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Tuesday, 28 August 1973
Page: 495


Mr Whan (EDEN-MONARO, NEW SOUTH WALES) asked the Minister for Civil Aviation, upon notice:

(1)   In the matter of noise pollution, are there international standards for noise levels of aircraft landing and taking off.

(2)   If so, which of the following aircraft are (a) above and (b) below those standards: Boeing 747, Boeing 707, Boeing 727, Douglas DC9, BAC 111, Fokker F28, Fokker F27, HS 125, HS 748.


Mr Charles Jones (NEWCASTLE, VICTORIA) (Minister for Transport) - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   International standards for noise certification of turbojet aircraft (take-off, side line and approach noise levels) are set down in Annex 16 to the convention on international civil aviation known as the Chicago Convention. These standards apply to turbojet aircraft whose maximum all up weight is in excess of 12,566 lb. These standards also apply to turbojet aircraft that were first granted a certificate of airworthiness by the country of manufacture:

(a)   After 1 March 1972 and are powered by jet engines whose bypass ratio is 2 or more;

(b)   after 1 January 1969 and are powered by jet engines whose bypass ratio is less than 2;

(c)   prior to 1 January 1969 - newly manufactured aircraft in this category must meet the international standards after 1 January 1976.

(2)   Boeing 747B - the noise levels recorded for these aircraft are lower than the maximum levels allowable under the standards contained in Annex 16.

Boeing 727/200 series aircraft - the noise levels recorded for these aircraft are lower than the maximum levels allowable under the standards contained in Annex 16.

Fokker F28 aircraft - the noise levels recorded for these aircraft are lower than the maximum levels allowable under the standards contained in Annex 16.

HS 125 series 3 aircraft - the noise levels recorded for these aircraft are lower than the maximum levels allowable under the standards contained in Annex 16.

Boeing 707/320 series aircraft - the recorded noise levels for these aircraft are higher than those allowable for the particular all up weight of the aircraft, but as these aircraft fall into category 1 (c) above they are not required to meet the standards until 1 January 1976, if economically feasible to do so.

Boeing 727/100 series aircraft - the recorded noise levels for these aircraft are higher than those allowable for the particular all up weight of the aircraft, but as these aircraft fall into category 1 (c) above they are not required to meet the standards until 1 January 1976, if economically feasible.

Douglas DC9/30 series aircraft - the recorded noise levels for these aircraft are higher than those allowable for the particular all up weight of the aircraft, but as these aircraft fall into category 1 (c) above they are not required to meet the standards until i January 1976, if economically feasible to do so.

BACIII aircraft - the recorded noise levels for these aircraft are higher than those allowable for the particular all up weight of the aircraft, but as these aircraft fall into category 1 (c) above they are not required to meet the standards until 1 January 1967, if economically feasible to do so.

HS748 and F27 aircraft - there are no international noise level standards for 'turboprop aircraft' as yet. The noise levels of all turboprop aircraft operating in Australia are considerably lower than those for turbojet aircraft.

Department of Overseas Trade: Accommodation (Question No. 594) Mr Garland asked the Minister for Overseas Trade the following question, upon notice:

(1)   Has his attention been drawn to the reply by the Minister for Services and Property to my question No. 174 (Hansard, 16 May, 1973, page 2250), in which he suggested that details relating to occupancies by Commonwealth authorities in buildings not owned by the Commowealth should be obtained from the Ministers concerned.

(2)   Will he provide details, as set out in that question, of all places occupied by his Department and by authorities under his control in buildings not owned by the Commonwealth.


Dr J F Cairns ns - The answer to the honourable member's question is as Follows:

The Department of Overseas Trade rents all its office space through the Department of Services and Property, and details in respect of that Department were included in Mr Daly's reply.

The Export Payments Insurance Corporation which is a statutory Authority responsible to the Minister for Overseas Trade arranges its own accommodation and occupies office space in buildings not owned by the Commonwealth.

The details of buildings occupied and rentals paid by that Authority are as follows:

 

Department of Secondary Industry : Accommodation (Question No. 595) Mr Garland asked the Minister for Secondary Industry the following question, upon notice:

(1)   Has his attention been drawn to the reply by the Minister for Services and Property to my question No. 174 (Hansard, 16 May 1973. page 2250). in which he suggested that details relating to occupancies by Commonwealth authorities in buildings not owned by the Commonwealth should be obtained from the Ministers concerned.

(2)   Will he provide details, as set out in that question, of all places occupied by his Department and by authorities under his control in buildings not owned by the Commonwealth.


Dr J F Cairns - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

In the States the Department of Secondary Industry uses office space Tented by the Department of Services and Property and details were included in Mr Daly's reply.

The Australian Industry Development Corporation, which is a Statutory Authority responsible to me, has advised me that it rents office space in Canberra, Melbourne and Sydney. The average rental cost per square foot is $7 for a total area of 19,677 square feet.







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