imposing the general interest charge must be separate to the Act providing for the incidence of the charge. This assumes, of course, that the charge is actually a tax and not a fine or financial penalty.

2.2 Charge may not validly be able to be imposed otherwise than as a tax or at all

The fact that the Bill imposes the general interest charge as a tax, only to the extent to which the general interest charge cannot validly be imposed otherwise than as a tax, raises two questions:

  1. What is the charge if it isn't a tax and how is it proposed to be v alidly imposed?
  2. If the charge cannot be validly imposed as intended without having recourse to imposing it as a tax, would it be properly characterised as a tax in any event?

2.2.1 What is the charge if it isn't a tax and how is it proposed to be validly imposed?

Presumably, the charge is considered to be either a payment incidental to a tax or a penalty that is something less than additional tax, for example the current late payment penalty tax.

If the charge is 'with respect… to taxation' in accordance wi th section 51(ii) of the Constitution, the Commonwealth has power over such matters and can provide for the incidence of such a charge.

The fact that the Bill provides for the facility to impose the charge as a tax indicates that there is a possibility that it may be characterised as a payment in the nature of a tax. In this event section 55 of the Constitution asserts that laws imposing taxation shall only deal with the imposition of taxation. This is the reason for the separate Bill.(1)

2.2.2 If the charge cannot be validly imposed as intended without having recourse to imposing it as a tax, would it be properly characterised as a tax in any event?

This matter is raised as an indicator of the sorts of issues canvassed with the introductio n of any tax. For the valid exercise of Commonwealth power under section 51(ii) of the Constitution, the legislation must be 'with respect to …taxation.'

A tax is a payment demanded as a contribution to revenue irrespective of any legality or illegality in the circumstances upon which liability depends.(2)

The conventional view is that whilst taxes are formally, at least, distinguished from financial penalties, section 51(ii) can be used to support legislation which will have the effect of regulating behaviour over a wide social and economic spectrum provided that the legislation imposes a legal obligation to pay taxation.(3)

A question, therefore, is whether the general interest charge would be seen as a financial penalty or a tax.

If the general interest charge were determined to be a financial penalty, that is, if it were a payment, for example,  'claimed as solely a penalty for an unlawful act or omission rather than the non-payment of or incidental to a tax',(4) the Bill would be an invalid exercise of Commonwealth power.

The general interest charge relates to approximately 30 sections of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 and 20 sections of other Acts. If it were to be characterised as a penalty for an unlawful act or omission and not a payment incidental to tax, its validity in respect of those sections may be in doubt.

If the general interest charge cannot validly be imposed as intended, the Bill by merely asserting that it is to be imposed as a tax does not of itself make the charge a tax and therefore valid.

Main Provisions

Subclause 3(1) imposes the general interest charge as a tax, but only to the extent to which that charge cannot validly be imposed otherwise than as a tax.

Subclause 3(2) confirms that general interest charge means the charge worked out under Division 1 of Part IIA of the Taxation Administration Act 1953 .

Concluding Comments

1. Taxation laws are characterised by their legal operation.

It is sufficient for the purposes of this digest to merely raise the question as to the intende d operation of the general interest charge and to state that consideration must be given to the nature of the rights, duties, powers and privileges which an enactment changes, regulates or abolishes in order to determine if it is a tax or a financial penalty.(5)

It should be noted that the general interest charge replaces current penalty provisions, the validity of which have not been challenged.

For Constitutional purposes, the distinction between a tax and a charge is not clear.

2. Bills Digest for the Taxation Laws Amendment Bill (No.5) 1998

For further information in relation to the operation of the general interest charge and other related matters please refer to the Bills Digest for the Taxation Laws Amendment Bill (No.5) 1998.

Endnotes

  1. In Re Dymond, Ex parte The Debtor (1959) 33 ALJR 48, the Full Court of the High Court was divided on the question whether provisions normally included in Assessment Acts - eg the imposition of liability to additional tax on persons in default - came within the expression 'laws imposing taxation'.
  2. R  v  Barger (1908) 6 CLR 40, 99.
  3. Fairfax  v  Commissioner of Taxation (1965) 114 CLR 1 and Northern Suburbs General Cemetery Trust  v  Commonwealth (1993) 176 CLR 555.
  4. R  v  Barger (1908) 6 CLR 40, 99 (Isaacs J).
  5. Fairfax  v  Co mmissioner of Taxation (1965) 114 CLR 1, 7.

 

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Contact Officer

Lesley Lang

 

15 February 1999

Bills Digest Service

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