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Thursday, 14 May 1970


Mr Barnard asked the Minister for the Army, upon notice:

(1)   How many officers of the Citizen Military Forces have gone to Vietnam on study trips.

(2)   How many have (a) been killed, (b) been wounded and (c) contracted diseases while in Vietnam.

(3)   Are these officers entitled to benefits under the Repatriation Act.


Mr Peacock - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   Since February 1967, 436 officers of the Citizen Military Forces have visited Vietnam as observers attached to field units.

(2)   (a) Nil

(b)   1

(c)   There are no readily available statistics of Citizen Military Force officers who may have contracted diseases while in Vietnam. However, it is certain that there have no cases where an illness or disease has reached the notifiable casualty category. Notifiable casualties include cases where a member is placed on the very seriously ill or seriously ill list, is medically evacuated from overseas because of a serious illness, is evacuated to hospital for investigation of tuberculosis, or is evacuated to a receiving or mental hospital or ward of a mental hospital.

(3)   Yes.

Hostels for the Mentally Retarded (Question No. 145)


Mr Whitlam asked the Minister for the Interior, upon notice:

(1)   Since there are no residential hostels for mentally retarded children in the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory as there are in all the States (Hansard, 12 August 1969, question No. 747 (2) (b), page 125), what arrangements are made for such children to be accommodated in hostels.

(2)   Have plans been made for such hostels in the Territories.


Mr Nixon (GIPPSLAND, VICTORIA) (Minister for the Interior) - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   Where residential accommodation for intellectually handicapped children of residents of the Australian Capital Territory is required, private centres or mental hospitals in New South Wales provide the necessary facilities depending on the individual circumstances. A social worker of the Handicapped Children's Association of the A.C.T. assists parents in making these arrangements. A subsidy to meet the salary of the social worker is provided by the Commonwealth. In the Northern Territory a hostel accommodating 10 children is attached to the Slow Learners Centre in Darwin. The more severely handicapped children in need of intensive care are accommodated in institutions in South Australia.

(2)   The plans of the Handicapped Children's Association of the A.C.T. include the construction of a hostel at Page in the Belconnen area to accommodate twenty handicapped children up to the age of 16 years. Negotiations are being conducted between my Department and the Association on the establishment of this hostel. There is no proposal at present for additional hostel accommodation for mentally handicapped children in the Northern Territory.







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