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Wednesday, 29 September 1971
Page: 1703


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for Immigration, upon notice:

(1)   How many of the (a) 3,891 assisted settlers and (b) 3,041 unassisted settlers described at page 40 of his department's 1970 consolidated statistics as coming from unstated British Commonwealth countries were of (i) European, (ii) partly European and (iii) non-European descent.

(2)   How many came from Rhodesia.


Dr Forbes - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   (a) With the possible exception of a very small number of non-European dependent family members of European family heads who have not been recorded statistically as such all the 3,891 assisted settlers who came from unstated British Commonwealth countries in 1970 were of European descent.

(1)   (b) The 3,041 unassisted settlers from the same countries were comprised as follows:

 

(2)   Separate figures are not maintained for Rhodesia and for statistical purposes this country is grouped with Zambia and Malawi. From all three countries there were 45 arrivals during 1970. All of these were of European descent, 7 being assisted and 38 unassisted.

Deportations under Crimes Act (Question No. 3799)


Mr Grassby asked the Minister for

Immigration, upon notice:

(1)   How many Australian citizens have been deported under the provisions of the Crimes Act since World War 11?

(2)   What weretheir names and offences in each case?

(3)   Does the Government inform naturalised citizens that they have the full rights and privileges of native born citizens when in fact they can be deported?

(4)   Is consideration being given to the elimination of this discrimination?


Dr Forbes - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows: (1), (2) and (4) I refer the honourable member to parts 6 and 7 of my answer to his Question No. 2922 (Hansard of 3rd May 1971, page 2412).

(3)   When an alien is notified of the approval of his application for naturalisation he is informed that upon naturalisation he will enjoy thesa me rights and privileges and become subject to the same responsibilities as an Australian born citizen.

Deportations (Question No. 4144)


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for

Immigration, upon notice:

How many of the persons deported in each of the last 5 years (Hansard, 10th September 1971, page 1 148) were of (a) European, (b) partly European and (c) non-European descent.


Dr Forbes - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

The following table shows the number of (a) European, (b) mixed descent and (c) nonEuropean persons, and the sex of the persons in each category, who were deported in each of the last 5 financial years:

 

Com mon wealth-State Committees (Question No. 3710)


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for

Primary Industry, upon notice:

On what joint Commonwealth-State committees, such as the Fresh Fruit Disinfestation Committee (Hansard, 15th September 1970, page 1169) and the Co-ordinating Committee on Pesticides (Hansard,5th May 1971, page 2638), do officers of his Department serve.


Mr Sinclair - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

The Fresh Fruit Disinfestation Committee and the Co-ordinating Committee on Pesticides are standing committees responsible to the Agricultural Council. Other committees of a similar type on which Commonwealth and State officers serve are:

Animal Production Committee

Australian Weeds Committee

Committee on Importation of Cheese

Commonwealth and States Dairy Officers Committee

Commonwealth and States Entomology Committee

Commonwealth and States Horticultural Committee

Commonwealth and States Veterinary Committee

Co-ordinating Committee on Seed Certification

Consultative Committee on Drought

Multi-Resistant Cattle Tick Committee

Tractor Testing Committee

Fruit Fly Commodity Treatment Committee

Standing Committee on Soil Conservation.

Australian Meat Board (Question No. 3885)


Mr Hurford asked the Minister for

Primary Industry, upon notice:

(1)   When did the Australian Meat Board appoint the Washington legalfirm of Clifford, Warnke, McIlwain and Finney as its legal representatives and advisersin the United States of America.

(2)   Does this firm still act for the Board.

(3)   If so, is the firm a lobbyist for the Board in the United States Congress.

(4)   Is he able to say whether this function is normally carried out by professional firms of lobbyists rather than by legal firms.

(5)   What are the other functions of the firm in its relationship with the Board.

(6)   What sum has been paid by the Board to the firm in each financial year since its appointment.

(7)   What is the Board's assessment of the benefits it has derived by the appointment of this legal firm.


Mr Sinclair - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows: (1), (2) and (5) The Australian Meat Board appointed the firm of Clifford, Warnke, Class,

McIlwain and Finney as its legal representatives and advisers in December 1969. This arrangement still exists. Apart from its role as legal representative the firm also informs the Board of all legislative moves in America which could affect meat imports.

(3)   and (4). No. This is the responsibility of a firm of lobbyists - Warner and Harris - which was engaged by the Board for that specific purpose.

(6)   The arrangements between the Board and the firm of Clifford, Warnke, Glass, McIlwain and Finney are confidential to the two parties.

(7)   The Board believes that considerable benefit has accrued to the Australian meat industry from the regular reports of its legal representatives. In addition the advice received on a number of specific issues which have arisen since their appointment has been of material help in avoiding possible errors of judgment which may have occurred had their advice not been available.

South Vietnam: Economic and Social Assistance (Question No. 3997)


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for

Foreign Affairs, upon notice:

What changes in the (a) nature and (b) extent of economic and social assistance to South Vietnam have occurred since the answer by a former Minister on 3rd September 1970 (Hansard, page 1031).


Mr N H Bowen (PARRAMATTA, NEW SOUTH WALES) - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

Details of economic and social assistance to Vietnam are shown in the following publications, which are available through the Parliamentary Library: 'Economic and Social Aid to Vietnam', a report of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Vietnam for the period up to 31st December 1970, about civil assistance from all foreign sources; the Operation Reports of the United States Agency for International Development for financial year 1971; the 'Report to the Ambassador from the Director ofthe United States Agency for International Development 1970' covering United States assistance to Vietnam.

Twenty-three countries gave bilateral assistance to the Republic of Vietnam in 1970. The 8 major donors (more than$USlm) in order of the size of their assistance programmes were the United States, Germany, France, Australia.Japan, Canada and the Republic of China.

A brief general summary of aid programmes of these donors follows:

The United States: The United States continued to be by far the largest donor of assistance to Vietnam. Total United States economic and technical assistance to Vietnam in fiscal year 1971 (1970-71) was estimated at $US534m, excluding the Military Assistance Programme. The Commercial Import Programme has been estimated to cost $US270m, the Food for Peace (P.L. 480) programme $US115m and the Project Programme approximately$US159m.

Germany: German assistance continued to be centred primarily in the field of medical care and social welfare activities. Limited economic assistance was given to projects previously financed with German grants or credits. The aid continued to be concentrated in Quang Nam Province in Region 1 and in the Saigon area. Total German bilateral aid in 1970 was $US5,440,650.

Prance: France continued to provide both cultural and technical assistance at approximately the same level as during the preceding years. Most aid was a continuation of previous undertakings. Under the Cultural Assistance Service, France continued to provide senior staff, books and equipment to schools and cultural centres. Through its Technical Assistance Service it continued to provide experts and commodities to the public services in public health, technical and agricultural education, industry and handicrafts, and to many national medical and educational institutions. Total French bilateral aid in 1970 was $US5,094,088.

Australia: Australian economic assistance to Vietnam in 1970-71 was $A2.916m, an increase of about $A0.9m on the previous year. The most important element of Australia's aid continued to be the provision of town water supplies. Current water supply projects, which accounted for more than$Al.lm in 1970-71, are for the cities of Can Tho, Saigon and Vung Tau. Other important items in 1970-71 were the improvements in Bien Hoa Hospital (complementary to a similar programme completed the previous year), surgical teams for the hospital, training of Vietnamese students in Australia, repairs to the Ban Me Thuot radio transmitters, and continuing Civic Action Work in Phuoc Tuy Province including the construction of housing for the families of members of the Regional/Popular Forces.

Japan: Japanese aid to Vietnam in 1970 was $US 1,832,733. As in the past, it continued to be concentrated in the medical sector, although a larger proportion than in previous years was given to other forms of aid including a donation of assistance in the six-year plan to establish an agricultural faculty at Can Tho University, and construction of the television studio at the Instructional Materials Centre. Japan also made a relief grant to the Vietnamese Red Cross for victims of the typhoons of October 1970, and refugees from Cambodia.

Canada: The Canadian Government continued its assistance in the form of grants for technical assistance, food aid, construction equipment and supplies. The value of Canada's total bilateral assistance to Vietnam in 1970 was$US1,639,832. No major new projects were commenced during the year. Construction of the auditorium for the Science Faculty at the University of Hue, suspended after the Tet offensive, was completed in 1970. Canada also provided emergency relief for refugee Vietnamese from Cambodia and for victims of the typhoons.

Republic of China: Chinese bilateral assistance in 1970 was $US1, 171,040 and was primarily in the fields of agriculture (vegetable seeds, vaccines, water pumps, sprayers and other equipment); power (study or construction of a number of electric power projects); public works (including the continuation of the dredging project in the

Mekong Delta); post and communications (postal equipment and motorcycles) welfare and relief (flood relief for Central Vietnam).

Importation of Fancy Cheeses: Examination by Inter-departmental Committee (Question No. 4020)


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for Primary Industry, upon notice:

(1)   Which departments are represented on the inter-departmental committee appointed to examine the importation of fancy cheeses.

(2)   When was the committee appointed and when did or will it report.


Mr Sinclair - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(i)   and (2) The inter-departmental committee was appointed in August 1970 to examine a number of aspects relating to cheese imports into Australia. The Committee consists of representatives of the Departments of Primary Industry, Trade and Industry and Customs and Excise. An interim report was submitted to the then Minister for Primary Industry in September 1970. The committee recommended that its examination be deferred until the effect of anti-dumping action on cheese imports could be established. The Tariff Board has completed its public inquiry but not yet submitted its report.







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