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This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. The US Secretary of State calls for action as North Korea conducts another missile test.Diplomatic and financial power will be backed up by willingness to counteract North Korean aggression.The Government takes aim at university students in the upcoming Budget.Police in the UK foil an active terrorism plot after carrying out a raid in a house in London.Greater Western Sydney get their revenge on the Bulldogs beating the premiers by two points. Good morning. I'm Andrew Geoghegan. I'm Kathryn Robinson. You're watching Weekend Breakfast.

Thanks for joining us. We do have that breaking news coming out of North Korea. We will get some more comprehensive coverage, although scant detail at this point, but according to South Korean media, the missile test occurred north of the capital Pyongyang early this morning. The flight path of that ballistic missile is still not clear. US Government sources are claiming the test was unsuccessful. In other words, it failed.This is the second missile test this month and comes as US President Donald Trump prepares to make 100 days in office. This, of course, comes after Rex Tillerson spoke to a special UN meeting saying the world needs to drastically increase pressure on the regime to avoid a catastrophic outcome. We will bring you the latest reaction from home and abroad, crossing to the US shortly. Before we get to the main news, let's check the weather around the country:

As we have been reporting, North Korea has test fired a ballistic missile after the US Secretary of State called on the world community to drastically increase pressure on Pyongyang to curb its nuclear ambitions. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called for sanctions to be fully enforced and for diplomatic relations to be suspended or reduced in a bid to heap more pressure on North Korea. He warned the United States will sanction nations and individuals supporting the regime and urged the world to act before North Korea's nuclear reach extends further. China called for all parties to remain calm and exercise restraint and avoid provocative rhetoric or actions that would lead to miscalculation.The threat of a North Korean nuclear attack on Seoul or Tokyo is real. It is likely only a matter of time before North Korea develops the capability to strike the US mainland. Indeed, the DPRK has repeatedly claimed it plans to conduct such a strike. Given that rhetoric, the United States cannot idly stand by, nor can other members of this Council who are within striking distance of North Korean missiles. University students could soon be hit with higher fees in a revamp of the Abbott Government's higher education package to be included in the Budget. The Australian newspaper reports the broad outline of the new funding formula which could see student fees rising by a minimum of 25%. It will be unveiled to vice chancellors on Monday. The plan will increase the amount of cost borne by the student from the current 40% and require repayments of higher education loans earlier. The Education Minister Simon Birmingham is expected to defend the proposed changes following the announcement early next week. British police say they've intercepted an active terrorism plot after a woman was shotted during an armed -- shot during an armed raid in North London. The senior national coordinator for counter-terrorism policing confirmed six people were arrested in the operation. Authorities are still hunting for suspects connected to the plot but police believe they contained the threat. The 21-year-old woman shot during the raid is in a serious but stable condition.A terrorist suspect arrested near Britain's Houses of Parliament has been identified. Mohamed Khalid Omar Ali was stopped in Whitehall in the middle of Government district by police acting on a tip-off. The 27-year-old is a British national born overseas who was known to police and security services. He has been held on suspicion of possession of an offensive weapon and preparing for acts of terrorism. The French far right party, the National Front, has replaced the man chosen to lead it while Le Pen contested the presidential election. It comes amid allegations that Jean-Francois Jalkh denied the Holocaust. Mr Jalkh gave an interview with an academic 17 years ago in which he allegedly questioned whether the Nazis had used a cyanide-based pesticide in the gas chambers. He is taking legal action but an official says Mr Jalkh will no longer occupy the post due to the current climate. In Germany, airlines are dropping safety rules brought in after the 2015 Germanwings plane crash which requires two people in the cockpit at all times. Andreas Lubitz killed 150 people by crashing the plane, apparently on purpose, after the captain left to use the toilet. Airlines now say the two-person rule has no safety benefits. Eurowings which merged with Germanwings is one of the airlines now dropping the requirement.Pope Francis is visiting Egypt in the aftermath of bomb attacks that have killed dozens of Christians. The Pope went straight to a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi after landing in Cairo. His trip is aimed at improving ties between Muslims and Roman Catholics. Speaking at a leading university of Sunni Islamic learning, he urged all leaders of all faiths to renounce violence carried out in the name of religion. TRANSLATION: God, the lover of life, never ceases to love man and so he exhorts us to reject the way of violence as the necessary condition for every earthly covenant. In fact, violence is the negation of every authentic religious feeling as religious leaders we are duty bound to unmask the violence which purports to be carried out in the name of the sacred. Sport now with Georgie. Canberrans were treated to possibly the game of the round in the AFL last night?I know. There has only been one match so far but what a match it was. The first match for the Giants on a Friday night. GWS had never had that opportunity before. They only began in the competition back in 2012. I think they got a taste for it last night because they were on the winning end of a tight scoreline. A thrilling chapter written in the growing Dogs-Giants rivalry. This time GWS picked up bragging rights but they may be without one of their stars for a few weeks. Backing up from one of the best prelims we have seen in AFL, the match lived up to the hype. The Dogs could only manage a nine-point break -- lead at the break. Toby Greene was reported for striking Caleb Daniel, looked nasty. We are all spent. Coming off a 6-day break and then going into that, it was a great battle. They are the games we want to play in.Cowboys fans were buoyed by the expected return of Johnathan Thurston but he was a late scratching against the Eels and North Queensland's night got worse from there. Thurston was forced to watch on helplessly as Parramatta outclassed the home side. Clint Gutherson crossed for a double. 26-6 winners. The Cowboys slumped to their third loss in four games. The Rabbitohs were never in the hunt against a rejuvenated Manly. Tom Trbojevic, Akila Uate and Dylan Walker running riot 46-8. Maria Sharapova has continued her fine form at Stuttgart, back from a 15-month doping ban. The Russian progressed to the semifinals eliminating qualifier Anett Kontaveit in straight sets 6-4, 6-3. Sharapova is yet to drop a set in her comeback tournament. She will take on a pretty vocal critic of hers Kristina Mladenovich in the next round. We saw a tight match in the AFL. Two pretty big blowouts in the NRL. Comfortable wins we saw last night for the Eels and Manly who just continue to go from strength to strength this season. The bunnies.As we heard from their coach, they have to take a long, hard look at themselves.Many thanks. Thank you for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come, North Korea has conducted another missile test. We will get reaction from US affairs analyst Sara James.Also ahead, British police have foiled an active terrorist plot. We will have the latest on the counter-terrorism raids in London.Later, News Limited and the Nine Network have recently launched online sites dedicated to female-specific content but one website started it all. This year Australia's leading independent women's website Mamamia is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The team from Download This Show speak to the woman behind the website Mia Freedman. There have been more dramatic counter-terrorism arrests in London. Police say they have foiled an active plot in the north-west of the British capital, shooting and seriously injuring a woman in the process.Here is Europe correspondent James Glenday.About 7 o'clock in the evening, heavily-armed police began their raid. (GUNSHOTS) Gas canisters were fired through windows and those nearby ducked for cover.I ran to the kitchen, I was like "There is armed officers outside". At that point we heard another bang.Officers trained their weapons on the house. Once it was over, six people had been arrested and a 21-year-old woman had been shot. Police say they swooped to stop an active terrorist plot.The armed entry was necessary due to the nature of the intelligence we were dealing with and involved armed officers firing gas into the address. During the course of that operation, one of the subjects, a woman, was shot by police. She remains in hospital.The raid came just hours after an unrelated terrorism arrest near the Prime Minister's house in central London. British national Mohamed Khalid Omar Ali was detained after a tip-off from a family member. A backpack with knives was taken from the scene.What you have seen today and yesterday is police preventing a terrorist attack. That's really important because when a person gets to the point of blowing themselves up or shooting people, it is too late.These arrests brought back memories of the recent attack in Westminster that claimed five lives but police are hailing the two new operations as a major success and say they've contained all current threats to the UK. North Korea has again provoked the United States by conducting another ballistic missile test just hours after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson urged the world to drastically increase pressure on the regime to avoid a catastrophic outcome.Details about the missile test are still coming in but America Government officials confirmed they tracked the launch. For the latest, we are joined live from Washington by US bureau chief Zoe Daniel. What more can you tell us about this missile test, what sort of missile, where was it potentially headed? This is what's called the KN-17 intermediate range ballistic missile. It was not nuclear-armed but it is one of nine tests that North Korea has conducted in the first 99 days of Donald Trump's presidency. As we understand it - much of this reporting is coming from South Korean news agencies with some information from US officials - this test happened at around 5:30 local time in North Korea from the north-east of Pyongyang. The direction of the ballistic missile was to the north-east, so towards the Sea of Japan. We are told, though, by US officials that this was a failed test, that the missile broke up soon after launch. But it is somewhat cheeky particularly in the face of comments made, both by President Donald Trump yesterday that there was the chance of major conflict with North Korea and that coupled with the appearance of the Secretary of State Rex Tillerson at the UN today, his first appearance there, where he told the world, essentially, to start squeezing North Korea, to adhere to financial sanctions, to wind back diplomacy, saying that that is the only option, that otherwise North Korea will continue to ramp up its nuclear program with potentially catastrophic consequences. Let's take a look at what the Secretary of State had to say.The policy of strategic patience is over. Additional patience will only mean acceptance of a nuclear North Korea. The more we bide our time, the sooner we will run out of it. In light of the growing threat, the time has come for all of us to put new pressure on North Korea to abandon its dangerous path. I urge this Council to act before North Korea does.The Trump Administration has been very vocal about wanting a diplomatic resolution to this, asking China, if you like, to do a lot of the heavy lifting. Is that likely to change in light of the last hour?Hard to say. I think the fact that this is not a nuclear missile test, and, of course, there is still the possibility that will happen at some point near in the future but it is North Korea effectively testing the boundaries with the United States and just what Donald Trump's Administration is prepared to tolerate. Certainly the pressure is on the Chinese and there was a little bit of push-back from them today at the United Nations where they effectively said "Well, this is not only on us. Yes, we are the key ally of North Korea" - in fact, China and North Korea's trade is about 90% of trade into North Korea but, that said, China saying "Everyone has to participate". Also suggesting not too subtly that the US needs to wind back the rhetoric, that there needs to be measured tones in the language that is used to avoid something happening, a reaction from either side, if you like, in response to language of the other that could lead to actions that, indeed, as Rex Tillerson said, are catastrophic.Has there been any reaction yet from, indeed, the President or Rex Tillerson?No. We haven't seen anything from either of them as yet. This test happened about an hour and a half ago now so this is still very fresh. We are only starting to see those tid bits of information trickle out from US officials. Perhaps we will see a response from either the President but certainly from the State Department this evening but we would also expect to see some commentary from North Korean State media probably fairly soon as well.This all falls on a weekend where President Trump is marking his 100 days in office?Yes, it does. Donald Trump will be conducting a major rally tomorrow. This is a rally that's conducted by his campaign team. It's not a White House event. But he will be going out to his heartland, into western Pennsylvania, bringing together some of those members of his base and conducting the sort of campaign rally that we saw many times over the last 12 months. In a sense, with his people celebrating those things that he feels he has achieved over the first 100 days of his presidency. But, of course, there are many critics saying that he has attempted to start many things, that he has not been able to progress. There is a fair bit of leeway among his supporters on that but there will be an expectation of results, too.Bureau chief Zoe Daniel reporting from Washington there, many thanks.To assess Donald Trump's first 100 days in office, we are joined by NBC News correspondent Sara James in Melbourne. Thanks very much for joining us this morning. Pleasure.I wanted to start with the news we just heard regarding North Korea. Foreign policy has featured prominently in Donald Trump's first 1 00 days in office. Have you been surprised that his Administration has been interventionist?I think the reality is maybe not so surprised because what happens always for presidents is they come in with their to-do list, even a maverick like President Trump, and then events happen and the reality is that things are never really stable. The world is always moving, things are always taking place. Countries around the world don't simply wait for any US President to get their sea legs, things just happen. So always there is the potential for action to occur but the reality is, I think, as we have heard from the President himself, things are a little bit trickier than he imagined. Have a listen to what he said in a recent interview with Reuters.There is a chance that we could end up having a major, major conflict with North Korea. Absolutely.Of course, we have heard that news, they've test-fired, although apparently it's failed, another ballistic missile. Donald Trump, when he was campaigning during the election, indicated perhaps that he would be more isolationist, that America would be more isolationist. Do you think what he has done so far, obviously his involvement in Syria, Afghanistan, North Korea, that perhaps he is disappointing his core base there? You are right about that. He is certainly going in a different direction from what he had signalled to the people who are his core voters. The reality is that, right now, he seems to be able to make a case to them. He does this directly through his Twitter feed among other ways. I think what he has said to them is these are, from his perspective, strategic, independent, individual decisions. For example, if you look at what happened in Syria, to use that example, there was the tomahawk cruise missile strike and then it's been quiet. I think for his base, and that base is really interested in what's happening in the United States, in getting jobs, in going back to work, many of them are also interested in that wall that he has talked about, they're not as interested in some of these other world events but I think they are willing to give him latitude, it's message and messenger. They voted for him. All the polls show they are sticking by him. So far that's holding solid. Jobs is obviously critical, certainly in some of the Rust belt States. Also States such as West Virginia which is heavily reliant on coal to employ people. Certainly under the Obama Administration he cut a lot of the jobs there because he wanted to clean up the industry. Donald Trump promising those jobs will come back, and some of them have.It is no mistake that the rally that he is holding is in western Pennsylvania. I know that part of the country. It's coal country. These are the people who voted for him, who remain wildly enthusiastic about him. What you see in the United States right now is really a quite polarised country. His poll numbers overall are pretty dismal. We are talking historic lows. But his base, to steal the words Megan Trainor, it's all about the base. He is rallying around them and for them, he's hoping to deliver for them while many other Americans are frustrated and wishing they had a different president.You mentioned how polarised America is. Is it your view there are still very much two Americas. We had those who voted for him and those who didn't and perhaps the gulf between the two groups is growing?I think that may be the case. I think some interesting things are occurring. I was speaking to some folks in Virginia who were talking about going to a Democratic political meeting. In the past, there might have been 20 stalwarts who showed up. Suddenly there were more than 100 people. I think what's starting to happen - again, we are in very, very early days - is some of the people who weren't really thinking this would happen so maybe they didn't vote or maybe they voted but didn't get very active, are starting to grow more active. There isn't a lot of complacency in the United States any more. People aren't complacent. They are taking steps to move forward. I think there are core divisions but, in a positive zone, there is a lot more interest in politics and a lot greater understanding of the impact of who is elected and what they do and whether or not your team has the White House.Let's look at it objectively, those achievements and failures of his first 100 days. I will just throw a couple of issues at you. Building the wall, that clearly hasn't happened. Cracking down on immigration, essentially mired in the courts at the moment. He did propose tax cuts for income paid by tax corporations. That is a wish list, hasn't happened. Repealing Obamacare, that hasn't happened. Unwinding NAFTA. Essentially he is saying now he will renegotiate the deal rather than killing it.Yes. I think what you are pointing out are a lot of things he had said would happen have not happened. If you specifically go to the wall, that's a big one. Because, as you know, he asked for money in the Budget, a billion dollars, to support paying for that wall. He was knocked back by his own party, by the Republicans, in Congress on that. They didn't put that money in that big bill. That hurts. But I think what he has discovered is that the reality is there is a massive difference between running a company and running a huge economy, a country like the United States. So I think he is discovering that. But there are wins and intriguingly he has had a lot of wins in things like his executive orders. This is something he criticised former President Obama for. Taking action through executive orders rather than going through Congress but the reality is that when presidents don't get their way and don't get what they want, then they pull out a piece of paper and a pen and they do everything they can through executive orders and that's certainly something that this President is doing right now.How would you describe the way he governs? The way in which he discharges his duties as the chief executive. Who is running the White House?I think he is a maverick. I think - the interesting thing about this is we have seen him change his position many, many times. Sometimes from one to the other to back again. NAFTA is an example of that. "I'm going to get rid of it. I might discuss it". Really, it is difficult to chart his position. Here is why that is working for him with his base. While that frustrates many people, for his base, it is a sign of what he said he would do. He said throughout the campaign, although he gave a very express set of "Here's what I'm going to do, here is my contract with the voters for the first 100 days", he also said "I like to be unpredictable". If you will, that has been his trump card - pun intended. The reality is that's what he uses "I said I wasn't going to tell you exactly what I'm going to do and I'm not" but it does make it complex for world leaders and for the American public to know exactly which direction in which he is going. To answer the second part of your question, I think the reality is he is the boss and we have seen him shift some of the people around him, notably what appears to be a demotion of Bannon, for example, and his son-in-law becoming far more a player, his daughter Ivanka as well, but one person who we saw right here in Australia last week was the Vice President Mike Pence. People like dealing with the Vice President. It certainly appears that the President has a great deal of confidence in his Vice President.Thanks very much for analysis this morning.You're welcome.That is Sara James.

To other news now, Pope Francis is in Egypt for a 2-day visit aimed at improving ties between Muslims and Christians. It's the first time the head of the Roman Catholic church has set foot in the country for 17 years.The visit comes in the wake of twin bombing attacks on Egyptian Christian churches. Pope Francis arrived in Cairo bearing a message of peace and co-existence. The Vatican says the head of the Catholic Church travelled to Egypt to help extinguish the flames of sectarianism and encourage interfaith dialogue in the Arab world. He arrived at a sensitive time for the Christian community in Egypt. Although mainly followers of the Coptic Church, they will still look to him for leadership following the bomb attacks that shook their community on Palm Sunday. Addressing political and religious leaders, Pope Francis stressed the need for unity. TRANSLATION: The challenges of civilisation calls on everybody, Christians and Muslims, everything, to give their contribution and come together. We live under the same sun and, therefore, we can call each other brothers and sisters because, without God, our lives are like a sky without sun.The Egypt's Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has, for a long time, tried to position himself as a so-called moderate leading the fight against ISIL. Human rights groups, however, say his crackdowns have targeted political opponents and not the armed group. Despite this, the Vatican has praised al-Sisi for his public speeches encouraging coexistence. TRANSLATION: Egypt stands at the forefront of fighting evil and terrorism. Its people are carrying a heavy price for confronting such a serious threat. With the full intent to defeat it while keeping their unity. I once again emphasise the full defeat of terrorism requires more coordination and solidarity among all peace-loving forces in the international community.Pope Francis also addressed the international interfaith conference organised by the oldest religious institution in the Muslim world before meeting the head of the Coptic Church. While many will be encouraged by his attempts to bridge the interfaith gap, there are those who want his visit to highlight human rights abuses by the Egyptian Government. Pope Francis received widespread admiration across the Arab world for supporting Syrian refugees and criticism of their mistreatment. For the thousands in Egypt, the hope is it will not be limited to Syria. Let's look at the weather: Tropical Cyclone Frances is causing gusty showers in the northern Kimberly. Brisk winds are causing showers in the south-east. A high in the south is allowing mostly clear skies and a cool morning to much of southern and central Australia. Around the country:

The top stories from ABC News: North Korea has test fired a ballistic missile from a region north of the capital, defying intense pressure from the United States. A newsagency says the missile appears to have blown-up a few seconds into flight. The US Secretary of State used a special meeting of the UN to call for more pressure to be placed on North Korea. Rex Tillerson urged the international community to suspend or downgrade diplomatic relations with Pyongyang. University students will be reportedly hit with higher fees and cuts to university funding will be scrapped when the Federal Budget is handed down next month. The Australian reports the changes to the Abbott Government's higher education package could see students' fees rise by as much as 25%. British Police foiled an active terrorism plot after a woman was shot during an armed raid on a horse in North London. Six people were arrested during the operation, with police saying the threat is now contained. And: The GWS Giants have come from behind to defeat the Western Bulldogs in Canberra. The Giants were down 11 points in the fourth quarter, but kicked three of the last four goals to secure the two-point victory. Almost budget time and we talk about the winners and the losers. Well, let's talk about some of the potential losers. Students or uni students could soon be hit with higher fees in the revamp of the higher education pack and to be included in the budget.To discuss this and other stories making headlines in today's papers, we are joined now by Georgia Waters, editor for the Sydney Morning Herald.Good morning.This story, hitting university students, it seems like a soft target, but in saying that they haven't had changes to their fees for quite a few years now.Yes. This budget package we are seeing in the paper today, this is Government's new offering. As we know the Abbott Government sort of deregulation package in the budget from three years ago never passed. This is their new offering. Instead of cutting funding to universities, they are going to ask students to increase the pro--er monthtion of their -- proportion of the fees they pay from 40 to 50%, and it will affect necessary by 25%. They will also ask them to pay it back earlier, lowering the threshold. It will be a hit to students, for sure. The argument is that they have - haven't had any significant increases for some time now. They do need to lift the load as well. So, they are going to cop it.Yeah.You look at the cost of a degree is upwards of $30,000 for a student. That is going to make quite possibly unaffordable, and then how does it speak to the innovation nation that the Prime Minister is trying to create?Yeah. It looks - according to the story, the Government is going to argue the ace that a degree does impact on your earning power, leading the higher salaries later in life. Speaking to an economist, he says that premium for a degree is not what it once was.It goes to the argument what is a degree worth these days and do you really need a degree? In some instances you don't with the way jobs are changing rapidly.Unemployment rates among university graduates are getting higher than they once were as well, which is another factor.I find that odd. Do or you don't you need a degree? I would have thought that education post-school is a necessary step up to follow potentially the career...I know what you are saying. If you are talking about the innovation nation you need nor -- more highly educated people. Will this discourage people? We will see. Taking a look at another story, in the Sydney Morning Herald today, your paper, looking at - it is a New South Wales story. What they are propose for the before -- bushfire he vows N Sydney a lot of homes front on to bushland meaning they are at risk.The State Government wants - is changing the way that we fund our fire services. It used to be a tax on your insurance policy. But now they are saying, no, they are going to sort of put a tax on land. They will value it by how much your land is worth. People who don't have insurance will be paying it. They have released today the details and it seems to be higher.It is probably hard to see on the screen, many suburbs are being slugged with the levy who have no threat of fire going through?It is based on land value, more than the risk? You look at a place like Mosman, you haven't - probably not a lot of bushfire zones, because it has a highland value, whereas the Blue Mountains, a high fire-prone area, is at the lower endWe are funding public spaces and... The Government is arguing that it will end up costing people - people who were fully insured before less than what they were paying previously. But they have said they are going to monitor insurance companies to make sure they pass on the savings. That will be something to watch.The insurance company passing on savings! Watch that space indeed! (LAUGHTER) To another story in the Daily Telegraph. The language is extreme, saying that there will be a tsunami of homeless women that will be knocking on doors of charities, etcetera, due to increases in divorces, and the gender pay gap. Yes. This is - charities and social workers are issuing the warning, saying they have seen up to 44% increase in women in their 50s and 0s accessing homeless services in the past five years, which is a sharp increase. They are saying there are various reasons for this. Women do obviously - often retire with less superannuation because they have been working inside the home instead of outside the home. Divorce and that sort of thing - or fleeing domestic violence. Once upon a time would would leave or retire with a house oh of their own. That is often not the house now. Particularly if they divorce, the house is sold off.Yes.It depends where the proceeds go. If they haven't been working for a long time, their save ltion be lower than perhaps the husband.Absolutely. With property prices very high and rental prices, it is making it difficult. It is important - in media we talk about property prices and the impact on young people, but older people are - low- and middle-income people are suffering as well. That is one of the factors that is leading to this. Um. They are sort of quoted about 700,000 Australian women who are over 45 who are single and 500,000 of them are going to be under housing stress in the next two decades, which is really...They are big numbers. I guess that would suggest the use of the terminology that has been written...Seems to be accurate! Thanks for taking us through the papers.Thank you.Staying on women - they make up about half of the population, and are often the decision makers when it comes to the household budget.It is something there companies and advertisers have known for years. Until recently there's been a limited amount of female-specific content. Marc Fennell from Download This Show sat down with Australia's women's media pioneer, Mia Freedman.Right now there is a gold rush for female attention online, News Corp have stepped in with their new service Women, Nine have stepped in with their Nine Honey. One woman has been doing this for 100 years - the 10th year anniversary of Mama Mia. Welcome to the show.I am very old and tired!Take me back to the beginning. How did it start. It was in your head before you left Nine. It was.What happened?I knew I wanted to go and I knew that I didn't want to go back to magazines. I was done...Why?I have worked in whatever medium I am most interested as a consumer. So, almost in women's media. I knew - left magazines because I was interested in online. TV was a detour. I thought the job was in front of me, the money was great. I thought why not give it a go. I knew that women were moving online because I was moving online and I'm very mainstream in my tastes. I used the redundancy I negotiated with Nine to start a blog. I didn't know what it was going to be, although I knew what it wasn't going to be. It wasn't going to be a blog about me, it wasn't going to be a blog just about one thing, like - sounds funny, but back in those times, the mid-2000s, the only sites for women was themed - fashion, gossip, parenting and cooking sites. I was interested in all of them - except maybe cooking - but also in other things. I was interested in them a you would at once. I wanted something that resembles or us in feed - light and shade, high and low, you know, everything from politics to pelvic floors.One of the interest things I noticed as you talk about the early year days is most content makers have a love/hat relationship with commentators. You did something interesting. You hired them.I did! Back then it was different. It was before social media took off, back when Twitter was a nice place.The good old days!Remember those?I don't - it is a hazy memory.The community side was a huge part of it. That is why I was drawn to the internet. I was so tired of putting out stories in this broadcast way, through print or through TV, I wanted it to be the start of a conversation, not just a speech. So, the comments were crucial. The idea that I also knew that as a woman I wanted to be talking back to my media. So, I knew that there were other people who felt the same way. It was a little bit like the Cheers Bar where everyone knew your name. It was a lovely time. It was an important time in the growth of mamma Mia. I had to make the painful decision to keep growing, which upset a lot of those people, and - who didn't want the little bar to become a huge pub.Yes.And so - yeah. That was a part of the process of the evolution. And I guess as it has been indexed to women, it has had a number of incar nations. At that time it was community-base and commentators were a central base. One of the thing I have noticed - because I am dumb and click on everything - is there is a lot of stories about crime.I know! Something shocking and you hit on it because they are well-ring headlines. But that is a crime on the other side of the world that doesn't have a material effect to my life. I'm trying to work out how did that make the world better?It's a... Certainly mistreat of my husband when I would be getting submissions about someone's kid drowning in a backyard pool and it was the most heart-wrenching story and I would start reading it to him and he would put his hands out to stop my worths and say, "Stop. I don't want to know. It is just upsetting me." I would never understand that, because these are the kind of stories that women share compulsively among each other. I have since come to understand it is like we're biological programmed to consume and share this information to ensure the survival of our tribe. While the men were off hunting, we were sharing information like those berries - don't eat those, they will kill you. Or that leaf - don't wipe with that, lit give you a rush. Women, when they feel a strong emotion, they are very likely to share a piece of content because we are sort of programmed to try to learn from it. So, by sharing this story of the little baby that drowned in the pool, I will hopefully make you think about closing the fence and, you know, giving your kid swimming lessons, and I will hopefully help protect everyone else. It is that kind of paying it forward idea by sharing information, even if it is upsetting information.When have you betrayed your principles for clicks?Early. Audiences will always push back. Early on I had a picture that was available of Britney Spears, not a good time in her life, she was getting out of a car. You could see her tampon string. And I knew that it was not a good thing to pub learn. An awful thing to publish. I knew it was going to get clicks. At that stage it was just me. I put it up. Immediately I got massive pushback. I went - everyone called me out. And I went, "You are right - I'm taking it down." Because we have a big team, everyone sense checks each other. I think that is a big mistake to try to manipulate your audience with click bait, which is different to a good headline. A good headline isn't the same...What is the difference?Click bait is its explicit forms is, "I just did an interview with Marc Fennell. You won't believe what he asked me."I am going to name this episode that! (LAUGHTER)
Exactly. A good headline would be, "Marc Fennell asked me some really tough questions in the interview." See the difference?Yeah.One is just true, leads me to read the story, and because we have got software that enables us to see where someone stops reading, if you have done click bait you will get a how bins rate. They will be pissed off. You will see that because they will get to the administrator and go, "Ugh." Also people - I do it people - I will not give something my click if it is manipulating me. "Guess what? Or, "You won't believe what happened next."There there is a 30 minute conversation on the Download This Show pod past. See you there. Thank you. 2012...Yes.The tiny town of Girgarre in Voight -- Victoria's Goulburn Valley suffered a blow when the hugest employer shut up shop.The community realised it had to find a new way to survive. Peter Lusted went to find out how Girgarre turned itself around.At first glins Girgarre looks like -- glance Girgarre looks like just another country town. It doesn't have a pub, and the supermarket butcher and cafe have all been closed for years.It changed a bit? It certainly has!Many of the region's dairy farmers sole up and left in the early 2000s due to drought. Things got worse 10 years later when Girgarre's main employer, Heinz, announced it was shutting the sauce factory, taking with it 146 jobs.It's the end of an re.With the town facing a dire future, the locals needed to act.Our toot was we needed -- attitude was we needed to change.An idea to start a farmer's market was initially ridiculed.Morning.The first market was only small, but it has grown steady from six stalls to 150. On its best days welcomes up to 2,500 vistors.Look at the baby chicks! The chook action is used to fund the upkeep of the local football, tennis and netball facilities.Probably easily generate 50 or $60,000.Other stalls fund the Country Fire Authority, the RSL and a community car for medical appointments. Girgarre suffered another blow when its kindergarten was closed by the local council. There were concerns the primary school would be next, and it would be all over for the town.If you take the school out of a town and suddenly the town becomes an old town.But using money raised at the markets, Girgarre kept the kindergarten open for six months, until another provider was found. (MUSIC PLAYS)The success of the markets led Girgarre to the next idea - a music festival for people who have never played an instrument. We have grown now to probably 8 or 900 people coming through the workshops.Girgarre believes it created a template for other towns facing extinction to turn their luck around.What they have to do is search for the ideas that can help empower their own communities. Because nothing's impossible. We've found that one out.It is extraordinary!It is a great story. Absolutely. What next for Girgarre? Watch this space! Taking young people out, losing the young population, a town will die, won't it? They have managed to avoid that. To fund a kind Garrettn't foresix months -- kind garten from the -- kindergarten from the markets is extraordinary!Lucrative TV rights are the cash cows which keep sport alive. Seven and Nine pay around a billion dollars each for two big codes.Network Ten has the Big Bash for now but the huge loss unveiled this week cast doubts on whether it can win any future bidding war with Nine. It is dreadful time for Cricket Australia, which is negotiating new TV deals for all forms of the gameFinch goes big! He goes massive.With its big hits and non-stop action, all crammed into three hours, the Big Bash has filled stadiums and grabbed television eyeballs all around the country. It is cup of Ten's few bright spots, but the Big Bash presents a big conundrum far a ferk that just lost $230 million.They are making 20 to $30 million. They don't get it the next time or they will have to pay a price where they can't afford it.18 months ago Seven committed for than $1 billion to keep AFL at the same time as Nine was agreeing a similar amount with the NRL. Sports rights have been going through the roof in an environment where the earnings of the commercial television networks are falling.The problem with sport is it's a loss leader for all the networks. They do not make profit. Whether is why investment bank UBS is urging Nine to ditch test cricket and the $30 million a year of losses. All the cameras, as well a Spidercam Snicko, don't come cheap. The um peer's call...Nine is unlikely to head that advice, but it adds up to financial pressure on Cricket Australia at a time when the TV contracts for all three forms of the game are up for grabs.They will come out of this rights deal probably the same - a lower number for test and ODI, but a significant increase for Big Bash.While the next rights contracts almost certainly will not deliver a huge pot of goal, Cricket Australia is in a fortunate position that other sports are not. In cricket-made India television companies pay big money to show matches from Australia.An average game of cricket watched on television, they will get 60 to 80 million viewers. The rights fee that Cricket Australia will earn out of India will be 50% greater than what they earn out of Australia. In the mark of $150 million or thereabouts. While Cricket Australia will be the first of the major sports to have to embrace the new straightened times in fair-to-air television, fans to will have to get used to change. The Big Bash is unlikely to stay on Ten, and there could be less cricket on free-to-air as the internet continues to disrupt the TV world.I can predict that Fox Sports, through Fox temperature, will be a -- Foxtel, will be a bidder, alongside a free-to-air network, and it also could be possible that Optus, who have got a strategic relationship for streaming with Cricket Australia, they could also broadcast Big Bash League games as well.Which will be more evidence that the free-to-air television landscape is in a Spain. Let's talk a bit more about this. Georgie joins us with sport. I guess there is a question - there is so much sport around at the moment, certainly on TV, are there enough dollars in the mix as well? That's the issue right now. Especially you see the growth of the shorter forms of the game. It isn't just the traditionalal aspects. We have the different leagues, the women's leagues, and also competing with the men's league. Then you add to that that - the spectacle of sport on television, it has risen. There is an audience. In terms of dollars, what does that mean for people at the game? Crowds are turning to TV.I think it is a question of economies of scale too. Given Australia is still a small population relatively, 24 million, you compare it with the United States, it has fewer professional sports.Yes.On that grand scale, with a population of, you know, 300 plus.Much great earth pay packets! Yes! Much greater. I mean, the Cricket Australia issue is one that is going to continue on for the next couple of weeks. But the decision of whether - for the Players Association to actually rescind what Cricket Australia was offering in terms of their payment ripghts and their -- rights and their part of that, or what they might be able to take away in term of that is players salary is something we haven't seen before. The cricketers, I think it is something they are trying to figure out.You spoke about crowds. And the Friday night crowds were there to support on the GWS last night in Canberra. They rallied to take the Bulldogs...Although, on that point, there has been criticism that the game was held in Canberra because it's a small ground, it's not - not...Doesn't matter! Still their first Friday night game.Why in Canberra?? Keep Canberra a go. It is a small over. It would have been packed a the showgrounds. That ground - the showgrounds is only 21,000. The last time the two teams met it was absolutely packed! It was something - it was cold last night as well!Canberra is part of Western Sydney, isn't it?Yes. (LAUGHS) Yes, it was! A great spectacle for them to see last night. This wasn't so great for GWS fans. Toby Greene getting in trouble with the umpires, once again, reported straight away on the field for striking Caleb Daniel. He was left bloody and had to leave the pitch after the incident. It comes after Toby Greene escaped suspension last week for his headbutt on Isaac Heeney. It wasn't - Toby Greene is getting the attention of the umpires. I think he will be out for couple of weeks. It was a good performance if the Giants. We can see there just how excited they were by their very first match honour Friday night. It is something if they keep playing footy like that, we might continue to see as well. They were able to get the better of the Western Bulldogs, though, after that prelim loss. The tragic prelim loss for Giants fan - only two points separating it. The forward line for the Giants is standing strong. Toby Greene three goals, at the top of the dolman med -- Coleman Medal Stannings. They -- standings. The Bulldogs are still good - they really should have capitalised more on the chances they had. They had a strong second term, but weren't able to carry that on into the rest of the game and convert it in terms of goals. They had more behinds than the Giants. But the Giants are happy One of those weeks you pencil in at the start of the year. A spitting image of the prelim. Just showed that we learnt from mistakes made last year, our structure held up. It is my first Friday night. Amazing. So proud of the guys that we got the win in the first Friday night game. A great feeling, mate.The general standing tall!Yes. Literally! (LAUGHTER) Figuratively there. Two wig bins in the NRL -- big wins in the NRL. Melbourne over the Bunny. Parramatta too good for the Cowboys.What Cowboys fans aren't wanting to hear - they have yet another injury to their toll. They were hopeful that Johnathan Thurston might be able to spark a resurgence. The Cowboys have been out of form since he's been out. He was expected to play. A late scratching. There was a flare of the injury. It cost the Cowboys. They were just out of sorts in terms of their attack. When you say - not only missing Thursday Thursday, but also Coote and Granville. Putting points on the point isn't their strong point right now. Then Gavin Cooper went down with a shoulder injury. He is the stand in skipper. It continues to mount. The Eels were good - 26-6 winners. So were the Sea Eagles. They were dominate! Dylan Walker - he has just signed himself up for a New South Wales jerg -- jersey. He was spectacular. Akuila Uate got four tries. The Sea Eagles are proving they have bought well. Akuila Uate, Hastings, and Tom Trbojevic, the superstars, with his brother Jake. The Bunnies three straight losses. They are in all kinds of trouble. Their coach said they have to have a really long look at themselves because that performance wasn't good enough. 46-8.We are out of time. Talk Maria Sharapova's comeback when we talk to you next hour. Thank you. Coming up in the next hour:We will be joined by Headspace school support manager Kristen Douglas to discuss the controversial TV series 13 Reasons Why. We will have that and the rest of the day's news. Please stay wuss. -- with us

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The US Secretary of State calls for action as North Korea conducts another ballistic missile test. Diplomatic and financial power will be backed up by a willingness to counteract North Korean aggression with military action.The Government takes aim at university students in the upcoming Budget. Police in the UK foil an active terrorism plot after carrying out a raid on a house in London. Greater Western Sydney get their revenge on the Bulldogs beating the premiers by just two points.Good morning. I'm Andrew Geoghegan.I'm Kathryn Robinson. You're watching Weekend Breakfast.

Thanks for joining us.Thanks for your company.Coming up this hour, we are going to go into space.We are - not literally. We are going to bring you some pictures from space! Saturn in particular. This amazing mission by the Cassini spacecraft which has been in space for about 20 years, took seven years to get to Saturn. It's now in the last phases of its deadly mission. It will crash and burn eventually.Some would say its most important phase where it is beaming back all the images and data.It is diving between the planet Saturn and its innermost rings which is quite perilous. Cassini transmitted these photos, capturing new details of the planet's atmosphere. The probe will repeat the dive another 21 times, one per week, until the mission ends spectacularly in September. Dr Morris Jones will take us through the photos from Cassini later this hour.Some of the images are animated but they have sent back some grainy black and white vision which is yet to be fully processed. One showing a giant hurricane on I think it was the North Pole of Saturn. I don't know how big it is but it is huge! You can only imagine what's going down there on the surface.They are also very interested in its moon.Enceladus. Which could possibly have life on it. We will talk that later this hour. Let's see how the weather is looking here on earth, or at least around Australia:

North Korea has test fired a ballistic missile after the US Secretary of State called on the world community to drastically increase pressure on Pyongyang to curb its nuclear ambitions. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called for sanctions to be fully enforced and for diplomatic relations to be suspended or reduced in a bid to heap more pressure on North Korea. He warned the United States will sanction nations and individuals supporting the regime and urged the world to act before North Korea's nuclear reach extends further. China called for all parties to remain calm and exercise restraint and avoid provocative rhetoric or actions that would lead to miscalculation.The threat of a North Korean nuclear attack on Seoul or Tokyo is real. It is likely only a matter of time before North Korea develops the capability to strike the US mainland. Indeed, the DPRK has repeatedly claimed it plans to conduct such a strike. Given that rhetoric, the United States cannot idly stand by. Nor can other members of this Council who are within striking distance of North Korean missiles. University students could soon be hit with increased fees in a revamp of the Abbott Government's higher education package to be included in the Budget. The Australian newspaper reports the broad outline of the new funding formula which could see student fees rising by a minimum of 25% and it will be unveiled to vice chancellors on Monday. The plan will increase the amount of cost borne by students from the current 40 % and require repayments of higher education loans earlier. The Education Minister is expected to defend the proposed changes following the announcement early in week. Police say they've intercepted an active terrorism plot after a woman was shot during an armed raid on a house in North London. The senior national coordinator for counter-terrorism policing confirmed six people were arrested in the operation. Authorities are still hunting for suspects connected to the plot but police believe they've contained the threat. The 21-year-old woman who was shot during the raid is in a serious but stable condition. A terrorist suspect arrested near Britain's Houses of Parliament has been identified. Mohamed Khalid Omar Ali was stopped in Whitehall in the middle of the government district by police acting on a tip-off. The 27-year-old is a British national born overseas who was known to police and the security services. He has been held on suspicion of possession of an offensive weapon and preparing for acts of terrorism. The French far right party, the National Front, has replaced the man chosen to lead it while Marine Le Pen contests the presidential election. It comes amid allegations that Jean-Francois Jalkh denied the Holocaust. Mr Jalkh gave an interview with an academic 17 years ago in which he allegedly questioned whether the Nazis had used cyanide-based pesticide in the gas chambers. He is taking legal action but an official says Mr Jalkh will no longer occupy the post due to the current climate. In Germany, airlines are dropping safety rules brought in after the 2015 Germanwings plane crash which require two people in the cockpit at all times. Co-pilot Andreas Lubitz killed 150 people by crashing the plane, apparently on purpose, after the captain left to use the toilet. Airlines now say the two-person rule has no safety benefits. Eurowings, which merged with Germanwings, is one of the airlines now dropping the requirement. Pope Francis is visiting Egypt in the aftermath of bomb attacks that have killed dozens of Christians. The Pope went straight to a meeting with the Egyptian president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi after landing in Cairo. His trip is aimed at improving ties between Muslims and Roman Catholics. Speaking at a leading University of Sunni Islamic learning, he urged the leaders of all faith to renounce violence carried out in the name of religion. TRANSLATION: God, the lover of life, never ceases to love man and so he exhorts us to reject the way of violence as the necessary condition for every earthly covenant. Violence is the negation of every authentic religious feeling. As religious leaders, we are duty bound to unmask the violence which purports to be carried out in the name of the sacred.Georgie joins us with the sport. An epic game in the nation's capital last night?Epic is the word. These two sides are making a habit. The rivalry goes from strength-to-strength. Another thrilling chapter written in Canberra between the Dogs and the Giants. This time the Giants picked up the bragging rights but they may be without one of their stars for a couple of weeks. The rematch in Canberra lived up to the hype. The reigning champs dominated the second quarter but could only manage a nine-point lead at the main break before goals from Jon Patton and Toby Greene proved crucial for victory. Greene was reported for striking Caleb Daniel. 75-73.After the game, we are all spent. Coming off a 6-day break, going into that, it was a great battle. They are the games we want to play in.Cowboys fans were buoyed by the return of Johnathan Thurston but he was a late scratching against the Eels. Thurs was forced to watch on helplessly from the sidelines as Parramatta outclassed the home side. Clint Gutherson grabbed a first half double. The Eels crossed four tries to one, 26-6 winners. The Cowboys slumped to their third loss in four matches. The Rabbitohs made it three straight losses. They were never in the hunt against Manly. Tom Trbojevic, Akila Uate and Dylan Walker running riot. 46-8. Maria Sharapova has continued her fine form at Stuttgart. Back from a 15-month doping ban, the Russian progressed to the semifinals eliminating Anett Kontaveit in straight sets 6-4, 6-3. Sharapova is yet to drop a set in her comeback tournament. Her controversial comeback tournament. She will take on Kristina Mladenovich in the next round. Andrew and Kath, as we know, Mladenovich has been very vocal in her criticism of Maria Sharapova being awarded those three wild cards to a couple of key tournaments, especially this one. She is going quite well in Stuttgart. If she makes the final, that's an automatic qualification for the French Open next month.It must be very tense in the locker rooms.Maybe separate lockers.A couple of years ago, Mladenovich and Sharapova were fast friends. All kinds of videos of them having fun on the tennis court. Maybe not so much next match. Thanks, Georgie Tunny. Thanks for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come, North Korea has conducted another missile test. Our US correspondent Zoe Daniel will have reaction from Washington.Also ahead, UK authorities have foiled a terrorist plot following raids in London. An update on that and the ongoing investigation.Later, it is the controversial television show that has teenagers hooked but is it causing more harm than good? The national manager of Headspace School Support, Kirsten Douglas, joins us to discuss Netflix's series 13 Reasons Why.North Korea has again provoked the United States by conducting another ballistic missile test hours after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson urged the world to increase pressure on the regime to avoid a catastrophic outcome. Details are still coming in but the White House has confirmed it is aware of the test and the President has been briefed. Zoe Daniel has more from Washington.As we understand it, this is what's called a KN-17 intermediate range ballistic missile. It was not nuclear-armed but it is one of nine tests that North Korea has conducted in the first 99 days of Donald Trump's presidency. As we understand it, much of this reporting is coming from South Korean news agencies with some information from US officials, but as we understand it, this test happened at around 5:30 local time in North Korea from the north-east of Pyongyang. The direction of the ballistic missile was to the north-east so towards the Sea of Japan. We are told, though, by US officials that this was a failed test, that the missile broke up soon after launch. But it is somewhat cheeky, particularly in the face of comments made both by President Donald Trump yesterday that there was the chance of major conflict with North Korea and that coupled with the appearance of the Secretary of State Rex Tillerson at the UN today, his first appearance there, where he told the world, essentially, to start squeezing North Korea, to adhere to financial sanctions, to wind back diplomacy, saying that that is the only option, that otherwise North Korea will continue to ramp up its nuclear program with potentially catastrophic consequences. Let's take a look at what the Secretary of State had to say.Policy of strategic patience is over. Additional patience will only mean acceptance of a nuclear North Korea. The more we bide our time, the sooner we will run out of it. In light of the growing threat, the time has come for all of us to put new pressure on North Korea to abandon its dangerous path. I urge this Council to act before North Korea does.Zoe, the Trump Administration has been very vocal about wanting a diplomatic resolution to this, asking China, if you like, to do a lot of the heavy lifting. Is that likely to change in light of the last hour?Hard to say. I think the fact that this is not a nuclear missile test and, of course, there is still the possibility that will happen at some point near in the future but it's North Korea effectively testing the boundaries with the United States and just what Donald Trump's Administration is prepared to tolerate. Certainly the pressure is on the Chinese and there was a little bit of push-back from them today at the United Nations where they effectively said, well, this is not only on us. Yes, we are the key ally of North Korea and, in fact, China and North Korea's trade is about 90% of trade into North Korea but, that said, China saying everyone has to participate. Also suggesting, not too subtly, that the US needs to wind back the rhetoric, that there needs to be measured tones in the language that is used to avoid something happening, a reaction from either side, if you like, in response to language of the other that could lead to actions that indeed, as Rex Tillerson said, are catastrophic.Zoe Daniel there. The US President Donald Trump is marking the first 100 days of his Administration. During his campaign, he promised to overhaul free trade deals and protect American jobs in this time.So, how has President Trump measured up? ABC US affairs analyst Sara James says it is clear Donald Trump under-estimated how hard the job would be.What happens always for presidents is they come in with their to-do list, even a maverick like President Trump, and then events happen and the reality is that things are never really stable. The world is always moving, things are always taking place, and countries around the world don't simply wait for any US President to get their sea legs, things just happen. So always there is the potential for action to occur but the reality is, I think, as we have heard from the President himself, things are a little bit trickier than he imagined. Have a listen to what he said in a recent interview with Reuters.This is more work than in my previous life. I thought it would be easier. I thought it was more of a - I'm a details-oriented person, I think you would say that, but I do miss my old life. I like to work so that's not a problem but this is actually more work.Donald Trump, when he was campaigning during the election, indicated perhaps that he would be more isolationist, that America would be more isolationist. Do you think what he has done so far, obviously his involvement in Syria, Afghanistan, North Korea, that perhaps he is disappointing his core base there? You are right about that. He is certainly going in a different direction from what he had signalled to the people who are his core voters. The reality is that, right now, he seems to be able to make a case for them. Hell does this direct -- he does this directly through his Twitter feed, among other ways. I think what he has said to them is these are, from his perspective, strategic, independent, individual decisions. For example, if you look at what happened in Syria, to use that example, there was the tomahawk cruise missile strike and then it's been quiet. I think for his base, and that base is really interested in what's happening in the United States, in getting jobs, going back to work, many of them are also interested in that wall that he has talked about, they're not as interested in some of these other world events but I think they are willing to give him latitude. It's message and messenger. They voted for him. All the polls show they are sticking by him and so far that's holding solid.You were talking of jobs there, obviously that's critical, certainly in some of the Rust belt States, also States such as West Virginia which is heavily reliant on coal to employ people. Under the Obama Administration, he cut a lot of the jobs there because he wanted to clean up the industry. Donald Trump promising those jobs will come back, and some of them have.It is no mistake that the rally that he is holding is in western Pennsylvania. I know that part of the country and it's coal country. These are the people who voted for him, who remain wildly enthusiastic about him. What you see in the United States right now is really a quite polarised country. His poll numbers overall are pretty dismal. We are talking historic lows. But his base, to steal the words from Magan Trainor, it is all about the base. That's his core group of people, that's who he is talking to. He is rallying around them and for them and he is hoping to deliver for them while many other Americans are frustrated and wishing they had a different President. That's Sara James.

There have been more dramatic counter-terrorism arrests in London. Police say they foiled an active plot in the north-west of the British capital, shooting and seriously injuring a woman in the process. Here is Europe correspondent James Glenday. About 7 o'clock in the evening, heavily-armed police began their raid. Gas canisters were fired through windows and those nearby ducked for cover.I ran to my partner in the kitchen, I was like "Quick, there is armed officers outside". At that point we heard another bang.Officers trained their weapons on the house. Once it was over, six people had been arrested and a 21-year-old woman had been shot. Police say they swooped to stop an active terrorist plot.The armed entry was necessary due to the nature of the intelligence we were dealing with and involved armed officers firing CS gas into the address. During the course of that operation, one of the subjects, a woman, was shot by police. She remains in hospital.The raid came just hours after an unrelated terrorism arrest near the Prime Minister's house in Central London. British national Mohamed Khalid Omar Ali was detained after a tip-off from a family member. A backpack with knives was taken from the scene.What you have seen today, and yesterday, is police preventing a terrorist attack. That's really important because when a person gets to the point of blowing themselves up or shooting people, it's too late.These arrests have brought back memories of the recent attack in Westminster that claimed five lives but police are hailing these two new operations as a major success and say they've now contained all current threats to the UK. The Netflix series 13 Reasons Why is a hit with teens across the country. However, the content is causing concern amongst parents, schools and young people as it centres on a young woman who suicides. Kirsten Douglas is the national manager of Headspace School Support and she joins us from Melbourne now. Good morning, thanks for your time today. Good morning, Kath, how are you?I'm very well, thank you. 13 Reasons Why deals with very confronting issues, it is very graphic, it's very human. Your organisation has labelled this series as seriously dangerous. What are your concerns with it?Well, about a month ago, the show started airing in Australia and we certainly watched a slow and steady rising concern from parents and school and even young people saying they were quite distressed by the content. We had a look at the content. By all respects, it is quite dangerous in terms of the way it depicts suicide. It is quite graphic in its depiction in the method of how she dies but the glamourising and glorifying and almost the romanticising of suicide is quite dangerous. We know that evidence shows kids might connect with this and it may create a lot of harm in community.If kids are connecting with this, which they seemingly are here in Australia, it's out there for them to see, what do you advocate and advise them and their parents to do? If they are going to watch it, should they sit down with their parents so it at least creates a discussion about the topic of suicide?There has been huge debate in the last couple of weeks. I know New Zealand has changed the age restriction on it up to 18. We have got 15. America and Australia mental health services have been saying there is a load of warnings that should go with this. I know young people on social media, Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, are saying "Watch this, isn't it great". People are saying it is great we are talking about youth suicide. We don't want to stop the conversation about youth suicide and mental health difficulties. We say depicting it in the way it is can create further risks. We have had young people saying this is triggering their vulnerabilities. They are talking their suicidal thinking and feelings and we are worried it may stem vulnerability moving forward. We know it is a No.1 show for Netflix so the exposure is high but we are worried about suicide contagion which is most prevalent for young people and it is absolutely aimed at teens. We have primary schools contacting us saying "We need to help parents talk about this". Parents need to be prepared, if young people have seen it, to open up the conversation, ask them how distressing it was for them, turn the message to help-seeking as opposed to the suicide content.How better should advocates like yourself, who want to start the conversation about suicide in a sensible manner, how should they capture teens' imaginations?This is so popular because it is very graphic, it pushes the boundaries, it's very entertaining. So I think we need to be cautious about what is able to be seen in terms of suicide. It's different to other graphic imagery. Suicide can create quite a bit of disturbance for viewers and what we are seeing is particular method and mean and showing those particular details is very, very dangerous for young people. We also know that the exposure is high across Australia so we are trying to have some public commentary. We are trying to make sure people understand if they are distressed to go and see someone, get some help, to reach out and have a conversation about it.Do you think part of the problem is, given the audience is teens, perhaps they aren't in a position to analyse it as what adults might, Hannah the lead in it, who suicides at the end, she seems to have a very strong voice and a free voice in her death and I guess that speaks to the romanticising of the notion of doing this?It also gives this unreal perception that, after death, after you suicide, you get to see the reactions of people and you get to send a message, you get to see how many likes and shares and who comes to your funeral. That's a very unreal thing. For a lot of young people, children especially don't understand the finality of death. Once you have died by suicide, you've died. So we are trying to say this depiction is not very real. We want parents to be able to use the latest evidence and to be saying well-informed things. The writer came out recently and said "The reason I made it so graphic is I want people not to suicide. I want people to see the hideousness of the act". But we know that's not an effective suicide prevention strategy.It is important to note that the Netflix producers and directors et cetera did create this series in conjunction with specialists so you would think their intentions were right but some of the criticism is also aimed at that it is packaged up neatly in a linear form whereas suicide, as we know, is multifaceted.It is. In some ways it simplifies a complex thing. You watch the journey with Hannar and her friends, it is engrossing and you have to follow it through from the end. For parents, they are not sure what's going to happen with the title. Even for kids, you don't know what's going to happen until you have seen it. Once you see it, you can't unsee it. We are worried about how many young people have seen it. There has been commentary from parents and schools saying kids feel pressured to see it because all their friends are talking about it and they need to feel part of the conversation. If they are going to watch it, be prepared. We are not trying to slam the show or Netflix, we are trying to say there are more helpful ways to have the conversation. We have all been to school, had some sense of bullying or being a part of an act of bullying or a part of school life. We can connect with it. It is very engrossing. We are concerned with people connecting with it so much they think it is an option for them. Particularly that final scene is one of the most graphic and horrifying scenes I have ever seen. Should it be banned?I don't know about banning. We have an organisation called Mind Frame in Australia. We have quite healthy ways of reporting suicide. We are quite protected as Australian viewers but we have a lot of platforms like Netflix that are international platforms that don't necessarily have the same warnings. We need to be savvier as viewers and parents to make sure if they are seeing something distressing, have the ability to have a conversation. Make the observation "I have noticed you are not going so well". A lot have said after viewing this, they felt quite a significant mood change. That's adults I have been talking to so I can't imagine what young people might feel after viewing it.Kirsten Douglas, national manager of Headspace School Support, many thanks for that discussion this morning.Thanks, Kath.If you need information or support, you can contact Beyond Blue:

Tropical Cyclone Frances is causing gusty showers in the northern Kimberly. Brisk south-westerly winds are causing light coastal showers in the south-east. A high in the south is allowing mostly clear skies and a cool morning to much of southern and central Australia. Around the country:

These are the top stories on ABC News - North Korea has test fired a ballistic missile from a region north of the capital, defying intense pressure from the United States. The Yonhap news agency says the missile appears to have blown up a few seconds after take-off. The latest test comes after the US Secretary of State used a special meeting of the United Nations to call for more pressure to be placed on North Korea. Rex Tillerson urged the international community to suspend or downgrade diplomatic relations with Pyongyang. British police have foiled an active terrorism plot after a woman was shot during an armed raid on a house in north London. Six people were arrested during the operation with police saying the threat is now contained. A man and a woman in New South Wales have been charged for allegedly staging a car crash to claim money back on insurance. Police have charged the couple with five fraud-related offences as part of investigations into syndicates scamming the compulsory third party insurance scheme. The pair was arrested during a raid of a Merrylands home in Sydney's west yesterday and are due to face court next month. The Giants have come from behind to defeat the Western Bulldogs in Canberra. The Giants were down 11 points in the fourth quarter but kicked three of the last four goals to secure a 2-point victory. Reforming the gas sector, securing the nation's energy and security and a look ahead to next month's Federal Budget. Some of the issues on the news agenda this week. Let's get more on this. We are joined by public policy consultant Terry Barnes. From Canberra, managing director Hawker Britton, Simon Banks. Welcome to both of you. Terry, the solution to the gas crisis, this should have been a win for the Government, saying there is a crisis there, we are going to do something about it as far as prices are concerned. Somehow along the line the message got mangled. Hang on, a price is going to be halved, no, it's not. Who is the winner?It is a classic case of politicians need to think about what they are saying before they say it. If we could harness the hot air over Parliament House, we could solve our energy problems all together. (LAUGHS)Clearly the Government has decided to intervene in the domestic gas market to ensure sufficient supply to Australian households and businesses. However, the way the Prime Minister tried to explain it yesterday, first saying it could lead to halving the price, then backtracking and covering himself, I guess, just made it a bit more uncertain for people. We are dealing with bandaid measures rather than looking at a comprehensive second look at the whole sector so that we are looking more than this winter, we are looking way, way ahead and we are not.Simon, we will bring you in here, that has been part of the problem, this is a short-term fix. Did you see this as policy on the run?Unfortunately, you can only come to that conclusion. The Prime Minister gave a major speech here in Canberra at the National Press Club in January outlining his political priorities for the year. He had energy firmly on the equation. Mainly, of course, attacking renewables. Did say we did need some extra domestic gas production but didn't talk at all about this crisis of supply in the manufacturing market. That was literally a few months ago. Yet it has blown up into a crisis. Anyone who has been following the debate about gas supply into the manufacturing sector has known this has been coming for some time. Labor, for example, had a policy it took to the last election to try and deal with this. The consequence the crisis has been allowed to be mature and then have to be addressed. It's meant the Government's intervention is probably far more dramatic than it needed to be than if it acted, say, for example, 12 months ago. Inevitably, it had to act. As Terry rightly pointed out, they have mangled the sales job on their solution.Terry, do you think the Government has been far too late on this?No, I actually don't. The problem, though, is the industry itself I think didn't take the Government and the Prime Minister and Josh Frydenberg, the Energy Minister's warning seriously enough when they first tried to crack heads a couple of months ago. Now that the Government has stepped in, there is confusion about where to go from here. Again, I think it comes down to the fact we do have energy security issues, we do have price issues, and we also have demand issues. One of the things we aren't looking at, which I think we need to, is when we are planning ahead, how do we assess what we need to provide energy for? What sort of demand are we looking at, not just in household, businesses and industry now but what's needed in 10, 20 years' time?The public sees Australia has an abundance of natural gas, how can we possibly have a supply problem?Exactly right. The problem is that the attractions of the overseas market in terms of selling that gas are very tempting. We have to ensure that we have sufficient at home to make our homes and businesses work, particularly in the next year or so. Where to from here? To fix the problem, Simon, I might pose this to you, as well as gain political capital, does it boil down to lifting the State restrictions on exploration and development?That might solve part of the problem. I actually just think there is more gas exploration and development going on in the Australian domestic market and I think now the players know that Government is serious about ensuring that there is a supply into the Australian market as well, I'm sure they will treat that far more seriously. I actually think this has overwhelmingly been a relatively short mismatch between supply and demand in the market. As Terry said, a number of the gas companies were very aggressive on pursuing the export markets and locking in very long-term contracts. They were as much surprised by how much the mismatches occurred. Even though it has been evident in the market since 2014 this mismatch was starting to take place. That's why I say if the Government had maybe done a few more light touch things earlier in this debate, we wouldn't have got to the crisis point. I think we will get through it over the course of the next couple of years and go back to a more regular market situation. Nonetheless, we were facing imminent shortages we were going to see manufacturing plants, particularly in the western suburbs of Sydney, literally shut down this winter because they couldn't get gas at an affordable price.Part of the problem here is - I think Simon alluded to it - is exploration. Being able to discover and unlock the resources that are available we aren't tapping at the moment. The reason for that is particularly the environmental lobby resisting any moves in, say, coal seam gas fraccing, for instance. If we are going to take these sort of steps in the domestic market from the supply side, we need to look at the whole picture including the ability of miners and providers to explore new resources.That lobby is very powerful, that greeny lobby. Indeed it is as we have seen with Westpac and the Adani coal project. That'sThat's another issue. Gas is one element. We saw the CSIRO has come up with what it thinks is a road map by 2050. We could be completely weaned off coal but it is important to note that they are saying it does need to be a price on carbon.That's right. It doesn't matter whether you are a current market operator, an investor, whether you are a major user. There is almost universal agreement amongst anyone who is actually involved in this industry now that we need some form of a market mechanism. We need to actually fuse our energy and climate change policies together. The one that there seems to be the greatest consensus around is a emissions intensity scheme. The Labor Party has indicated it is prepared to support that. The Government has the support in within the industry, within the sector, within the Parliament if it wants to get this change done but, for ideological reasons, this is the only solution to this problem that the current Government is not prepared to examine. It's really because of the internal politics of the Coalition, not because what's good policy, what's in Australia's national interest. We know that if you actually get this policy mix right, all the evidence is that this will make sure we have got a reliable energy supply at the lowest possible prices so it actually hits all of the criteria you would want from a successful energy and climate change policy but, for some reason, this Government just can't bring itself to consider it.Terry, how do you think the Prime Minister needs to handle this report? Obviously it's highly sensitive politically. He and the Energy Minister not long ago were at odds on the Emissions Trading Scheme - intensity scheme. From my side of politics, another carbon tax or Emissions Trading Scheme, whatever you want to call it, is just not on. Simon is right about that. In terms of the policy but also in terms of the effect of emissions trading on the prices you and I pay for our energy. It is important that we ensure that - taking steps with gas to make sure that supplies are adequate and affordable, that we do that across the board. Look, I think the other side of this is that report is good. I guess it's anticipating advances particularly in terms of storage of renewable power and battery technology and so forth. It is anticipated but at this stage it is not concrete. I think, personally, it's a wrong way of going about it to say "This is wonderful, let's go down this track" but shut down any discussion about using existing and abundant fossil resources including coal and gas.You two are very excited because the Budget is upon us! (LAUGHS) We always talk winners and losers. Simon today in The Australian they are talking university students could be the latest losers. What do you make of this report they'll cop it, they haven't had a price increase for a while in fees?The Government went to the 2013 election saying they weren't going to change the funding arrangements around University. They of course broke that promise in the 2014 Budget. They didn't have a higher education policy they were prepared to tell the Australian people about at the election last year. Now we hear that students are going to have to pay 25% more or thereabouts to go to university. There has been no kind of broad discussion in the community about what's the appropriate contribution that students can make, how do we set this, what are the factors we use to do that? The Government has made this decision intern ideally itself. We are having a number of other important debates at the moment. A debate in the context of 457 visas about skills shortages yet we are going to make it harder for Australians to acquire skills. That seems crazy to me. We are having a discussion about housing affordability and we are about to lump extra debt on students and make it harder to get into their first home. This is a government that pursues these policy ideas more for ideological purposes rather than carefully thinking about the full ramifications of what they are doing or taking the community with them. You can expect a lot of anger in the community if it is as it is reported in the newspaper today. The Government literally made the decision yesterday to continue with the next $27 billion of their corporate tax cuts that would more than pay for a high-quality university education system, plus TAFE plus other things as well. This Government does have choices, it keeps making the wrong ones.This is the first Budget after an election. It is the time when you make the tough decisions. You actually make the tough and unpopular choices including what's reported in the papers today. It's when you actually try and set out a blueprint for the rest of the term economically and in terms of the Budget. I think it is actually important that the Government is looking for - keeps going with budget repair, basically. It is looking for savings, looking for efficiencies, it is not going to be able to please all the people all the time and it does what's right rather than what's popular.It is trying to appease the ratings agencies by saying there is good and bad debt. We will pursue good debt by nation building, infrastructure projects. Are the ratings agency going to buy that?It is a fair distinction to make. If you are using the borrowings wisely, particularly in terms of building national infrastructure, that's not a bad thing. At the end of the day, debt is still debt. It may change on the budget balance sheet and the way it is reported but we still have to pay it back to somebody at some stage and pay interest along the way. I do think the Government has to show a bit of courage, a bit of leadership, in terms of doing the tough decisions, taking a scalpel to its own actions and its own operations. That's never popular. Simon, what do you make of the good debt/bad debt change of reporting we will see from the Treasurer in May? I'm always up for a debate about the quality of debt and what our nation invests our money in. This is a government that got elected promising to reduce the debt. It is now $216 billion higher than what they got elected. It has gone up more than in the nearly four years it has been in power than it did under the six years of the previous Labor Government and, of course, Labor had to deal with the GFC, almost half of its increase in debt came from the collapse in tax revenues caused by the GFC. This is a government that's basically broken its promise when it comes to reducing debt to the Australian people. I'm glad we are having I guess the start of a more sensible discussion about how we use debt to leverage and finance things. The interesting thing is the very models they are using, things like the NBN model which earlier this week the Prime Minister was praising as a way to help fund the infrastructure of the future, four years ago, he criticised that model and called it dodgy accounting. I think this is, again, a sign of a government that's making it up as it goes along, covering for its political mess. It is pretty inept I've got to say, I think the Australian people can see through it.Terry, your wish list for the Budget?My wish list is actually something that you wouldn't expect from me in terms of health. That is I would like to see the Government make a decision to start phasing out the private health insurance rebate. The $6.5 billion a year and rising we are contributing to private health insurance. Because I think it's done its job. It saved the industry in the 2000s but now it's got to the point where it's a bit like low interest rates in a volatile - overheating housing market. It's making it more attractive to doctors and hospitals to get as much as they can out of it and that affects the premiums being subsidised anyway. I think the time has come to phase it out.I will sound like a broken record but the thing that will make Australia richer in the future is by investing in our physical and human capital. That's obviously roads, rail, ports, telecommunications networks but then it's us in terms of our education and our skills. They are the things that are going to guarantee Australians a bright future into the 21st century. I hope the Government re-orients its policy more in that direction. It looks like it may be going down that path in relation to infrastructure. I just regret that, in areas like health and education, they are disinvesting from those areas, making Australians less skilled, less able to compete in the global economy.Simon Banks and Terry Barnes, thanks very much. Pleasure.After 20 years in space, including seven years travelling to Saturn, scientists, space watchers and the curious were jubilant as NASA's Cassini spacecraft successfully dived between Saturn and its inner-most rings.Cassini was able to transmit photos capturing new details of the planet's atmosphere. The probe will repeat the dive another 21 times, that's one per week, until the mission ends in September. Dr Morris Jones is a space analyst and writer and says it's a precise operation. It is like they are playing chicken without a space and all the crud that floats around there. The mission isn't over yet but I'm wondering if it will last through all those 21 cycles.When you say the crud, as in the rings, rock and debris.The rings are natural space junk. Some as small as dust, some as large as pebbles. There is a lot of stuff out there. It falls into Saturn, we know that. Even though that whole area appears to be empty and fairly clean, it is not as empty as it appears.We received some of the first pictures back yesterday. What did it show you? These are pictures never beamed back before. We have never been this close to Saturn before. Result we are seeing spoils in the atmosphere that we have never seen before. Saturn is so big, has such a complex atmosphere, the whole physics of how its atmosphere works is very different from a smaller planet like earth.I should point out the pictures we are seeing at the moment are animated, these are not the real pictures. That is animating how it is going to to burn up in the atmosphere. Here are the pictures. What are they telling us? That's a hurricane. That's definitely a hurricane. We have seen even larger ones than that before but to see smaller swirls, cloud patterns and at the very top of the atmosphere, even though it is a big planet with a lot of gravity, the atmospheric pressure is similar to earth. How does that different combination of the size, the gravity, affect the way fluids behave because fluids are very flex things. We can't predict weather patterns on earth properly so imagine trying to work out what's happening on Saturn.This is a gas giant, unlike earth which is a rocky planet. SmileThat's right it is gas all the way down. Saturn as a whole is less dense than water. If you could get a giant bucket and put the planet there, it would float.Let's channel the inner optimist in ourselves and say that the next 20 dives are going to yield results and will be successful. What more can be learned on top of what we have just learnt in the last 24, 48 hours?The big deal is that every time they pass between Saturn and its rings, they are taking measurements on how Cassini gets nudged by the gravity of those rings. This gives you a way to work out the mass of the rings. You can see them. But because they are so thin and so broad and have so many different particles, if you are on the outside, you can't get an accurate measurement so they are getting the first measurements of the inner gravity and how that determines the mass of the ring.It is not reaching out and grabbing a piece of dust as it flies by the rings.No.It is using beams or microwaves to do this?It is a case of seeing how the gravity of the rings alters the course of Cassini is the way we predict, and they can make precise measurements of the exact position. Measuring how the spacecraft gets nudged is how they take that measurement.Dr Morris Jones. From the Rwandan conflict more than 20 years ago comes an unlikely story of inspiration.One child saw the work of Australian peacekeepers and decided he wanted to become a soldier. Now he is one of the Australian Army's newest recruits.Army recruits push hard to become graduates at Kapooka but Theogene Ngamije has strived harder than most. He is from war-torn Rwanda.I still can't believe it. This morning I was getting dressed and I was like "Is this real or is it just a dream? ". It's real but I still can't believe it.This soldier's motivation came from meeting an Australian peacekeeper in a Rwandan refugee camp in 1994. The Australian offered Private Ngamije a bis kat and an Australian -- biscuit and an Australian flag and, in doing so, became a life-long role model. But it took another 22 years for the refugee to resettle and then enlist in the Army.It goes to show what a simple gesture from that soldier can do do change someone's life. Now Ngamije has the opportunity to change more lives.The identity of the Australian peacekeeper is unknown but maybe not for long. The story is already being widely shared among veterans' groups and on social media. His family is celebrating.He is like the first Rwandan I know who has graduated, become a soldier in the Australian Army and he is my cousin so, yeah, very emotional experience and I'm very proud of him.I don't know if it's appropriate to say but I was feeling pumped. Yeah I've done it with my mates, it was just awesome.Private Ngamije will now join the Ordnance Corp and hopes to serve as a peacekeeper himself some day. Time to talk sport, Georgie joins us again. I'm liking the look of the AFL competition at the moment. There are some close match-ups here.Yes and there is a few wins for the Dockers on the board which I know you are happy about.(LAUGHS)The Western derby is coming up later on today. I know the people in the West get concerned about the pronunciation of the derby over there. We have a couple of other big games to preview and wrap up one of the biggest of the round. We have had the one match so far but it was a pretty good one. A thrilling chapter has been written in the growing Dogs/Giants rivalry. GWS picked up bragging right but they may be without one of their stars for a couple of weeks. ABC Grandstand commentator Matt Clinch joins us live. Thanks for being with us. You are in the commentary box for the games this weekend. Let's start with last night's performance. The Bulldogs/GWS are making a habit of the close ones? Good morning. Not often do the sequels live up to the prequel. But last night it was a thriller. Last night the Giants got their redemption in a two-point win. Six lead changes throughout the match. The biggest margin was only a couple of goals. Even all the way through to the last quarter, the match was still alive. The Giants burst out of the blocks. They led by six points at quarter time. The Bulldogs got on top in the second quarter and led by nine points at the main break. Marcus Bontempelli outstanding once more. He is so hard to contain. He was able to kick three goals. With a five-point lead at the three-quarter time break, the game was alive and the Giants stood up. Jeremy Cameron booted four goals. Toby Greene and Jon Patton kicked crucial goals in the last quarter which allowed the Giants to prevail. Greene grown was -- Toby Greene was reported for a strike on Caleb Daniel. The interesting part was the umpire said they have been closely monitoring him over the last couple of weeks. That will be discussed as to whether that's the right approach. Shane Mum ford with a big tackle on Tom Libertore. There was a 50m penalty where Woods effectively gave Jon Patton an easy goal. These things come into debate when the result is two points. This is a real rivalry after Giants were able to pinch some players. If that's a taste of what's to come when we reach September, these two will put up a great contest no doubt. There is no doubt about that. Toby Greene. His run-in again with the umpires and that altercation after rightfully getting cited for striking Caleb Daniel, it must be said. Is that something you have seen before, the umpires signalling him out and saying "Yeah, we are keeping an eye on you"?Not so much with an individual. Unusual for an umpire to make direct reference for previous weeks. You like to think each decision is judged on its merit. If they are taking a player on its previous record, I don't know if that's in the spirit of the game. Toby Greene flirts on the line, aggressive by nature. Unfortunately the spoil got Caleb Daniel high and as a result he will probably have a two-week suspension cut down to one week. Leon Cameron knows it is an issue. It is something he addresses with Toby Greene regularly.He is at the top of the Coleman Medal standings with Jeremy Cameron for now. At the end of Round 6, either Adelaide or Richmond will no longer be unbeaten in this clash. How do you see it panning out?It is a great contest. Josh Jenkins returns for the kros Talia is lining up. The Crows are hard to contain, especially at the Adelaide Oval. The Tigers are flying 5 and 0. You can feel it around Melbourne when Richmond are up and about. Their best start to a season since 1995. Plenty of Richmond fans will make the trek. Last week they trailed by 20 points at three-quarter time, they rattled home. This is a much tougher task. If Richmond can win, they are the real deal in 2017.They still have their doubters. Very quickly, you will be in the box for Sydney up against Carlton. How do you see this one going? Will the Swans finally get a win?They desperately need to. Only once have they failed to miss the finals in the last 15 years. At 0 and 5, their season would be over. John Longmire has had to blood six debutantes in five rounds. Carlton don't score much. The Blues struggle to kick more than 10 goals. This will be a tight contest at the MCG. There has been a bit of rain around Melbourne the last couple of days. It could go either way. Sydney have to get a win if they will keep their season alive.Another tight one. Matt, thanks for joining us, taking us through the action. Enjoy your time in the commentary box this weekend. Thanks.That game between the Bulldogs and the Giants, I love when those two teams play.Looking forward to the Tigers and the Crows. I reckon the Crows will be sitting pretty at the end of the round.I think so as well. We might be made to look foolish -We? I said nothing. Thanks, Georgie. Coming up in the next hour on Weekend Breakfast -We will look at Donald Trump's first 100 turbulent days in office. Stay with us for that and more news of the day.

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The US Secretary of State calls for action as North Korea conducts another missile test. Diplomatic and financial leverage of power will be backed up by willingness to counteract North Korean aggression with military action. Police in Britain foil an active terrorism plot after carrying out a raid on a house in London. Insurance fraud - a couple charged after allegedly staging a car crash in Sydney's west. And Greater Western Sydney get their revenge on the Western Bulldogs, beating the premiers by two points. Good morning, I'm Andrew Geoghegan. And I'm Kathryn Robinson. You're watching Weekend Breakfast.

Thanks for joining us. Also coming up, it's the time of day parents hate most - dinner time. We've all met fussy eaters, and often children are notorious for refusing to eat certain types of foods. Toddlers, babies. Often children are notorious for refusing to eat certain foods. You might spend time in the kitchen cooking one meal and they want something else. Cooking multiple meals. However, some foods seem to be universal hits and enjoyed by even the pickiest eaters. Fussy eating is the inspiration behind the new children's book series called The Dinner Detectives. A little later this hour we will get some tips from the team behind the book. As you said, parents of toddlers go to great lengths to get their children to eat. I knew this family whether dad would stand in the lounge room and make a kookaburra sound at the top of his voice while the mother was feeding the child in the kitchen and the child would only chew and swallow when the kookaburra was making the sound. There is no way back! It can be a very difficult time, particularly for first parents with their first child. No idea what you are doing. Why are they not eating? Who knows? One trick we employed in our family which worked really well was to fix so you would stick to fix into everything and it was a bit of the game. You can only eat so many party sausages, though. A bit of a toothpick in the eye, didn't happen. I'm glad it didn't happen. Let's check the weather in the capitals.

Perth will be sunny and partly cloudy in Darwin. Perth will be sunny and partly
cloudy in Darwin. North Korea has test-fired a ballistic missile after the US Secretary of State called on the world community to drastically increase pressure on Pyongyang to curb its nuclear ambitions. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called for sanctions to be fully enforced and for diplomatic relations to be suspended or reduced in a bid to heap more pressure on North Korea. He warned the United States will sanction nations and individuals supporting the regime and urged the world to act before North Korea's nuclear reach extends further. China called for all parties to remain calm and exercise restraint, and avoid provocative rhetoric or actions that would lead to miscalculation. The threat of a North Korean nuclear attack on Seoul, or Tokyo, is real. And it is likely only a matter of time before North Korea develops the capability to strike the US mainland. Indeed, the DPRK has repeatedly claimed it plans to conduct such a strike. Given that rhetoric, the United States cannot idly stand by, nor can other members of this Council who are within striking distance of North Korean missiles. British police say they have intercepted an active terrorism plot after a woman was shot during an armed raid on a house in North London. The Senior National Coordinator for Counter Terrorism Policing confirmed six people were arrested in the operation. Authroties are still hunting for suspects connected to plot but police believe they have contained the threat. The 21-year-old woman who was shot during the raid is in a serious but stable condition. A terror suspect arrested near Britain's houses of parliament has been identified. Mohamed Khalid Omar Ali was stopped in Whitehall, in the middle of the government district, by police acting on a tip-off. The 27-year-old is a British national born overseas, who was known to police and the security services. He has been held on suspicion of possession of an offensive weapon and preparing for acts of terrorism. The French far-right party, the National Front, has replaced the man chosen to lead it, while Marine Le Pen contests the presidential election. It comes amid allegations that Jean-Francois Jalkh denied the Holocaust. Mr Jalkh gave an interview with an academic 17 years ago in which he allegedly questioned whether the Nazis had used a cyanide-based pesticide in the gas chambers. He is taking legal action,

Airlines in Germany are dropping safety rules brought in after the 2015 Germanwings plane crash which require two people in the cockpit at all times. Copilot Andreas Lubitz killed 150 people by crashing the plane, apparently on purpose, after the captain left to use the toilet. Airlines now say the two-person rule has no safety benefits. Eurowings, which merged with the Germanwings brand, is one of the airlines now dropping the requirement.

A man and a woman have been charged for allegedly staging a car crash to claim insurance. Part of investigations into syndicates scamming compulsory third-party insurance schemes. The 39-year-old woman and 44-year-old man were arrested in Maryland in Sydney 's west yesterday. It -- officers seized electronic devices and documentation. The pair is due to face Fairfield local Court next month. Pope Francis is visiting Egypt in the aftermath of bomb attacks that have killed dozens of christians. The pope went straight to a meeting with Egyptian president, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, after landing in Cairo. His trip is aimed at improving ties between muslims and Roman Catholics. Speaking at a leading university of Sunni Islamic learning, he urged the leaders of all faiths to renounce violence carried out in the name of religion. TRANSLATION:God, the lover of life, never ceases to love man, and so he exhorts us to reject the way of violence as the necessary condition for every earthly 'covenant'. For violence is the negation of every authentic religious expression.

Time now to talk sport with Georgina Tunny. And Georgie, GWS prove they've got the temperament to go far? A bit of revenge from the prelim final that we saw last year in September. The rivalry continues. This is the fifth time in the last six clashes that have been separated by less than a goal. The rivalry will continue for as long as possible, as far as I'm concerned because that is the kind of quality football player creating. Another thrilling chapter. GWS picked up the bragging rights. This time GWS picked up bragging rights, but may be without one of their stars for a few weeks. Backing up from one of the best prelim final battles ever seen in the AFL, the rematch in Canberra lived up to the hype. The reigning champs dominated the second quarter but could only manage a 9-point lead at the main break before final term goals from Jon Patton and Toby Greene clinched a nailbiting victory. It could come a cost, though - Greene reported for striking Caleb Daniel. Just speaking to some of the boys after the game. They are all spent. Coming off a 6-day break and going into that, at great battle. They are the games we want to play in. Cowboys fans were buoyed by the expected return of their skipper Johnathan Thurston. But he was a late scratching against the Eels, and North Queensland's night just got worse from there. Thurston was forced to watch on helplessly from the sidelines as Parramatta thoroughly outclassed the home side.

outclassed the home side.
Led by Clint Gutherson, who grabbed a first-half double, the Eels crossed for four tries to one. 26-6 winners. While the Cowboys slumped to their third loss in four games. Earlier, the Rabbitohs made it three straight defeats. They were never in the hunt against a rejuvenated Manly. Tom Trbojevic, Akuila Uate and Dylan Walker running riot 46-8. And Maria Sharapova has continued her fine form at Stuttgart, back from a 15 month doping ban. The Russian progressed to the semi-finals, eliminating qualifier Anett Kontaveit in straight sets 6-4, 6-3. Sharapova is yet to drop a set in her comback tournament. She will take on Frenchwoman Kristina Mladenovich in the next round.

And you and Kath had to point out, we will have a bit of a viewing of the video of the Sam of Brisbane Broncos has released. We know he is a bit of a larrikin. We saw him impersonating the Gold Coast while one of his teammates is attempting to convert a try. He is back at it.

# He can sing.He sounds like Salim Dion. -- Celine. The fact that he knows the words. The passion on his face. What a power ballad. I feel like listening to Celine beyond that now. -- data Celine Dion. There is a reason she is in Vegas year after year after year with her shows. Thank you for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come, North Korea has conducted its second missile test in the space of a fortnight. We get reaction from Washington. Also ahead, 100 days in office. Donald Trump marks a major milestone. And later, cheap island getaways. Winter holiday deals and fancy new ads will soon be rolled out in a bid to lure holidaymakers back to the Whitsundays. It's been one month since Cyclone Debbie lashed the Queensland coast. But tourism operators in towns that were spared say they're unnecessarily suffering in the downturn as well. Find out how you can snap up a bargain later this hour. North Korea has again provoked the US by conducting another ballistic missile test just hours after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson urged the world to drastically increase pressure on the regime to avoid a catastrophic outcome. Details about the missile test are still coming in but the White House has confirmed it is aware of the test and that the president has been briefed. North America correspondent Zoe Daniel has more from Washington. As we understand, this is what is called the K and 17 intermediate ballistic missile. It was not nuclear armed but is one of nine tests that North Korea has conducted in the first 99 days of Donald Trump's presidency. As we understand, much of this reporting is coming from South Korean news agencies with some information from US officials. As we understand, this test under is -- happened at around 530 local time in North Korea from Bukchang which is north-east of John Yang. The direction was to the north-east, towards the Sea of Japan -- Pyongyang. We were told this was a failed test and the missile broke up soon after launch that it is somewhat cheeky, particularly armed -- particularly in the face of comments. Comments from Donald Trump that there was a chance of conflict from North Korea. Coupled with the appearance of the Secretary of State Rex Telethon at the UN today, his first appearance, where he told the world to start squeezing North Korea to add here to financial sanctions, to wind back diplomacy, saying that about is the only option otherwise North Korea will continue to ramp up its nuclear program with potentially catastrophic consequences. Let's look at what the Secretary of State had to say.Additional patients will only be with an additional North Korea. The love we bide time, the sooner we will run out of it. The time has come for all of us to put new pressure on North Korea to abandon missiles. I urge people to act before North Korea does.The Trump administration has been vocal about wanting a diplomatic resolution to this, asking China to do the heavy lifting. Is that likely to change in light of the last hour?

Hard to say, I think the fact this is not a nuclear missile test and there is still a possibility that will happen in the future, but it is North Korea, effectively testing the boundaries with the United States which is what Donald Trump's administration is prepared to tolerate. Certainly, the pressure is on the Chinese. There was a bit of pushback from them today at the UN where they effectively said, well, this is not only on us. Yes, we are the key ally of North Korea and China and North Korea's trade is about 90%. That said, everybody has to participate, says China. Also suggesting, not too subtly, that the US needs to wind back the rhetoric, that there needs to be measured tones in the language that is used to avoid something happening, a reaction from either side, if you like, in response to language of the other that could lead to actions that indeed, as Rex Telethon said, are catastrophic. And you can catch John Barron with a panel of experts talking about the first 100 days of the Trump presidency this weekend. Their special program will be airing on the ABC news channel this Saturday at 9:00pm, Eastern Standard Time. There have been more dramatic counter-terrorism arrests in London. Police say they foiled an active plot in the north-west of the British capital, shooting and seriously injuring a woman in the process. Here's Europe correspondent James Glenday. About 7:00 in the evening, heavily-armed police began their raid. Gas canisters were fired through windows and those nearby ducked for cover. I ran to my partner in the kitchen, I was like, "Quick, there's armed officers outside." At that point we heard another bang. Officers trained their weapons on the house. Once it was over, six people had been arrested and a 21-year-old woman had been shot. Police say they swooped to stop an active terrorist plot. The armed entry was necessary due to the nature of the intelligence we were dealing with, and involved armed officers firing CS gas into the address. During the course of that operation, one of the subjects, a woman, was shot by police. She remains in hospital. The raid came just hours after an unrelated terrorism arrest near the Prime Minister's house in central London. British national Mohamed Khalid Omar Ali was detained after a tip-off from a family member. A backpack with knives was taken from the scene. What you have seen today, and yesterday, is police preventing a terrorist attack. That's really important because when a person gets to the point of blowing themselves up or shooting people, it's too late. These arrests have brought back memories of the recent attack in Westminster that claimed five lives, but police are hailing these two new operations as a major success and say they've now contained all current threats to the UK. The annual ceremony for Baby Lily Grace Awareness Day was held at the Eastern Suburbs Memorial Park in Sydney this morning. It marks the discovery of the body of an unkown baby found on Maroubra Beach in late 2014. The baby was subsequently adopted and named Lily Grace by the community, where she was then laid to rest. The awareness day has been created to honour all unkown children and to call for the introduction of "safe haven laws." Graham Boyd is the CEO of the Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust and he joins us now. Good morning.Good morning.You have a predawn ceremony this morning at six a.m.?Yes, it was very reflective. It started at six o'clock and as the sun was rising, around 6:29am, there were special prayers set by the auxiliary Bishop in Sydney, Father Terence Brady, and the candles were snuffed out, because a greater light was rising in the east. That was great hope, that overcame, in terms of spiritual hope for these children. So it was a very sombre ceremony but we finished with hope.This is the second year that the awareness Day has been held. Tell us a bit about the story of Baby Lily Grace?Baby Lily Grace was found on a beach in Maroubra by some children. There was further inquiry and they could not find the parents, or the mother, particularly. It came to the bigger issue, how many other children are like Baby Lily Grace every year? We started doing research and we found it is actually quite high. According to a French court study, assuming that translates to Australia, there are about 2.1 children per 100,000 who suffer the same fate as Baby Lily Grace.Is it known how she died?No, it is not.Now, the statistics, while they are not, we do not know how true they are, but the statistics that we have, which would probably underestimate the issue of babies who are being abandoned and dying, they are quite confronting. Between 2007 and 2010, eight children were found dead in public places.That's right, and that is just the pinnacle. The question is, how many are dying that we will never find, never know about, never hear about? That is the bigger issue.What was the aim of today? Is it to show parents and perhaps mothers in particular that there is hope, that there are options, and that that is not the only option you have if you are struggling as a new mother? Absolutely, it is to raise awareness, give options, and preserve the life of the defenceless. Once we raise awareness, solutions can be found. For example, in 1198, Pope Innocent the third was worrying about all these babies dying in the Tiber River. So he created this baby boxes, they were cylinders in the church. And the babies would be put in one side, turned around, and then a bell would be wrong, and caretakers, nuns, would come and take care of those babies. Solutions can be found, but we have to be aware of the problem to find a solution.That has certainly been put forward here, perhaps hospitals could have a place where babies can be placed, so they would obviously be taken care of. The coronary New South Wales also talked about safe haven laws, which would allow a new mothers who are perhaps finding it very difficult to have some security and protection.That is right, there was a coronial inquest and the coroner's recommendation was to review safety laws, such that if you bring a baby safely to authorities, you will not be prosecuted. He also recommended the creation of those baby hatches, which as I say, go back to mediaeval times.There is also evidence that the women who are faced with these can is and feel as though there are not many options for them, it is essentially a mental health issue. They are depressed, they have low self-esteem, they have emotional immaturity as well.That is correct. In 50% of the cases in that French court study, it was fear of abandonment, fear of not being worth, at low self-esteem. In those circumstances, people should seek help. Beyond blue, Black Cap McDonald, these are great organisations people can follow up with. -- black Dog.We have this awareness Day in Sydney, but do you know of any others across the nation?The greater metropolitan cemeteries trust last year ran an event down in Melbourne. Also in Adelaide, there is lots of attention they are, there was a baby found in some toilets a number of years ago. Robert Pitt, the CEO down their out Enfield, he conducts services there two. The issue is really international. In Ireland, for example, they are doing lots of investigation in one of the homes over there, just one home, of children between zero and three years of age, potentially 800 of them, and they have started this inquiry since 2014, excavations in sewers to try to find these babies. Truly horrendous.They are extraordinary numbers. Ringing it back home, should governments at all levels be doing more, in your opinion? -- bringing.Governments need to raise awareness, make mental health a big issue. You are right, 50% of the cases are mental health-related. But there are other tangible things that can be done. If people want to try to save the lives of babies, they can donate to newborn centres and hospitals and things like that. But, yes, the government can do more to look at this issue, but mental health is probably the biggest issue they can tackle at the moment.Graham Boyd, thanks very much. Leading youth mental health organisation Headspace has come out against the popular US Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, describing its depiction of a high School student's suicide as "seriously dangerous." Pres Kristen Douglas, the national manager of Headspace School Support says while her organisation doesn't want to shut down a conversation about youth suicide, the series presents a harmful way to talk about it. About a month ago the show began airing in Australia, and we certainly watched a slow and steady rise in concern from parents, schools, even young people, saying they were quite distressed by the content. We looked at the content, and by all respects it is quite dangerous in terms of the way that it depicts suicide. It is quite graphic in its depiction of the method and means of how she dies. But also the glamorise Singh and the glorifying and almost be romanticising of suicide is quite dangerous. -- glamourising. The evidence shows that kids connect with this and it could create lots of harm. There has been a big debate in the last few weeks. I know that New Zealand has changed the age restriction on it up to 18. We have 15. In America and Australia, mental health services have been stating that there is a load of warnings that should go with this. I know young people on social media, Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, they are saying you should watch it, it is great. People say, isn't it good we are talking about youth mental health and suicide? These are important topics and we do not want to stop the conversation about it. What we want to say is that this is a harmful way to talk about it. Depicting it in the way that it is can create further risk. Lots of young people have come out and said to us that this is triggering their vulnerabilities. They are talking about their suicidal thinking and feelings and we are really worried it might actually stem vulnerability moving forward. It is a number one show on Netflix, the exposure is high. We are worried about things like suicide contagion, which is most prevalent for young people. This is absolutely aimed at teenagers. We have got primary school principals contacting us saying that we need to help parents talk about this. Parents need to be prepared, if their young people have ready seen it, to open up the conversation and ask about how distressing it was for them, and turned the message to seeking help as opposed to the suicide content. For more information or support you can contact Beyond Blue, or if you or somebody you know is experiencing distress, please contact Lifeline.

Every day, restless, cafes and shops throw a perfectly good food, still perfectly good to eat. A product might be slightly marked, or just past its best use by date. Instead of going to landfill it is being harvested by a charity which this week opened Australia's first rescued food supermarket. A supermarket with no pricetags or cash registers. It sounds almost too good to be true.When you walk into our supermarket and see the quality produce, you just think, wow, why is this being given away for free? These shelves stock surplus food that would otherwise be thrown out by supermarkets, cafes, airlines, and restaurants. The store is run by volunteers and customers are told by what -- told to take what you need and give if you can.Every dollar donated provides two meals to people in need. We have been blown away by what we have seen.OzHarvest sources food from over 2000 donors across Australia and distributes goods to over 900 charities. Australians waste up to one fifth of the food they buy, and 4 million Thoms ends up in landfill per year. The Federal Government estimates it costs the Australian economy $20 billion annually. Age agencies say providing basic necessities like food can help break the cycle of poverty. -- aid agencies.When it comes to poverty, food is one of the most underestimated tools that charity workers have at their disposal.The store only opened yesterday and it is already popular.I think every suburb should have at least one. This month the Federal Government set a target to reduce food wastage by 50% by 2030. This type -- this shop in Kensington is being run as a trial. If successful more stores could open across the country. Let's take a look at the weather. Tropical Cyclone Frances is causing gusty showers in the northern Kimberley. Brisk south-westerly winds are causing light coastal showers in the south-east. A high pressure system in the south is allowing clear skies and a cool morning for much of central and southern Australia.

The top stories from ABC News - North Korea has test-fired another ballistic missile from a site north of the capital Pyongyang. The US Pacific Command says it detected the missile early this morning but it appears to have exploded shortly after take-off. The latest test comes after the conclusion of a UN security council meeting, where the US Secretary of State called for more pressure to be placed on North Korea. Rex Tillerson urged the international community to suspend or downgrade diplomatic relations with Pyongyang. British police have foiled an active terrorism plot after a woman was shot during an armed raid on a house in north London. Six people were arrested during the operation with police saying the threat is now contained. A man and a woman in New South Wales have been charged for allegedly staging a car crash to claim thousands dollars back on insurance. Police have charged the couple with five fraud-related offences as part of investigations into syndicates scamming the compulsory third party insurance Scheme. The pair were arrested during a raid of a Merrylands home in Sydney's west yesterday and are due to face Fairfield local court next month. And the Greater Western Sydney Giants have come from behind to defeat the Western Bulldogs in Canberra. The Giants were down 11 points in the fourth quarter but kicked three of the last four goals to secure the two-point victory.

US President Donald Trump is marking the first 100 days of his administration. During his campaign he promised to overhaul free-trade deals and protect American jobs. So how has President Trump measured up? Earlier I spoke to Charles Hankla, an associate professor of political science at Georgia State University. I think the country remains quite divided still about how well President Trump has done in his first 100 days. I do think that looking into here clear at the record, you can start to sense that among his pop -- popular space, there is beginning to be a bit of disappointment that President Trump has not been able to do more and fulfil more of the promises he made in the campaign --.The pundit has said it has helped Wall Street almost double digits.What has driven that? I imagine and most commentators would argue it is about the hopes for the deregulation of the financial sector. Also the corporate sector. President Trump has followed out on a lot of the areas because he doesn't need Congress, he can do it with his executive powers. One of the most important changes he has made since becoming president is using his executive orders for the purpose of deregulation so I think that gave a boost to the financial sector. I do think that honeymoon is over.We saw on his first few days in office, he pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership of which Australia is party to. He has since all selected on a number of other trade issues, particularly with NAFTA and with Europe.Absolutely. Of course, during the campaign, Donald Trump had a very America first policy which you could translate as being protectionist. He promised he would pull out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership which includes Australia and 12 Pacific rim nations. He promised he would pull out of all possibly renegotiate NAFTA and it is one of the first thing he did after becoming president was a pullout of the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Since then, it appears his trade policy has become a bit more traditionally conservative and less populist so after that initial move of pulling out at the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the president's chief appointee of trade did say that the US was open to the TTIP agreement with Europe. The President backed off plans to eliminate the import and export bank. A number of the President's policies have started to look essentially a little bit more traditionally pro- free trade which has traditionally been the Republican position. However, there is also some evidence in the past week or so, it's hard to keep track of President Trump's policies, in the past week or so, we have seen some oscillation of Mount so it was first reported a few days ago that the White House was preparing a memo that would withdraw the United States from the free trade agreement with Canada and Mexico which would have been hugely significant for all three economies. But then President of Mexico and the Prime Minister of Canada, Trumper said he wanted to renegotiate.In the past week had, we have also seen his policy on tax. Huge changes, cutting many industry tax rates and taking them down to 15% in some cases. What has been the reaction of that and is it likely to even get through?The President has in promised the biggest tax cuts ever. The proposal that he has put forward is still fairly vague so we don't know all of the details but it would cut the brackets down from seven down to three. Overall, what it would do is it might benefit some lower income people, depending on their circumstances, particularly if they are moved down from a 20% to a 15% tax bracket. Others, depending on where they lie within the tax bracket, could be bumped up. The effect on middle income and lower income Americans will depend on upper income Americans and it would likely be very beneficial to them because of the lowering of the highest rate and because of the alteration. In terms of corporations, that is where the biggest cut is. As you mentioned, President Trump would cut the corporate tax rate down to 15%. Republicans have been pushing for this for some time because it turns out to be relatively high compared to other countries. They hope that these will keep corporations inside the United States. But I think that on the other hand, there is a danger that wealthy people, professionals, business people, lawyers, consultants, are largely file for corporate status in order to lower their taxes down to 15% which is another issue. All in all, there would be significant tax cuts. It seems barely likely that this will increase the budget deficit in the national debt, despite the assurances that it will stimulate enough economic growth. The President is willing to increase the national debt in order to have lower taxes which he hopes will stimulate the economy.Which I think might make it hard for some of the big infrastructure projects to get through if he is relying more and more on the budget. In conclusion, can I ask you, has he delivered on his promise of greater economic change?I think overall, what he has been able to add content in the first 100 days has been fairly limited. Part of that is because he hasn't got his people in place very quickly and there has been a steep learning curve. Part of that I think is because he has run into obstacles in Congress. We know that he tried to repeal Obama can, the Affordable Care Act and was unable to do it. There is opposition to his tax PowerLAN in Congress, even from Republicans. I think, on the economic front, what Donald Trump has been able to do primarily has been through executive action which is most importantly pulling out of the transpacific partnership and some of the deregulatory policies. In the long run, this is going to be problematic for him politically because when you actually look at what he has done, a lot of it is the more traditional pro-business conservative economic policies rather than the populism that got him elected from working class people. Trade policy might be a partial exception to that but tax policy very much is in the vein of traditional Republican ideas. Charles Hankla, many thanks for your time today. And you can catch John Barron with a panel of experts, talking about the first 100 days of the Trump presidency, this weekend. Their special program will be airing on the ABC News channel this Saturday at 9pm, eastern standard time. We've all met fussy eaters and often children are notorious for refusing to eat certain types of foods. Oh no, it's the kids, isn't it? However, some foods seem to be universal hits and enjoyed by even the pickiest eaters. This was the inspiration behind a new children's book series called The Dinner Detectives. Joining us now is the author of the series, Yves Stening, and illustrator of the books - including the first in the series, A Fearsome Beast and Dumpling Feast, Nigel Buchanan. I think as parents, we all go through that stage where it is really tricky to get some food into your kids and you are desperate to because you want to nourish them. How did you come up with this idea? Were you going to a similar thing?I was living in LA and had a very young daughter and we were intrigued by, firstly, having to cook separate meals for ourselves and her will stop being quite intrigued and then engaging with other parents as to what they are parents liked. The difficulties of getting kids to it some foods and I was intrigued.Are that you had some great stories about the length that parents go to. We came up with the idea that it was actually a good idea to keep putting the things on the table and trying to get to a point where they are going to eat the things you like to eat.Same experience, Nigel?I had frenzied children who often had white or beige diets. Incredible, it was about the colour. If that was too colourful, they would go through it. -- I had friends with children. Think it resonates with a lot of parents. The whiteness or beige nurse of the foods. -- beige.There is great food that is made with dumplings. In this book.There are two lead characters. Their sister loves cooking and food and her little brother Axl, only eat white things. The breakthrough comes through going on that journey through history with his cousin who is Chinese, half Chinese, into stories Web dumplings came from. -- stories about Web dumplings came from.You read with your eyes, the illustration is set to captivate the children.Some of the histories of food that you think you know are actually quite surprising and intriguing. The element of food which we may not have delved into before at a bit of spice to it, I think.Obviously, you have gone for dumplings here. Our kids love the dumplings. That is going to wear broccoli and brussels sprouts come from.

We are hoping this will be an ongoing series. Full histories and backgrounds.Foods that kids love to eat and that there is a great story behind those dishes. Things they eat everyday.The storyline in this, it is not some happy little fairy tale. You go on quite a journey to a place where people see as falls off. Allan yes, it's so-called in the village where this doctor that invented dumplings first comes from. The legend says that the villagers' is fell off and buy new year, they will all happy because of the hot dumplings. -- by the Thai New Year came. Great read, good book. Did you roadtest it on your kids?Indeed we did.You in particular, he went through all the emotions. You went through the simple recipe at the end of the book which was well roadtested.My kids have Chinese cousins and we learnt to make dumplings with their cousins so the recipes were roadtested and we tried many different variations. In the rest of the in the back, you can make a vegetarian or pork version.I think I might give it ago my kids, as I just mentioned and you did as well, love dumplings. Where to now for this series? Do you have grand plans?Absolutely. I'm working on the next book now that is due for release in November this year. After that, the next one, it will go on forever.The one coming after this is the Legend Lurking in Your Lunchbox. I was working in the film and TV industry and wrote it as a TV series but it got put in the draw. It wasn't until I saw Nigel's poster for the school fete, the School our kids go to, but I discovered Nigel 's work and said wow, he is the illustrator for this project.Great pitch. It's been great to have you both on. Thank you and congratulations. Cheaper winter holidays, that is something you are interested in. Other than food, we have done that, now let's tick this Ox.Yes, all the finer things in life. Cheap winter holidays and fancy new ads will soon be rolled out in a bid to lure southern holiday makers back to the Whitsundays. It's been one month since Cyclone Debbie lashed the coast. But tourism operators in towns that were spared say they're unnecessarily suffering in the downturn as well. Josh Bavas reports. How do you convince Southerners to come back to this? The State Government hopes these ads might do the trick.I know just the place. You will be very welcome, you'll go home with a smile on your face, and you really will enjoy your time. About $300,000 of state and federal funding will go towards the new campaign to sell discounted Whitsunday holidays for the winter. The special deals are being marketed like two large corporations, who are also chipping in.We are taking advice from the experts in markets that this is the best way.It follows the environment minister's inspection of Whitehaven Beach, now a far cry from its preCyclone days. But further south in Agnes Water, tourism has hit a brick wall.For them to allocate funds to Airlie Beach, that is fine, but we are running at 90% occupancy at annually. We are trying to squeeze hoodie 5%.Operators say Ings began to take a nosedive even before the cyclone when one of two Reef boats was lost in a fire last year.The overflow from the reef impacts all the other operators, from stand-up paddle to kayaking to the 4-wheel-drive tours to the restaurants and cafes.There has been damage to other places across Queensland, including Townsville, even down to Rockhampton. Absolutely we are working with those regional tourism organisations to have marketing campaigns for them as well.All parties involved should be making a contribution to getting things up and running.The specials will include discounted airfares to the north for stays longer than three nights, especially in the month of June. The tourism industry in the Whitsundays is worth more than $1.5 billion to the Queensland economy, supporting some 7000 jobs that are now on the brink. Lucrative television rights deals are the cash cows which keep national sport alive. Seven and Nine have paid around $1 billion each for the two big codes. The 10 network has the Big Bash, for now. But the big loss unveiled for Channel Ten this week casts doubt on whether it can win any future bidding war with Nine. It is a dreadful time for Cricket Australia, which is negotiating new TV deals for all forms of the game. COMMENTATOR: He goes big, Finch! With its big hits and non-stop action all crammed into three hours, the Big Bash has filled stadiums and grabbed television eyeballs all over the country. It is one of Channel Ten's few bright spots. But the Big Bash presents a big conundrum foreign network that has just lost $230 million.They are making $20 million out of it, I don't think they will get it the next time. Or they will have to pay a price where they will not be able to afford it. That is the problem. 18 months ago, Channel 7 committed more than $1 billion to keep AFL, at the same time that Nine was agreeing to a similar amount with the NRL. Sports rights have been going through the roof in an environment where the earnings of the commercial television networks are falling.The problem with sport is that it is a loss leader for all the networks. They don't profit from it.Which is why investment bank UBS is urging Channel Nine to ditch test cricket and the $30 million a year of losses which go with it. All those cameras, including spider camera and the Snickometer and the highly paid commentary team, they do not come cheap. Nine is unlikely to heed it UBS' advice, but it all adds up to financial pressure on Cricket Australia at a time when the TV contracts for all three forms of the game are up for grabs.They will come out of this rights deal probably the same. A lower number for test and ODI -- test and ODI at acyclic and increase the Big Bash. While the contracts will probably not liberate pot of gold, Cricket Australia is in a fortunate position that other sports are not. In cricket mad India television companies pay big money to show matches from Australia.An average game of cricket watched on television, they will get 60- 80 million viewers. The rights fee that Cricket Australia will earn out of India will be 50% greater than what they earn out of Australia. So in the mark of $150 million or thereabouts.While Cricket Australia will be the first of the major sports to have to embraced the new straitened times in free to air television, fans will also have to get new -- get used to change. The Big Bash is unlikely to stay on 10, and there will be less cricket on free to air TV as the internet continues to disrupt the television world.I can predict that Fox Sports through Foxtel will be a bidder, alongside a free to air network. It also could be possible that Optus, who have a strategic relationship for streaming with Cricket Australia, they could also broadcast games of Big Bash as well.Which will be more evidence that the free 2-hour television landscape is in a spin. Time to talk more sport, Georgi joins us again. A cracker of a match in the AFL last night, the giants and the Bulldogs. More to come today? Yes, a massive day or football coming up this weekend. I know you will be watching the Derby very carefully, the Western Derby. Fremantle against West Coast. Feeling confident? A bit hard to know. You know, the West Coast Eagles will want to come back hard after a bad loss last week. But you do feel that the Fremantle Dockers have it in them.Three straight wins, maybe leaving it late, but at least they are getting the points on the board, which is more than we can say for the Sydney Swans, who are up against Carlton Sanaya. They will be desperate to get their first win of the 2017 season on the board. Then we have Adelaide versus Richmond coming up as well this weekend. And after round six, finally, one of those teams will no longer be unbeaten. That will be an interesting match, to see just how much the Tigers against the Rows are stacking up as a legitimate flag contender this year. Let's focus on the match last night against -- last night in Canberra, the Western Bulldogs versus GWS. Both of them are serious contenders, I think. Bontempelli, of course, he is always in on the action. It was the Western Bulldogs who had the better of it at the start. Led by nine points at the main break. It really should have been more. They had more opportunities, more shots in front of goal. Toby Greene, GWS' forward, losing his head a bit there. Caleb Daniel had to leave the field because he was bloodied after that one. Toby Greene was cited on the spot. The umpires stated they had been keeping an eye on him. He was lucky not to be suspended last week after his head but on Isaac Heeney, because there was insufficient force in the head but, that was the official term. Interesting that they are still keeping an eye on him one week after that incident. Anyway, GWS will be happy because it was their first Friday night match in Canberra and they were able to win only by two points. This rivalry goes from strength to strength. Toby Greene, whom we have been talking about, but also James Paton and Jeremy Cameron were very strong for the Giants, especially in that quarter. A couple of majors to Toby Greene and James Paton really seal the deal.In the NRL, a couple of teams really out of form?Yes. Not going well. If you are a fan of the Cowboys or the Rabbitohs, look away now. It was not the best night of football. Cowboys fans, that is not the site you want to see. Look at the star power on the bench. There were rumours that Johnathan Thurston might be able to run out for his side, but a late flareup of that calf injury made him a late scratching. And this in, it was very impressive for the eels. He bagged a double before the break. Unfortunately, the Cowboys' defence was in disarray. They were unable to get any points. An important win for Parramatta. Another injury likely as Gavin Cooper, he will have scans on that shoulder after landing on its very heavily. Not a good night for the Rabbitohs at all. They lost 46-8. Manly West so impressive. Dylan Walker and if you like but four tries. -- and Uate. So, mainly go from strength to strength, but the talk of the morning has been about a Brisbane Broncos forward, Sam Friday, and just what he is like off the field. -- Thaiday. We saw him impersonating a goalpost, trying to put off his teammate. It did work, because for all money, you thought that was going over. The curse of Sam Thaiday, it just misses in the end. He let him know by just how much he missed that. So close! He has taken to social media. I think we will enjoy this rendition of one of our favourite songs here in the studio.

in the studio.(SINGS CELINE DION).

Go on, Georgie. Give it a crack.A fantastic rendition. It has to be Taylor Swift for me to get involved. You have a career post- footy. Comedian, actor, singer...Georgie, thank you.Thanks, guys.Well, that is all from us here at Weekend Breakfast for today. Hope you have a great afternoon. Join us again tomorrow. Thanks for watching.

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Hello and welcome to Australia Wide. I'm Yassmin Abdel-Magied. This week on the program,
the strength of a good friendship.

MAN: Our story starts
70-odd years ago. I can remember
sitting on our back steps when Mr Chamberlain broadcast
that we were at war with Germany. We flew Mosquitoes
for the rest of the war. Here they are! I couldn't believe it. Over 60 years - we'd finally
come into contact again. As you know, it's a very special
10 days here at Newmarket... Also on the show,
the end of an era at Newmarket. GINNY STEIN: The hammer
is being swung at Newmarket for the last time. For the Inglis family,

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