Save Search

Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010



Download PDFDownload PDF

 

 

ISSN 1328‐8091 

Parliament of Australia Department of Parliamentary Services

BILLS DIGEST NO. 56, 2010-11  6 December 2010

International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010 

This is a new edition of a Bills Digest previously prepared for  the 42nd Parliament. 

Morag Donaldson  Law and Bills Digest Section 

Contents 

Purpose ............................................................................................................................................... 2 

Background ......................................................................................................................................... 2 

Article 19 of the Singapore Agreement: the exchange of information .............................................. 3 

Committee consideration ................................................................................................................... 5 

Financial implications ......................................................................................................................... 5 

Key provisions ..................................................................................................................................... 5 

 

 

2  International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010   

International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010 

Date introduced:  29 September 2010 

House:  House of Representatives 

Portfolio:  Treasury 

Commencement:   

Links: The links to the Bill, its Explanatory Memorandum and second reading speech can be found on  the Bills home page, or through http://www.aph.gov.au/bills/. When bills have been passed they can  be found at the ComLaw website, which is at http://www.comlaw.gov.au/.  

This Bill lapsed on the proroguing of Parliament in July 2010. It has been re‐introduced without  any significant changes. 

Purpose 

The Bill amends the International Tax Agreements Act 1953 (the Agreements Act) to give domestic  legal effect to the ‘second Singapore protocol’.  That protocol was signed on 8 September 2009 and  amends the existing tax treaty between Australia and Singapore. 

Background 

On 11 February 1969, the Governments of Australia and the Republic of Singapore (the contracting  states) entered into an agreement for ‘the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal  evasion with respect to taxes on income’ (the Singapore Agreement).1  The text of the agreement is  set out in Schedule 5 to the Agreements Act.2   

Like the other double tax agreements Australia has made with other nations, the Singapore  Agreement is intended to avoid the situation where a taxpayer (who resides in Australia and/or the  other contracting state—in this case, Singapore) is taxed on the same income in both Australia and  the other state.  (This concept of being taxed twice on the same income is referred to as ‘double  taxation’.)  The agreement clarifies the taxing rights between the contracting states on different  types of income, and also provides for the reduction (or exemption) of tax on certain types of  income.  It also aims to prevent income tax evasion by encouraging cooperation and the sharing of  information between the contracting states, and by ensuring that the laws of Australia and the other  state are enforced. 

                                                             1.   Preamble to the Singapore Agreement.  2.   Schedule 5 to the Agreements Act is available electronically at   http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/itaa1953299/sch5.html (viewed 10 August 2010). 

Warning: All viewers of this digest are advised to visit the disclaimer appearing at the end of this document. The disclaimer  sets out the status and purpose of the digest. 

  International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010  3 

 

On 16 October 1989, the parties signed a protocol (the first Singapore protocol) amending the  Singapore Agreement.  The text of the first Singapore protocol is set out in Schedule 5A to the  Agreements Act.3  It replaced various articles in the Singapore Agreement to reflect changes in  terminology, legal drafting and financial practice that had occurred since the Singapore Agreement  was made in 1969. 

On 8 September 2009, the parties signed another protocol (the second Singapore protocol)  amending the Singapore Agreement.  The text of that protocol is to be inserted as proposed  Schedule 5B to the Agreements Act.4  Essentially, the second Singapore protocol omits Article 19 of  the Singapore Agreement and replaces it with revised text which not only meets the international  standard on the exchange of tax information developed by the Organisation for Economic Co‐ operation and Development (OECD) (the OECD model tax convention) but almost replicates it  verbatim.5 

On 23 June 2010, the Gillard Government introduced a Bill (titled the ‘International Tax Agreements  Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010’) into Parliament, but it lapsed when the 42nd Parliament was  prorogued and the House of Representatives was dissolved on 19 July 2010.6 

Article 19 of the Singapore Agreement: the exchange of information 

Article 19 of the Singapore Agreement deals with the exchange of information between Australia  and Singapore in relation to matters covered by the tax treaty.   

In its original 1969 form, Article 19 provided that the parties (through their ‘competent authorities’)  ‘shall’ (that is, must) exchange information (which is at their disposal in the normal course of  administering their respective taxation laws) as is necessary for the purposes of carrying out the  Singapore Agreement, or for the prevention of fraud or administering statutory provisions against  legal tax avoidance.  Such exchanged information is to be treated as secret but may be disclosed to  persons (including to courts and tribunals) concerned with the ‘assessment, collection, enforcement  or prosecution’ of the taxes that are subject to the agreement.  However, the parties cannot  exchange information which would disclose any ‘trade, business, industrial or professional secret or  trade process’.  Article 19 was not amended by the first Singapore protocol. 

                                                             3.   Schedule 5A to the Agreements Act is available electronically at  http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/itaa1953299/sch5a.html (viewed 10 August 2010).  4.   See item 7 of Schedule 1 to the Bill.  5.   See the text and commentary on the OECD Model Tax Convention on Income and on Capital at 

http://www.oecd.org/document/37/0,3343,en_2649_33747_1913957_1_1_1_1,00.html (viewed 20 August 2010).   Article 26 of that Convention deals with the exchange of information.  6.   That Bill’s homepage is at  http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22legislation%2Fbillhome%2Fr4414%

22 (viewed 16 August 2010). 

Warning: All viewers of this digest are advised to visit the disclaimer appearing at the end of this document. The disclaimer  sets out the status and purpose of the digest. 

4  International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010   

Article 19 is far more detailed in its 2009 form.  Particularly, in replicating Article 26 of the OECD  model tax convention (which, as mentioned above, deals with the exchange of information), it: 

• expands  the  range  of  taxes  to  which  the  information  exchange  provisions  of  the  Singapore  Agreement will apply 

• limits  the  information  to  that  which  is  ‘foreseeably  relevant’  to  the  administration  or  enforcement of those taxes, and 

• clarifies  that  the  absence  of  a  ‘domestic  tax  interest’  in  the  information  sought  by  either  contracting state (and/or whether the information concerns a resident of either state) is not a  reason for refusing to provide the information,  

Further, while it is not immediately apparent from the revised text of Article 19, the Explanatory  Memorandum states that the revised text also clarifies that bank secrecy laws are not a reason for  limiting the exchange of information.7 

In its revised form, Article 19 provides that the parties shall exchange information as is ‘foreseeably  relevant’ for carrying out the provisions of the agreement or the administration or enforcement of  domestic tax laws to which the Singapore Agreement applies.8  A contracting state that receives the  exchanged information must treat it as secret ‘in the same manner as information obtained under  [that party’s] domestic laws’.  The state shall only disclose it to persons and authorities (including  courts and administrative bodies) concerned with the assessment, collection, enforcement or  prosecution of, and in relation to, the domestic tax laws.  Any person or authority to whom the  information is disclosed must use it only for these purposes too.  They may disclose the information  in public court proceedings or in judicial decisions.9 

These obligations do not include: 

• carrying out measures at variance with the laws or administrative practice of either contracting  state 

• supplying information which is not obtainable under the laws or in the normal course of the  administration of either contracting state, or 

• supplying  information  which  would  disclose  any  ‘trade,  business,  industrial,  commercial  or  professional secret or trade process, or information, the disclosure of which would be contrary  to public policy’.10 

If a contracting state requests information, the other contracting state shall use its information‐ gathering measures to obtain the requested information, even though that state may not need such  information for its own tax purposes.11 

                                                             7.   Explanatory Memorandum, International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010, p. 6.  8.   Paragraph 1 of revised Article 19, as it appears in the second Singapore protocol.  9.   Paragraph 2 of revised Article 19, as it appears in the second Singapore protocol.  10.   Paragraph 3 of revised Article 19, as it appears in the second Singapore protocol.  11.   Paragraph 4 of revised Article 19, as it appears in the second Singapore protocol. 

Warning: All viewers of this digest are advised to visit the disclaimer appearing at the end of this document. The disclaimer  sets out the status and purpose of the digest. 

  International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010  5 

A contracting state cannot decline to supply information solely because the information is held by a  bank, other financial institution, nominee or a person acting in an agency or fiduciary capacity, or  because the information relates to ‘ownership interests’ in a person.12 

The second Singapore protocol comes into force 30 days after the parties last notify each other of  the completion of the necessary domestic procedures.13  In the case of Australia, these procedures  essentially involve the tabling of the second Singapore protocol and the enactment of the current  Bill.14 

Committee consideration 

The second Singapore protocol was considered by the Joint Standing Committee on Treaties (JSCOT)  in Chapter 3 of its report tabled on 10 March 2010.15  The committee supported the protocol and  recommended that binding treaty action be taken.16    

Financial implications 

Treasury has estimated the revenue impact of the second Singapore protocol as ‘unquantifiable’.17   However, the proposal is expected ‘to improve taxpayer compliance and increase tax revenue’.18 

Key provisions 

Items 1-4 of Schedule 1 to the Bill amend subsection 3(1) of the Agreements Act to: 

• insert definitions for the terms ‘the first Singapore protocol’ and ‘the second Singapore protocol’ 

• amend the definition of the term ‘the Singapore Agreement’ by inserting reference to both the  first Singapore protocol and the second Singapore protocol, and 

• repeal the definition of the term ‘the Singapore protocol’ (because it has been replaced by the  more specific reference to ‘the first Singapore protocol’). 

Item 6 inserts proposed section 7B into the Agreements Act.  It provides that, subject to other  provisions in the Agreements Act, the second Singapore protocol has the force of law on and after  the date of its entry into force. 

                                                             12.   Paragraph 5 of revised Article 19, as it appears in the second Singapore protocol.  13.   Article II of the second Singapore protocol.  14.   The second Singapore protocol was tabled in both Houses on 25 November 2009.  15.   JSCOT, Report No. 110: Review into treaties tabled on 18, 25 (2) and 26 November 2009 and 2 (2) February 2010, 15 

March 2010, Chapter 3, viewed 18 August 2010,  http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/jsct/25november2009/report1/chapter3.pdf   16.   Ibid., p. 14.  17.   Explanatory Memorandum, International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010, p. 3.  18.   Ibid. 

Warning: All viewers of this digest are advised to visit the disclaimer appearing at the end of this document. The disclaimer  sets out the status and purpose of the digest. 

6  International Tax Agreements Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2010   

Warning: All viewers of this digest are advised to visit the disclaimer appearing at the end of this document. The disclaimer  sets out the status and purpose of the digest. 

Item 7 inserts the second Singapore protocol as Schedule 5B to the Agreements Act. 

 

  © Commonwealth of Australia 2010 

This work is copyright. Except to the extent of uses permitted by the Copyright Act 1968, no person may reproduce or  transmit any part of this work by any process without the prior written consent of the Parliamentary Librarian. This  requirement does not apply to members of the Parliament of Australia acting in the course of their official duties.  

Disclaimer: Bills Digests are prepared to support the work of the Australian Parliament. They are produced under time and  resource constraints and aim to be available in time for debate in the Chambers. The views expressed in Bills Digests do not  reflect an official position of the Australian Parliamentary Library, nor do they constitute professional legal opinion. Bills  Digests reflect the relevant legislation as introduced and do not canvass subsequent amendments or developments. Other  sources should be consulted to determine the official status of the Bill. 

Feedback is welcome and may be provided to: web.library@aph.gov.au. Any concerns or complaints should be directed to  the Parliamentary Librarian. Parliamentary Library staff are available to discuss the contents of publications with Senators  and Members and their staff. To access this service, clients may contact the author or the Library’s Central Enquiry Point  for referral.  

    Members, Senators and Parliamentary staff can obtain further information from the Parliamentary  Library on (02) 6277 2500.