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Thursday, 7 May 1970


Mr CLYDE CAMERON (HINDMARSH, SOUTH AUSTRALIA) asked the Minister for Labour and National Service, upon notice:

(1)   Is it a fact that there is virtually full compliance with the main provisions of International Labour Organisation Conventions Nos > 23, 32. 52. 58. 62. 81, 84, 92, 98, 101. 102, 109, 112, 118, 123 and 128.

(2)   If so, what is the reason for not ratifying these Conventions.

(3)   With which of these Conventions has the Commonwealth failed to comply.

(4)   Which of the State governments have (a) refused or (b) failed to comply with each of these Conventions.

(5)   What is the Commonwealth doing to secure State government agreement to ratification of these Conventions.


Mr Snedden - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows: (1), (2), (3) and (4) The position of law and practice relating to these Conventions and the considerations affecting ratification are set out in the 'Review of Australian Law and Practice Relating to Conventions Adopted by the International Labour Conference* published by my Department in October 1969. I have previously provided the honourable member with a copy.

(5)   There are continuing consultations with the States concerning all unratified Conventions which deal wilh matters within their jurisdictions. In addition, Conventions which there are some prospects of ratifying are discussed each year at the meeting of the Departments of Labour Advisory Committee. Of the Conventions listed by the honourable member. Nos 32, 52, 58, 62, 81, 9-2, 98, 101, 112, and 123 have been discussed in recent years.

Minimum Wage: Effect of Technological Change (Question No. 809) Mr Clyde Cameron asked the Minister for Labour and National Service, upon notice:

To what extent has technological change during the past 20 years resulted in an increase in the real purchasing power of the nominal minimum wage for a standard working week.


Mr Snedden - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

Changes in the real purchasing power of the nominal minimum wage for a standard working week are influenced not only by technological developments but also by other factors such as changes in the stock of capital per worker, movements in the terms of trade, the educational level of the work force, managerial efficiency and economies of scale.

As there are conceptual and technical difficulties in separating out the contribution made by technological change no useful answer can be provided.







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