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Wednesday, 13 October 1971
Page: 2328


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for Defence, upon notice: What payments were made in 1970-71

(a)   for each class of ship and aircraft which has been ordered for the services from overseas, and

(b)   for ammunition which has been imported for each of the services from overseas.


Mr Fairbairn - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(a)   Payments made in 1970-71 for each class of ship and aircraft which has been ordered for the Services from overseas are set out hereunder. This information includes payments made both overseas and in Australia.

 

(b)   Payments made in 1970-71 for ammunition which has been imported for each of the services from overseas.

 

Navy -

Submarine Signalling stores 4.5" and 5"/ 54 shells and fuses, MK8, 23 and 46 torpedoes

Aircraft power cartridges and flotation equipment 5" Browning ammunition

Ship Pyrotechnics

Anti submarine and demolition stores

Aircraft rockets 2" rocket plane motors

Bombs, HE and practice, and component fuses 20 mm aircraft ammunition

Mine disposals weapons

Sidewinder missiles.

Army -

Cartridges 20 pounder, . 30" . 303", . 50" 76 mm and 105 mm

Rockets 2.75" and 66 mm

Mines.

Grenades.

Air- 30 mm Aden ammunition 20 mm for F111C.

Timber: Exports (Question No. 3920) mr Scholes asked the Minister for

National Development, upon notice:

Will he appoint an expert committee to study and report upon the immediate and long-term effects on Australian forests ofthe continued export of large quantities of timber products.


Mr Swartz - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

I assume the timber products to which the question refers are woodchips, as the quantity exported in other forms is relatively small and has not changed significantly for many years. As a result of sound management these exports have not resulted in any adverse effects on the forests.

The methods used to produce timber for woodchips do not differ from long established Australian forestry practices. Australian foresters have had considerable experience with the methods employed, and whilst the scale of operations associated with woodchips tends to be larger than other forms of forest utilisation,there is no reason to suggest that the forests will be impaired by controlled extension of these techniques.

It would appear unnecessary therefore to appoint a committee of investigation.







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