Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Full Day's HansardDownload Full Day's Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Wednesday, 30 June 1937


Senator COLLINGS (Queensland) . - Yesterday, through the courtesy of the Leader of the Senate (Senator Pearce), certain information was made available to me concerning the reclassification of officers of the Public Service in various departments in the several States. I have not had time to examine this thoroughly in detail, but it appears to me that the officers of the Pensions Department have not been fairly treated. I notice that in Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia, the heads of the branches of that department are not only paid a lower salary than the heads of branches of other departments, hut are also listed for increases of salary so small as to be almost insulting. The same thing applies to the officers of the department in other States. How is it that such a state of affairs prevails? I do not wish to read all the details in the reply furnished to me but some of. the contrasts are remarkable. For instance, the head of the Pensions Branch in Victoria, who was formerly on a salary range of £708-£780, now has a range of £732- £804. The increase is only £24 a year. The corresponding officer in Queensland was on a salary range of £584-£612 and his remuneration has been increased to £608-£636. The increase is less than 10s. a week. In Western Australia the corresponding officer was formerly on a salary range of £600-£660 and his new range is £636-£708. The difference in this instance is somewhat greater, but still very small in comparison with the salary of the heads of branches of other departments. I notice, for example, that the PublicService Inspector in New South Wales, who formerly had a salary range of £950-£l,100, now has a range of £1,050-£1,200. Such an increase can be appreciated. Why are the increases to the officers of the Pensions Department so small? I wish it to be distinctly understood that I do not object to the increases. I desire higher, not lower, salaries to be paid. The more people we have who receive good wages and salaries the better I shall be pleased. I should like to know, though, why the officers of the Pensions Department have been selected for what seems to me to be mean if not offensive increments.







Suggest corrections