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Thursday, 11 October 1973
Page: 1954


Mr SPEAKER - Yes. The Minister is perfectly in order.


Mr Mcleay - He had finished his remarks.


Mr ENDERBY - No, I had not. These figures show a decline in the proportion of wages and salaries and supplements as a proportion of national income between the years 1948-49 and 1971-72. This is a progressive decline from a percentage of 76.5 per cent to 66.6 per cent in 1969-70. I know that it is always said that anything can be proved by statistics and figures. It may well be that that is what the honourable member for Mackellar sought to do with the table that he produced. It is unfortunate that we have not the time to compare the figures to determine which set is correct or gives the true position.

I have incorporated these figures in Hansard to put the point of view that this may be what the Prime Minister had in mind when he made his remarks yesterday. The figures that I have incorporated in Hansard show a most consistent and progressive decline in the share of the wealth produced by Australia going to the employee groups of Australia - the wage earners of Australia. Indeed, this is exactly what one would expect to have happened under the leadership of a Country Party-Liberal Party coalition type of Government because those Parties have very little purpose other than to ensure that the wage earners of the country get as little as possible and that the other people in the country who obtain wealth get as much as possible. I refer to the people who get their wealth from dividends, rents and profits. They have been extremely successful because between 1948-49 and a year or two ago the proportion given to wage earners fell from 76.5 per cent to 66.6 per cent. Honourable members opposite have been extremely successful in their task.







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