Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Full Day's HansardDownload Full Day's Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Tuesday, 22 May 1973
Page: 2458


Mr Mathews (CASEY, VICTORIA) asked the Minister for Immigration, upon notice:

(1)   How many teachers are employed in Victoria under the Child Migrant Education Program.

(2)   What is the (a) number and (b) percentage who are employed (i) full-time and (ii) part-time.

(3)   What are the names of the Victorian schools in which teachers are employed under the Program.

(4)   How many teachers are employed under the Program in each school.

(5)   What (a) number and (b) percentage of the students at each school needs to be taught English.

(6)   What are the names of Victorian schools in which teachers would be employed under the Program if they were available.

(7)   What (a) number and (b) percentage of the students at each of these schools needs to be taught English.

(8)   Are teachers employed in Victorian schools under the Program being used for general teaching duties.

(9)   If so, on how many occasions has this abuse been reported to him or his predecessors.

(10)   Has he been able to establish whether the Victorian Director of Education, Mr Brooks, was expressing Victorian Government policy when he said on 6 March 1973 that additional teachers would not be employed under the Program until general teaching requirements had been met.


Mr Grassby - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   There were 495 teachers employed in Victoria (447 in State schools, 48 in Catholic schools) under the Child Migrant Education Program as at the beginning of the 1973 school year.

(2)   -

 

(3)   and (4) The information is set out in Tables A and B below-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(5)   This information is not available. One of the difficulties is the lack of objective tests which will assess how the migrant child performs in his own language and his current confidence in and mastery of English. Among the research projects planned by my Department will be the development of the necessary tests and other devices which will assist teachers to assess the needs of migrant children. It is known, from a survey recently completed by the Commonwealth Departments of Immigration and Education, the Victorian Education Department and the Victorian Catholic Education Office of a limited number of schools of high migrant density in inner Melbourne, that not all migrant children attending special classes are receiving sufficient instruction. The report showed also that some proportion of migrant children in the schools surveyed were not receiving instruction at all. Action is being taken to remedy this situation.

(6)   and (7) The Victorian State and Catholic Education Authorities have both advised that they do not have the clerical resources to compile the information sought. Under the program the Commonwealth pays the salaries of special teachers who are to be engaged exclusively in teaching migrant children in special classes. The appointment of a 'Special teacher' requires as a rule a minimum of 30 migrant children in the school in need of special instruction. Where the number of childrenisless than 30, financial assistance is provided on a pro rata basis to enable a special teacher to be employed part-time. Generally, a minimum of 10 children would qualify a school for the appointment of a part-time teacher (though the number may be less). Alternatively the program provides for a special teacher to be employed at several adjacent schools where the number of migrant children in need of special instruction at any one particular school does not justify the establishment of a special class. In some States (Tasmania for example), migrant children are brought from schools to a central instruction point. The number of schools being catered for has been steadily increasing since the program was introduced in April 1970. Estimates for the 1973-74 financial year providein Victoria for an increase of 151 in the number of special teachers to be employed (104 in State schools and 47 in the Catholic schools).

(8)   and (9) The Victorian State Education Department and the Victorian Catholic Education Office both have advised that none of their migrant teachers are used for general teaching duties.

(10)   I aminformed that the Director-General of Education was quoted out of context and what he in fact said was that he would not take teachers trained for general purpose teaching out of normal classes to teach in special classes for migrant children, especially where these general purpose teachers were currently engaged in areas of special need (science, mathematics and English in particular).







Suggest corrections