Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Full Day's HansardDownload Full Day's Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Wednesday, 6 May 1936


Senator GIBSON (Victoria) .- I am very much afraid that Senator Leckie's logic is at fault. He says that the effect of the amendment is to reward the importing interests for their exploitation of primary producers. For a long time purchasers of imported farm machinery have been penalized, because spare parts have not been available in Australia. The PostmasterGeneral has told us that this is a small matter, and that spare parts are now being made locally. That is true of the Massey-Harris machine, which is now being manufactured by H. V.

5

McKay and Company, but that machine has been so altered, that Australian parts will not fit, and the purchaser is forced to buy imported parts, if he happens to own a machine that was imported prior to the combination of the two firms. Since the inquiry by the Tariff Board, the International Harvester Company has also entered into an agreement with a Melbourne company to manufacture its machines in Australia, so neither make of machines is now being imported. Consequently, farmers who cannot afford to buy up-to-date, machines have to rely entirely upon replacements to keep their plant in operation. I hope that the Minister will give this matter further consideration. Of my own knowledge the only reaper threshers that have been imported into this country are the Massey Harris and International Harvester Company's machines, and both are now being manufactured in Australia. .


Senator Hardy - Can the honorable senator say how many farmers need machinery parts from overseas. .


Senator GIBSON - I should say that thousands of farmers are in need of spare parts for imported machines.


Senator Hardy - Then how does the honorable senator account for the low imports last year - only £700 ?


Senator GIBSON - In .good seasons imports were as high as £S,000.







Suggest corrections