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Tuesday, 19 April 1966


Mr Whitlam m asked the AttorneyGeneral, upon notice -

What percentage of matters under the Bankruptcy Act is heard in each State by a Federal judge or official?


Mr Snedden (BRUCE, VICTORIA) (Attorney-General) - The answer to the honorable member's question is as follows -

The percentages set out hereunder are calculated from the number of matters dealt with in the year ending 30th June 1965, and represent an average year.

New South Wales-

Judicial matters by a Federal judge- 100 per cent.

Examinations under sections 68 and 80 of the Bankruptcy Act by a Federal official - 89 per cent.

Victoria-

Judicial matters by a Federal judge - 100 per cent.

Examinations under sections 68 and 80 of the Bankruptcy Act by a Federal official - 100 per cent. Queensland -

Judicial matters by a Federal judge - Nil. Examinations under sections 68 and 80 of the Bankruptcy Act by a Federal official - 70 per cent.

South Australia -

Judicial matters by a Federal judge - Nil. Examinations under sections 68 and 80 of the Bankruptcy Act by a Federal official - 87 per cent.

Western Australia -

Judicial matters by a Federal judge - Nil. Examinations under sections 68 and 80 of the Bankruptcy Act by a Federal official- 100 per cent.

Tasmania -

Judicial matters by a Federal judge - Nil. Examinations under sections 68 and 80 of the Bankruptcy Act by a Federal official - 67 per cent.

Naturalisations. (Question No. 1595.)


Mr Webb b asked the Minister for

Immigration, upon notice -

1.   How many persons who were eligible for naturalisation at the 31st December 1965 were unnaturalised?

2.   How many persons were naturalised during the twelve months ended on the 31st December 1965?


Mr Opperman - The answers to the honorable member's questions are as follows -

1.   It is estimated that as at 31st December 1965, 213,750 persons over the age of sixteen years were eligible to apply for naturalisation but had not lodged applications.

2.   During the twelve months ended 31st December 1965, 33,186 persons were naturalised.

Army Cadet Corps. (Question No. 1624.)


Mr Cockle e asked the Minister for the

Army, upon notice -

1.   Is it the intention of the Army to lift the numerical ceiling of the Cadet Corps to 47,000?

2.   Has his attention been drawn to a report that the Woodlawn College at Lismore has disbanded its 200 strong cadet unit?

3.   What significance does he see in this action?

4.   Is there any evidence that this disbandment is likely to be the forerunner of similar action by other schools?

5.   Is there any obligation on schools to maintain and develop the Cadet Corps?

6.   What action will be taken by the Army to prevent any further disbandments and ensure the build-up of the number of cadets under training to the stated ceiling?


Mr Malcolm Fraser (WANNON, VICTORIA) - The answers to the honorable member's questions are as follows -

1.   The current three year programme will bring the ceiling of the Cadet Corps to 45,000 in 1967-68. This is an increase of 5,000 for the period. It is hoped that it will be found practicable to increase the ceiling in the next programme.

2.   I am aware that Woodlawn College has requested the disbandment of their cadet unit.

3.   I see nothing of great significance in this action which was taken by the board of directors and the Rector of the college for the reason that a transfer of teachers has left the college with no suitable personnel to administer and control the unit.

4.   No. To the contrary, the honorable member will be interested to know that, since the commencement of the current three years programme, twelve new units have been raised and only one disbanded.

5.   There is no legal obligation for schools to maintain and develop the Cadet Corps.

6.   At present there arc many schools awaiting the formation of cadet units and many schools are desirous of increasing the size of their present units, and there is no difficulty in attaining the present authorised ceiling.







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