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Thursday, 27 April 1972
Page: 1377


The PRESIDENT - I have received a message from the House of Representatives. Order! Senator Devitt, would you mind resuming your seat, please?


Senator Devitt - Mr President, must I resume my seat?


The PRESIDENT - It is the proper place to be when you are conducting a private conversation. In any case you should not conduct such a conversation when the President is on his feet.


Senator Devitt - As my seat is now vacant I will resume it, Mr President, at your request.


The PRESIDENT - Not only at my request but also in accordance with the Standing Orders.


Senator Devitt - I have never heard that order given before. I am quite serious about this, Mr President.


The PRESIDENT - So am I. The message I have received from the House of Representatives reads:

Mr President,the House of Representatives transmits to the Senate a Bill entitled 'A Bill for an Act to amend the Distillation-'


Senator Devitt - Mr President, I rise on a point of order. You have requested me to resume my seat. Does that request apply to all other honourable senators who are out of their seats?


The PRESIDENT - Order! I asked you to resume your seat because you were conducting a private conversation when you were not in your place and when the President was on his feet.


Senator Devitt - Under what standing order did you do that?


The PRESIDENT - It is inherent in the Standing Orders. If you look them up you will find it. Please resume your seat while I transmit this message. It reads:

Mr President,the House of Representatives transmits to the Senate a Bill entitled 'A Bill for an Act to amend the Distillation Act 1901-1968' in which it desires the concurrence of the Senate.

The message is signed 'W. Aston, Speaker of the House of Representatives', and is dated 26th April 1972.

Standing Orders suspended.

Bill (on motion by Senator Cotton) read a first time.







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