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Wednesday, 6 October 1971
Page: 2000


Mr Barnard asked the Minister for Supply, upon notice:

In relation to total expenditure in Australia on purchases by the Department of Supply for each of the last 3 years, what has been the percentage expended in each State.


Mr Garland - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

 

South African Sporting Teams (Question No. 4088)


Dr Everingham asked the Minister for

Foreign Affairs, upon notice:

Will he approach the South African Government suggesting that Australians would unanimously welcome sporting teams from South Africa which are selected without regard to race.


Mr Sinclair - As Acting Minister for Foreign Affairs I supply the following answer to the honourable member's question:

I have no doubt that the South African Government is well aware that the great majority of Australians would welcome sporting teams from South Africa selected on the basis of sporting prowess without regard to race.

Transport Conventions (Question No. 4054)


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for

Foreign Affairs, upon notice:

Why is Australia so much more prompt in ratifying multilateral treaties which concern the Department of Civil Aviation than in ratifying those which concern the Department of Shipping and Transport.


Mr Sinclair - As Acting Minister 1 supply the following answer to the honourable member's question:

The Departments concerned closely examine multilateral treaties with a view to giving effect to them within Australia as soon as appropriate. If Australia is more prompt in ratifying civil aviation treaties than in ratifying those relating to other forms of transport, it is largely because of the nature of the treaties themselves and their general applicability to Australia.

Many of the maritime conventions which have not been ratified by Australia have not yet gained sufficient support from other countries to bring them into force, whereas virtually all civil aviation conventions are of such a nature that they have received sufficiently wide support to bring them into force. Of the 14 Inter-governmental Maritime Consultative Organisation conventions and amendments drawn up since 1960, 6 have entered into force: Australia has become a party to 5 of these and is actively working towards becoming a party to the other. The remaining 8 have not yet come into force but are under consideration in Australia.

Some transport conventions, other than those drawn up byIMCO, particularly those relating to road and rail transport, have little application to an island continent like Australia which does not have road or rail systems connected to similar systems of other countries. It is not proposed at this stage that Australia should become a party to them.

Others arc under close consideration and, where appropriate, action is being taken which will permit Australia to become a party to them.







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