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Thursday, 31 May 1973
Page: 3066


Mr Garland asked the Minister for Housing, upon notice:

(1)   What is the average cost of acquiring and developing the blocks of land in each . State capital on which the State Housing Authority is at present building houses with Commonwealth grants.

(2)   How many blocks had each State acquired and developed by 31 December 1972 for future building of houses.


Mr Les Johnson (HUGHES, NEW SOUTH WALES) - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

It is impossible to set out the information supplied by the State Housing authorities in a manner that would permit direct comparison. This is so because of variations between the States in such factors as the proximity of the land being used to the capital city centre, the date of acquisition of the land, whether the land was purchased in a developed state or was bought 'raw' and developed by the housing authority, the extent of development required, and whether the land was bought in small quantities or in broad acres.

(1)-

New South Wales

Land at present being used to provide housing for ordinary family applicants in the Sydney area is principally located at Mt Druitt and was acquired in 1969 at a cost of $806 per lot. The cost of road and drainage works, provision for kerbing, guttering and footpaving (in 1971), and water and sewerage services (determined in 1969), amounts to $1,857 per lot.

Victoria

Information in respect of two areas where the Housing Commission is currently building houses is:

 

Development costs include holding charges and the cost of preparing the sites ready for house construction.

Queensland

The Housing Commission has indicated that land used by it in the Brisbane area is acquired and developed by various means i.e. land purchased 'raw' and developed by the Commission; land developed by private vendors and purchased prior to the vendor incurring publicity and vending costs; residual lots sold by vendors to finalise an estate; and single scattered sites wherever available at satisfactory prices. In view of these variables the Commission does not compile statistics of the average cost of land on which houses are currently being constructed. Typical examples of land costs were provided by the Housing Commission in 1971 and were incorporated in the answer to Question No. 3691 (Hansard, 16 September 1971, page 1503). In September 1972, the Housing Commission advised that an increase of 10 per cent on 1971 costs of acquisition and development could be considered to indicate a trend. Similarly, the Commission has advised that there has recently been a further increase of 15 per cent.

South Australia

It is the practice of the Housing Trust to purchase land several years in advance of requirements and usually in broad acres. The Trust has not undertaken the purchase of any large quantities of land In the past year. The actual cost of acquiring the land it is currently using was about$700 per allotment. Development costs for roads, footpaths and kerbing average about $750 per allotment. In addition, water and sewerage installation average $500, stormwater drainage approximately $130, and the introduction of underground cabling for electricity has added a further $120 per allotment.

Western Australia

The average cost of individual detached home sites currently being used for the erection of homes for eligible applicants in the Perth metropolitan area is, (a) prime land cost $630; and (b) development cost $2,330. This prime land cost, which includes holding charges such as interest, rates and administrative costs, reflects the purchase price of very large tracts of broadacre holdings acquired by land resumptions between 1950 and 1954. Since that time the cost of land that might be acquired by the Commission has increased to between $4,500 and $6,000 per acre for land zoned Urban, $3,000 per acre for Urban Deferred, and $1,200 per acre for land zoned Rural. Small purchases of land made by the Commission in the six month period ended 31 December 1972 cost approximately $2,000 per acre for Urban/ Urban Deferred land and $1,372 for land zoned Rural.

Tasmania

No significant land acquisitions were made by (he Housing Department in the period from 1 July 1972 to 31 December 1972, but in 1971-72 the average cost of land in the Greater Hobart metropolitan areas was $205 per lot. This includes purchases of cheaper land at the fringe of the metropolitan area. Excluding this lower cost land the average cost per lot was $270 compared with the figure of $250 per lot for 1970-71. The average cost of development in the period from 1 July 1972 to 31 December 1972 was $1,700 per lot

(2)-

New South Wales

The Housing Commission held land with an approximate potential of 22,000 dwellings. Part of this land reserve is located in the Sydney metropolitan area and much of it is in other areas throughout the State. Those parcels of land not already in subdivision and serviced are made ready for building construction progressively as required for the Commission's purposes.

Victoria

Vacant land held by the Housing Commission throughout the State had an approximate potential of 36,669 blocks. Included in that figure were 1,800 developed blocks.

Queensland

Land held by the Housing Commission throughout the State represented 10,770 sites. Of these 3,400 were developed.

South Australia

The Housing Trust attempts to hold sufficient land for approximately five years' operation, but the land is not physically developed until it is actually required for a building program. For this reason the number of blocks held for development for the future cannot be given.

Western Australia

The Housing Commission held approximately 5,400 acres of land in the Metropolitan Region. This land could yield in the order of 18,900 individual detached home sites but this would be contingent on future policy. The number of sites developed or in the course of development from these holdings was 2,275. In addition the Commission had acquired approximately 219 fully-serviced lots, making an aggregate of 2,494 lots available.

Tasmania

The Housing Department was holding land in the Hobart metropolitan area with potential of approximately 7,000 blocks. Of this number 202 were developed.







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