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Thursday, 30 August 1973
Page: 715


Mr SINCLAIR (New England) - I do. I claim to have been personally misrepresented by a statement made by the Leader of the House (Mr Daly) in a speech recorded on page 589 of Hansard of Wednesday, 29 August when he said:

From memory, not one member of the Country Party has 'ever won more than SO per cent of the primary votes before being elected to this Parliament.

Equally by his rejoinder this evening, of which there is not yet a Hansard record available I was misrepresented. The figures quoted relate to my own electorate and to the Party of which I am a member. As I recall it, the Leader of the House tonight in his response related his statistics only to the 1972 general election and then quoted figures-


Mr DEPUTY SPEAKER -Order! I would suggest that the honourable gentleman is debating a general question.


Mr SINCLAIR - I am explaining how I have been misrepresented.


Mr DEPUTY SPEAKER -The honourable member is explaining how he has been misrepresented but he is also debating a question on behalf of a Party. Apart from saying that the Leader of the House used figures relating to his electorate, the honourable member has not indicated in any way how he has been personally misrepresented.


Mr SINCLAIR - I have been personally misrepresented because the figures are not accurate in respect of the electorate of New England.


Mr DEPUTY SPEAKER - Then the honourable member is entitled to correct the figures but not to debate the question.


Mr SINCLAIR - I agree. In his remarks tonight the Leader of the House referred to figures relating to the 1972 electoral results giving percentages of persons enrolled. Last night he made no reference to the number of persons enrolled. He spoke in general form only and said that no ohe member of the Country Party had ever won more than 50 per cent of the primary votes before being elected to this Parliament. As regards the electorate of New England this statement is not accurate. In the 1966 general election 18 of the 21 seats won by the Country Party, including the electorate of New England-


Mr DEPUTY SPEAKER -Order! I think the honourable gentleman is going a long way wide of the provisions Of the Standing Orders relating to personal explanations. The purpose of a personal explanation is to explain how a member has been personally misrepresented. I think it is very doubtful that this is a personal misrepresentation; I think it is more of a debating point. The honourable member has continued to refer to numerous electorates and the Country Party.


Mr SINCLAIR - I have referred to the electorate of New England which has been inaccurately portrayed in respect of every election other than the 1972 election. I am the member for New England and the figures for my electorate were deliberately misrepresented by the Leader of the House. The figures he quoted tonight and last night and the statements he made were incorrect. They were inaccurate according to the available statistical records prepared by either the Department of the Interior, as it then was called, or the Bureau of Census and Statistics. With respect to the electorate of New England and 18 of the Country Party seats won in the 1966 elections the Leader of the House was inaccurate. In respect of the 1969 elections and in relation to the electorate of New England and 14 of the seats won by the Country Party the figures given were not accurate. All these seats, including the electorate of New England, were won with outright majorities. Only at the 1972 elections were the figures accurate in respect of the electorate of New England, but they were not accurate in respect of eleven of the twenty seats won by the Country Party.

Mr DEPUTY SPEAKER (Mr Scholes)Order!The honourable gentleman is again making a general point. He ought to respect the forms of the House and not debate the -question. If he wishes to debate the question there are ways to do so.







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