Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Full Day's HansardDownload Full Day's Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Wednesday, 7 November 1973
Page: 1567


Senator CARRICK (NEW SOUTH WALES) - My question, which is directed to the Minister for the Media, refers to the Broadcasting and Television Act and to the specific provisions of the Act governing the projection of political matter, both paid and free.

Since the inception of television in Australia, have there been any occasions on which television stations have charged political parties to broadcast political speeches? If so, can the Minister give details, including the years and the political parties involved? Has the imposition of such charges been legal under the Act and specifically under section 116(5.) of the Act? Finally, has the Australian Broadcasting Control Board ever made any recommendation for the suspension or revocation of a television licence arising out of an action which has been legal under the Act?

Senator DOUGLASMcCLELLANDSection 1 16 (5.) of the Broadcasting and Television Act provides that nothing contained in that section, which relates to the broadcasting or televising of political matter, requires a licensee to broadcast or televise any matter free of charge. Having said that, naturally I do not comment on the legal implications that are involved in the honourable senator's question. However, I do know that so far as the Sydney metropolitan area is concerned, there have been at least a dozen or so instances when either one or two, or in one case three, commercial stations did make a charge for the televising of a political leader's policy speech. I cannot give the honourable senator the exact details, but I know that in 1965 the three commercial stations did impose a charge. As to whether the Australian Broadcasting Control Board has ever made any recommendation for the suspension or revocation of a licence arising out of an action - (An incident occurring in the gallery).


The PRESIDENT - Order! Sir, you in the gallery. Who are you? You have no right to do that. You may not address senators over the balustrade. Leave the chamber at once.


Senator Douglas McClelland (NEW SOUTH WALES) -As 1 was saying in answer to portion of Senator Carrick 's question as to whether the Board had ever made any recommendation for the suspension or revocation of a licence arising out of what is considered to be a legal action, I would not know. I would hardly think that it is so but again I do not comment on that which is legal or not legal. It is not a matter for my interpretation.







Suggest corrections