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Thursday, 30 April 1942

Sunday Telegraph Service

London. Saturday

The managing director of a firm engaged on war work referred to his employees as "beasts" "animals," and"riff-raff"' before an investigating committee.

A reportby the committee, which was organised by the Advertising Service Guild to investigate war production, reveals this.

The managing director was distinguished mid titled," the report states. " He addressed the committee for more than two hours on the selfishness and stupidity of his work-people who number many thousands, and are mostly highly skilled."

The report quotes this man's views as an example of the need for more intelligent use of human resources in war production.

Other employers regarded compulsory introduction of works canteens as the beginning of Communism, and considered the very idea of works councils as the equivalent of sabotage, the report adds.

Nearly one in ten of the firms studied was strongly anti-trade union.

The report does not suggest that either labor or management has a monopoly of blame.

It is apparent from the two extracts I have read that, whilst one section of the industrial community believes that there should be greater co-operation between employers and employees, that workers should be co-partners in industry and should share in the management of, and rewards from, industry, there is another section which looks on employees as beasts and animals who should be driven to do their duty. Under Statutory Rule No. 77, the Government has an opportunity to move towards greater co-operation between all sections of the industrial community, and to pave the way for a higher social system. If this be not done by an evolutionary process, a section of the community might attempt to bring it about by bloody revolution.







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