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Wednesday, 3 April 1957


Mr POLLARD (Lalor) .- -I wish to refer to the remarks of the honorable member for Canning (Mr. Hamilton). The facts are these: The honorable member for East Sydney (Mr. Ward) believed, rightly or wrongly, that the honorable member for Lyne (Mr. Lucock) last night was seeking to create the impression, if not directly saying so, that he was a hero who had served his country overseas, and that the honorable member for East Sydney was not of the same courageous calibre, lt is quite true that the honorable member for East Sydney did not serve as a soldier in the war. Unfortunately, through no fault of his own, the honorable member for Lyne did not serve in the war either. Nor was it the fault of the honorable member for East Sydney that he did not serve in the war. If I liked to stir this matter up sufficiently I could point some bones at a lot of people on both sides of this chamber who were as eligible for active service as was the honorable member for East Sydney.

The honorable member for East Sydney has never, to my knowledge, cast aspersions on, or made disparaging remarks about, any man who served his country in World War II. - and I have been in this House as long as most honorable members. The honorable member for East Sydney rendered very distinguished service to this country during the war as a member of the Cabinet that administered the war-time affairs of Australia. If it is considered that the honorable member for East Sydney has cast aspersions on the honorable member for Lyne, why does not the honorable member for Lyne come in here and defend himself? It is well known that almost immediately after the honorable member for East Sydney had resumed his seat the honorable member for Lyne was hiding behind the curtain at the door of this chamber. Why did he not come in and himself attack the honorable member for East Sydney, or, alternatively, if he had wronged the honorable member for East Sydney by implying that he was much more courageous than the honorable member for East Sydney, why did he not come in and either confirm or deny that he intended to create such an impression? That is where we see the indicator of courage.







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