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Wednesday, 10 October 1973
Page: 1919


Mr Cooke asked the Minister for Labour, upon notice:

(1)   Is it a fact that thousands of working people were left without transport in Sydney on 19 September 1973 because of a train strike.

(2)   If so, was this strike due to a demarcation dispute between two unions.

(3)   If the position is as stated, what action does he intend to take to ensure that the public is not made the innocent victim of such inter-union squabbles in the future.


Mr Clyde Cameron (HINDMARSH, SOUTH AUSTRALIA) - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   As a result of a stoppage by guards in Sydney rail transport facilities were not available in the metropolitan area on September 19.

(2)   Yes.

(3)   The Government is aware of the difficulties arising out of demarcation issues and has repeatedly stressed its support for the principle of amalgamation of unions - a move which would eliminate many of the problems which cause disputes of this kind. As the honourable member will know, the Conciliation and Arbitration Bill, reintroduced into the House by the Government on 30 August, provides for the removal of existing barriers to trade union amalgamations.

Visits by Overseas Trade Union Specialists: Discussions on Collective Bargaining (Question No. 957)


Mr Lynch asked the Minister for Labour, upon notice:

(1)   Did he in answer to my question No. 764 (Hansard, 19 September 1973, page 1306) confirm that it is the intention of the Government to invite prominent trade unionists to Australia.

(2)   Is it also the intention of the Government to invite prominent employers and employers' representatives to Australia as part of the same program.


Mr Clyde Cameron (HINDMARSH, SOUTH AUSTRALIA) - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   Yes.

(2)   The trade union officials referred to in my answer to the honourable member's question No. 764 are to be brought to Australia under the Special Overseas Visits Fund. This Fund can also be used to bring prominent employers or employers' representatives to Australia. Indeed, I am advised that earlier this year 11 overseas industrialists visited Australia under the SOVF. The Government is anxious to encourage informed discussion and rational action in the labour field and I have taken the initiative in obtaining a small sum to be included in my Department's vote to enable a small number of overseas experts on labour matters to come to Australia each year to give us the benefit of their knowledge and experience and to stimulate the thinking of Australian practitioners in the labour field. If employers or employers' - representatives can contribute in this way the Government will certainly consider inviting them to come to Australia through one of the avenues I have mentioned.







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