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(generated from captions) This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. The US policeman who shot and killed Australian woman Justine Damond identified as a junior officer with just two years experience. A man arrested in Melbourne's north after a woman's body is found in a house. Cabinet says a debate for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's plans for looking at ASIO. And a memorial to MH 17 which included 238 people, including 38 Australians. And the world snail-racing championships in eastern England. A very good morning to you, it is Tuesday, July 18. I'm Michael Rowland.And I'm Virginia Trioli. You're watching News Breakfast.

The distraught family members of an Australian woman shot dead by police in the United States gave a statement about their grief.Local media suggests that the 40-year-old was shot through the door of a police car by a junior officer as she approached the police inside. An investigation is under way after revelations that police did not have their body cameras turned on, hindering any possible investigation. Good morning, Virginia. Justine's family still coming to terms with the random death. She was loved in America and by her many family and friends in Manly in Sydney.We're expecting to hear from her fiance shortly who will be addressing the world's media and we'll bring that to you as soon as we can. Our Washington correspondent will be joining us for some analysis for this bizarre and seemingly inexplicable matter. Minneapolis being a hot spot for police shootings which has further underscored the tragedy of this. Welcome back. And how is the tooth? Tooth is fine. I had such an adventurous holiday. I know we both did. We hit Queensland and Sydney and eastern Victoria. Good morning to one of the most beautiful townships in all of Victoria.How is your tooth?And the tooth. You know what I learnt yesterday from the dentist?What's that sophThat evolution is rubbish. You know why? Why? . At this age, we should grow another set of teeth. Our teeth is not designed to go the distance. So at this stage, whatever it is. They're starting to fall apart on me. So if I turn up here with dentures in a few weeks. Who says we need to grow another set of teeth? We do. Because they're not designed to go the distance and designed to fall apart in your 40s.They fall out and then you grow artificial teeth.That's what I'm saying. Evolution, can you get on with it, please. Now to the main news of the morning and we'll go back to Minneapolis shortly. Victoria police have arrested a man over the death of a woman in Melbourne's north overnight. Police say they were called to a house in lalor just before 1:00am when they found the woman's body. The man, in his 40s, is in police custody. Police say that the pair knew each other.Federal Cabinet will meet to discuss the Prime Minister's plan for a new ministry to oversea Federal security and the spice agency ASIO. It could mirror that of the Home Secretary in the United Kingdom which coordinates domestic security agencies. Peter Dutton is tipped to lead the new department. Security expert John Blaxland from the Australian National University says changing the current system carries significant risk.While on one level, it may appear that this will improve efficiencies and improve security, I think in terms of confidence in the system, that may actually have a corrosive effect on Australian society. And that's, I think, where the danger lies. A memorial for the victims of MH 17 has been unveiled in the Netherlands three years after the plane was shot down over Ukraine. The memorial features 298 trees - one for each person who died, including 38 Australians. The trees are planned in the near Schipol where the plane took off. It also has a memorial in the shape of an eye looking up to the sky. Victims' families say that they still hope that one day, those responsible for bringing down the plane will be brought to justice.A man has been charged over the shooting death of a dressmaker in Melbourne's west. Vung Tau vung was found murdered in his house on June 26. Detectives believe he may have been killed up to 11 days before he was found by neighbours. Police have charged a 35-year-old man with murder and say that a 45-year-old man is assisting with inquiries. In Italy, questions are being raised about the safety of Rome's metro after this footage emerged of a woman being dragged along a platform by a train. The woman, from Belarus, was trying to leave the train at the last minute when her bag became caught. Italian media say she has broken bones from the incident. The train driver was caught on camera eating before driving away. The driver has denied being reckless saying he followed protocol and checked the mirror twice before taking off. Foxtel has apologised to angry Game of Thrones fans after its streaming services crashed just as the new season was released. Fans of the HBO show vented their frustration on social media as they tried to tune in to watch Episode 1 of series 7 only to be met with an error message. In a statement on Facebook, Foxtel say it is is devastated that its services crashed due to unprecedented demand. And the snail-racing championships have been held in the UK. PK should be doing this one! More than 150 snails took part in the Gastropod Games in Norfolk in eastern England. The championships have been running since the 1960s. Each slimy race to the edge of the circular table begins with a call - ready, steady - slow! This year's winner was Larry who was rewarded with a silver tankard stuffeded with leafy lettuce leaves.I thought maybe the slow snail race was linked to the previous Foxtel streaming story. Yes, very much so. I tell you what happened, if you like? I watched it. I will stab you through the eye with a pencil if you tell me anything about Episode 1.I'll be shouted down by lots of Game of Thrones fans.He doesn't know anything, I assure you. What do you reckon of the championships?Fantastic, it must be a slow news day. Tour de France leader Chris Froome thought his chances of winning were gone when he fell off the bike and had to replace a back wheel on stage 15. Speaking on the final rest day before the peloton winds its way to Paris. He said that he had to pull off a great save to stay in front. There are six more stages. He reckons that this tour will be the closest. He leads Fabio Aru by 18 seconds and three others not far behind him. NoimNow with finance, it's good morning to Del Irani. Welcome back. Good morning everyone. Let's take a quick look at the global markets:

Let's check the Tuesday weather now with Nate. Good Good morning Michael and Virginia. A severe weather warning for damaging winds for the New South Wales Alps and parts of South Australia. I'll have the full update for that shortly. But around the capitals:

let's go back now to the death of an Australian woman in the United States, Justine Damond. She was shot dead by police after calling for their help. Our North America correspondent Ben Knight joins us from Minneapolis. Good morning. Her family and loved ones still grappling with the random death?The whole neighbourhood is. And to a certain extent, a large part of the city is, and we've seen many of them come by to the site of the shooting today. From early this morning, friends, neighbours, as they've told me, shattered in a way that they can't quite explain. So people have been coming along. They've been laying flowers. They've been leaving pictures and writing messages and tributes in chalk. But the answers that they seek only grow in number. And what's happened today is that the police department has acknowledged that this is a very, very big problem that they have on their hands. Because there are so many unanswered questions. The more we find out about this, the more we don't know. As you walk around here, as you walk in the alley that Justine Damond was shot dead in, you can see that there are street lights in there. There are lights on the gearnals that come on automatically when -- garages that come on automatically. It is a well-lit area and a very safe area. I talked to people who talk about being able to talk through pretty much any part of this neighbourhood during the day. Details being reported about just exactly what took place - that Justine Damond, who was not carrying a weapon. That's been confirmed already by the independent body that's investigating this. No weapon was found. But also that apparently she was shot while the officers were still inside their patrol car. So all of it just beggars belief. Then again, of course, why the body cameras were not switched on, as is procedure, not just during the incident but after the incident. It's required that they put on the body cameras. The information that came out from police that the dashboard camera in the squad car didn't capture the event. I guess that makes sense if you consider that it happened behind the camera, but why is there no mention of any audio that might have captured anything that when on and might be able to help with inquiries? You know, there are just so many answers that they speak and the 911 call. The police chief said - we understand that. The police chief shares the same questions and has promised an expedited investigation, even though it is being handled independently.We are expecting to hear from Justine's shattered fiance shortly?Yes, the family are gathering just behind us here waiting for Don Damond to come out. We're expecting something like a guard of honour that they're presenting. And as he walks out, there are yet more details. The media has identified the officer who fired the weapon. His name is ho mam Ed Nur, and he -- Mohammed Nur, and he was the first Somali police officer in Minneapolis. Minnesota has one of the largest Somali populations in the United States so when he became a police officer, it was big news. It was something that was Trumpeted by the city's mayor Betsy Hodges, as being a breakthrough. As we're finding out now, officer Nur already has a couple of complaints against him this year and now a major investigation under way.We'll get back to you when the fiance speaks. Thank you for that. To another of the big stories this morning and more on the possible new super ministry to apparently oversee border security. Our political reporter joins us from Parliament House. Good morning. So what does the Prime Minister want? . Good morning. We understand today that the Prime Minister and Cabinet will sign off on this new super agency that will combine the domestic spy agency, ASIO, Federal Police, immigration and border protection. At this stage, the details haven't been announced but we understand that it will model the UK-style Home Office and Peter Dutton is tipped to be elevated to the new Home Affairs Minister. This is a highly contention proposal. Cabinet is divided over the plan. Those who back this new super agency say that it will better coordinate our counterterrorism efforts, but those firmly against it say that the system that we have at the moment is serving us fine and the old saying goes - if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Yesterday, Justice Minister Michael Keenan, who is not in Cabinet but has responsibilities in these areas, appeared to publicly speak out against the idea of a new super agency when he said that Australians are well served by the arrangements we have in place at the moment. Labor appears to have a pretty similar view. Richard Marles, the defence spokesman, on Lateline asked if it was a power grab by leading conservative Peter Dutton. The Government simply hasn't made out a case for what it is doing. I mean, the first question that the Government needs to explain to the Australian people is what is it that's broken that they are trying to fix? Right now, all we've really got is a whole lot of speculation, which seems to be more about the ambitions of Peter Dutton than it is about the national interests. Richard Marles there. Well, it certainly is a diminution of the portfolio of Senator George Brandis, because he would lose the AFP and ASIO out of that. What of this criticism of Peter Dutton himself? That perhaps it's the man who might be leading this new unit that's leading to some of the disquiet? It's not a particularly new issue. Scott Morrison was rumoured to be advocating for the proposal under Tony Abbott and Labor even toyed with the idea back under Kevin Rudd, but each time, it has been quashed. So there are those who would suggest that this is a way of placating Peter Dutton, who is a leading conservative, and who is critical to Malcolm Turnbull's leadership. One of the key questions that comes out of this is legal oversight. As you mentioned, George Brandis, as the top legal officer of the land at the moment, has responsibility for both AFP and ASIO. So he signs off on things like ASIO warrants. So the question is - would Australians feel comfortable about having that role placed under Peter Dutton, having him sign off on things like warrants. And they are certainly some concerns that have been raised by security experts. Even the outgoing Defense Secretary Dennis Richardson earlier this year was asked about a Home Office-style portfolio and he said that he was agnostic in that the case would need to be made in giving the serious legal powers over to a minister responsible for a whole bunch of law enforcement agencies.Yes, it certainly is a big shift in that particular way. Good to talk to you. Thank you so much. Now to the morning's headlines online and from the major news outlets this Tuesday morning. Kicking off with the Guardian Australia which leads with the Government's plans for that national security super department bringing together ASIO, the Australian Federal Police and the Australian Border Force.The Age reports that Peter Dutton is tipped to head the new super portfolio, as Jane was saying.The Canberra Times features the story suggesting that the Prime Minister could announce the changes as early as tomorrow. American nightmare. The Daily Telegraph leads with the death of Australian Justine Damond shot by police in Minneapolis after she was calling 911 for help. ABC News online says friends of Justine called her a power of love. And NBN costs and falling speeds. The Financial Review leads with a warning about hybrid securities from the outgoing chairman of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission. The Courier-Mail writes that the future of Queensland's Cross River Rail project will be thrown into doubt if the Liberal-National Party wins the next election. The Sydney Morning Herald reveal that is a proposed tunnel railway between Rozelle and Allambie Heights will cost $14 billion.And debt owed by public housing tenants had a has increased by 13% in two years. The NT news looks at the Government's home improvement scheme saying that it could finish $10 million over budget. The fabulous Jessica Mauboy also graces the front. Here's a front page for you. "He was not there". Ron Iddles backs a look saying that he wasn't there. That is in the Herald Sun. The Mercury features a local government minister giving another two weeks not to extent the suspension. And fine dodge fiasco. The Advertiser says that the worst penalty defaulters owe $3.1 million in police fines. Please tell me that they're not all parking fines!I know that city parking can be tough, particularly in Adelaide. But gee, you would think that some speeding fines would be there in the mix as well. This debate about the sacking of two high profile AFL executives, which happened last week, continues today. They were sacked by the AFL boss for having affairs with fellow AFL staffers. Gill McLachlan said that they didn't set the proper standards and were meant to be role models in that position. This morning, over the last couple of days but this morning, the push back against that sacking continues and it continues at pace.It does. And from a couple of interesting quarters. So Cathy Lumbie, a well known feminist writer and a woman dealing with the NFL in Sydney and across the country on their sexual transgressive matters for a number of years has weighed in. And so has the Employment Minister saying - AFL get with the timent. This is excessive and they didn't need to be sacked because they weren't in direct lines of reporting. And adults can make their own decisions and we don't make a judgement about whether it was right to have an extra marital affair. If you have consenting adults and if you don't have abuse of power and if you don't have bullying and coersion. This is something that I spent a lot of time on when I wrote my book. The issue is about an abuse of power and whether a woman has been put in a difficult position. On the face of it, it would seem that there wasn't. Andrew Bolt wrote a strongly worded column saying that neither woman launched a formal complaint about the men's behaviours. Where it is murky is the so-called hit list, which hasn't been denied by the AFL, hit list of women that men would like to sleep with at the AFL.And the origin story of Facebook where the makers of Facebook started that at the university campus just compering and contrasting the women and click left or right for the ones that you prefer.Which says, is there a bloky culture and a systemic issue here?I'm sure that there is. But there's a difference between that and discussing what should happen, what action should happen regarding consensual affairs between consenting adults.I think so too and the abuse of power and how that person, male or female, experienced it. If they experienced it as coersion, then it is offensive. If they experienced it as assault, then it was or inappropriate. And we don't really have the sense here that it was. Let's kick it around with you today. It's an interesting one.If you'd like to get involved one.If you'd like to get involved
in what we're discussing today, we always like to hear from you:

A reminder that we are about to take you back to Minneapolis to hear from Justine Damond's grieving fiance as soon as he starts speaking over there. Labor Senator Pat Dodson says a referendum on an Indigenous advisory body is still some way off. The Referendum Council's final report has been released. It says that the only question present for a national vote should be about enshrining the national body in the founding document. Speaking on 7:30, Senator Pat Dodson said that the proposal would be new to many Australians and must be explained before the people visit the ballot box.I think that it is really up for the message that at least at this stage, both parties seem to be open to the discussion around us. There's a need for greater clarification about the detail and the means and methods by which this voice would be put into reality. I think that it is relatively simple to get a set of words but it is the functionality of what the voice would do and how it would go about his business and the interface with the Parliament that's not clear. I think that you can simply have a set of words that would say that there ought to be an Aboriginal voice to the Parliament. Do you agree? But I think that Australian voters would find that a bit difficult because they'd want to know - what is it going to do? How will it be constituted and what will the function be? And will it impact with the process of Parliament?And the debate rolls on and it is intensifying as we hopefully get towards that referendum. To Western Australia where a man who ran down a Kalgoorlie teenager says he never intended to kill him and chased him down a dirt track because he wanted to get back his stolen motorbike.The 56-year-old, who can't be identified, admits that he was driving too close to the teenager but the fatality wouldn't have happened if the youth hasn't veered in front of him. Our correspondent was in court for the start of the trial. 14-year-old Elijah sms Doherty suffered facial injuries when he was run over on a dirt track in August last year. Now the man accused of running him down is on trial for manslaughter. The Supreme Court was told the 56-year-old had made a split-second decision to chase the teenager after seeing him ride a motorbike that had been stolen from his home the day before. Prosecutors allege that the man was grossly negligent because he failed to use reasonable care or take reasonable precautions to prevent any danger to life, health or safety. The man admits his driving was dangerous because he was too close to the motorbike. But he claims that entirely unexpectedly and without warning, the motor bibling veered in front of him. And "Had the bike not veered in front, there would have been no collision". The man's lawyer said that his client would be eternally sorry for being involved in the fatality. But he said that the man had no intent to hit or kill the teenager whom he told police had hoped would ride into the bush and fall off so he could get his motorbike off. Members of Elijah Doherty's family packed the courtroom for the trial, which may include a visit by the jury to the scene. The case is expected to end next week. A fascinating and troubling case to follow there. A reminder stay with us and we'll take you back to Minneapolis just as soon as we hear from the fiance, Don Damond, of Justine Damond, who was shot dead by police officers when she called 911 for help. You can see there family members and Ben Knight our reporter will be crossing to us shortly. The family members are gathering behind him this looks to be Justine Damond himself and we'll take you there live just as soon as we hear him start to speak. In the meantime, as we await to go back to Minneapolis, let's go to the sport. I'll be quick. Tour de France leader Chris Froome thought his chances of winning were gone when his bike failed him on stage 15 over the weekend. Speaking on the final rest day before the peloton winds its way to Paris, Froome said that he had to pull off a great save to stay in front of the other general classification contenders. There are six more stages. Froome reckons that this tour will be the closest of his career. He leads Italy's Fabio Aru by 18 second and three others not far behind.A good five or ten minutes there that I thought - this is just... Just knowing that the pace that AG 2 were setting going into the climb, I was standing on the side of the road with my teammate trying to change wheels. I thought that that was potentially game over. If I didn't reach that front group by the top of that climb, I don't believe that I would have made it to the finish line in yellow. Exciting stages ahead. In the AFL, Richmond's Dustin Martin remains el edgible to win the Brownlow Medal after' voiding suspension over the incident against Brisbane. He was under scrutiny for the clash but the Match Review Panel deemed it worthy of a fine. Robinson was handed a ban for hitting Trent Cotchin. Melbourne veteran Bernie Vince was given a 2-week ban for hitting Eddie Betts. Patrick Dangerfield says that he's still a chance to play against the Crows on Friday night, and also in the AFL, Fremantle captain Nat Fyfe has delighted his teammates and club supporters by signing a 6-year deal. He was poised to become a free agent at the end of the season and had been courted by several Victorian clubs but not seriously, he said. The 2015 Brownlow Medallist reckons he has unfinished business with Fremantle, which is still chasing its first Premiership. And Paralympian Isis Holt won an event. he was favourite to win Paralympic gold in Rio. She came away with silver but blitzed the field yesterday. Isis Holt, one of our favourite athletes on News Breakfast. And Patrick Dangerfield, not one of my favourite comedians.No. As a comedian, he makes a fantastic AFL player!He does. I think that's safe. He turned up at a press conference yesterday and someone was questioning whether or not he had treated his injuries a little bit... That he inflated how bad they were. And then he turned up with crutches. So he's clearly no son of the great Rodney Dangerfield! If he's no great comedian.Looks good on you.I was at the Geelong-Hawthorn game and the first time that I had seen Dangerfield play live and he is a true star of the game. Even playing injured, he's a fantastic player. Great to watch those ones.He's brilliant.Come on, there's got to be some vaudeville. I don't mind him doing that. All of the highly-paid tribunals and blah, blah, blah, to look through the entrails and see the truth. Give me the fun!And if he plays full forward, it will be more fun for everyone.True danger for all of the clubs he's up against.And thank you for the mention of Rodney Dangerfield!And we're off!I was just about to do a Rodney Dangerfield field and I thought - I can't do that on News Breakfast.Back to school? . No, I was going to quote Kaddyshack.Maybe have a look at 6:30 am. Speaking of which, it is time for which, it is time for the weather with Nate. Good morning. A severe weather warning current for damaging winds for parts of South Australia just in yellow here on the chart. Strong to damaging north to north-westerly winds about 50km/h to 60km/h and damaging winds most likely with squally showers and thunderstorms and around elevated terrain. A similar wind condition expected for the Alps in New South Wales above 1,900m. Let's look at what's causing it. A slow-moving low pressure system causing the showers and windy conditions right across the south-east and damaging winds for parts of South Australia and the Snowy Mountains. The system will continue to move east today as the next cold front approaches the south-west corner. Let's take a look around the states:

Thank you for that. Plenty more coming up on News Breakfast. Including talking about saving lives with a man known as Dr Death. And the newest generation of Britain's royal family, George and Charlotte, join their parents on a visit to Poland. Apparently this little one didn't want to get off the plane, but he did eventually. Here's Michael with the latest headlines. Thank you. The US police officer who shot an Australian woman in Minneapolis has been identified as a junior officer with just two years on the job. 40-year-old Justine Damond was shot after phoning police to report an assault near her house late on Saturday night. The ABC understands an officer, named Mohammed Nur, fired the shot that killed her. Victoria Police have arrested a man over the death of a woman in Melbourne's north overnight. Police say that they were called to a house in Lalor just before 1:00am where they found the woman's body. A man in his 40s is in police custody. Police say that the pair knew each other. Federal Cabinet meets to discuss the Prime Minister's plan for a new ministry to oversee border security, Federal Police and the spy agency, ASIO. It could mirror that of the Home Office in the United Kingdom. Peter Dutton is tipped to lead the new department. A memorial for the victims of flight MH 17 has been unveiled in the Netherlands three years after the plane was shot down over Ukraine. The memorial features 298 trees - one for each person who died, including, of course, 38 Australians. The trees are planted in the near Schipol airport in Amsterdam where the plane took off. And Foxtel has apologised to angry Game of Thrones fans after its streaming services crashed just as the new season was released. Fans of the HBO show vented their considerable frustration on social media as they encountered error messages. In a statement on Facebook, Foxtel said that services crashed due to an unprecedented demand. Unprecedented demand, of course, because nobody thought that a lot of people might want to watch Episode 1, Series 7! Now with finance, here Del. Thank you so much. Good morning everyone. Leading the finance news this morning. China's economy has grown slightly higher than forecast at an annual rate of 6.9% between April and June according to official figures. The growth rate, which compares it for the three months in the previous year was the same for the first quarter of this year. Beijing is trying to bring in debt by imposing tough measures on the property sector and lenders. Many analysts expected China's economy to slow, but the latest data is well above Beijing's 6.5% growth target for 2017. Meanwhile, Australia has witness add 5-year long record-breaking housing boom, especially in the south-east. But now there is growing evidence that the boom is coming to an end. Last week saw key data on construction activity that appears to confirm the peak of the building boom has passed. ABS data shows a 2.4% fall in the value of construction work done, led by a near 4.5% slide in new residential buildings. It reinforces the downward trend in building approvals which are up almost 20% in the last year. Deloitte Access Economics warns that the housing booms of New South Wales and Victoria will be hardest hit by the downturn. Now for a look at the global markets and here's how they finished up overnight:

Checking commodity prices:

Trading of shares in embattled milk formula group, Bellamy's, is there. Investors are reeling from the shock news that Bellamy's Chinese import licence at the newly acquired powder cantery has been suspended. Retail investors who bought shares in Bellamy's $60 billion issue will have until August to decide whether to get back the shares and get their money back. It would allow investors to claim back the $45 million raised three weeks ago and return the stock. In news from oversea, the owner of the Ashley Madison infidelity website which was hacked in July 2015 has offer add settlement to people suing. Millions of members had the personal details stolen when the site, which encouraged people to cheat on their partners, was breached. Ruby Life has put forward a class action. And some of the funds will be used to help those with a valid claim. Ashley Madison was a website for people who already had a partner but looking to haven a affair and in July 2015, the systems were compromised and details of 33 million accounts were posted online. Before I go, the rocketing Australian dollar has reignited debate over the likely direction of interest rates with economists expecting the RBA to continue to sit tight. The Aussie dollar burst through the 78 US cent mark last week and has been up 8.5% against the US dollar so far. In contrast, the US dollar index hit a 10-month low yesterday. The move in the Aussie is likely to be of concern for the Australian Central Bank, which has been cutting interest rates for the past few years and has seen the Australian dollar move back from the mining boom highs. Economists are worried if it hits 80 US cents, it would basically be the equivalent of an RBA rate hike putting a brake on the Australian economy. O it is obviously great for people travelling overseas.Am I the only one who has questions about compensating people who signed up to the website to encourage completing on the partners? Is it must me? You're being overly moral there?You think so.I think that the bigger issue is the data security. You should be able to sign up to even the most wobbly and strange of websites and still expect your data to be secure.I think that there is a thing called karma here.That's why the hackers did it to get back at it. It was a debate in the newsroom before I walked in. We were having the same conversation out there.What is the world coming to! AFL and Ashley Madison. $11.5 million in compensation. The moral gaddian of the program. I'm happy to be one. Don't ask us, we're scurrilous! The Prime Minister has come under fire for having masked soldiers in the background of a press conference where he announced greater powers for the Defence Force.Speaking on Q&A, the British broadcaster says that he found the images unsettling. Watching the Prime Minister today at the barracks standing and surrounded by six special forces soldiers with masks on their faces. I mean, if that's not using the military for political reasons, I don't know what is. I found that a little bit uncomfortable for the Prime Minister to turn up with sixth commando. They didn't need to be there with them. And too much use of the military there for the political points. There's been a long bipartisan approach to not use the military for campaigning purpose and it is important to continue to respect that. The fact is that people in the military are putting their lives on the line every day and deserve our respect and grat gratitude and not to be be part of a backdrop of campaigning. Having said that, I have to say that I was in a committee hearing and I didn't get a chance to watch the press conference itself. I only saw the stills of it. But I know that there is discomfort being expressed in the community over the way that that appeared. Q&A last night and a lively debate there. And the new Home Office-style by the Prime Minister. It's a paradox known as Dr Death has probably saved millions of lives worldwide. He analyses data to advise governments right around the world how best to change health policy to stop preventable deaths. Professor Lopez's team is set for a major cash injection to continue its work and he joins us in the studio this morning. Allen Lopez, good morning and welcome to News Breakfast.Good morning.So tell us about the work that you do. How does analysing death end up saving lives? It works indirectly. What we're trying to do is strengthen the evidence based for policy. So rather than having governments have health policies in a vacuum, they've got data. And if they have data, they're more likely to get policies right and improve population health. You've got the money, a progressive amount of money from Michael Bloomberg's foundation to enable you to do your work. How is this enabling you to go to places like Myanmar, which is a particularly interesting case study to stop preventable deaths?To get the data, you need to do a lot of things and you can't do those things without funds. So what we need to do is get experts together to go to Myanmar, to teach them the methods that we've used elsewhere, that work. In countries in like Australia, which have good data, because they've got good practices.Tell us about the so-called verbal autopsies carried out in Myanmar and how they stop people dying unelse inily?What they do is that it is a method of collecting data where there is no doctor. In Australia, we have doctors who certify every death and governments benefit from that. But in Myanmar, they don't. So what we do is we go to the family of the person who died and ask a series of questions and in epidemiology, there's a strong relationship between causes of death and symptoms. And people remember symptoms and report them and as long as we can keep the interview very short, we can exfract that information and use computers to analyse it.And the figures show that 65% of deaths are unrecorded worldwide and millions of death don't have the documented cause. But you say that you do the work so that policy workers don't work in a vacuum. Do policy makers in Australia come to you. Do we change our policies and health policies accordingly because of the data?I think that it is not so much my data but Australia has had 100 years of doing this and they've had a good system of doing it. Australia has bold and public policy that's worked in improving the health of Australians. Look at the road traffic accident decline as a result of the drink-driving. That happened because people were looking at the data and saying - where are all of these young men dying unnecessarily. Lung cancer is another.Around the world, they're not doing it so much? No, Australia is a leader in using data for public policy.Are there particular diseases that are you focusing on as part of the data collection process and project to help minutise and stop deaths from them?I think that the big advantage of this project is that it is reducing ignorance. It's showing governments that there are big problems that they did not think that they had. So for example, in Solomon Islands recently, for the first time ever, they put out a newspaper article and said - heart disease is the leading cause of death and we're all surprised. They thought that it was measles andal Aria and things like that. So the new evidence that comes from the project that is really having an impact.Will the cash injection enable you now to range far and wide and the collection of information? It's a 4-year country and 20 countries is a big ask so we're already very, very busy. But the idea is that we would use the same methods, because we are working elsewhere.This has been your life's work. It must be tremendously fulfilling for you.Now to see the translation of the methods and helping governments upstand what people are dying of and doing something about it is a great feeling.Really great to meet you this morning. Thank you very much. Now, the Duchess of Cambridge have arrived in Warsaw for an official visit to Poland in Germany.And 3-year-old George and 2-year-old Charlotte came along for the tour. The BBC has this report. At 3, he's far too young to know if he's a reluctant royal. But Prince George wasn't keen to embrace Warsaw without his father's helping hand. One future King did persuade another one to follow in his footsteps. On the tarmac, George struck a nonchalnt with a ballet pose. A fidgeting toddler... We'll leave that there and take you to Minneapolis where the fiance of Justine Damond is speging to the press. Let's take you there now.

Ladies and gentlemen, families have been devastated by this horrible tragedy. Today, my brother would like to give a brief statement. He will not be taking questions at this time. And we thank you in advance for respecting the privacy of our family. Thank you for being here. First of all, I want to thank our family here and in Australia. Our friends from all over the world. Ouricallies and our neighbours, for the amazing outpouring of love and support we received. Our hearts are broken and we are utterly devastated by the loss of Justine. It's... As you know, it was Justine who called 911 on Saturday evening reporting what she believed was an active sexual assault occurring nearby. Sadly, her family and I have been provided with almost no adigal information from law enforcement regarding what happened after police arrived. We've lost the dearest of people and we're desperate for information. Piecing together Justine's last moments before the homicide would be a small comfort as we grieve this tragedy. The death of Justine is a loss to everyone who knew her. She touched so many people with her loving and generous heart. She was a teacher to so many and living a life of openness, love and kindness. Our lives are forever changed as a result of knowing her. She was so kind and so darn funny. She made us all laugh with her great wit and her humour. It is difficult to fathom how to go forward without her in my life. We ask that you respect our privacy as we grieve the loss of our dear Justine. We will provide more statement as information comes to light. Thank you.Don gunman

Don Damond dealing with his grief there as the questions are unanswered over the circumstances of the death of Australian native Justine Damond in an alleyway behind the house there in Minneapolis.If you're just joining us this morning. We're learning that the very young and rather inexperienced police officer who shot her had just been on the job for two years. And she had made a 911 call for a suspected theft or robbery that she thought was going on in the lane behind her house. So this one is going to have very serious ramifications. But let's take a look at what's making news in principle and online this morning and that is a key story there it. We're joined by media commentator Steve Carey. You have this particular story on your list as well.I had it on the list because there are so many unanswered questions and what we've just seen there is the public grief and the grieving. The story is going to live on. So many questions. How? Why? And then you get that emotional? That physical connection with the fiance. And your heart just goes out to them. Because he's asking the questions that we all want answered. As we said, why? It wasn't like she was running at the car or anything else. It beggars belief.We'll look at the story that you celebinged which is page one of the Australian. The body cameras which US police are wearing now was off when she was shot.That really is surprising. The other thing that's surprising about that is that they were off at the time. But after an incident, they are supposed to be back on regardless, so you would have thought that in those moments following that the cameras were on. This is intrinsic and critical information that needs to be brought to light.And we know from watching all of these real life crime shows that the police cams feature all the time, even minor robberies. So the big question as to why they were switched off and the questions are still being posed today. Let's come back to the Herald Sun. On the front page is a crime of some decades ago that shocked not just Victoria, but the nation. Questions being asked about that too?This is a really, really interesting one. And for the Herald Sun to splash this across the front page and then do quite extensive coverage within the paper shows to the public, the significance of the placement. This was a shocking story. 1998, the shooting, the murder of two policemen. There have always been questions about it. But what's interesting here is that the guy who was the secretary of the police union Ron Iddles, has now come out and said that basically, he doesn't believe that one of those accused and jailed is guiltily. That's going to cause a lot of angst amongst the Government, particularly the Attorney-General.Talking about questions to be answered - why now? Exactly why now.Why has someone been in jail for all this time when someone shouldn't have been in jail and someone is holding their counsel?This will be the argument that will play out. We've got a lot of questions to be answered. And a lot of my friends... I was on the road in those days so that was one that I covered. And some of my friends who were also on the road have very strong views in their mind that he's in jail and then someone of the magnitude of Ron Iddles basically saying that he was the man who of the former Homicide Squad and head of the union at the time saying that he believes and he has signed an affidavit. And politically it's a hot potato there because what does he do? He's between a rock and a hard place. The backlash would be enormous.And law and order is big there. Let's go to the Australian and the proposed super home ministry on the table?In this case, it is an interesting one. Why to fix something if there's a perception that it is not broken so the notion that you're going to create an equivalent of the Home Office in Britain. It follows in all of the recent terrorist attacks overseas. I think that there is some sort of an indication that what we're seeing is the Government wanting to be front footing as well to give us some surety that they're on the case in terms of making sure that they're safe. But for Dutton, it isn't a interesting one. He become as very powerful player.There's that argument and then the other sceptical argument is - is it a play really just to keep Tony Abbott and his supporters off his back? And that would be an extraordinary decision to take, a truly political decision, playing politics with homeland security.Well, there are some people already saying that. So that's going to be interesting when it is debated and it will be fiercely debated. It's going to be interesting too from an AFP and ASIO perspective. They already share information and they're already doing a pretty good job.But they come out from under the Attorney-General and civil lib tearians will have a big problem with that.Watch that space. There will be a lot we'll see coming out in the next few days on that one.As we go to the Herald Sun story on online shopping. Are up an online shopper? Sna I have woken up the next morning and about three weeks later, some things arrive from Sweden and you think - when the hell did I do that? No details, it's a family show!You get that drunk at night, do you!Some would say!It's called a lost weekend - of shopping. We like to end up the segment with a little bit of light relief. So on this one, it's a story which has been done with an online shopping survey conducted by Australia Post saying, not surprisingly I guess in my case, the peak hours for online splurge shopping is 7:00pm to midnight. You've had a couple of reds or whatever and all of a suds, it's on mur doorstep.That's what my husband does - endless boxes of shirts.I think that it is not a bad one. We're addicted to online and love that kind of shopping. The good thing from our point of view is that one of the top items is actually books. So yay!That's nice. That's good.Yes, I'm sure!In plain brown paper packaging!Please, come on. Trust me.Actually, booze is popular. Speaking of wine and beer. Is it?Yeah, we buy lots of booze - in moderation.With he buy lots of - slash, in moderation! Figure that one out! Thank you. Coming up on Breakfast, the fabulous Rob Sitch joins us ahead of season 3 of Is it Fact, Is it Fiction Utopia? .I've had three utopia conversations in the last few weeks and they're straight out Utopia. Good morning Medicare!Let's go to sport now and PK has the very latest. Good importanting. Thank you very much. Sporting headlines. Headlines. -- morning. Thank you very much. Chris Froome thought that his chances of winning the Tour de France were over. Speaking on the the previous stage, he reckons that this is going to be the closest of his career. He leads Fabio Aru by 18 seconds. Dustin Martin remains eligible to win the Brownlow Medal after avoiding an incident. The Match Review Panel deemed this only worthy of a $1,50. Robertson was handed a 1-week ban for targeting Trent Cotchin. Bernie Vince had a 2-week ban for striking Eddie Betts. And Patrick Dangerfield went before the reporters on Saturday after injuring his foot on Saturday against Hawthorn. The Cats star says he's still a chance to play against the Crows on Friday night. And Paralympian ISIS -- Isis Holt is on top of the world after going in the Paralympics. She won two years ago as a 14-year-old. She was favourite for the Paralympic gold in Rio last year but came away with silver. She blitzed the field last year and added another world championship to her impressive resume. I can tell you that Australia continues to do well at the para-athletic championships. But James Turner and Scott Riordan have both won gold in the last hour.Very nice to hear. And speaking of the AFL there, there's a bit of a backlash brewing to the sacking late last week of two senior AFL executives for having affairs. Consensual affairs, with two fellow AFL staffers. Commentators like Josh Bornstein, Andrew Bolt and Catherine Lumbie, who advises the NRL on gender issues, saying that the boss should stay out of the bedroom.Here are the comments. "Unless your job somehow effects your ablets to do the duties, having an affair isn't grounds for being fired"."Having an affair with someone you have superiority over is wrongment many companies have specific policies against it". What do you think of this, PK?They did, in fact, resign their position. It is probably semantics because there would have been pressure on them to leave their post there. And the boss has since come out and said that he hopes that they find positions elsewhere. I think that it is an interesting one. I think what also interested me is that one of the blokes is on about $900,000 a year, which worries me for other reasons, because the game's development needs a few more hands there on the wheel. But I think that it is an interesting discussion. I don't think that people's relationships, are anything to do with the boss unless it involves the power.Power and harassment.Or coersion. Harassment is where you find it and experience it. It can't be defined. So one thing that you do to me is harassing and that other person, it is not harassment. And that's the point. And this has not been shown to be, so far.Sometimes from the outside, we don't know the details and we probably need to know a bit more if we're going to be definite on judgement.Thank you, keep the views coming in. Let's go to the weather now with Nate. coming in. Let's go to the weather
now with Nate. A slow moving low pressure system is causing showers across the south-east. It will continue to move east as the next cold front starts to approach the south-west. Let's take a look around the states:

next hour, we'll go into the murky world of in orderic noir and speak to directors of shows like the Bridge The condition killing.Big fans This program is not captioned. program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services.

The US policeman who shot and killed Australian woman Justine Damond identified as a junior officer with just two years experience. Her distraught family demands answers from police as they grieve for Justine.The death of Justine is a loss to everyone who knew her. She touched so many people.A man arrested in Melbourne's north after a woman's body is found in a house. Cabinet set to debate Malcolm Turnbull's plan for a British style home office for border security and spies.We will talk to director, the genius behind TV drama hits. Scat killing and the Bridge about her latest production. Welcome back on this Tuesday morning, you're watching ABC News Breakfast.

The distraught fiancee of an Australian woman shot dead by police in Minnesota says his heart is broken. Justine Damond was killed after reporting an assault here her house on Saturday night. Don Damond says she touched many people and was a teacher to so many. Media reports suggest the 40-year-old was shot through the door of a police car by a junior officer named Mohammed Noor. Police have promised a thorough investigation after revelations the police officers involved did not turn their body cameras on. Don Damond criticised police for the lack of information given to the family.Our hearts are broken and we are utterly devastated by the loss of Justine. As you know, it was Justine who called 911 on Saturday evening, reporting what she believed was an active sexual assault occurring nearby. Sadly, her family and I have been provided with almost no additional information from law enforcement regarding what happened after police arrived. We have lost the dearest of people and we are desperate for information. Piecing together Justine's last moments before the homicide would be a small comfort as we grieve this tragedy. The death of Justine is a loss to everyone who knew her. She touched so many people with her loving and generous heart. She was a teacher to so many and living of life of openness, love and kindness. Our lives are forever changed as a result of knowing her. She was so kind and so darn funny, she made us all laugh with her great wit and her humour. It is difficult to fathom how to go forward without her in my life.Don Damond speaking there. Our North America correspondent Ben Knight joins us from Minneapolis now. Good morning, Ben. Don Damond picking up the pieces, Justine had moved to the US in recent years to start a new life. They were set to be married very shortly. His life now changed forever?That is obviously what you heard there, some deep emotion from a family that has been struck by an unimaginable tragedy. It is the nature of that has shocked this entire neighbourhood. We have beep here most of the day and have beep talking with a number of people, some who knew the family well and some who knew them vaguely and some who knew them not at all but they have all been shocked that something like this could take place. It is a pleasant neighbourhood. A classic mid-western, middle class American neighbourhood. Behind these houses is an alleyway which is where the shooting took place. It is well lit. There are street lights and lights on the garages that illuminated at night. I have talked to women who walked their dogs down the alleyways late in the evening. This has shattered this community in a way that they can't describe.What do we know of the circumstances surrounding Justine's death? We know infamously the body cameras weren't switched on so we will never know the full details but what are police telling you?Not a lot. As the visiting visiting journalist, you don't expect to have an entree into the local police service but speaking to local reporters, even the family doesn't have any information. The police have confirmed the basic details that have taken place, that a shot was fired and a person was killed, that was Justine Damond. As far as other information, there is a lot more that needs to be found out. First of all, not just why the body cameras weren't turned on during the incident but why they weren't turned on after the incident which is also part of the regulations. Why the camera in the squad car which was pointing forward, may not have caught the vision of what was happened behind it but should have caught the sound. Why did police come out and say it didn't capture any of this incident. That is raising a big red flag amongst a lot of people including the civil lib sis union. The mayor and the police know they have a big problem on their hands. I have been talking to residents here today and many say this is just the latest in what has been a problematic relationship between the people of Minneapolis and their police force and this will not stand.We have the identity of the police officer who is said to have shot Justine?Yes, Mohammed Noor is a recent recruit to the Minneapolis police force and was a trumpeted recruit when he first joined. He is the first Somali police officer to join the Minneapolis police force in a State with one of the largest Somali populations in the US. When he was appointed to the force as a junior officer, it was something that the mayor decided was worth a photo opportunity and an announcement. He is now apparently under investigation and also it is not his first investigation, there are apparently two complaints out against him already this year. For people here, this raises not just a question about an individual officer but larger questions about how the police force operates and trains its recruits, about whether they are ready to go onto the road, about the types of people. One person said today he has lived in this area all his life and his father was a police officer for 35 years. He says he has seen this police force has been recruiting a large number of military veterans which seemed like a good idea at the time. He said those guys are on pins and needles and people are nervous.Thanks Ben. Victoria Police have arrested a man over the death of a woman overnight. Police were called to a house in Lalor just before 1:00am where they found the body. A man in his 40s is in custody. The pair knew each other. Federal Cabinet meets today to discuss the Prime Minister's plan for a new ministry to oversee border security, Federal Police and ASIO. The proposed unit could mirror that of the home office in the UK that coordinates Britain's domestic security agencies. Peter Dutton is tipped to lead the department. Security expert John Blaxland from the Australian National University says changing the current system carries significant risk.While on one level it may appear that this will improve efficiencies and improve security, I think in terms of confidence in the system, that may actually have a corrosive affect on Australian society. That is where the danger lies.A memorial for the victims of flight MH17 has been unveiled in the Netherlands three years after the plane was shot down over Ukraine. The memorial features 298 trees, one for each person who died, including 38 Australians. The trees are planted in the shape of a ribbon near Schipol airport in Amsterdam where the Malaysia Airlines plane took off. The monument has a monument in the shape of an eye with victims' names looking up at the sky. The families say they still hope one day those responsible for downing the plane will be brought to justice. A man has been charged over the shooting death of a dress maker in Melbourne last month. The Phong Vuong was found murdered inside his Deer Park home on 26 June. Detectives believe he may have been killed up to 11 days before his body was found by neighbours. Police have charged a 35-year-old man with murder and say a 45-year-old man is also assisting them with their inquiries. Foxtel has apologised to angry Game of Thrones fans after its streaming services crashed just as the new season was released. Fans of the HBO show vented their frustration on social media as they tried to tune in to watch episode one of series 7 of the new series to be met with an error message. In a statement, Foxtel says it was devastated that its services crashed due to unprecedented demand. To sport now, good morning Paul.Australia's had a golden world breaking night in London at the para athletics championships. James Turner broke the world record in the 200m T36 and Scott Reardon held on for the gold in the 100m T42. Turner and Reardon won gold at the Rio Paralympics last year.With finance here is Del.Good morning. Let's look at the global markets and US shares ended the day flat.

The Australian dollar going gangbusters. Let's check your Tuesday weather with Nate.We have a severe weather warning this morning for damaging wind for the New South Wales Alps and southern parts of SA. The full details shortly...

His popularity is at a record low and serious questions remain about the US President's campaign links with Russia. The first articles of impeachment have been tabled but how real is the prospect of that? The CEO of the US Studies Centre joins us from Sydney now. I am sure a lot of people think impeachment probably means the bringing down of a President and the end of a Presidency, it doesn't does it?No, impeachment, the analogy of criminal law is indictment. The matter goes onto the Senate of the US where it takes on a more legal character. There is a trial in the Senate and you need a two-thirds vote of the Senate to remove a President from office at the end of that trial. Given the way that Congress is constituted in the US at the moment with the Republican majority, there is no prospect of that, is there? No, there really isn't. It is even difficult to see how the process gets started, how an impeachment vote would get to the floor of the House of Reps in the first place let alone a two-thirds vote in the Senate.His poll standing is low and according to another poll they have found impeaching President Trump is more popular now than impeaching Richard Nixon was at the start of the Watergate scandal. He has that to deal with. If that turns into something for antsy Republicans, what might happen?You just hit the nail on the head, it is antsy Republicans are where the action is. Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton for that matter, faced hottile congresses if you will. Congresses in the control of the opposite party. Donald Trump doesn't have that problem. He has Republican control of both house and Senate and the issue is do those majorities hold? For now, the answer would be yes, Donald Trump's approval rating, as low as it is in the general population, remains at 85% amongst Republicans and while that number holds, he faces no real political threat at all, at least not from impeachment.Talking of the antsy Republicans, they would need to see their reelection prospects dwindled before they did something and if they did, what would they do?That is right. The first thing you have to remember is they have primary contests coming up ahead of the mid-terms. You have to think it is a brave Republican who looks at a Donald Trump with an approval rating of 85% and says let's bring on impeachment, how that will play out in their primary constituency. For that reason, I think it is unlikely to happen. The mid-term elections are a big marker. One pathway could be if Democrats took back the House of Reps. At that point there may be traction for this in the house, then there is still the issue of two-thirds vote required in the Senate. The point here is that understand the circumstances here, it has never happened in American political history. Nixon resigned. Clinton had 70% approval rating so everybody needs to lower the pressure on impeachment talk and understand the political realities here.The other political reality is that the commentary and the criticism and the amazement can swirl and swirl and do so on a 24-hour basis. It makes no difference, when the President is the President and has the support of Congress.The interesting thing about that too, we are in a different age to the Nixon impeachment. One of the things about the Nixon matter was the way that - the New York Times and the Washington Post, the networks were still the arbiters of truth and could shock middle America that these allegations against the President could possibly be credible. I can't help but think yes in a different environment now where the polarised media climate, mirroring polarisation in the broader electorate means what would it take to shake Republican faith in Donald Trump? What will it take to drive that approval rating of 85% down to the 50% approval rating that Richard Nixon had amongst Republicans on the eve of impeachment proceedings against him. That is a whole new ballpark and no-one knows. Maybe it comes down to electability. Thanks Simon. Language is important here. John McCain, former Republican nominee, senior figure in Washington will be key to whatever happens to Donald Trump's Presidency. He has been undergoing surgery for a blood clot above his eye in the last couple of days. Donald Trump wished him well in his recovery and in the process described John McCain as "Crusty". Is that a way of continuing to garner support from Republicans in difficult days ahead?He has never been one for winning hearts and minds. Let's say he is right and she crusty, he still has his seat and he is enormously significant. He has been in hospital for a bit of time and is expected to stay for some time. Not many votes can take place in the house without him. That grinds to a halt. The story that keeps on giving, the US Presidency. Charlotte Sealing is the director and creative genius behind the Killing and she is in Australia at the moment promoting her latest big screen project, a satirical film called The Man. It is part of the fourth Scandinavian film festival and it is very popular. I spoke to Charlotte earlier about her wide and varied work.

Lots of Australian viewers would know and love your directing work on the Bridge as well as the Killing. I want to focus on those two as we start. They fall underer batter of Nordic Noir. How is that distinctive from your standard US or UK crime series?A lot of people from Scandinavia are making crime and a noir learnt from the US. They taught us everything we know, I think. Then it has become a brand more than an actual genre. It is a brand so people know it is a feel of light. It is dark.It is very dark and arguably the Bridge and the Killing are morally complex than other shows. Is that a fair assessment? Yes, I think you are right. It has to do with the stories. It is not just the Killing and you don't bother about that anymore. It is about society and about real cha, that are striving and struggling with their lives. There is a lot about the light that gives it this feel. There is a lot of shows like that, a lot of stories. We don't have so many stories in the whole world. We have seven, they say, and we make them in different ways. The feel has to do with who we are and the fact that how it looks in Denmark and Sweden and Norway and Finland.

Your work on these shows, particularly the Bridge gave you entree to the US. You have worked on Homeland. How is that different for you or what is demanded of you as a director in America as opposed to Denmark?I was educated by and it is a few days, more hours and it is the same in America. Shooting for television and movie is the same, it is just a question of how much, how many people. There is more people and more money.That always helps as a director, doesn't it, having more cash?I won't say it is always the best. We are good at doing low budgets and it is a help that you can do a lot on a little.You are out here for the Scandinavian film festival to talk about your second film. Scat man. You said "I needed to explore a simple idea what is it about men"?I have no idea. But this film, it is not about men, it is about a specific kind of man. One of those that distributes or he is a big artist and we love that we can sit on beautiful chairs by designers and watch movies and watch theatre and watch beautiful art but behind that strong character, I just wanted to see what happens if that king is met by the Prince that he doesn't really want, he doesn't want to leave the throne, so it is a father/son rivalry in a way.The father being an established artist and the son being a well-known street artist and the father fears he is trying to take his crown.What happens when you get old and when you become the king and you are always in your comfort zone? I didn't know where I was going. I just ended up thinking this is a real king. Let him own the world from his own premises and let's see what happens when the king is challenged.

You started your life as an actress, you were a celebrated theatre actress in Denmark. What made you move behind the camera?Different things. I was in the middle of shooting a child's movie where I was the mother and then I was at the theatre and I had small kids. I was 35 and then I realised if I am going to stay here, I felt for the movies, then I will play the mother in all the child movies from now on and that is not what I want to do and I went to the film school for writing. I got in there and whilst being in there, we had the dogma movement, our big director had made this wave so the whole country was just - in the film business so much was happening and then I just didn't know I was going to be a director, it really just happened by me working and somebody asked me "Do you want to make television". Pleased to meet you Charlotte. A charming woman. Great interview. Such a fantastic wealth of TV they have made over there. They should be proud of it. I love it.Well made and well acted. Regardless of what she says, Charlotte could still be a fantastic actress, I hear. The Scandinavian film festival appearing in various parts of Australia at the moment.Sport with PK now. He is back on the desk now.I am here. Overseas because Australia's had a golden world record-breaking night at the para athletics championships. James Turner broke the record in the 200m T36 and Scott Reardon held on for gold in the 100m T42. They both won gold in Rio last year. Continuing great form and wonderful celebrations. Yesterday, Isis Holt was on top of the world again after winning the 200m T35 event as a 14-year-old two years ago. She came away with silver in Rio. She blitzed the field yesterday and added another world championship to her resume.Chris Froome thought his chances of winning the Tourism Australia Tour de France were gone. Speaking on the final rest day before the peloton winds its way to Paris, Froome had to pull off a great save to stay in front of the other general classification contenders when he had to catch up after a bike problem. He believes this tour will be the closest in his career. He leads Italy's Fabian Aru by 18 seconds and there are three others not far behind them.A good five, 10 minutes there that I thought this is just knowing the pace that Ag2r were setting going into the climb and I was standing on the side of the road with my teammate trying to change wheels. I thought that was potentially game over. If I didn't reach that front group by the top of that climb, I don't believe I would have made it to the finish line in yellow.Did well to stay there. There are two critical stages to go in those final six stages. One is a big climbing stage on Thursday and then there is a time trial over the weekend. It is likely those two stages will decide the Tour for this year. In the AFL, Richmond's Dustin Martin remains eligible for the Brownlow after he avoided suspension over this incident. The Match Review Panel deemed that only worthy of a $1,500 fine. Robertson was handed a one week ban for headbutting Trent Cotchin and Bernie Vince has been given a two week ban for striking Eddie Betts. And Patrick Dangerfield hammed it up after injuring his foot. One of the Koreans brothers suggested he overplays his injuries so he turned up to the press conference pretending he was worse for wear. He still reckons he is a chance to play against the Crows this weekend. And Nat Fyfe has delighted his teammates and supporters by signing a 6-year deal. Fyfe was poised to become a free agent at the end of the season. He had reportedly been courted by several Victorian clubs. He said he never contemplated leaving. He has unfinished business at Freo. They still haven't won a premiership and he is the man to take them there if that is going to happen in the couple of years. They lost to the West Coast Eagles on the weekend. Let's look at the Scott Reardon race. He had his girlfriend in the commentary box, Vanessa Lowe. This was unique.Major championship titles over 100m for Scott Reardon. Champion again.He just knows how to perform. He lets his performance do the talking. He doesn't get involved in all the media and whatever. That is what he needs to do, I am going to run and give that man a real quick hug.That is Scott Reardon's other half, Vanessa Lowe, go down track side.And she did. She is a Paralympic champion from Rio in the long jump for Germany but has been naturalised as an Australian. They caught up straight after that event. You could tell she was saying something before she... It was OK to leave.Thanks PK. We are getting comments on your sacking last week of the two AFL executives. Lots of push back by prominent commentators. Chris says their termination is not justified. Is having an affair morally poor he says? Yes but sackable, according to Chris, definitely not.Julian says you should be sacked for having an affair with a co-worker. And Marilyn says adults make choices and must accept the consequences but it shouldn't include losing their employment. Sara says their wives should actually sack them, taking the AFL out of the equation.Or their partners if they are not wives.If you would like to get involved with what we are discussing on ABC News Breakfast this morning, please do. You can join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. Lots going on on the weather front. Nate is here weather front. Nate is here to tell us about it.I will start with this photo from Christine. It is a sunrise shot but taken facing in the wrong direction. She wanted to know why she can see the sun rays and the light continues to shine from the atmosphere through the sun and it is reflected off particles and back to the ground. If you look up and see a sky you have questions about, take a photo and send it to me to see if I can help. You can find me on social media. To SA where the weather isn't calm. We have a severe weather warning for damaging winds current for parts of the south. Winds around 50-65km/h. Peak gusts in excess of 90km/h are possible. Most likely with squally showers and thunderstorms around elevated terrain. Similar conditions for the Alps in New South Wales. Wind over 80km/h there and gusts other 120km/h. There is a slow moving low pressure system causing those conditions and wet conditions for the south-east. It will continue to move east as the next cold front approaches the south-west. Looking around the States...

Thank you very much, Nate. Lots ahead on Breakfast this morning. More on the proposed super ministry being proposed by Federal Cabinet this morning. And money makes the world go around. We talk to Belle Shakespeare's latest production of the fabulous Shakespeare production. Now for the latest news. The US police officer who shot an Australian woman in Minneapolis has been identified as a junior officer with just two years experience. 40-year-old Justine Damond was shot night.
after phoning police on Saturday night. The ABC understands an officer, named Mohammed Nur, fired the shot that killed her. A short time ago, Justine's fiance, Don Damond, criticised police for the lack of information given to him and the family.Sadly, we've been provided with almost no additional information from law enforcement regarding what happened after police arrived. We've lost the dearest of people and we're desperate for information. Don Damond speaking a short time ago. Victoria Police have arrested a man over the death of a woman in Melbourne's north overnight. Police say they were called to a house in Lalor where they found the woman's body. A man, in his 40s, is in police custody. Federal Cabinet meets today to discuss the Prime Minister's plan for a new my industry to oversee border security, Federal Police and the spice agency ASIO. The proposed unit could mirror that of the Home Secretary in the United Kingdom which coordinates all of the domestic security agencies. Peter Dutton is tipped to lead the new department. Foxtel has apologised to angry Game of Thrones fans after its streaming services crashed just as the new season was released. Fans of the HBO show vented their frustration on social media as they encountered err o are messages. Foxtel says that the services crashed due to unprecedented demand. A big crash, was that you, Del? Do we point the finger there! You found it there. Thank you. Let's take a look at the finance news this morning. And China's economy has grown slightly higher than forecast at an annual rate of 6.9% between April and June according to official figures. The growth rate, which compares expansion with the same three months in the previous year, was the same as in the first quarter of this year. Beijing is trying to rein in debt and a housing bubble by imposing Duff measures on the property sector and lenders. Many analysts suspected that it would slow, but the latest data is well above Beijing's 6. 5% growth target for 2017. Australia has witnessed a 5-year long record-breaking housing boom, especially in the south-east. But now there is growing evidence that the boom may be coming to answered. Last week saw key data and construction activity that appears to confirm that the peak of the building boom has passed. ABS data shows a 2.4% fall in the value of construction work done led by a 4.5% slide in new residential building. This reinforces the downward trend in building approvals which are off 20% in the last year. Deloitte Access Economics warns that the housing boom economies of New South Wales and Victoria will be the hardest hit by the downturn. To the global market and Wall Street had a turbulent day, rising and falling several times before finishing flat. The Dow Jones fell by 8 points and the NASDAQ rose by 2 points and the S&P 500 was unchanged.

Trading of shares in the embattled infant milk formula group Bellamy's is still there. Investors are reeling from the news that the import licence at the newly acquired Camperdown area is there. New shareholders will have until mid-August to decide whether they wish to hand back the shares and get their money back. This would allow retail investors to claim back the $45.5 million raised just three weeks ago and return the stock. The owner of Ashley Madison infidelity website, which was hacked in July 2015, has offered a settlement to people suing the company. Millions of members had the personal details stolen when the site, which encouraged people to cheat on their partners, of breached. Ruby Life has put forward $11.2 million to settle a number of class actions and some of the funds will be used to compensate those with a valid claim. Ashley Madison was a dating website for people who already had a partner, but were looking to have an affair. In July 2015, the systems were compromised and details of 33 million accounts were posted online. Finally, the rocketing Australian dollar has reignited debate over the likely direction of interest rates with economists expecting the RBA to continue to sit tight. The Aussie dollar burst through the 78 US cent mark last week and has been up around 8.5% last week against the US dollar. In contrast, the US dollar index hit a 10-month low yesterday. The move in the Aussie is likely to be of concern for the Australian Central Bank which has been cutting interest for the past few years and seen the Australian dollar move back from the mining boom highs. As I said earlier, if it hits 80 US cents, it's as good as an RBA rate hike. And that will move for the economy, which is not a good thing. It's good for those travelling overseas. I think that 80 cents is a good trigger to start looking for airfares.I'm going overseas on Friday, so woohoo!It's challenging for Australia's exporters the higher that the dollar gets.And it will really put a brake on the economy, which is right now something that we don't need, especially when you have consumer confidence that's not that high. Thank you. Labor Senator Pat Dodson says that a referendum on an Indigenous body is still some way off. The Referendum Council's final report has been released.It says that the only question put to a national vote should be about enshrining a representative body in Australia's founding document. Speaking last night, Senator Pat Dodson said that the idea would be new to many Australians and must be explained carefully before people vote.Well, I think that it is really up for the message that at least, at this stage, both parties seem to be open to the discussion around this. There's a need for a greater clarification about the detail and the means and methods by which this voice would be put into reality. I think it's relatively simple to get a set of words, but it's the funkality of what the -- functionality of what the voice would do and how it would go about its business and the interface with the Parliament that's not clear. I think that you could simply have a set of words that said - you know, there ought to be an Aboriginal voice to the Parliament. Do you agree? But I think that Australian voters would find that a bit difficult because they'd want to know - what is it going to do? How is it going to be constituted? What is the function going to be? And really, will it impact with the processes of Parliament anyway? Pat Dodson last night. A British broadcaster has given his take on Islamophobia in Australia and around the globe.Speaking on Q&A last night, the Al Jazeera host says much Islamophobia comes from misinformation spread on the internet and in the media.I've been here a week now. Hugely welcoming country. Love this place. Let me say that very clearly. But the day after I arrived, a report came out last week from a bunch of universities about Islam phobic attacks in Australia. 2443 verified -- 243 verified Islam phobic incidents. 80% of the women were in headscarves. I find it ironic that the criticism of Islam is about the treatment of women who are trying to save women yet the people trying to bear the brunt of it is the attacks on women. And it's a great problem. It's growing everywhere. I've come from the United States where anti-Muslim bullying in schools is at a record high. In the UK, the same again. Many people say that Islamophobia drove Brexit, in a way. So it is a global problem right now, and you can say that it is to do with terrorism and to do with violence and the reaction to ISIS, and I'm that that is all a part of it, but a lot of it is driven by the bigotry highlighted by the misinformation that certain people get from social media. Let's get some more for you now on the possible new super ministry to oversee border security in Australia.Our political reporter joins us now from Parliament House. Jane, good morning. This is going to be debated today, but it's really divided Cabinet, hasn't it?Yeah, it certainly has. This idea to create a super agency combining Federal Police, the domestic spy agency ASIO, immigration and border protection, we understand is going to be signed off by Cabinet today. It will likely be modelled on the US-style Home Office, and the expectation is that it will be led by Immigration Minister Peter Dutton. But it is certainly a contentious idea. Those who are pushing for this believe that it will better coordinate our counterterrorism efforts. But there is a significant number of senior ministers in Cabinet who believe that the case simply hasn't been made for change. To use the old saying they believe - if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Yesterday, Justice Minister Michael Keenan, who is not in Cabinet, but has responsibility for the AFP, made the case against the idea of a super agency saying that Australians are well-served by the system that's currently in place. Labor has raised some similar questions and Richard Marles, the defence spokesperson last night on Lateline suggested that this was more about a power grab by leading Conservative Peter Dutton than any good administration idea. Here's what he had to say.The Government simply hasn't made out a case for what it's doing. I mean, the first question the Government needs to explain to the Australian people is - what is it that's broken that they're trying to fix? Right now, all we've really got is a whole lot of speculation, which seems to be more about the ambitions of Peter Dutton than it is about the national interest.Richard Marles there on Lateline. Well, there are some very high profile and senior people who appear to be lined up against them. We understand that Julie Bishop is one of them. The division is deep here. It can't just be a political stop to Tony Abbott and Peter Dutton, can it?It's actually hard to find anyone who has publicly advocated in favour of the idea, beyond just some general comments about the need for Australia to continually adapt to the evolving threat of terrorism. This isn't a new idea. Scott Morrison, as Immigration Minister, reportedly pushed for this super agency back under Tony Abbott. Kevin Rudd even suggested that this would be a good idea back when he was leading the Labor Party. But each time, it has been quashed. But it does appear that this time, the Government is looking to move and actually establish this agency. I guess there are two interesting side effects from this. One is that it will likely cause a ministerial reshuffle and reshuffles usually have more losers than winners. And the other big question is local overnight. At the moment, the Attorney-General has control over ASIO and there are many legal powers that ASIO has. But one of which is asking for warrants. So the question is - would the Australian public be comfortable with Peter Dutton, as the minister in charge of the home affairs ministry, signing off on warrants for ASIO and not having the top legal officer having such a role? Yeah, that's going to be a concern to many. Interesting debate coming up. Thank you so much. Now, it's a birth place of reggae and artists like Bob Marley. It's fair to say that Jamaica has a rich musical heritage.In recent years, it's been hijacked by a violent brand of homophobia. As tonight's Foreign Correspondent shows us, a new generation of artists is starting to change cha that. I will no

noAtan -- - Atana, known as the strong one, is one of the success stories. She follows Ratafarian teachings, except when it comes to judging people on their sexuality. Rastafarian, is one love, fighting for the rights of one people, for the poor, the sick, the elderly, the needy. That's what rasta is about - loving and caring and sharing. # If you want to get desire # You need a will to drive Everyone has a right to decide his own destiny. Bob Marley even put it in a song. Right? That's a serious thing. The judgement needs to be left up to that. # And then cast up the way that I feel for you. # I think that the younger generation now think - I'm just going to be myself. # To fight and to pray I have many gay friends and I know their personality. I'm not saying that it is for everybody, because everybody is not as strong as they are. But they're not worried. I have confidence, I have faith. And I know that they'll be alright. # The loving that we are # Living for it # The right of correction # Will give us direction # Away from that # Fantastic music and the odd great cricketer from Jamaica over the years. You can see more on the store on tonight's Foreign Correspondent on ABC TV and on iView as well. Money makes the world go around. That's the central theme in Shakespeare's the Merchant of Venice.The latest production from the Belle Shakespeare Company has kicked off a national tour, and its director and the man who plays Shylock join us both in the studio. Good morning.Good morning.Welcome to News Breakfast. So this is, of course, one of Shakespeare's greats, with one of the most complex, and I guess, probably unfairly dealt characters that he wrote in the character of Shylock. How do I approach that famous role?As you say, there's been many versions of Shylock? Is he a villain? A sympathetic character? There's many ways that that can be approached. But Annalise and I spoke a long time ago about how we wanted to approach it as an exploration of difference. Not just with Shylock, but with Portia and her relationship to her suitors and the difference in race and class. That was the primary spot.And picking up on Mitchell there, a fair amount, or more than a fair amount of casual racism is inserted here when it comes it Shylock, a Jewish money lender, and also Portia. How do you explore those in the updated version for the play?The main thing was not to run away from that but to embrace the darkness and hope that in putting that on stage and putting the right question marks around it, we would actually ask the audience to empathise more. There was something about the darkness realeding the play again that actually felt very relevant to the way that others are treated in our society.It's interesting, because you have some current examples which don't necessarily include Judaism but other ethnic groups and we were speaking about that earlier in the show. All of those concepts you get into the morasse.Exactly. But the main thing for me was making sure that the question marks were right and that we're asking the audience to interrogate what they were seeing. So it's a very theatrical production and story telling and hopefully people will go on the journey with us.It's an epic tale of love, mercy, justice, pounds of flesh. It's one of Shakespeare's more complex plays. Therefore, as an actor, is it particularly challenging to take on a role like Shylock in this play?It's interesting, Shakespeare's father was a money lender too. At the time he wrote it, there were other plays like the Jew of Malta that were more anti-semetic. He wanted to up # End how the things were views. So I think in Shylock, you have a villain perceived by the rest of the community, but has some of the greatest speeches of all time about similarity and the communityion of the human spirit. So I think that it's a really -- the communion of the human spirit and so I think it's a really great platform to embrace. John Bell, when he founded the company so many years ago and he is one of the thea, -- theatrical greats. Was there always an approach or philosophical approach that he wanted it to take when it came to the outpouring of the baird?I know other productions that he's been and he's very conscience about acting on the line, not acting around the text.Explain that to the viewers? So that you use the text as a platform to leap into communicating with the audience. You're not acting around and doing lots of big pauses and thinky thinky acting. It all happens on the text and John was big on that.How does that challenge you, as a director?I think that the biggest thing about that is trusting the language. It is actually helping the actors to get to the place where they trust that it is in the words and it's all there for you. And if you trust the sounds of that poetry and you speak it fully, it will resonate through a room and touch an audience.It also has to have a degree of faith in the audience that even though it is, to some extent, an archain language, once it is spoken, it becomes almost conversational and ordinary language and much more understandable than perhaps people think. There has to be a degree of faith there.We work hard on making sure that we're clear and communicating that but there's something about the sound of the poetry that hits your body in a room.I actually learnt my lines in front of my 11-year-old nephew, Patrick. . I'm glad that you said that because it is kid who get shake peer well. He started reading it. There hath not a Jew eyes, speech. He was brilliant and the metre of it sat well with him. And I thought he did it better than I am. There's something about if you just go with the text and the rhythm that's within it, the meaning flows out of it.Well, you've got a well written play.The fabulous thing about this play is that obviously lots of people in big cities can see it, but it's been on the road in some the key regional centres as well. Tell us about that.It has, we started in Orange in New South Wales to weeks ago. We premiered there. And then last week, the cast have gone to Warnambool.Ballarat and Sale.27 venues around Australia.What has the reception been like?Fantastic so far. Great applause and gasps of terror and horror and laughs.Do people normally get the opportunity, for whatever reason, to come to a city to see a play?That's right, and it's great going to different venues because you have to adapt slictly for each venue, which is wonderful -- slightly for each venue, which is wonderful.Nice to hear that it is on the road and you're about to open in the big towns as well. So go well! And hope that it all goes well on stage too. Thank you.Thank you. So Merchant of Venice. How many hundreds of years old is that play? 1590.And still being put on. Astonishing. The kind of longevity you would hope for as a writer, but not many get it. A Queensland cat has had one of its nine lives spared thanks to a bottle of vodka, apparently. I can identify!Now we're talking. The feline was on the brink of death after eating poison, but kept alive, if a little woozy, by the antidote. It's odd for a black cat to this be lucky. The feline was found outside a tyre shop with just a whisker to live after swallowing anti-freeze. He couldn't stand, he was hypothermic and having convulsions and really having trouble breathing. Rushed to the RSPCA, quick-thinking staff found an unusual treatment. The antidote is intravenous ethanolo vodka. It just so happened that one of our nurses had a bottle of vodka laying around so we were able to administer it just in time to save his life.The cat, given the stiff drink via a drip, to break down the poison, as well as plenty of fluids to help with the hangover.Oh, he was off his rocker! He was having a jolly good time.The RSPCA says it is unsure if the cat, now named tipsy, was intentionally poisoned. It could actually be in this case that he was outside a tyre company and maybe there was some anti-freeze just been left around. We simply don't know.Tipsy is very lucky to be alive, but unfortunately he's not microchiped. The RSPCA is now looking for his owners or he'll be put up for adoption. He's expected to make a full recovery. When the hangover wears off!I always knew it had medicinal qualities. That explains a lot. Good, I'm feeling better about the vodka consumption now!That reminds me of the movie Doc Hollywood where Michael J. Fox goes to a country town and the old doctor administers a cola drink for someone! Perfect placement! Australia has had a golden world record breaking night in the para athletics championships. James Turner broke the record in the T-36. And minutes later, Scott Riordan held on for told in the T-42. It was Riordan's Third World title in a row. Just to remind you what happened yesterday still at the championships and the Paralympian Isis Holt is on top of the world again after winning gold in the 200 metres T-35. She won it two years ago as a 14-year-old and then went in as favourite in Rio. But had to settle for silver on that occasion. Won silver. She blitzed the field yesterday and added another world championship to her impressive resume. I've seen a photograph with her coach. Tour de France leader Chris Froome thought his chances of winning were gone when his bike failed him on Stage 15 over the weekend. They had a rest day overnight, so it gave him a chance to reflect on that and look forward to the next six stages as they wind their way to Paris. This is Chris Froome talking about the mechanical incident. A good five or ten minutes there that I thought - this is just... Just knowing the pace that AG 2 were setting going into the climb and I was standing on the side of the road with my teammate trying to change wheels. I thought that that was potentially game over. If I didn't reach that front group by the top of that climb, I don't believe that I would have made it to the finish line in yellow.So there you go. Six stages to go. One of them is right up there in the mountains and the other one is a time trial over the weekend. I think that it will come down to the time trial, unless Froome is broken and has spent too much energy trying to make up that gap yesterday. But it's going to be really close. There's about five riders all within a minute or two. How many days are we away from Paris?Six stages. It will finish in Paris on Sunday. But remembering that the last stage is ceremonial. So there's five stages of racing to go. And then they get on the liquor, a bit like Tipsy and have a flute on the way to Paris.I love watching them drinking their champagne. And they chat. And have a little catch-up with each other. Good stuff, thank you. A very special birthday shoutout to Merl Lang, a special viewer there, she turns 100 today! With her grandson David Lang who sent that photo in. She still drives, according to David.Well done, girlfriend! A telegram from the Queen coming and thank you for watching News Breakfast. We really appreciate it. Let's go to the weather now: Let's go to the weather now:
Good morning. We have a severe weather warning to talk about for damaging winds. It's current for parts of the south of South Australia today. Strong to damaging north-westerly winds looking at 55-65km/h. Peak gusts in excess of 95km/h possible. Windy conditions expected for the Alps in New South Wales above 1,900 metres with winds over 80km/h and gusts over 120km/h. Let's take a look at what's causing that. It's all thanks to a slow-moving low pressure system causing the systems across the south-east. It will continue to move east today as the next cold front approaches the south-west. If we take a look at the rainfall, the north is fairly fine but in the south, we see the maximums of about 10mm expected out of that and showers developing for the south-west as well. Let's look at the capitals for today:

The showers will lin remember for parts of Victoria. And taking a look around the country tomorrow: This program is not captioned.

The US policeman who shot and killed Australian woman Justine Damond identified as a junior officer with just two years experience. identified as a junior officer with
just two years experience.Her distraught family demands answers from police as they grieve for the Australian.The death of Justine is a loss to everyone who knew her, she touched so many people.A man arrested in Melbourne's north after a woman's body is found in a house. Federal Cabinet sets to debate Malcolm Turnbull's plan for a British style home office for border security and for spies.It has been a world record-breaking night for Australian sprinters at the para athletics championships.Also ahead - Utopia's back with a new season of while elephants. We will talk to Rob sip all about the new season. You're watching ABC News Breakfast.

The distraught fiance of an Australian woman shot dead police in Minneapolis says his heart is broken. Justine Damond was killed after reporting an assault near her house on Saturday night. Don dald says his fiancee touched many people and was a teacher to many. Local media reports suggest the 40-year-old was shot through the door of a police car by a junior officer named Mohammed Noor. Police have promised a thorough investigation after revelations the police didn't have their body cameras turned on. Our North America correspondent Ben Knight joins us now. A shattered Don Damond spoke to the media a short time ago.Family, friends and plenty of supporters. There was something of a guard of honour that was formed for the family as they made their way to face the cameras this afternoon. A courageous act in itself for a family and community that is still very much in shock. A couple of things Don Damond had to say about the lack of information from police but paying tribute to the woman he was due to marry in August. Here is what he had to say.She was a teacher to so many in living a life of openness, love and kind ness. Our lives are forever changed as a result of knowing her. She was so kind and so funny. She made us all laugh with her great wit and her humour. It is difficult to fathom how to go forward without her in my life.His shoulders being rubbed by his shattered son, Zach. The name of the policeman who shot Justine has been revealed as well?Yes, it has. The name of the officer is Mohammed Noor. He is a junior officer in the Minneapolis police department. He has only been with the force for a couple of years. When he joined the force, it was a significant moment, one that the mayor deemed worthy of a photo opportunity because he is the first Somali American to join the force in a state with a high Somali American population. We are learning that it hasn't been a great run for him in his short time in the force. Two complaints have been lodged against him already this year. Now there is a major investigation into what went on right here where I stand. You can probably see the tributes and flowers that have been laid. That has been going on since Sunday morning. People have been coming all through the day to lay flowers and photos and to simply pay tribute, not just people in the neighbourhood who knew Justine Damond. Some knew her and some didn't know her at all. I have spoken from people who came because they are angry about the relationship that the community, this community, that the city of Minneapolis, has with law enforcement. When we talk about Mohammed Noor, it is not about the actions of one police officer. There are questions being asked about how the force operates. How it trains its officers. What the culture is and the information that is coming out.Those questions will continue to be asked as that family grieves, thanks Ben Knight. Let's take you to other news and Victoria Police have arrested a man over the death of a woman in Melbourne overnight. Police are saying they were called to a house in Lalor just before 1:00am where they found the woman's body. A man in his 40s is in custody. Police say the pair were known to each other. Federal Cabinet meets today to discuss the Prime Minister's plan for a new ministry to oversee border security, Federal Police and the spy agency ASIO. The proposed unit could mirror that of the home office in the United Kingdom that coordinates Britain's domestic security agencies. Peter Dutton is tipped to lead the new department. Labor says the Government hadn't made the case for the changes and the move is more about politics than proper administration. A memorial for the victims of flight MH17 has been unveiled in the Netherlands three years after the plane was shot down over Ukraine. The memorial features 298 trees, one for each person who died, including the 38 Australians. The trees are planted near Schipol airport in Alps Dom where the Malaysia Airlines plane took off. It also has a monument in the shape of an eye with victims' names looking up at the sky. Victims' families say they hope one day those responsible for downing the plane will finally be brought to justice. A man has been charged over the shooting death of a dress maker in Melbourne's west last month. The Phong Vuong was found murdered inside his Deer Park home on 26 June. Detectives believe he may have been killed up to 11 days before his body was found by neighbours. Police have charged a 35-year-old man with murder and say a 45-year-old man is assisting them with inquiries. Firefighters from New South Wales and Victoria are heading to Canada to help local authorities tackle about 150 wild fires. 48 firefighters fly out tomorrow, at least 40,000 people have been forced from homes in central and southern British Colombia since the blazes began earlier this month. Foxtel has apologised to angry Game of Thrones fans after its streaming services crashed just as the new season was released. Fans of the HBO show vented frustration on social media as they tried to tune in to watch the new series, only to be met with an error message. In a statement on Facebook, Foxtel says it is devastated that its services crashed due to what it calls unprecedented demand. A world first study has found petroleum based oil can cause reef fish to engage in what is termed risky behaviour. Researchers from James Cook University have found the equivalent of a couple of drops in a swimming pool can cause fish to make poor decisions. The study published in the journal Nature, Ecology and Evolution today looks at six fish species from the Great Barrier Reef. It found after oil exposure, the fish were unable to identify friend from foe and stopped travelling in groups. The animals had trouble selecting suitable habitats and couldn't swim quickly away from danger. Let's check your weather now...

For more on an expected captain's call from Malcolm Turnbull who is paving the way for a new super ministry. Department will be styled along the lines of the UK's home office bringing together border security, the AFP and ASIO, despite strong opposition from several senior ministers. To discuss the prospect we are joined from Canberra by Jacinta Carroll, a counter-terror expert with the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Thanks for joining us.Good morning.Given this is to be debated by cabinet and we don't have a formal outcome, does this seem like a sensible and safe thing to do?The way that we have our security agencies and law enforcement agencies organised has been the subject of fairly constant review since 911, including some formal large scale reviews. There is to be released, we are told probably tomorrow, is the latest review of how Australia's intelligence agencies are working together. It is not unusual for the Government to be seriously considering have we got the best arrangement. What is interesting in this one is that the idea of having the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation, ASIO, removed from being under the Attorney-General's direction would be quite a stark change. That would be the first time in the history of the organisation that ASIO isn't under the first law officer of the Commonwealth in making decisions about intrusive powers while at the same time under the direction of the person who is responsible for protecting civil liberties. That is probably the most contentious thing about the proposal being put forward. That delicate balance has been at the basis of decisions from the 1940s, the establishment of ASIO in 1949 and Royal Commissions held into ASIO and intelligence and security. The other decision, it appears, or the discussion about bringing law enforcement and immigration closer together is one that has come up many times. All of these agencies work well together. It is not that contentious. It might have been a bumpy ride because immigration and Border Force have only recently come together and what we are hearing about the proposal is that the standard immigration tasks wouldn't be part of this new portfolio. It is more the security elements. That would be disruptive. As a security expert then, and you would need to answer this question in two different parts, from a security perspectives that something that would please you then, taking ASIO away from the Attorney-General and putting it into enforcement and from a public citizen point of view, is there any reason for us to be concerned about it?Probably not concerned. We are not hearing a lot about changing roles of agencies. There is a very strong legal basis and a strong history for putting a security intelligence service under the direction of the Attorney-General.That is about oversight, isn't it?Absolutely, it is oversight and checks and balances. That is always something that has been very seriously considered and we have heard the Attorney-General, George Brandis, talk about that. We are hearing that there are different views in cabinet about it. The checks and balances and oversight don't just reside with the Attorney-General, we have an Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security. We have parliamentary Joint Committees and so on. That is probably one of the things outside the intelligence agencies that we are hearing politically is there hasn't been an identified need for a significant change in relation to the intelligence agency and what we are hearing about the intelligence agency review report also is that it wasn't suggesting substantive change. The other side of it is that there has been some discussion of a super department but what has come out to date, and the devil will be in the detail when there is an announcement made, is it is looking at having a ministry portfolio which is very much the way most of these agencies operate already.Just to jump in there, where most Australians will actually pay attention to this news is whether they believe it is going to make them safer or not and I suppose that should be the bottom line, will it make a difference to our day to day security, what do you think? Interestingly, there has been a lot of discussion about focusing on the UK home office. The home office model isn't exactly what we are talking about here but it brings together immigration, border security policy direction for MI5 which is the security service in the UK. Law enforcement oversight also. Australia is not the UK. We moved away from a home office model decades ago. Importantly, where the rubber hits the road in counter-terrorism in particular, which is one area where all of the agencies do work together, that is in our State jurisdictions. Where terrorist plot disruptions occur, where investigations occur, that is a joint activity between the AFP, ASIO and the State or Territory police and that works well. It is not apparent from any of these discussions that there would be any significant change to those arrangements. That said, if we do have one minister who is charged with focusing on security broadly counter-terrorism broadly and a senior official, a department head who is again focused on CT and security, then they probably take over some of those roles that the counter-terrorism coordinator currently has previously done by a National Security Advisor. That would serve to effectively coordinate, communicate better with the States and Territories and that is the focus of the CT coordinator's role in improving that.We will leave it there, thanks for joining us today. Taking you to WA now where a man who ran down a Kalgoorlie teenager says he never intended to kill him and chased him down a dirt track because he wanted to get back his stolen motorbike. The 56-year-old who can't be identified, admits he was driving too close to the teenager but the fatality wouldn't have happened if the youth hadn't veered in front of him. Joanna Menagh was in court for the start of the trial.14-year-old Elijah Doughty suffered multiple fatal injuries when he was run over on a dirt track in August last year. Now the man accused of running him down is on trial for manslaughter. The Supreme Court was told the 56-year-old had made a split second decision to chase the teenager after seeing him riding a motorbike that had been stolen from his home the day before. Prosecutors allege the man was grossly negligent because he failed to use reasonable care or take reasonable precautions to prevent any danger to life, health or safety. The man admits his driving was dangerous because he was too close to the motorbike. He claims that entirely unexpectedly and without warning the motorbike veered in front of him and had the bike not veered in front, there would have been no collision. The man's lawyer said his client would be eternally sorry for being involved in the fatality but he said the man had no intent to hit or kill the teenager whom he told police had hoped would ride into the bush and fall off so he could get his motorbike back. Members of Elijah Doughty's family packed the courtroom for the trial which may include a visit by the jury to the scene. The case is expected to end next week.The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have arrived in Warsaw for an official visit to Poland and Germany. 3-year-old George and 2-year-old Charlotte came along for the tour. The BBC reports. At 3, he is far too young to know if he is a reluctant royal but Prince George wasn't keen to embrace Warsaw without his father's helping hand. One future King did persuade another one to follow in his footsteps. On the tarmac, George struck a nonchalant pose and practised the odd ballet move. A fidgeting toddler with a life time under an intense spotlight ahead of him. Princess Charlotte's freedom of movement was constrained by being in her mother's arms. The language divide isn't the only challenge. Here, a country that relatively recently embraced the EU is welcoming royals from one on the way out of the institution.The Union Jack.The nitty-gritty of Brexit won't feature here, rather William and Cate are in Warsaw to remind people of the depths of past links and the potential for future ones between the UK and Poland. The spoken for royal with an admirer in the crowd. A crowd like others elsewhere, curious to see the future of the British monarchy. The BBC's Peter Hunt reporting there. You feel sorry for George and Charlotte. They have decades of this coming up.The entire report was about how the children behaved getting off a plane. That is what we are reduced to, it is ridiculous.As a reporter, you have to fill 90 seconds worth of air time. Limited movements and limited activity, limited speeches, you rely on the pictures.That is the only thing we're all interested in, nothing about the so-called royal visit. I don't want to get off the plane. He wanted to stay back there. Poor kids, a life of it indeed as the reporter just mentioned.Coming up, Rob Sitch joins us in the studio to previews season three of Utopia, the nation-building authority goes from strength to strength. We believe some of the dubious projects being discussed this season include a very fast rail link between a certain city and a certain airport.I have got a great sense of humour as the next person, however I don't want jokes being made about an important bit of infrastructure that in my life time I hope to see completed. Tony Woodford, AKA Rob Sitch is the man to get it done -No, it will be a total balls-up if he has anything to do with it.I want to ask him if he feels the urge to strangle Lemo as the dubious Government advisor. I certainly would.I have had a number of Utopia-like conversations with various bureaucracies over the last couple of days. It is not comedy but they manage to get a life out of something that is painfully true. Stick around for that chat with Rob. Let's look at the morning's finance news with Del.Good morning everyone. China's economy has grown higher than forecast at a rate of 6.9% between April and June according to official figures. The growth rate which compares expansion with the same three months in the previous year was the same as in the first quarter of 2017. Beijing is currently trying to rein in debt by imposing measures on the property sect yore and lenders. Many expected the Chinese economy to slow as the policies kicked in. The latest data is well above Beijing's growth target for this year. Australia has witnessed a record-breaking housing boom in the south-east but now there is growing evidence that the boom may be coming to an end. Last week saw data on construction activity that appears to confirm the peak of the building boom has passed. ABS data showed a 2.4% fall in the value of construction work done led by a 4.5% slide in residential building. This reinforces the downward trending in building approvals which are off 20% over the past year. Deloitte Access Economics says the housing boom of New South Wales and Victoria will be the hardest hit by the downturn. Wall Street has risen and fallen several times before finishing flat...

I am joined now by equity analyst Fiona Clark. What do you make of the data out of China, what does it mean for Australia?Good data, not just the GDP but we had retail sales, fixed asset investment and industrial production data yesterday and all three of the numbers were better than expected. This is important in terms of policy holders in China wanting to have a balanced economy where the consumer and industrial side are performing well. It is good for our Australian economy. We are a huge trading partner with China. This is good for Chinese facing consumer stocks, stocks selling products into China, A2 Milk and Bellamy's. But the good industrial production data is good for the miners who continue to export projects and iron ore to China. Very good for Australian demand. Good for tourists and good for our economy. Great all round numbers yesterday.You mentioned Bellamy's. I want to talk to you about that because their shares will resume trading on Thursday. They had a capital raising that went wrong. Tell us about that?That is rate, Bellamy's raise $4.5 million to fund the purchase of a Camperdown powder facility - the Chinese authorities suspended one of its key licences so it could no longer export into China. They have gone into a trading halt and as part of the announcement yesterday Bellamy's said it has complied with all of the information that the Chinese authorities wanted in terms of the Camperdown production facility and it also gave a positive trading update and it said revenue and sales for the quarter had been very strong and risen, cashflow for the company is positive since March and earnings would be at the top end of its recent guidance. Good news in terms of trading conditions but perhaps not so good news for shareholders who will see the share price fall. This highlights an issue with Bellamy's. When China changes regulations, it directly impacts Bellamy's and we see the result for them and the shareholders.This is not the first time Bellamy's has been hit by a change in Chinese regulations in terms of products sold there. We had a change early last year. It highlights the risk involved in trading in China. The opportunities are obviously very attractive. That does come with a risk for shareholders.The Reserve Bank minutes came out yesterday. What did they say?We are expecting no change. The minutes we had when there was no change were surprising for the market because some analysts were expecting them to be more hawkish in line with other central banks. The full minutes out today and we are expecting more information on that. In terms of where the RBA - we are expecting much of the same. The RBA can't cut rates in current environment. Growth is still strong and it doesn't want to stimulate the housing market more than it already is. It is very conscious of the high levels of household debt and the impact that an interest rate increase might have on that. We have a strong dollar and low wages growth. Caught in the middle.The RBA will have its hands tied with that dollar that keeps raising?Yes, we might see jawboning talk to try and ease that.Thanks Del. Before we head to the real sport, we have some other kind - are we calling it sport?Yes, this morning we are. Why not?You be the judge. The snail racing championships, yes they have been held in the UK. This is a thing. More than 150 snails took part in the Gastropod Games at Norfolk in eastern England. The championships have been running, very slowly, since the 1960s. Each slimy race to the edge of the circular table begins with the call "Ready, steady slow". This year's winner was Larry awarded with those lettuce leaves. There has to be athleticism involved if it is a sport -Yes, you need to be a fast snail.You need to be free of drugs, were they swabbed?No doping.What else do you need to qualify as a sport?People turning up.No corruption, I am not sure anyone else is bidding for the hosting rights.I reckon there was lots of betting going on. What the hell else would you do at a snail race.Staying in the UK with proper sport and magnificent performances from Australians. A golden night at the London para athletics championships. James Turner broke the world record in the 200m T36 not unsurprising, he has broken a few records. And Scott Reardon won the gold in the 100m T42, his third world title in a row. They both won gold at the Rio Paralympics there. Still at the championships, Isis Holt won gold yesterday, she won the 200m T35, the event she won two years ago as a 14-year-old and won silver at the Paralympics in Rio. She is back on top. Blitzed the field and added another world championship to her impressive resume. Tour de France leader Chris Froome thought his chances of winning were gone when his bike failed him on stage 15 over the weekend. Speaking on the final rest day before the peloton winds its way to Paris, he looked relaxed but said he had to pull off a great save to stay in front of the other general classification contenders. There are six more stages to go and Froome reckons this Tour will be the closest of his career. He leads Fabian Aru by 18 seconds and there are a few others nipping at his back wheel also.A good five or 10 minutes there that I thought this is just - knowing the pace that Ag2r were setting going into the climb and I was standing on the side of the road with my teammate trying to change wheels. I thought that was potentially game over. If I didn't reach the front group by the top of have
that climb, I don't believe I would have made it to the finish line in yellow.In the AFL, Richmond's Dustin Martin remains eligible to win the Brownlow after he avoided suspension for that incident with Nick Robertson. Nick Robertson was suspended for a week for headbutting Trent Cotchin. Other incidents - Bernie Vince got a two-week suspension for getting Eddie Betts with an elbow and Patrick Dangerfield hobbled into a press conference to poke fun at the fact he had a sore foot. He is likely to play next week. He was having a crack at someone who said he overplayed his injuries. Freo captain Nat Fyfe is delighted his teammates and club supporters by signing a 6-year deal. He had reportedly been courted by several Victorian clubs. It turns out he never contemplated leaving. He will be at the Dockers for six years now chasing a premiership. Going back to Scott Reardon's performance, we will give you the commentary after he won the 100m sprint in London not too long ago. His girlfriend was in the commentary box. Vanessa Lowe said this.Major championship titles over 100m for Scott Reardon, champion again.He just knows how to perform. He lets his performance do the talking, doesn't get involved in all the media and whatever but that is what he needs to do and I actually am going to run and give that man a hug real quick.That is Scott Reardon's other half you are hearing there Vanessa Lowe.She should have been commentating from the finish line...Maybe we could have got the hug on tape.And an intimate post race interview. For those people who may have been thinking that Patrick Dangerfield is related to Rodney Dangerfield, such was his humour yesterday at that press conference, we don't believe so. We have had a discussion in the newsroom about whether or not it was funny. Our online producer believes it was hilarious but he is a Geelong supporter.We make a lot of concessions for that. That is a pity. The poor humour would indicate there is no genetic passage there. Let's check the weather with Nate. A bit of fog around?There is. We will start here. Ben sent me this video showing fog blanketing Brisbane this morning. The conditions have delayed some flights and caused problems on the roads. The fog is expected to clear by mid-morning. You can share your weather shots with me like Ben did on social media. From fog to wind, a severe weather warning for damaging winds current for parts of SA. Strong to damaging winds around 50-65km/h expected with peak gusts in excess of 90km/h possible. Dangerously windy conditions are expected for the Alps in New South Wales above 1,900m with winds over 80km/h and gusts over 120 there. Taking a look at what is causing it thanks to a slow moving low pressure system moving to the south causing the windy conditions and showers across the south-east. It will continue to move east today as the next cold front approaches the south-west corner, starting to develop showers later on there tonight.

Thanks Nate. It is back, Rob sip and his band return for the third season of the ABC hit comedy show Utopia. The latest season continues to track the tight-knit team in charge of building the nation, one white elephant at a time.You want us to look at a defence white paper?Yep. I know nothing about defence.That is an advantage, fresh eyes.Is there a problem, Jim?No.Is there a problem?We don't understand what it is saying.What.No-one understands it.The Prime Minister? National Security Committee?Parts of it. What about the defence minister?He is waving the white flag. He was a Minister for the Arts three months ago.The best training to be Defence Minister. Rob Sitch joins us this morning. Good morning.That is based on a true story. I can't remember what it was, he was the minister for the ageing two weeks ago what would he know? I am on a high today. As I walked in, we have a new building. I was given an electronic card and we based a whole episode on the electronic things that don't work. Do you think it worked for me today? Fess up, this entire episode of Utopia is based on the ABC and various outrages contained there in, true or false?Loose inspiration.I thought Tony would walk away in sheer utter humiliation and exasperation, he is back for more punishment, why?I have given him a character arc. In the second series, I was fit, I had Velcro and eating smoothies and in the intervening period I have given up, put on 10kg. Gone greyer and on that verge, the whole this series, I am on the verge of saying - the resignation letter - that is it.Do you keep re-doing it and putting it back in the bottom drawer?Yes, that old I am out of here.It would be funny if it wasn't so sad and true. We have been trying to build a nation for slightly more than 200 years now and we don't seem to get it right. How dare you make fun of it?That clip was about defence. I remember Brian Toohey the great journalist kept pointing out in the German Aldi stores you can buy submarines off the shelf for $42.50 on a red spot special. When the sub thing came along, somehow we managed to get the bill up to $10 billion. It is that process, the A-Z we know the outcome. The process is immensy amusing to me.You have worked in a fair few bureaucracies and the ABC is one of them. What have you learnt about the bureaucratic process that actually beats the creative, the joy out of what might have been once a good idea?I have tried to think about that. I have come to the conclusion that stupidity is scaleable. As we improve and so far ift Kate, I read the other day that they say your iPhone has as up power as the Apollo 11. That is completely wrong? It has 250,000 more transmitters than the Apollo 11 but we use it for stupidity but the mismatch keeps going. I was in offices in what I call the prelanyard era. It is a reminder that you are smart and the Western civilisation is going well. That misleads us.Impossible projects talked about in this series including a rail link between an airport and a big city?That is where the cost blows out.You have got the costing have you?That is it.It will never happen will it - a rail link between Melbourne and the Melbourne Airport?I do love that episode. We got an old guy in under the start program that he invented and he did the costings using a slide rule and came up with 50% of the cost that we came up with the computers.When you see episodes like this, the ghost of John Clarke hover all of us?I referencing him the other day. The business cases get used often but the business case to the Pathenon doesn't stack up and almost sent Athens broke. One day there was something in his local area being shut and he said it is not making money and John Clarke said "That is bad news for foot baths".Rest in peace. Talking before about Lemo who plays Jim the sleazy Government advisor. Are there times you want to reach across and strangle him in character?Yes, the whole time. That creature exists. Someone told me they are the people that suffer no pain. They cause pain.I have met them.In the second series we were proud we had a healthy heart week and the nurse came in and was measuring everyone's blood pressure but she measured mine as I was talking to his character and I had to go on medication. His was good.I wanted to ask you, it is interesting in this time of the era of TV as it is described. You and your mates had a business model to use that phrase, that has served you well from the beginning. You took over production yourselves of Working Dog and you and your partner, Jane Kennedy and Michael Hirst. How have you managed to stay mates and friends and keep it together?It is more the people that didn't want to be there left. Good groups, like bands, they often get formed by people leaving. We were writers at its heart. TV - you say the golden age, I look at that and I say TV was always a great writer's medium. It is that, we only learnt to edit because it is a form of writing. Writing and doing drafts and drafts is a constant feeling that you are creative. It is a like a Rubik's cube, or Sudoko. It is funny the people that are into that but writing is our form of that.It has worked. Not since Reg Grundy productions has there been such a successful production house. (LAUGHTER) There has been debate and lots of calls for the return of the night-time variety show. Would that work these days?It has some head winds. Most variety shows depend on guests. A Facetime guest is not the same as Sammy Davis Jr jumping out and sitting with Don Lane. I reckon it will be reinvented. Free-to-air TV still gives you a feeling that nothing else does and that is the sense that other people are watching with you.Is that still the stronger feeling for you than settling down with a brilliant box set of 12 episodes of something beautifully written?I do both. It is one of the problems I have with this series of Utopia is trying to explain to a 15-year-old that he have to sit down at an appointed time.What do they say to that?They shake their head and say "What do you mean I can't watch every other episode straight after that? ".And many other stars returning this season?Yes, Luke McGregor was in the first two series and he said I am going off and doing my global stand-up tour. That is good because real offices have turnover. We replaced a red haired Scott with a Sri Lankan accountant which was emblematic of Australia. You didn't think to invite on a couple of hard hitting breakfast TV hosts as a cameo?You dodged a bullet. We - when we use real media, we have to pick something that looks authentic but people don't know. That is three strikes for you.You had to ask.Tamara who does the weekends we approached. It is worth watching. She delivers our words like - I start to believe them.A credible journalist.There is no wink in her eye and I go "She can get away with that".Tamara is one of our fabulous news readers in Victoria. I have no doubt she hit it out of the park.We were going to go with Brisbane. They can't be well-known.Good news readers up there as well and everywhere.Maybe after we retire.Good luck Rob. You can watch the first episode of Utopia season three on Wednesday night, yes it is appointment viewing, 9:00pm on ABC TV and thereafter on iview. We tell you about the paradox, a man known as Dr Death, Allen Lopez has probably saved millions of lives worldwide. He analyses data meticulously to advise Governments how best to change health policy to stop preventable deaths. Professor Lopez's team at the University of Melbourne is set for a major cash injection and he joined us to talk about his work earlier this morning. We are trying to strengthen the evidence base for policy. Rather than have Governments planning health policies in a vacuum they have data. If they have data, they are more likely to get the policies right and improve population health. You have this money - in fact a progressive amount of money from Michael Bloomberg's Foundation to help you do your work. How does this allow you to go to places like Myanmar which is an interesting case study to stop preventable deaths? You need to do a lot of things to change or get better data. You need funds. We need to get experts together who go to Myanmar to teach them the methods we have used elsewhere that work. Countries like Australia have good data. They have good practices.Tell us about the ver tall autopsies that have been carried out in Myanmar and how they stop people dying unnecessarily?It is a method of collecting data where there is no doctor. In Australia we have doctors who certify every death and Governments benefit for that. In Myanmar they don't. We go to the family of the person who died and we ask a series of questions. In epidemiology there is a close relationship between causes of death and symptoms. People remember symptoms and so they report them. As long as we can keep that interview short we can extract that information and use computers to analyse it.The figures show 65% of all deaths are unrecorded worldwide and millions of deaths don't have a documented cause. You say you do this work so policy workers don't work in a vacuum. Do policy makers in Australia come to you and do we change our policies accordingly because of your data?It is not so much my data. Australia has had 100 years where they have been doing this. They have a good system. Absolutely, Australia has bold public policy that has worked in improving the health of Australians. Look at the road traffic accident decline as a result of the drink driving. That happened because people were looking at the da data and saying why are all these people dying of cancers. Australia is a world leader in using data for public policy.Indigenous Labor MP Lindy Burney says the council's recommendation for constitutional change is limiting. The council's final report says the only question that should be put to a national vote is about enshrining an Indigenous representative body in the constitution. Speaking on radio national, Ms Burney says it might be a challenge to get support for that proposal.I think it is limiting. It is recommending a legislated consultative body to the parliament and that is not new. We have had those bodies in the past. The difference is that if it is entrenched in the constitution, even if it is dismissed by a minister, it has to be replaced. That is important and powerful. The fact that it is - that the Referendum Council has not recommended that we deal with the race powers is why I am saying it is fairly limited. They are very clear about that. The side of politics that I represent wants to have the discussion, wants to explore and pursue the notion of a voice to the Commonwealth parliament. The thing that people need to recognise now is that the Referendum Council has finished its work. They have delivered their report and we are listening to their recommendations and certainly considering them.That is an interesting discussion and surprising to many that the soul recommendation or the recommendation of the vote that Australians consider enshrining this new Indigenous advisory body within the constitution is surprising because many of us thought it was going to be a much broader and more philosophical question we would be asked to engage with about recognition of the first peoples in the founding document as a way of bringing everyone closer together. There is a question mark now about whether a vote specifically about that, about a publicly-funded body would get up or not.If there is some this much division in the bath towards a referendum, you have to ask questions about whether it will happen or in the time frame people expect it to happen.The director and creative genius behind TV dramas such as the Killing and the Bridge. She is in Australia promoting her big film project part of the Scandinavian film festival and earlier I spoke to Charlotte about her work.

Lots of Australian viewers would know and love your directing work on the Bridge or the Killing and I want to focus on those two as we start. They fall under the banner known as Nordic noir. How is that distinctive from your standard US or UK crime series?I think it is a lot of people from Scandinavia who are making crime and who are making a kind of noir, learnt from the US. They taught us everything we know, I think. Then it has become a brand more than an actual genre. It is a brand so people know it is a feel of light, it is dark.It is very dark and arguably these shows are more morally complex than other crime shows. Is that a fair assessment?I think you're right there. It has to do with that the stories - it is not just a killing and you don't bother about that. It is about the society and it is about real characters that are striving and struggling with their lives. Also, I think there is a lot about the light that gives it this feel. There is a lot of shows like that, a lot of stories. We don't have so many stories in the whole world. We have seven they say and we make them in different ways. The feel has to do with who we are and the fact that how it looks in Denmark and Sweden and Norway and Finland.

Your work on these shows, particularly the Bridge gave you entree to the US. You have worked on Homeland, like the Americans, well-known shows. How was that transition for you and how different is the directing style or what is demanded of you as a director in America versus Denmark?I was educated at our network DR who did the Killing and the Bridge and all that, so I was very well educated I realised when I came to the US because it is just more hours. Fewer days but more hours. It is the same and I think it is like all over the world, shooting for television and movie, it is the same. It is just a question of how much, how many people, there is more people and more money.That always helps as a director, having more cash?It is fun. I won't say it is always the best. We are good at doing low budgets. That is a help that you can do a lot on a little.Australian directors would say the same thing, suddenly all the money and people. Big difference.You realise how thrifty we are. I love Charlotte's observation that it is about the lie. A lot of it is about the even flat grey light, the sun never comes from behind the grey clouds and it creates an add Mott fear that is amazing.As they hunt for the murderer. It is the birth place of reggae and artists like Bob particularly and it is fair to say Jamaica has a rich musical heritage. In recent years it has been hijacked by a violent brand of homophobia. Foreign Correspondent will tell us a new generation of artists is changing all that.

Atarna, known as the strong one, is one of Jamaica's current success stories. She follows teachings, except when it comes to judging people on their sexuality.Rastafari is love, togetherness, oneness, unity, unconditional love. Fighting for the rights of the people. For the poor, the sick, the elderly, the needy. That is what it is about. Loving and caring and sharing.

# And if you want to get desire # You really need to try #Everyone have a right to decide his own defendant ine. Bob particularly put it in a song, right? That is a serious statement. It needs to be followed.

The younger generation now have decided I am just going to be myself.

I have many gay friends and I know their personality. I am not saying it is for everybody because everybody is not as strong as they are. They are not worried. I have confidence, I have faith and I know they will be all right.

A great story with a fabulous sound track. You can see more of that story on tonight's Foreign Correspondent.

Lots of reaction to the Rob Sitch interview. Shaz has Tweeted she reckons the nation building authority in Utopia is based on Canberra's National Capital Authority. That is according to a former employee there.Stop it.Take it to different States and Territories ferally, you would find one. He is fantastic.What a great interview. I have seen many great interviews on our show. From the top shelf that one. Rob Sitch is so easy to listen to. Great questions about the future of TV. Variety TV.We are variety TV, just not prime time.We are trying to be.Given our - you would have variety TV on this program all three hours. We can't believe it doesn't exist at a time when there has never been such a wide variety and incredible range of performing talent in this country. You would have them lined up out the door. We will talk to Rob. Figure out a way.Live TV - and there is a fantastic new show called Sideliners, sports and entertainment and it is hosted by Nicole Livingston and it kicks off on Friday night on ABC TV. A move in the right direction.Someone you might know might make an appearance. Who is going to bob up - not me.It is not you. To be confirmed. Here is PK.Australia has had a golden world record-breaking night at the London para athletics championships - a couple of hours ago. James Turner broke the world record in the 200m T36 and Scott Reardon won the gold in the 100m T42. It was Reardon's third world title in a row. He and Turner won gold in Rio last year. At the peak of their powers the sprinters. Tour de France leader Chris Froome is hanging on by the skin of his teeth. There was a rest night - rest day overnight but he was reflecting about that incident where he had to change his wheel that almost cost him the race. He believes at that moment he thought it was almost game over. He is still there. Six stages to go, one includes a big climbing day and another is a time trial. Those will be the critical stages. We will update you on that one. We know we have big fans of cycling who watch the show.Thanks PK. Back to our top story briefly - in the US, audio has emerged from the moments just after an Australian woman was killed by police. Justine Damond was shot dead by police in Minnesota after reporting an assault near her house on Saturday night. Local media reports suggest the 40-year-old was shot through the door of a police car by a junior officer named Mohammed Noor. Let's listen, I think we can now to that audio that has emerged from Minneapolis.5.30, shots fired. Can we get the code on 51st street.Shots heard on 51st street. Sergeant to acknowledge one down.5.30, there are no suspects at large.No suspects at large.The audio is crucial because the officers' body cams were not turned on at the time. There won't be that visual evidence as to why the woman who made the call to 911, Justine, was shot. Now that and any other evidence they can stitch together. Let's look at the weather with Nate. It is winter, for sure. It is chilly in the south-east and rainy conditions as well. Let's look at the map...

Thanks Nate. I don't think we should have our AFL chat kicking off by volunteering who has had an office affair. Can we do that?Not in this office.I sort of did one day.Not in this office, Nate.Don't say stuff like that PK.I was only joking. Am I?I will go first.Nate said "Not in this office".Thanks for your comments on that. Am I the only one who hasn't got into Game of Thrones? Hence the Foxtel streaming service -No, you are not. I haven't got into it.Come on guys, it is an amazing bit of television. The production values of this TV show would rival most films you see. Just on that alone -Having said that, because there is such a big lag between when the seasons drop and the plot lines are so complex it is easy to drop off.It is great for you to join me, because you can watch it all at once. That is all today, see you tomorrow. This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Today - the fiance of an Australian woman shot dead by police in the US demands answers... Piecing together Justine's last moments before the homicide would be a small comfort as we grieve this tragedy.

Cabinet set to debate a plan for a new domestic security super-ministry. Warnings a cyberattack could cost Australia five times more than one of the country's most damaging natural disasters. And - a golden run for Australia at the para-athletics championships in London. Hello, and welcome to Mornings. I'm Joe O'Brien. The weather: