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This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Hunt for a killer. A man stabs another to death at an Adelaide shopping centre. Terror arrest. A London man detained carrying knives near Parliament. The unusual pet that firefighters stumbled across in a Darwin backyard. The first raw images from Saturn as Cassini begins its dive through the planet's rings. The Broncos show their best against Penrith but an injury sours their winning move. Cheers or jeers - Donald Trump set to mark 100 days as President.100 days in office. So many accomplishments. Lowered my golf handicap, my Twitter following increased by 700 and finally, we can see hibernating bears. M I boys will love that! It is Friday, April 28. I'm Michael Rowland.And I'm Virginia Trioli. You're watching News Breakfast.

Today, Adelaide police are hunting for a man who stabbed another man to death before fleeing the scene with a woman and a child. The attack took place just before 7:00 last night at a shop in Elizabeth in the city's north.Paramedics rushed the 25-year-old to hospital where he later died from the injuries. The investigation is still very much in the early stages but it is believed it was a targeted attack. Witnesses have told detectives they saw the suspect run from the scene, accompanied by a woman pushing an infant in a pram. I saw cops and ambulances run everywhere. People... I heard screams. It was absolutely crazy. And there are a lot of people very frightened right now. Disturbing scenes in central Adelaide overnight. We'll have more on that as the show goes on. Good morning to you. Very happy Friday morning to you.Well, thank you.We got there!It's always lovely to be here on a Friday morning. We know that not everyone gets to enjoy a weekend - we do. But we'll take you to the weekend in amusing style this morning because this woman, Cathy Lett has -- Kathy Lett has written a book. It is very punny. In fact, I learnt a few puns, you'll be happy to hear, reading the book overnight. That's called collateral damage. It's about the extent a mum will go to help her autistic son and it's very much based on her real life experiences. Her son there has Asperger's syndrome. She has raised him to be a happy, healthy guy. In fact, a very popular man in London. He has a role in a key UK TV show which Kathy says is his and her and her husband's ultimate revenge to ought the people who made money of him growing up as an autistic child. Some of the stories are heart breaking and Kathy will share them with you later on. A wonderful yarn and she's wonderful company and the story has a real beating heart. To another news now and a man has been arrested opposite the Houses of Parliament in London. This time on suspicion of planning to carry out a terrorist attack. Police say that they found knives on the 27-year-old man. He's being held on terrorism and weapons-related charges. Authorities say he was known to British intelligence. An Australian woman who died in a scooter crash in Bali has been identified by local authorities as 26-year-old Ella Knights. It appears she lost control of the vehicle and fell into a gutter. Police say that she was wearing a helmet but it may not have been correctly fastened. Israeli authorities won't deny that they were behind an explosion near the Damascus airport that targeted a weapons supply hub. Five strikes were carried out on an arms debot delivering weapons to Hezbollah. Israeli authorities say that it would correspond completely with Israel's policy of preventing Iran's smuggling of advanced weapons. A report released today shows Australia can produce electricity with no net carbon emissions if there's a nationally agreed policy and a carbon price. The energy Networks Australia and the CSIRO have spent two years working on a road map for the electricity sector. They found that roof top solar and batteries would help to drive Australia's energy transformation. French authorities are investigating if the party of presidential candidate Marine Le Pen defrauded the European Parliament of 5 million euro. The Parliament suspects that money went to assistants who were not working for members of Parliament, but instead to those engaged in party work in France. The National Front Party has denied the allegations. Marine Le Pen is campaigning in the second round vote to become president. Australian TV personality Bert Newton is spending his second night in a Melbourne hospital after recently suffering a bout of pneumonia. A spokes woman for Melbourne's Epworth Hospital says the entertainer is having tests and is under observation. Images of Saturn's atmosphere have been sent back to earth after the Cassini spacecraft's first dive inside the planet's rings. The unprocessed images came from the vehicle which successfully flew 3,000km from Saturn - the closest the spacecraft has ever come to the planet. Cassini will attempt another 21 close encounters before destroying itself by flying directly into Saturn's crushing atmosphere. And firefighters stumbled across an unusual household pet while battling a fire in Darwin. A pet crocodile answering to the name of Albert. The 4-metre croc was discovered when a house in the suburb of Fannie Bay caught alight. Albert has been in the backyard with a permit since 1958. Those firefighters made a "snappy exit".With a permit. There with a permit. There you are.Like dogs and cats.But you know, no foul, no penalty. If you have the permit!Exactly.I just love that you can get a permit for a croc! Now with finance, it's good morning to Del Irani. Let's look Let's look at the global markets. Moments before the close, the DOW is currently trading higher.

Nate is so happy, he's almost bursting out bursting out of his skin. Here he is.Stick around because in 20 minutes, I'll have the details about the late season Tropical cyclone Francis at the north of the country. But for now, let's look around the nation for today:

Let's get more on the terror arrest in London overnight. Our Europe correspondent joins us now. Good morning. So what exactly happened? Well, I was there within about ten minutes of this arrest and what happened was that a man in his 20s, a Londoner, was tackled to the ground diagonally opposite the Houses of Parliament. It was on Parliament Street which is halfway between the Houses of Parliament and Number 10 Downing Street which is where the Prime Minister lives and works. He was apparently crossing the road near Westminster Tube Station when police tackled him to the ground. When I got there, I could see him standing. There were four armed police officers around him. It didn't look like a chaotic scene T didn't look like he was resisting arrest or anything but it was far more serious than I first thought when I got there. What happened was that he was under surveillance by police and intelligence. They heard that he was going to Westminster and they did a stop-and-search suddenly tackled him to the ground on the traffic island next to the station and he had a bag and in that bag was knives. And he's now being detained under the Terrorism Act. They're concerned that he was planning a terrorist act. And here is what one eyewitness who was there at the scene said.I heard that there was something at Westminster and there were police officers there and it was cordoned off. And then I just spotted a suspect. He was literally just next to the red box, the public phone. And he was cornered by heavily armed police officers.So that eyewitness there. This person is apparently known to authorities?That's right. He was being monitored. And that's why they stopped him and that's why they searched him. There's around 3,000 people on the watch list here in the UK where police and intelligence cooperate and they have people who they suspect could be at risk of radicalisation or potentially committing terrorist acts. Apparently this person was under surveillance and police intervened and stopped him as he was going into Westminster just after lunchtime.So following that dreadful fatal attack of last month, the police presence there and the security presence around that area must be very high?It is. It's five weeks since five people were killed in that awful terrorist attack. And it was so close, it's about 100 metres from where it actually happened, where the police officer was killed. So yes, there is a large police presence, but they knew that this guy was coming, apparently. This report is emerging in the last hour in certain media outlets that there had been a tip-off from a family who were concerned about this young man, a man in his 20s, who is a Londoner. That's what we're hearing. We haven't got that confirmed but some media are going with that at this stage. So definitely, it sounds like police were monitoring this man and they intervened before they believed he could have potentially carried out an attack.And if that turns out to be the case, then I guess it indicates that the system is working. Good to talk to you this morning. Thank you. Let's take you across the Atlantic to America and US President Donald Trump has told Mexico and Canada he wants to renegotiate, rather than pull out from the North American free trade agreement. You'll recall that was one of the key election promises. With more, our North America correspondent joins us from Washington. Good morning, yet another back down here by Donald Trump.Yes, good morning. As a candidate, President Trump said that this was the worst deal in the history of trade deals and he repeatedly attacked his opponent, Hillary Clinton, over the deal. It was signed by her husband Bill Clinton in the '90s but originally negotiated by George Bush Sr. But it was throughout the election, it was a huge theme as the President called it anything from the "worst trade deal" to a "deal that dudded American workers out of jobs" and vowed to negotiate it. But now it seems that it is not so bad that it can exist for another couple of months. The President has tweeted that he was considering getting rid of the agreement as of the agreement as recently as three days ago but last minute phone calls with Mexico's leader and Canada's leader convinced him that he should stick with it and try to renegotiate the deal rather than rip it up. And here's a little of what it up. And here's a little of what
the President said earlier today.We have to make a deal that's fair for the United States. They understand that. So I decided rather than terminating NAFTA, which would be a pretty big shock to the system, we will renegotiate. Now, if I'm unable to make a fair deal, if I'm unable to make a fair deal for the United States, meaning a fair deal for our workers and our companies, I will terminate NAFTA but we're going to give renegotiation a strong shot. And renegotiation would go down strong with Mexico and Canada?Yes, that's right. And there's been some interesting reports coming out of Mexico that some in Mexico are now seeing President Trump as something of a bluffer, that the tough rhetoric doesn't necessarily always match up with the reality of how he's behaving in office. But certainly, as well as Mexico and Canada, there's a number of Republicans here in the US who will be relieved that the deal is being renegotiated rather than torn up. Prominent Senator John McCain is one of them who said that getting rid of NAFTA would decimate employment in his state.And a big moment looming for Donald Trump over the week. He marks his 100 days in office. Usually a big yard stick for every US sitting president. Is he planning anything around that?He is. He's planning a rally with his supporters in Pennsylvania on Saturday, US time where he'll thank them and go through his list of achievements. As with many things in America under President Trump, divisions remain and his supporters will say that this has been the most successful 100 days for a President ever and his detractors will say that it is the worst. President Trump will say some of his achievements are appointing Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court and continuing America's economic recovery. His critics will point to things like the bungled executive order, trying to ban immigrants from certain Muslim majority countries as well as a general state of confusion and misinformation that's persisted throughout many of the administration's announcements. Thank you. Now, a Taiwanese man has been rescued on a mountain in Nepal 47 days after he went missing.The 21-year-old was trekking the trail with his girlfriend. Tragically, she died just three days before they were discovered. Andrew Thompson reports. Nepal's treacherous mountain ranges attract tens of thousands of tourists from he around the globe each year, but conditions can be unprive fribing. Liang Sheng Yueh is now recovering in a hospital in Kathmandu. He was found on a ledge under a waterfall and evacuated by helicopter. His deceased girlfriend's body was also airlifted out. TRANSLATION: We were surprised to find him alive. When we asked him how are you here? He said, it's been 47 days. We were on track to Ganesh and coming back through the snow. The girl looked like she was dead. On our inquiry, he said that his girlfriend had passed away three days early and that he survived on just salt and water. The couple were trekking the trail in northern Nepal in March when they were caught in a snowstorm and lost their way. Eventually, their staple food ran out and they were left stranded. Mr Liang was able to survive on salt and water. TRANSLATION: He appears exhausted and has lost about 30 kg. He was suffering from severe malnutrition. His foot was covered with maggots and hair full of lice. Despite having to live like that for 47 days, he appears to be mostly normal.Despite the ordeal, he appears to be in good health.He's a very courageous person and he's smiling and the whole team took care of the person and also, we did have a good blood test also. We are starting slow, you know. Starting with IV fluids and also the slow oral rehydration solution. His body has been taken to a hospital in Kathmandu for a post-mortem. Indonesia's newest tourist attraction is part celebration part wake. Thousands of floral tributes to the defeated Jakarta governor Ahok have lined the hall.It's an unprecedented show of grief. Flower boards are an Indonesian tradition. You give them to somebody instead of a bouquet of flowers and see them set up outside weddings and celebrations like cafe openings, but I've never seen anything like this scene outside Jakarta City Hall. There are thousands of flower boards and they're all in support of the city's recently deposed governor Ahok who just lost a very religiously and ethnically charged election to a Muslim candidate. His supporters are obviously devastated that Ahok lost and out of their own pockets have paid for the flower boards saying things like "Thank you", "God bless you". There was one yesterday that I saw that referenced the force and said "The force is with you, Ahok". The governor is also facing trial for blasphemy. He stood up in front of the blasphemy case last week and said that he's just like the clownfish, Nemo, swimming against the current. But here inside the gates of Jakarta's City Hall, it feels like the governor is swimming with the tide. A lot of these people have been here since very early this morning hoping to catch a glimpse of their hero.I bring Nemos with the hope that there will be more Nemos born in this city, in this country. TRANSLATION: I feel sad. He's made a better Jakarta with many parks for the children, integrated public transport and new roads. It does not matter that he is not a Muslim. TRANSLATION: I'm here to say thank you. His healthcare program helped me with my eye operation.Governor Ahok has six months left to run in his term and there's a lot of speculation about what he'll do after that. There's some talk that he might even join President Joko Widodo's Government in the Cabinet. There's a lot of people here who certainly want that. Let's take a look at the front peadges of the major newspapers around the country -- pages around the country. The Financial Review says the Turnbull Government will help fund Inland Rail and is almost certain to build, own and operate Sydney's second airport, as big infrastructure becomes the focus of next month's Budget. The Guardian Australia shows a confrontation between Sydney University students and a man distributing Holocaust denial leaflets. The Courier-Mail is attacking the Palaszczuk Government over a culture of secrecy. It follows a string of reports into youth detention which were only released with large redactinos. The Herald Sun says online gamblers will be forced to bet with their own money under a crackdown aimed at bookmakers who offer lines of credit. The Age reports Peter Gant and Mohamed Siddique have had their convictions for art fraud quashed. A Melbourne court has found prosecutors failed to prove two Brett Whiteley paintings were fake. The snorld says the main liquefied natural gas producers have cast

The Sydney Morning Herald says the main liquefied natural gas producers have cast serious doubt over the Prime Minister's claim that export controls would slash wholesale prices.

The Australian says Sydney's red hot housing market has started to cool with house prices dipping 0.1% in the first 27 days of April. The Daily Telegraph pictures a man injecting himself while sitting in a gutter at 9:00am in Sydney's Surry Hills. The NSW Police minister Troy Grant labelling the scene distressing and disturbing. The Advertiser reports a teenager has been charged with making dozens of bomb hoaxes sent to Australian schools. The West Australian says the State Government has revived dormant laws which allows them to strip unexplained wealth from organised crime. The Mercury pictures John Ward and his son, Stephen, who were found in good health yesterday after spending three nights lost in freezing conditions in Tasmania's wilderness. We were reporting about this this time yesterday morning. We had no idea where they were and the headline is "Such a relief", and it is. The Canberra Times reports Josh Papalii's spot in the Australian rugby league squad may be in doubt after he was victed of drink driving. Pet Croc survives house fire. A Territory family have sadly lost their home, but luckily their 50-year-old saltwater croc, named Albert, survived. That story from the NT News. Yes, going down to the very important story with our paper reviewer. Del's been a tect tonic shift in the world of reporting that shows a fairly significant drop in electronic books. The stuff that you either buy and read on your Kindle or your tablet and a rise of physical books. Books that you can hold, that you can turn, that you can take to the beach, are back. And electronic books, which were all the rage not too long ago. I was part of that rage and a part of the shift now, have been declining in popularity. It's been a very interesting move and says a lot about where readers are heading and where they like to get their information from books.It's interesting. It's been seen in the Australian market, according to the most recent figures from Australian books and publishing e-books, the sales there have plateaued and it is considered right across-the-board. It sees 20% of the market here which is not insignificant. Interestingly, book sales have increased or at least the entire take has increased but only in value, not in volume. The same number of books are there. But we wonder if you reflect the trend. Have you given up on ebooks and gone back to the real paper stuff where and gone back to the real paper
stuff where you can crack a spine and turn down the corner of a page, we'd love to know your view. Michael, have you given up Michael, have you given up on the e books?Yeah, I have. I mean, I'm part of the generation who grew up on books. Yeah, I like that. But to paraphrase Bill Nighy from Love Actually, become a breakfast TV presenter and you get them for free! I buy books as well. But actually, the conversation that I like to have as well and I'm sure that this will resonate with a lot of people. I love books and have spent many delicious hours in book shops over the years but no longer have the time. I buy my books online.You mean, to go to book shops.Yeah, with kids and sporting events and this and that. I'd love to spend even an hour in a book shop on a Saturday afternoon. I don't get the time and a lot of other people share that view. If you're back to buying physical books, do you go to book stores, because that is part of the book-buying experience for so many people? Or do you just buy them very efficiently online like lots of people?I think that's your demographic. Because I have a younger one, I spend hours and hours in book stores but as he gets older, I'm sure that that will change. Let's go to sport, I always buy PK's books!No, you don't.Thank you, and I rely on it.That's not true. You give them to him for free.Yes, a nice signed copy with a beautiful inscription! Yes, good we're talking about books this morning. And also good to be talking about sport. I'll give you the updates now and starting with the rugby league. Broncos beat Penrith 32-18 last night. James Roberts were was a standout in the first-half scoring one of the tries of the season but the Origin hopeful was carried off with an ankle injury. It looked serious and scans will show how bad today. It was the Broncos fourth straight win and here are all of the tries. Some of them beauties. COMMENTATOR: The right-hand producing results and here's a result. The pass out. The cover comes across. He links up.

comes across. He links up. Trying to get to him. But nobody catches the jet. Beaten for the ball there. Pushing up and turning there. Inside out T goes across there. He finds some space and he got to the ground. Going to there. Spinning in a tackle. He'll reach out. The last play here. Moylan at the line. Taking them on. He got a cross. Moylan gives it back on the inside. The passes are sticking now. Blake loses it. Backwards. Yoe comes up. He went down straight away and took no further part in that scramble back towards the Broncos goal line. He can't even walk.Matt Gillett there. Milford with set play. They go back and they called them out. There you go. 32-18. So hopefully James Roberts' ankle is not as bad as it looked. The Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates has apologised for comments used in a leaked email. Disability advocates condemned him who told the ABC that it was the wrong choice of words. A vote will occur in a week with Danielle Roche challenging. Sports minister Greg Hunt says whoever wins needs to get on with correct governance. Sydney FC are looking for the finals against Perth Glory. They have a fully fit squad. Milos Ninkovic having recovered from the injury. The Sky Blues have become one of the most dominant teams in national league history so there were plenty of smiles this week and beaten Perth several times this season and say that they expect to win this weekend. That will be tomorrow and Milos Ninkovic's injury but he's OK but funny things can happen in finals. In AFL, North Melbourne coach Brad Scott says that the side can turn around the losing start to the season when it faces the Gold Coast. Scott reacted to the side's five straight losses by dropping Andrew Swallow and Lindsay Thomas. Swallow and Thomas have played a combined 414 games for the club. And get
that is a big move from the coach to get rid of a couple of vetterance, at least for this weekend. And coming up later in the program, we will be speaking to Caitlyn Bassett about the Super Netball and there will be a top two clash between the Lightning and the Vixens and I reckon that Bassett is the best netballer in the world. A dominant figure for her team. The new franchise that's done so well after setting up in the Sunshine Coast and Michael and Virginia, she's a dominant figure for the world champion Australian team as well, regularly goes out there and shoots 50 goals for Australia. So it would be great to catch up with her in the studio this morning.Thank you very much. Let's check much. Let's check your Friday weather now. Good morning. We have a late season cyclone that snuck in just under the fire. Tropical cyclone Frances a category one which is forecast to move west to south-west avoiding the mainland of Australia. We might see gales in the next 24 hours for the northern Western Australian coast. The tropical cyclone season officially ends on Monday but of course, the weather isn't that fulled about what the date is. Nevertheless, Frances will likely be the last storm to be named this year. Might even make it to a category two system. On the satellite, you can see tropical cyclone Frances producing that cloud in the north-west of the country as it tracks into the Indian Ocean and we'll just take a little bit of a closer look at that cloud that you can see the extent there is quite broad. On the synoptics, we have a high that's dominating the weather for most of the rest of the country. Taking a look around the states now:

plenty more coming up on Breakfast. Including that incredible court case involving the Brett Whiteley paintings. Yesterday, a Victorian court threw out the convictions of two men who were found guilty of selling fake works by the artist. It was described as Australia's biggest art fraud case. We'll take a closer look at that story shortly. But first, here's Virginia with all of the latest news. Adelaide police are searching for a man who stabbed another man to death before fleeing the scene with a woman and a child. The attack took place just before 7:00 last night at a shopping centre in Elizabeth in the city's north. Paramedics rushed the 25-year-old victim to hospital where he later died from his injuries. Witnesses have told detectives that they saw the suspect run from the scene with a woman pushing an infant in a pram. I saw cops and ambulances run everywhere. I heard screams. It was absolutely crazy. There is a lot of people very frightened right now. More from our Adelaide reporter later. A man has been arrested opposite the Houses of Parliament in London on suspicion of planning to carry out a terrorist attack. Police say they found knives on the 27-year-old. He's being held on terrorism and weapons related charges. The man was known to British intelligence authorities. An Australian woman who died in a scooter crash in Bali has been identified by local authorities as 26-year-old Ella Knights. It appears she lost control of the vehicle crashing into a gutter. Police say she was wearing a helmet, but it might not have been correctly fastened. And images of Saturn's atmosphere have been September back to earth after the Cassini aircraft's first dive inside the planet's rings. The unprocessed images came from the vehicle which successfully flew 3,000km from Saturn - the closest a spacecraft has ever come to the planet. Cassini will attempt another 21 close encounters before destroying itself by diving directly into Saturn's crushing atmosphere. Thank you. Let's go to the morning's finance news with Del. Thank you, good morning everyone. Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe has identified the internationalisation of the Chinese currency as one of the key events that will have significant implications for the global financial system. China's Central Bank spent billions of dollars last year to slow the currency's decline against the surging US dollar. The yuan hit an almost 8.5 year low against the greenback. They said that China needs to strike a balance between tightening the flows of the economy as that action returns counter to the longer term goals of liberalisation. Meanwhile, a new report says that Australia needs to focus on trade opportunities with China and India rather than being derailed by nerves about the rise of protectionism in the United States. The report sites the protectionist policies of US President Donald Trump and the Brexit vote as two key factors clouding potential trade deals with key emerging markets. It says that Australia is over emphasising traditional trade with the US and UK and New Zealand at the expense of expense of deals with China and India. Cheging the global markets. Markets. -- checking the global markets now:

a leading market economist says Australia will face pressure to drop the company tax rate if US President Donald Trump gets his proposed tax overhaul passed into law. The Trump Administration has announced plans to slash corporate tax from 35% to 15% in order to boost the US economy. AMP chief economist Shane Oliver says that if Australia is unable to compete with the US tax rate, some companies may decide to move their head office from Australia to the US. Staying overseas and European Central Bank head said that the economy is solid and face fewer risks. He added that inflation in the 19-nation bloc was not high enough to raise interest rates. The ECB has kept the interest rate on hold at zero for another month and decided not to change the ECB's bond-buying stimulus scheme. Economic confidence in the eurozone is at the highest level since the debt crisis but inflation continues to meet the ECB's target for a fifth straight year. Staying in Europe, boich bank could move up to 4,000 -- Deutsche Bank could move up to 4,000 jobs out of Britain. It is the latest warning of job losses from the company since the UK voted to leave the European Union. Currently, UK-based companies can conduct business throughout Europe but could lose that because of Brexit. Deutsche Bank's latest results show that more than 3,000 jobs cuts have boosted the profits. United airlines says it will now offer up to $14,000 to passengers who give up the seats on overbooked flights. It's part of a review after an inquiry was set up after a man was injured while he was dragged screaming from a fully booked plane earlier this month. United also says that it will no longer use law enforcement officers to remove passengers from flights unless it is a matter of safety and security and the airline says that seated passengers will no longer be asked to leave against their will. And finally, Samsung have posted its biggest quarterly profits in three years thanks to demand for memory chips and flat screens for TVs and phones. The South Korean giant has reported a 48% jump in operating profits to almost $12 billion for the three months to March. Samsung says it expects further growth in memory chip and a pick-up in earnings from the phone business. It's relying on the new Galaxy S 8 to help to rebuild the reputation after the exploding Note 7 fiasco. What a massive turn around for a company that was in doldrums there. It had to recall 2.5 million hand sets and now recorded a profit. So amazing there.The latest version of the Samsung are giving iPhone a real run for the money with the features. Absolutely, and great to see competition in the market because Apple and iPhone have dominated for such a long time and really with all of the various scandals that plagued Samsung last year, I was concerned about the demise of the company but there you go, you never know what's going to happen.As long as they don't blow up.That's the thing. I find that remarkable in terms of brand recovery and has something different happened in the consumer market. Because once upon a time, that wouldn't happen. That recovery would take a very long time if it was possible at all. Fascinating story. A new report out this morning found that Australia can produce electricity with no net carbon emissions if a national policy and a carbon price can be agreed upon. For more on that, our political reporter joins us from our Parliament House bureau. Happy Friday morning to you. So who wrote the report and what in particular have they had to say, especially on the carbon price angle?Happy Friday to you too! This is a report from both the CSIRO and Energy Networks Australia. This is an organisation that represents the gas and electricity distribution businesses and what they're saying is that if there is a carbon price, an emissions intensity scheme by 2020, that's a cap and trade scheme, that by 2050, we could see the network producing no net emissions. So we'll have to wait and see if there's the political will there for that to happen and this report highlights that as being one of the key problems, saying that the political bickering and squabbling over carbon and energy policy over recent years has meant that the price of investment has gone up, just given the risk in the market. So it's saying that if that can all get on track, we might be on the way to net zero emissions by 2050. It also mentions the importance of roof top solar going forward and projecting that that will increase, as well as the use of batteries by households to power people's homes when there are particular pressures on the grid.That's right. And especially as those battery, the household batteries are cheaper. The report also notes that increasingly, if these renewable targets are met and as the coal-fired power stations shut down, I think that the figure was five new renewable projects which have to be built in some of the key eastern states between 2030 and 2040.Absolutely, and talking about the need for that development. So in terms of those states, it's saying that Queensland in particular will see a boom in roof top solar with hundreds of thousands more homes having those on their roofs. But in terms of the battery storage, what it's saying here is that because the network, the development of the network is really geared towards those three or four days of the year where it is stinking hot and everybody has the air conditioning on, it's saying if the batteries can come in on those days, that could really reduce the price of electricity, the price of these networks, the price of development. But it also notes that given that that is a huge change in how electricity systems will operate, that it will be a difficult and expensive move towards battery storage, but one that they will be of benefit to themselves, of course, as well as consumers over the long run.And just before we go, there has been more fallout from the Government's move yesterday to put a potential cap on gas exports to ensure there's enough domestic gas supply. The latest coming from a former Coalition Government minister who knows a fair bit about the resources and energy markets.Ian MacFarlane was a Federal Government minister for many years and now heading up the Queensland Resources spn council and he's weighed into the debate about the Government potentially restricting exports whenever there is a domestic shortage of gas. The Prime Minister touted this yesterday, saying something that would drive down prices for households and businesses and said that it could possibly halve the price of gas. That was something that he was later forced to clarify and backtrack from, and probably wisely, because Ian MacFarlane, his former Cabinet colleague last night said on 7:30 said that price drops could be the biggest consequences on this.I don't think that it will reduce prices to some of the expectations but it will keep prices perhaps below $9 a gigajoule and perhaps lower if we have realistic development going on. The way to reduce the price of gas is to increase the level of supply to a point where it is almost over supplied, in fact, will be over supplied. Thank you very much. And next hour, we'll be joined live from Washington by the Energy Minister Frydenberg fry. Let's return to Britain now where armed police have arrested a man there and seized a number of knives in a suspected terror plot.The scene took place just metres away from last month's deadly attack in Westminster. The BBC's correspondent has more. Under arrest in the shadow of Government buildings in Whitehall. The man was detained by armed officers near Parliament Square. This wasn't a random stop-and-search and arrest. It's understood that the man was targeted by the police as part of an ongoing operation by Scotland Yard's counterterrorism command. And this is what he left behind - a rucksack and his knives. Police are said to have wrestled the suspect to the ground on a traffic island. It's close to the foreign office and the entrance to Downing Street. The Prime Minister was away from London on an election visit to Derbyshire.I'm aware that an individual has been arrested in Whitehall today and that that individual has been arrested on the basis of a terrorism charge. Obviously, I can't say much more about it because it is an ongoing police investigation.For the second time in just over a month, Westminster was once again on a terror alert. But this time to the relief of those who work here and the many visitors, any threat was stopped. No-one was harmed. The suspect is said to have no link to the man who launched his murderous assault, first with a car and then with a knife. He was shot dead by police. He took the lives of five people, including PC Keith Palmer, who, unarmed, confronted him inside the grounds of the Houses of Parliament. Since then, there's been a heightened sense of security here. The fact that he's in a location which has recently been the subject of a terrorist attack, that would tend to make any investigating officer think that this is the time to step in before he causes some harm. The fact that perhaps he was making his way towards Parliament as well is a very key point, that they would want to take him out while he was least expecting it.The man now in custody is said to be 27 and from London. It's understood that he holds a British passport, but wasn't born in the UK. Counterterrorism detectives and the security services, MI5, will have built a picture of him as then monitored his movements. They'll now be looking at his mental state, his beliefs and his associates. The BBC's June Kelly reporting there. And living and working in outback Australia can be hard and dangerous.Three graziers who each lost their husbands in separate tragedies have been left to run enormous sheep and cattle stations in outback Queensland, but as Landline reports, these remarkable women are making it work.

These three women have three different properties look after more than 60,000 hectares of land in outback Queensland. And they do it almost all on their own. Each of their husbands died suddenly. They've all made the choice to stay on and work the land. I used to think that it wasn't real. I think that it wasn't happened. He'll come walking in that back door. He never came back into that back door.Everybody has a sad story and you can't dwell on it and you can't feel sorry for yourself.Now, we must turn it into a positive and we've got to go on because people depend on us.

Ann has come to accept having 12,000 hectares basically to herself.I'm my p own boss. I live in a part of the world where there's a beautiful blue sky. I'm surrounded by a good environment that's got a lot of animals in it and I think a lot of the world is clammering to be - clambering to be in that situation. I feel very fortunate to live where I live. It does look amazing and we do hope that ABC Radio reaching you out there. We know that that is great company for many graziers. Can you see more of the story on Landline this Sunday. Let's take a look at today's papers, the Friday papers and we're joined by journalist Peter Wilmoth. He's had the fun of a broad selection. We're looking apt the Whiteley art fraud case which is so interesting and we had great imagery of the painting allegedly by Whiteley but who knows and the great headline. The charges were laid and despite the judge having encouraged the jury there, they decided to quit. And now the panel of three judges has decided to quash the conviction which raises so many questions and quite a rare thing for a conviction to be quashed but it raises questions about the difficulty in prosecuting art fraud cases in this country.And the prosecution has stepped back now from wanting to see the convictions stand is whether or not they are fakes. The paintings might actually be real ones.Well, there's commentary today in the media, including from Whiteley's biographer that the paintings are not real. And it's a bit confusing as to...It really is.Well, if the conviction has been quashed...On what basis.I haven't read an explanation of the basis of that happening. If they're not real and they've been sold, including to the President of the... Or the chairman of the Sydney Swans, who paid $2.5 million for one of the Lavender Bay series, now described by Whiteley's widow as not by him, and if anyone in the world knows a fake Whiteley, it's her. So it's a fascinating case. An ex-colleague of mine at the Age is writing a book about this and she notes in the Age today that it is very hard to prosecute a case like this because maybe the police and the courts are not equipped well enough to understand about art fraud. I had the incredible privilege of visiting Wendy Whiteley in her home in Lavender Bay and was in the home where he painted it and she showed me around the secret garden. She's made a garden down there. And that was a special day to stand in the place which is now a living room, but it was Brett Whiteley's studio back in the day. Yes, a fabulous place. Now, let's get down and dirty from high art to AOC politics and the story sadly for John Coates is on the front page, this time on the front of the Australian.And it is getting particularly dirty and grubbier with an email released yesterday from John Coates to a young female employee who was told that maybe it is time for you to get into the real world and we're not a sheltered work shop here. Now, of course, John Coates has been roundly and rightly criticised for using that phrase and he's since apologised. But the President of Swimming Australia has come out and talked br the culture of the AOC at the moment. And that there is a culture there that's a worry and that Danielle Roche is a good candidate and he calls her a "change agent". Exactly what the AOC needs right now. So the pressure on John Coates is obviously there now. The author of the piece who has graced your spot many times in the past for the Australian, who has covered the story deeply for the last few weeks says that even a week ago, he would have said that John Coates was there, despite all of this, he would romp it in and now Chip says and many other observers say that it is line ball and could go either way at the critical AGM.I heard Chipp on ABC Radio last night, or maybe another station, talking about...Stick with the ABC!Let's stick with the ABC. And talking about what support there is. The Seven winner sports and the summer sports.The smaller sports that are beholden to him.Whenever you hear the word "culture", you know there's a worry. It's like in football clubs, they talk about the culture. You know that something is there.I thought that you were going to quote Jack Warner there.And culture in most organisations starts at the top and the cultural framework is set in the chief executive's office or the president's office, in this case. Yes, it sets to standard, he or she sets the standard and when that's breached and there's a revelation or there's talk of bullying or talk of inappropriate behaviour and 27 years at the top is a long time for anyone. And the word "change" is creeping in there.And there's momentum now. So um mention there on the front page, I reckon that that is going to happen every single day now until the meeting and that builds its own momentum and people with him are going to look at that day after day and think, I don't know if I want to be a part of that. And Mike Tancred's role cannot be ignored.Let's look at the herald p sun. Time up for Corbyn - do you mean -- Corby, do you mean Shapelle Corby?She's served her time in Bali and living to Kuta for the last three years after being given parole.But she doesn't want to leave Indonesia, I remember reading a short time ago.That's right. I think when she returns, the question will be, of course, when she's offered millions of dollars or a lot of money by the TV networks for her story, which inevitably she will, and by publishers, when does the proceeds of crime kick in, because it has kicked in already I understand with Corby. What can she do? I'm sure she'd love to take one of them but it is a live issue with her.Let's finish with the story in the NT news. A tragic story of a house fire in Darwin, four generations of family had lived there, a valuable family heirlooms so we temper that against the backdrop but firefighters found a rather unusual beast in the backyard.She found a 4-metre crocodile called Albert. From a media perspective, it is just the Northern Territory news finding a story that sits very comfortably on the front page.That's right.That's a big croc. And who has a pet croc? Lots of people in Darwin apparent licks, you can get permits.The croc had a permit.Always a pleasure having you on. Thank you. OK, let's take you to the sport now with PK and of the latest ahead of his very special guest next hour. Thank you very much. Very dark over here. Now the lights are on. Let's go to the sporting headlines and the Broncos beat Penrith 32-18. James Roberts was a standout in the first-half scoring one of the tries of the season. His performance has helped the Broncos win four games in a row but the State of Origin hopeful was carried off with an ankle injury in the second-half and it looked serious. Scans will show today just how bad it is. We'll show you all the highlights from the rugby league and the injury from James Roberts in the next half hour. Australia Olympic Committee President John Coates has apologised for the comments in a leaked email where he used the term "disability work shop". A vote for the AAOC presidency will occur in just over a week with Danielle Roche challenging. Sports minister Greg Hunt says whoever wins will have to get on with effective governance. In the A-League, Sydney FC has finalised the preparations for this weekend's big semifinal against the Perth Glory. The top team has a fully fit squad including the star player Milos Ninkovic who has recovered from injury. The Sky Blues become one of the most dominant teams in national league history and beaten Perth several times this season and say they expect to win tomorrow. And why wouldn't they. That's it from me. Thank you very much, Paul. Asking for your views this morning if you're a book lover, how do you buy them? Online or e books or go to the book store and buy physical books. Eddie, a retired book seller says," When I got into the book selling trade in 1999, I was told by many that books would be a thing of the past and five years or ten at the most".Robin sayings "I prefer a real book but Kindle is cheaper and an iPad filled with books is a mobile library". You know what's driving book sales here, colouring books for adults that. books for adults that. 'S the growth industry. Checking the weather now. Tropical cyclone Frances in the north-west is tracking on a west to south-west course into the Indian Ocean. A high in the Bite is dominating the weather over much of the rest of the country. Taking a look around the stays now:

more on your comments about books and asking the question do you have in the fast-paced world have time to go to book stores to lovingly look at books and maybe buy one or ten at the same time? Dale says "In defence of the e book, I would never go back to paper when travelling". That's quite different to lugging five big hard cover than having those on your Kindle or iPad.I've never read them so what are they like reading? I know that some of the early versions, they really...That's harsh.They really had a hard time getting the lighting of it correct. Are they difficult to read and comfortable?I've never read on a Kindle so I don't know. I have read e books on a tablet and it's fine. It's visually fantastic. Like iPad versions of newspapers, publishers have and still do some fantastic veriesual things with those books but I and lots of readers, lots of viewers, are echoing this. I spent so much time and you do as well, all of us on the screens, we're doing it now reading these comments, that I, in fact, quite like putting the screen down now and reading a book, a physical book. So one or two less hours of screen time on the increasingly ageing eyes, it is not such a bad thing.And one less glowing thing to look at. Please keep the comments in. Colouring in books for adults. We'd love to know what drives the local book market here in Australia. We'll see you on News Breakfast after this short break. Yes, we will.

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Hunt for a killer - a man stabs another to death at an Adelaide shopping centre.Terror arrest - a London man detained carrying knives near Parliament. The unusual pet that firefighters stumbled across in a Darwin backyard.Cassini begins its death dive through Saturn's rings.The Broncos suffers an injury.Cheers or jeers - Donald Trump set to mark 100 days as President.100 days in office, so many accomplishments: Lowered my golf handicap, my Twitter increased by 700, around finally we can shoot hibernating bears - my boys will love that.Welcome back on this Friday morning. You're watching News Breakfast.

Adelaide police are this morning hunting for a man who stabbed another man to death before fleeing the scene with a woman and a child. The attack happened at a shopping centre in Elizabeth in the city's north.For more, our reporter Matt Smith joins us now from our Adelaide Newsroom. Matt, what can you tell us about this incident?Well, this is something that happened in front of a lot of witnesses. Just before 7 o'clock, the stabbing occurred at the Elizabeth City Shopping Centre in Adelaide's northern suburbs. A 25-year-old man from the nearby suburb of Blake view was stabbed in the chest. He was treated at the scene by paramedics and rushed to Royal Adelaide Hospital, but sadly he died of his injuries. While he was taken to hospital, a witness spoke about exactly what had happened.I saw cops and ambulances run everywhere, I heard screams It was absolutely crazy, and there is a lot of people very frightened right now.How extraordinary to have so many eyewitnesses, that happening right in front of them. Matt, are any of these people known to police? They're not. , although police are saying this wasn't a random attack. Now, strangely, a cameraman, a media cameraman out there spoke to witnesses, he said there could have been five people involved in this attack, and the man who carried out the stabbing fled on foot, and he carried - or went with him was a woman with a pram carrying an infant. They took off. Police did search the area, even trying a local train service they thought they may have jumped onto it. That appears nots to be the case. I spoke to police a short time ago, they still haven't located them. The manhunt dos continue.Are police concerned for the welfare of the child as well?Look, they're not seeing too much at the moment. They're concentrating on trying to get hold of the suspect, but of course, any situation involving an infant is a concerning one, and it certainly is a point of difference in this incident which took place in front of so many people.Matt, if you get any more details today, we hopefully will hear them from you. Thanks so much.Good morning, Virginia, happy Friday.Good morning #6r789Happy because one of this nation's most celebrated authors Kathy Lette is our special guest. There she is in a typically bright outfit. She has just penned her 16th book. It is called Best Lade Plans, the lengths that a mum will go to, to help her Australia tis tick son rments This case is based on lots and lots and lots of experiences, her own son Julius as as Perger's syndrome, Julius is a very popular UK actor in a UKTV show. Loving mother, son, funny read, it gets across very at times hard-to-read messages about the plight lots of autistic kids have.Kathy has been a doting defender of her son but also a great prosecutor of the argument that the world which needs to adjust to slightly different kids rather than the other way around. She has said that drama therapy has tumped out to be so useful for so many kids on the spectrum. So she will be with us for a great conversation later today.A man has been arrested opposite the houses of Parliament in London on suspicion of planning to carry out a terrorist attack. Police say they found knives on the 27-year-old. He has been held on weapons-related charges. He is known to authorities. An Australian woman who died in a scooter crash in Bali has been named as 26-year-old Ella nooiths. She crashed into a gutter. Police say she was wearing a helmet, but it may not have been correctly fastened. Israeli authorities refuse to deny they were behind an explosion. Five strikes were car required out on an arms depot delivering weapons to Alpe d'Huez. A report released today shows Australia can produce electricity with no net carbon emissions if there is a nationally agreed policy and a carbon price. Energy Networks Australia and the CSIRO have spent two weeks working on a road map for the will ek *ty sector. The report has found rooftop solar and batteries would help drive Australia's energy transformation. Australian TV personality Bert Newton is spending his second night in a Melbourne hospital after recently suffering a bout of pneumonia. A spokeswoman for the Epworth Hospital says the entertainer is undergoing tests and is in for observation. Newton was unable to attend the Logies last week due to his health.These unprocessed images came from the vehicle which successfully flu 3,000km from Saturn, the closest the spacecraft has ever come to the planet. Cassini will attempt another 21 close encounters before destroying itself by flying directly into Saturn's crashing atmosphere. Firefighters stumbled across an unusual household pet while battles a blaze in Darwin, a pet crocodile called Albert. The 4 metre croc was discovered when the house caught alight in fanny dpai, Bay. It was destroyed. Albert has lived there since 1958. That's one old crock. And lived there happily there as well:To take a look at the markets here is Del.Good morning, everyone. Taking a quick look at the markets:

Let's check your Friday weather now. A very good morning to Nate.Good morning. Stick around because in about 20 minutes' time, we will have details about the latest on the late-season tropical cyclone Francis. It has just been upgraded to a Category 2 system, so I will bring you all the updates on that. But for now, let's take a look at the p look around the nation:

Let's get more for you on the terror arrest in London overnight. Europe correspondent Steve Cannane joins us now. Steve, I understand you were actually nearby almost immediately after this arrest. What did you see? Yeah, I was there within about 10 minutes of the man being wrestled to the ground, just outside the Houses of Parliament. He was basically halfway between No. 10 Downing Street and the House of Commons, and what I saw was a man standing up surrounded by four police officers and it didn't seem like all that much of a big deal. Obviously the initial tackle to the ground was quite dramatic, but he didn't seem to be resisted arrest, or being interrogated by the side of Whitehall there. It seemed like a pretty calm situation. He was placed in a police car, a police escort of about three cars and they then drove him away. He away.. Was taken to, we later found out, to a South London police station where he was being questioned by counter-terrorism Command from Scotland Yard, so they are certainly treating this as a potential thwarted act of terrorism. Yes, amazing, and clearly he had been on their Lys, so the authorities were light onto him, Steve, in fact, they had clearly been in operation?That's right, this was no random stop-and-search. They knew who this guy was, knew he was on his way to Westminster, and they obviously decided now was the too imto act. When they pulled him over, when they tackled him to the ground just on Parliament Street, there was a number of knifes that hit the deck, so when I got there, you could see a brown backpack on the ground and you could see a number of knifes that were on the ground, and you could see the forensics experts in their gear there, picking up the knives, picking up the backpack, taking photos, securing all that evidence which will obviously be part of that investigation. Another part of that investigation that we know about so far is that a number of homes of associates of this man have also been searched tonight. Now, we don't know the man's name All we know is that he was in his late 20s, that vs a Londoner, that he was born overseas, we're told, but he has a British passport, so we've got a few details at the moment. Scotland Yard has released a statement this afternoon, but they certainly haven't been talking beyond that.I think we have got an eyewitness that we can hear from, Steve. We might listen to that person now.I think it shows that our police and intelligence and security services are on the alert, as they always are, looking to keep us safe and secure, and I would say that we owe a huge debt of gratitude to these people, many of whom are unseen, unheard, yet the job they do day in, day out, to keep us secure is a really important one.My apologies, Steve, that's not an eyewitness, although I guess in a sense a very important witness - of course the Prime Minister there, and this is part of really in the wake of the dreadful attack out the front of the Houses of Parliament, this crackdown that you've been speaking about? Yes, and it certainly happened in her neighbourhood, Downing Street the She was in Derbyshire in a factory where you saw her speaking there, and as you heard, she was praising police and intelligence services and this was an operation moving VIdd MI5 and police. And in London, those two bodies cooperate very well. There has been some criticism that in France those two entities don't do as good a job, but certainly in Britain, they seem to do that well and this was a case where they got intelligence, they go the it to the police and it looks like they thwarted a potentially awful situation in Westminster. Steve, thanks so much for that. Now a new report into Australia's electricity market has found that consumers will pay billions of dollars more, or face a less stable supply, until a detailed national energy plan is developed.The Energy Networks Australia and CSIRO electricity network transformation road map - that's a mouthful - has been released this morning. To tell us more about it, we are joined by the chief executive of Energy Networks Australia, John Bradley. Good morning to you.Good morning, Michael.This very detailed report says that Australia can produce electricity without any carbon emissions by 2050, but what needs to happen for that to eventuate?To do that, a lot of things need to be done by industry, including reforming our pricing, ensuring we have the right standards for integrating with all this new technology that is coming onto the grid, but also things that need to be done by state and federal governments including carbon-enduring policy.And you also argue carbon and enduring carbon price.Well, that could be an emissions trading scheme, it could be other things that the Government looks at in its review this year, but with the right kind of carbon policy, it is possible to achieve significant savings in the cost of this transition we are going to make, and to not only meet our current targets by 2030, but exceed those and put us on a pathway to zero net emissions by 2050. The technology is there, we can see significant use of renewables and battery storage. We can make use of gas resources provided we've got the right environment for efficient gas supply to our major industrial customers, and make use of that entire energy suite to deliver a carbonised system.So having an effective carbon price, be it an emissions trading scheme or a fully fledged carbon price, that is a more effective lever than the other policy options available in the electricity area, John?So as part of the rooked map, we looked at a range of carbon policy mechanisms and it found that an outcome-based technology, that that will deliver significant savings, over $200 per year on average between 2020 and 2030 Emissions trading scheme can do that, and that's one of the options that has been analysed as part of this process, but there could be other carbon policy oltions that the Government looks at as part of its carbon policy review this year. There is a consensus that we need state and federal governments to be better coordinated on carbon policy and we look forward to a constructive approach this year.We have been showing pictures of households across Australia with solar panels on their rooftops,. You argue in this report that increasingly households, the customer, will be key in terms of energy distribution around Australia?Yeah, this is the most exciting part, but also the most challenging part of the transformation, that you will see basically the electricity system upended from the way it was designed to operate, with about 40% of energy by the end of the period coming from the households at the end of the grid and our poles and wires in those residential areas, so with that kind of transformation, we will need the manage the grid in a much different way. In Queensland, for instance, we could see even by 2030, more solar rooftop capacity on the system than there is actually coal-fired generation in Queensland at the moment.John Bradley, we will see how the federal, state and territory governments react to that. Thanks for joining us this morning. Thank you.That is a fascinating dement development dget. If you are one of those making the really big push into self--generated electricity, using the sun over your home, an interesting shift. To the major papers around the could untri-now. The Financial Review says the Turnbull Government will help fund inland rail and is almost certain to build, own and operate Sydney's second April. Part of a big infrastructure push, part of the focus of next month's Budget.The Guardian Australia shows I a confrontation between Sydney University students and a man handing out Holocaust denial leaflets.The Courier-Mail rerlts on a string of reports into youth detention which were only released with very large redactions.The Herald Sun reports on bookies who offer lines of credit.The Age reports Peter Gant and Mohamed Siddique have had their convictions quashed. A Melbourne court found prosecutors failed to prove that two Brett Whiteley paintings were fake. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that the LNG producers have cast doubt that export controls would slash prices. The AustralianThe Australian says the red-hot Sydney market has started to cool with house prices dipping 0.1% to April. The Daily Telegraph shows a man injecting himself while sitting in a gutter at 9:00am in Surrey Hills. The Advertiser reports a teenager has been charged with making dozens of bomb threats. They were hoaxes in the end, and they were sent to Australian schools.The West Australian says the State Government has revived dormant laws that allow them to strip unexplained wealth from organised crime figures.The Mercury pictures John Ward and his son, Stephen, who were found in good health yesterday after spending three nights lost in freezing conditions in Tasmania's wilderness. A good news story there.The Canberra Times reports Josh Papalii's spot in the Australian rugby league squad may be in doubt after he was convicted of drink-driving.Pet croc survives house fire - a Territory family has sadly lost their home, but their 50-year-old croc named Albert survived. That story on the front page of the NT News theWe are talking about books. In fact, books are back big-time. Figures are on the rise with figures showing 2016 was a record year.The BBC has made a visit to the bookshops to try to find out why.See, the tiger who came to tea.Elaine Davis likes to take her grandson Harry to the bookshop most days for his benefit as well as hers. What's your attitude to reading real books as opposed to electronic books?They are different and I read them at different times, but I love real books, I love the feel of the books, I love to see the book sitting there, so I like books around the house.And Elaine sntd alone. A record year for UK publishing as seen a surge in sales of printed, not digital books. Last year, sales of physical books rose by 8%, but total digital book salesful by 3% and sales of consumer e-books, the best sellers you would find in most bookshops were down 16%. Devices like the kindle promised to spark an upheaval to the book trade, with the generation getting used to reading on screens, but now that revolution appears to have stalled.In every aspect of lives we have screens in front of us, whether it be at work or home, and people are actually choosing to spend time away from them, in their Lesh tour moments, looking at a book in the printed version.Harry Potter and the Cursed Child was the best-selling book for 2016.Grannies, granddads, aunties, uncles are buying books as presents teachers are. , the Chris Evans Writing competition, all those things are promoting reading an literacy and the importance of books and a good story.Academic books are moving online, but it seems the long history of the printed book still has a few chapters left.Life's simple pleasures. We would like to hear from you, are you part of that trend, reading more physical books. Send contact us:

That peace by The Guardian explaining in greater detail why there has been a greater trend. Kicking it all off for us this morning.Somebody who not only reads but writes fantastic books is Paul Kennedy.Thank you, looks like an interesting story, but read it later, a very special guest to talk about Super netball and perhaps the biggest game of the season so far. But updating quickly on the rugby league. The brong kos won last night. James Roberts scored one of the tries of the season and an Origin hopeful, but in the second half, he hurt his ankle and had to be carried off the field. Scans today will reveal just how bad that is. The Broncos have won four in a row now, looking good other than James Roberts' injury.John Coates has apologised for his comments in a leaked email where he used the term "sheltered workshop" disability advocates have condemned Coates. Danni Roche has challenged for the job. Sports Minister Greg Hunt says whoever wins needs to get on with effective governance. And in the A-League, a semifinal against Perth Glory. Star player mill loss has recovered from injury. The Sky Blues have become one of the most dominant teams in national league hort. They expect to win tomorrow, so of course they might lose. No, they will probably win. They have been an absolute standout. Let's go to the Super Netball and top-of-the-table clash this weekend with the Melbourne Victoria Enns hosting the Sunshine Coast Lightning. Both teams are on 7 points. Joining us in Sunshine Coast and Diamonds shooter Caitlyn Bassett. Good morning to you.Good morning.A very big game against the Vixens and two of the most unusual teams in that you've just become such a great balance wnl the line-ups, without a whole host of internationals?Yes, I guess at the start of the competition, not many would have tipped us to be top 2 on the ladder, but I think we've gone against expectation and our team in particular on the Sunshine Coast has been going fantastically well, and we have been keeping a sharp eye on the Melbourne Vixens down here.Tell us how you've done it. You've come from Perth. Landed at the Sunny Coast on the other side of the country and it is a region place that hasn't had a national team there based before? How has it been for you?It has been amazing. I needed something different for my career. To make the change has been the best thing for my netball in particular, but the Sunshine Coast is a region in need of a netball team and the support we've received from the community as been absolutely amazing. It is a fantastic place to live and an even better place to play sport. We've got all of the facilities up there we need.One of Australia's sensational areas. Going through your stats. 510 goals for your team this year, an attacking presence, obviously with yourself. You've shot 3867 from 413. Could you be in any better form than you have this year? Yes, I'm pretty lucky to receive the ball right underneath the post and when you have Laura Langman feeding the ball to you, and others giving you en opportunity to receive the ball down the other end makes my job easier. My combination with Stephanie and Kelsey has been exciting and potentially prospects later on in the season.Buttive ee at an age, I know you're being nice and humble, but do you feel like you've played any better than like you have this season and last year was a massive year for you?Yes, I think I've got much more development to go from herend at Noelene said she saw more improvements in my game and there is definitely more for me, with I is why I want to continue playing netball. But relishing the Sunshine Coast and fitting into this team and I think I'm definitely a lot more comfortable on court at the moment.Noelene is a really interesting coach, the most successful domestic coach in New Zealand. She was overlooked for the Silver Ferns job. How do you rate her?She is fantastic. She has an holistic approach to netball that suits us, not just on court, but off the court as well and the personalties she has brought into this team have integrated quite well. She has done a fantastic job, we all love her.What have your aspirations become now, do you have aspirations to captain your country? Yes, I will skip the coaching part for now, I will leave that for Lisa Alexander.That can come later?Yes, over the last few years I've stepped up into the leadership role and I've been supported by the players around me, and working with two such successful players and their leadership styles has really opened my eyes as to how I want to lead and to step out there and captain your country is a massive hon entrepreneur and I've still got a lot of work to do, but I've been enjoying the time and working with Sharni Layton and Madison Robertson at the Diamonds level.When Kim came in and had a chot a while ago, she said that netball has gone to a new level in Super netball. Do you a groo he?100%. The best league in the world. Opening up the national imports rule has allowed more Jamaicans, South African girls, Trinidad toe back go, and it has opened our eyes to different styles of play internationally and given the opportunity for so many unknowns to come up and play their hand and we've had fantastic girls across the league who have really stamped their authority on positions that no-one has seen before.A quick word about the Vixens who have done that exceptionally, better than anyone, given that they haven't got regular internationals on their line-up, on paper, probably shouldn't be on top of the ladder, but they are?Yes, I guess the opportunity, these spots tightly contested week in and week out, and it doesn't matter what the name is on the back of your dress, when you get the opportunity to step out on the court, you want to give it to your best and the likes of Emily and joey, and Chloe Watson, definitely have given it a red-hot crack and it has been fantastic. Hard to pick an Australian team when it's all over and a big year ahead. We can talk about that some other time maybe. Just something else, you are still studying journal #i678, how is thatYes, fantastic.It is a growth industry(Laughs? . Yes (, up on the Sunshine Coast University and loving it, go to training in the morning and walk over to uni in the afternoon. It is great.Brilliant. Maybe you can come back and talk to us about digital journalismTeach you about social media.Good luck, Caitlyn. See you over the weekend. Cheers.Perhaps, not to embarrass her, but the world's best netballer in the studio this morning. Thank you, PK, possibly the worth's tallest - man, she is tall.Yes, I feel like I need to put my platforms on, but how nice to hear her discussion on leadership, because that has been so missing and the women are really bringing it, so he great to see.Good stuff. Let's go to the weather now. Good morning, Nate.Good morning. Late-season cyclone has snuck under the wire today. Tropical Cyclone Francis now a Category 2 system, toer cast to intense Foo I to a Category 3, severe tropical cyclone, as it moves west to south-west, avoiding the mainland and moving into the Indian Ocean. Gale force winds for the northern western coast, though. Francis will likely be the last one we see this season. Let's move to the satellite picture and you can see how extensive the cloud associated with Tropical Cyclone Francis is in the north-west. Meanwhile, a high in the Bight is dominating the weather over much of the rest of the country. Looking around the states, a chilly start for parts of Queensland:

Stay with us. Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg is joining us shortly from Washington. Don't miss that. And good debt versus bad debt. The Treasure Epworth hospital wants to distinguish between the two in the Federal Budget. What does it all really mean and would it pass the test of the accountants? Barrie Cassidy will join us to discuss that and the week in Federal politics all coming up. But first, here's Michael with the latest news. Adelaide police are this morning searching for a man who stabbed another man to death before fleeing the scene with a woman and a child. The attack took place just before 7:00 last night at a shopping centre in Elizabeth in the city's north. Paramedics rushed the 25-year-old victim to hospital where he later doid from his injuries. Witnesses -- died from his injuries. Witnesses said that they saw the suspect run from the scene with a woman pushing an infant from the scene. A man has been arrested opposite the Houses of Parliament in London on suggestion pigs of planning to carry out a terrorist attack. Police said that they found knives on the 27-year-old. He's now being held on terrorism and weapons related charges. The man was known to British intelligence authorities. A report out this morning shows Australia can produce electricity with no net carbon emissions if there's a nationally agreed policy. Energies Australia and the CSIRO have spent two years working on a road map for the electricity sector. The report found that roof top sole are a and batteries will help to drive Australia's energy transformation. It found than an outcome based policy that doesn't try to pick technology winners or gep fine winners that need to be on the grid, that that will deliver significant savings, over $200 per year on average between 2020 and 2030. John Bradley there. Finally, images of Saturn's atmosphere have been sent back to earth after the Cassini spacecraft's first dive inside the planet's rings. These unprocessed images came after they successfully flew 3,000km from Saturn. Cassini will attempt another 21 very close encounters before destroying itself by flying directly into Saturn's crushing atmosphere. What a way to go. Now with the morning's finance, here's Del Irani. Thank you, good morning everyone. Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe has defined the internationalisation of the Chinese currency as one of the key events to have global implications for the system. China's Central Bank spent billions of dollars last year to slow the decline against the surging dollar. The yuan hit an almost 8.5 year low against the greenback at one point. Philip Lowe said that China needs to strike the balance between tightening the capital flows out of the economy as the action runs counter to the longer term goal of liberalisation. A new report says that Australia needs to focus on trade opportunities with China and India rather than being derailed by nerves about the rise of protectionism in the United States. The report cites the protectionist policies of US President Donald Trump and the Brexit vote as two key factor clouding potential deals with key emerging markets. It says that Australia is over emphasising traditional trade with the UK, US and New Zealand. Let's check the global markets now:

European Central Bank head Mario Draghi said that the eurozone's economic recovery is increasingly solid and face fewer risks. He also added, however, that inflation in the 19-nation bloc was still not high enough to raise interest rates. The ECB has kept its main interest rate on hold for another month. It also decided not to change the ECB's bond buying stimulus. Economic stimulus in the eurozone is at the highest level since the debt crisis but inflation continues to miss the ECB's target for a fifth straight year. And staying in Europe, Deutsche Bank could move up to 4,000 jobs out of Britain as a result of Brexit which is nearly half of its UK workforce. This is the latest warning of job losses from a company since the UK voted to leave the European Union. Currently, UK-based companies can conduct business throughout Europe but could lose the right because of Brexit. Meantime, Deutsche Bank's latest results show that 3,000 job cuts have helped to boost its profits. And United airlines says that it will now ufer up to $14,000 to passengers who give up seats on over booked flights. It's part of a review following an inquiry set up after a man was injured while he was dragged screaming from a fully booked plane earlier this month. United said that it will no longer use law enforcement officers to remove passengers from flight unless it is a matter of safety and security, and the airline says that seated passengers will no longer be asked to leave against their will. And that's the latest finance news for now. Thank you. We'll have some more for you from Michael who is on the couch and we're going to take you there now. Let's get more on the new report out this morning that found Australia can produce electricity with no net carbon emissions if a national policy and a carbon price can be agreed upon. Energy and Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg joins us now all the way from Washington. Good morn, minister.Nice to be with you, Michael.OK, over to you. The energy peak body and the CSIRO both say that a carbon price is the way of ensuring no net carbon emissions by 2050. Why not?There are lots of mechanisms that you can use to reduce your emissions and as you know, we've been very successful in beating our first Kyoto target. We're on track to beat the 2020 target by 224 million tonnes and we expect to beat the 2030 target which is reducing the carbon footprint by 2030 on the 2005 levels. We're doing that with a number of different mechanisms including at energy rodivity plan and the Renewable Energy Target as well as the work of the Clean Energy Finance Corporation and arena and I think we're on the right track, although we continually review the policies.This is the peak energy body and importantly, Australia's peak scientific body the CSIRO, says that's fine, but the carbon price is the most effective way of getting to that aim.As you know, we had a big fight with the Labor Party at the 2013 election over the carbon tax. We won that successfully and were successful at abolishing the carbon tax.Even with the advice from the CSIRO?We're certainly not going back down the route of a carbon tax. What we will do is look for world's best practice in trying to find the lowest cost of abatement and the policies that we have in place are working. I'm here in the United States exchanging notes with the administration on a range of measures that they're using, whether it's energy efficiency measures, getting more gas into the market because of course, gas has half the emissions of coal, or other mechanisms, for example, wind power, which they use a lot in Texas where the current US energy US energy secretary is from. I'll get to the views from the US energy secretary in a moment. Speaking of that, lots of scepticism from the Prime Minister's claim yesterday which he's since walked back from a bit in talking about the potential export ban on gas would halve, if not more, the wholesale price. Is that achievable?Well, I think Bill Shorten has been mischievous in the extreme, or indeed, misleading because the Prime Minister never said that all gas user also see a halving of their gas price. What he was pointing out to was the fact that some energy users are being quoted contracts for gas at $20 a gigajoule, which is double what you should be paying or more than double what you should be paying if you take into account what is called the net back price, which would be the price overseas for gas minus the transportation and the lick whichification costs. So -- liquefication. So it has been warmly received from everyone from the Manufacture's Council to the Grattan Institute.The Australian producers and exploration see it as a risk in terms of discouraging potential investment in Australia if the transport bans are slapped on?I don't believe that that is the case and clearly we have a real tight market domestically when it comes to gas and we have more than 65,000 jobs that are in gas dependant-industries. They range from chemicals to paper to glass and food manufacturing and we can't afford to see those jobs lost and those companies put under sustained economic pressure because of gas prices which are higher than the international market. So I think that everyone who watches this closely recognises that the Government's actions were the right actions. These are hopefully temporary targeted measures, but it will depend upon the company's ability to get more gas into the market so we don't see a continuation of the current gas problem.Realistically, they'll need to be more than temporary. These will be more or less permanent to achieve the aims you're after?Let's just see how we go, because the companies understand how important it is for them to produce more gas for the domestic market. On the east coast, we export about two thirds of what we produce and the Australian Energy Market Operator had predicted short falls in the domestic market from the summer of 2018-19 across the states to Victoria, South Australia, New South Wales and later on in Queensland. And that was completely unacceptable for the Government. Now, one of the other ways that we can improve the gas situation is to get the state governments that currently have moratoriums and bans on the development of unconventional gas lifted and I'm talking particularly of Victoria and also the Northern Territory. Because in both of those jurisdictions, they have enormous amounts of gas under the ground which they're denying the households and the employer and manufacturing in their own -- manufacturers in their own states and territories. You're there in Washington ahead of the visit next week and all about rebuilding the US and Australia relationship and consolidating it. How did the meeting with Rick Perry go? A man known to all of us through the various runs for the Republican nomination for the presidency?It was a great meeting of nearly an hour in length and we talked about everything from renewable energy to gas and carbon capture and storage. And later on today, I'm heading to Texas to see a carbon capture and storage plant that the Obama Administration had provided over glr 150 million towards -- $150 million towards. So both of our countries, Rick Perry and I understand that you need an all of the above strategy and you can't put all of your eggs in your basket. That we are transitioning to a lower emissions future and that energy security and energy affordability is absolutely paramount and I think that the relationship, whether it is in the energy space or the national security space or the economic space is very, very strong. It doesn't need rebuilding and the visit by the Prime Minister next week will be just an important continuation of what is our most important bilateral partnership.Famously, you once called Donald Trump a drop kick. How has that gone down in the official meetings?No-one has raised it Michael, but I can tell you...They all know it!As I've said subsequently, I could have been a bit more judicious in my comments but clearly the add my station is dealing with us very positively. I also met with another minister, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency as well as a number of Senators and Congressmen on the hill and their view of Australia could not be better.Josh Frydenberg in Washington, thank you so much for joining Breakfast this morning. . Good to be with you. Nice to see that he travels with his own camera crew as well. Let's stay with Federal politics and joining us with his take on the week is Insiders host Barrie Cassidy. Let me put a theory to you off the back of what we've been hearing the minister say. Is any electorate going to thank any Government for simply keeping the gas on? Isn't that just a given?Yeah, absolutely. I think that it comes into the category that the Government has done three or four things now in the last few weeks and I think that it is broadly popular. Starting with the Snowy Mount as decision and then the citizenship thing wept over well and now this. How could you be against setting aside a certain amount of your own gas for domestic use, especially with the prospect of it being cheaper than it is now. Despite what Josh Frydenberg just said, the Prime Minister did stumble a bit on that because he did suggest that the price... Excuse me... That it ought to be half of what it is. To say that implies that somehow it will be. When in fact, I think that the price differential won't be that great.That's the thing that that goes to my point about the gratitude. The gratitude will only kick in if they can get the price down and if they can't, then there won't be much of a net effect, it will just be a Government doing what any Government should do which is to make sure that the electricity is on.The second thing is reliability. It will certainly make it more reliable, but it raises the question - why wasn't it done years ago or by the previous Labor Government and Tony Abbott and Malcolm Turnbull because they had plenty of warning. And I seem to remember one minister and it might be somebody close to the one you were just talking to said that it would be an investment killer when Labor put up an idea that was broadly like this to guarantee supply. So there's been a bit of hypocrisy on both sides. And it wasn't an easy thing for this Government to do because it is interventionist and it amounts to export controls, and if not something that you would expect a Conservative Government to do, but it will be popular.As we head towards the Budget on May 9, we're now in the world of good debt and bad debt. Please explain.What they're doing is separating out productive debt as opposed to non-productive debt, I suppose. But where you're getting into trouble over this, productive debt is easy to explain and it is infrastructure and it's something that you get a benefit for. But can you really describe education and health spending as non-productive debt when, in fact, the benefits are immeasurable. So I think they've just got to be careful about how they explain that. But to be fair, they will be putting both analysis, both measurements side-by-side so they're not trying to deceive. You'll still get a sense of what it would have been in the real world as opposed to the new virtual world, I suppose.It seems to me a really unusual pre-Budget season. Normally by now, the Canberra press gallery and journalists are all in a flap about what will the surplus be and can you get debt under control and when it is going back into surplus and there seems to be an acceptance now that we're in the world of debt now.Rather than talk about the narrative and the objectives and whatever, what we're getting is a lecture on how they're going to do the maths.Yes, exactly, which we've never had before.That is odd and can you imagine what would have happened if Wayne Swann came up with this when the debt was really, really bad! Within it was half of what it is now. I think that Scott Morrison would have been a little critical and accused him of playing tricks. But nevertheless, you can see benefit in this. And what it does is that it is a precursor to announcing things like the Inland Rail project and as we see this morning the Sydney Airport and now it looks like the Government might be building it and owning it.And operating it as well. Does that strike you as unusual?Well, it is. Governments I thought were walking away from operating anything but now there seems to be an acceptance overnight that you can take on a $6 billion project and operate it yourself.Sto they can get the blame when it is there. So we can blame them when it is $6 for a bottle of water. Last week the interview with Peter Dutton on Insiders about that incident on Manus island. This is a story that's not going away?And Peter Dutton is still insisting that his version of events is correct. Interesting now, the three men who have been placed under suspicion for the behaviour are now saying that they want the whole thing investigated and they would like the CCTV footage released. Now, that would be an unusual approach for anybody to take if they felt in any way that they were guilty of something. It looks as if Andrew Bolt had been either given a briefing on the footage or has seen it because in the article yesterday, he said that the boy may be ten but he looks five. Well, how would you know that if you hadn't seen the footage? So if it is starting to be... If the footage is out there and certain people have been briefed on it or even been shown the footage, I think that it is high time that everybody got to see it because there's a lot at stake here and sently, eventually, the public is entitled to see the footage so it is clear in everybody's mind who is telling the truth.Now, tell us your interpretation of what Cory Bernardy has done in assigning the conservative movement with family first?I think it is two little parties trying to be a little bit bigger.You don't think that it has the potential to over time turn into something?In South Australia t will have an impact but what a hybrid there. Nick Xenophon is such a big figure in South Australia and the major pears are on the decline and now Family First and Cory Bernardi and the Greens there. So everybody gets a go in South Australia. But I can't see it... The main benefit for Cory Bernardi in this is that he gets all of the members, he gets all of the Family First members and that would be useful in terms of organisational support. But at this point, it is still one Senator.And we'll see what happens next. Now, the wooden spoon winner this week? Well, you mentioned this already and marking 100 days of Donald Trump. And Sean Spicer, I mean, what a remarkably foolish parody he's become but I'm tempted to give it to him.I love it when you send the spoon overseas. But Donald Trump, I think, because he said that the 100 days during the campaign, this was the going to be the measure of his performance. Now he's saying that it doesn't matter at all which is a rather apt way to end 100 rather chaotic and confusing days.Would you like me to ask you about a guest on Sunday morning or not?Yes, Mark Butler the shadow Energy Minister. So energy stays front and centre.It will.The light are stay on and the gas will keep coming, hurrah! Reasons to be cheerful part 3! As you mentioned, Barrie Cassidy's guest will be the shadow climate minister Mark Butler. Insiders is on from 9 am every Sunday morning and whenever you like on i view. As he mentioned, Donald Trump is about to mark 100 days in office. The world's most famous animated family, the Simpsons have marked the moment as only they can. Here's their take on the impact Donald Trump has made so far.

Don't wrinkle the suit.100 days in office, so many accomplishments, lowered my golf handicap. My Twitter following increased by 700. And finally, we concealed hibernating bears.Sir, here's a new bill, it lowers tacks for own Republicans. Can Fox news read it and I'll watch what they say? No, you have to read it.The new Supreme Court justice takes the seat on the bench. You can buy Ivanka's robe with earrings for over 1,000 roubles.You said that you would replace me with Garland. Oh, God, this is horrible. This was supposed to last me the whole four years.Marge, please, give the President of the United States some time. He's only 70 years old!Help, they're taking me back to where I came from.Where is that?I don't remember!100 day, we are 6.8% of the way home. Paid for any anybody else 2020.And on it goes. Yeah, the bit that we played at the start of the program with that unidentified animal on the top of Donald Trump's head is the absolute winner. That's the pearler and nicely done.Looked liabling a raccoon. Big bushy tail. Now, athlete Jana Pittman is a 2-time World Champion and Olympian and a 4-time Commonwealth Games gold medallist.On this week's One Plus One, she tells Jane Hutcheon that despite the athletic feats, it is her children that are the accomplishment.They are the best thing that happened to me. I had five mischearge carriages trying to get my two babies so the relationships breaking down, my marriage breaking down thinking that I wouldn't have any more kids and then losing those babies and breakdowns of those relationships, to then come out and feel like I had the biggest miracle on the planet with the birth of my children easily makes me realise how lucky I am and makes me teary to think how lucky I've been. I work in women's health and watch women in their 20s and 30s who can't have children and there I was thinking that I would never have any more because I wasn't married and because I kept losing them and now they're here.Do you feel life has been a fairytale? Or a hard slog?I don't know, actually. My family is very fairytale. My parents are very... Like, I have the most optimistic, happy, wonderful family that support each other through thick and thin and I think that I wouldn't be me if it wasn't for them and they certainly give me a very fairytale life. But certainly, it was an up and down rollercoaster. So I genuinely feel like I had two completely separate lives that were trying to amalgamate together and never really fit. And now that I'm retired, I've got one life and it is better.You can see the full he side at 10:00 on ABC TV and i view. One of this country's greatest sports women and great ambassadors for sport.I would be interested to watch that interview because I saw a snippet of Jana Pittman on the wonderful Insight program on SBS about athletes moving into life after sport. She spoke about how she felt like she hadn't really every retired even though she's retired but in her mind, she never won the Olympic gold medal that she wanted. So there's unfinished business but she has to move into... She's become ago doctor, of course so, she has got another life. But the shift that the athletes have to go through is a fascinating insight, one of the best.It would be a great interview because for the first time I've ever seen, she looks happy in her skin. That's the great challenge so she seems like she's got there.And I believe that Four Corners doing a strong story next week on athletes and the struggle that she go through as well. So look forward to that one.Now to sport and the Broncos beat Penrith last night 32-18. James Roberts, have a look at the footwork there and the speed. They call him Jimmy the jet. The Broncos were way out in front and scored tries in the second-half to come back and Roberts in fact hurt himself and had to be helped from the ground with an ankle injury. Scans today will see just how bad it is. But not a good time for anyone to get injured if they've got aspirations to play a part in the State of Origin which is just a month away. Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates has apologised for the comments that were in a leaked email that he used the term "sheltered workship". Disability advocates condemned it. He told the ABC that it was the wrong choice of words. A vote for the AOC presidency will occur in a week with Danielle Roche challenging. The sports minister said whoever wins has to get on with effective governance. And the A-League, Sydney FC has finalised its preparations for the semifinal against Perth glory. The top team is fully fit. Even the star player Milos Ninkovic has been declared fully fit. No wonder the coaches are smiling. Graham Arnold is almost smiling. They expect to win on the weekend. So yes, the star player and maybe the Johnny Warren medallist is back in action and great to have Caitlyn Bassett on the program talking about the top of the table fixture in the Super Netball that will happen tomorrow night. The Vixens versus the Lightning and when you sat down at the start of the season and looked at all the teams, you would have maybe not picked those two to be the top two teams. But they are superbly run. But they are superbly run.
Thank you. Starting with the satellite, tropical cyclone fran sells tracking into the Indian Ocean -- Frances tracking into the Indian Ocean. A high in the bite is dominating the weather for most of the country. Let's look around the states now:

thank you. Our special guest next hour talking lots about books this morn, she has written 16 of them. Kathy Lette has written a book about the challenges of a mum with a son with autism and the extraordinary lengths that she goes to make his life as normal as possible.That's coming up. Do stay with us. It will be a great conversation. We'll see you in a This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson

Hunt for a killer - a man stabs another to death at an Adelaide shopping centre manyTerror arrest - a London man detained carrying knives near Parliament. The unusual pet firefighters stumbled across in a Darwin backyard. The first raw images from sat tush as Cassini begins its death dive through the planet's rings. Also ahead - Kathy Lette asks the question: What happens when your autistic child grows up? We will talk to the author about her fascinating new book later this hour. Welcome back to this Friday morning. You are watching News Breakfast. Adelaide police are this morning hunting for a man who stabbed another man to death before fleeing the scene with a woman and a child. The attack happened at a shopping centre in Elizabeth in the city's north last night.Now, our reporter Matt Smith says the stabbing was witnessed by many people.This was something that happened in front of a lot of witnesses, just before 7 o'clock, this stabbing occurred at the Elizabeth City Shopping Centre in Adelaide's northern suburbs. A 25-year-old man from the nearby suburb of Blake view was stabbed in the chest. He was treated at the scene by paramedics and rushed to the Royal Adelaide Hospital, but sadly he died of his injuries. Now, while he was being taken to hospital, a witness spoke about exactly what had happened.I saw cops and ambulances run everywhere, people - I heard screams. It was absolutely crazy, and there is a lot of people very frightened right now. How extraordinary to have so many eyewitnesses, that happening right in front of them. Matt, are any of these people known to police? They're not, although police are saying this wasn't a random attack. Now, strangely, a cameraman, a media cameraman, out there spoke to witnesses. He said there could have been five people involved in this attack, and the man who carried out the stabbing fled on foot, and he carried - or went with him was a woman with a pram carrying an infant, so they took off. Police did search the area. Even trying a local train service, they thought they might have jumped onto. That appears not to be the case. I spoke to police a short time ago. They still haven't located him. The manhunt does continue.We have been reporting that a child in a pram was somehow near by that incident. Are police concerned for the welfare of that child as well?Look, they're not saying too much at the moment, they're concentrating on trying to get hold of the suspect, but of course any situation involving an infant is a concerning one, and is certainly is a point of difference in this incident which took place in front of so many people.Matt Smith who spoke to us earlier on the program. More news for you now and a man has been arrested opposite the houses of Parliament in London on suspicion of planning to carry out a terrorist attack. Police say they found knives on the 27-year-old. He has been held on terrorism and weapons-related charges. The man was known to British intelligence authorities.An Australian woman who died in a scooter crash in Bali has been identified by local authorities as 26-year-old Ella Knights 689 It appears Ms Knights lost control of the vehicle, crashing into I a gutter. Police say she was wearing a helmet, but it may not have been correctly fastened.A Victorian teenager is facing 74 charges over alleged bomb hoaxes at schools in Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia. The 17-year-old allegedly made the threats between May last year and this month. The teen's case will return to court in June.A report out this morning shows Australia can produce electricity with no net carbon emissions if there is an agreed national policy and a carbon price. Energy Networks Australia and the CSIRO has spent two years working on a road map for the electricity sector. The report has found rooftop solar and batteries will-drive Australia's energy France formation.A policy that doesn't pick technology winners or find a certain amount of renewables that need to be on the grid, that that will deliver significant saving, over $200 per year on average, between 2020 and 2030.Images of Saturn's atmosphere have been sent back to Earth. These unprocessed images came from Cassini which successfully flew 3,000km from Saturn, the closest the spacecraft has ever come to the planet. The Cassini will fly some more missions before pch destroying itself.A pet crocodile answering to the name of Albert was discovered in a house in the the suburb of Fannie Bay caught alive. Albert has lived in the backyard since 1958.Two baby Papua New Guinea wins have made their debut at London Zoo. The tiny birds hatched over Easter but have been looked after by keepers who say their parents haven't been able to care for them. The babies will be designed to a nurse are I in a couple of months. Look, they fit in a dish. No word yet on what they've been named.Let's check your weather:

Now, returning to Britain where, as we mentioned, armed police have arrested a man and seized a number of knifes in a suspected terror plot.The scene took place just metres away from last month's deadly attack in Westminster. The BBC's June Kelly reports.Under arrest in the shadow of government buildings in Whitehall. The man was detained by armed officers near Parliament Square. This wasn't a random stop, search and arrest. It is understood the man was targeted by the police as part of an ongoing separation by Scotland Yard's counter-terrorism Command. And this is what he left behind - a rucksack and his knives. P- shall Police are said to have wrestled the suspect to the ground on a traffic island. It is close to the Foreign Office and the entras to Downing Street. The Prime Minister was away from London on an election visit to Derbyshire.We are aware a man has been arrested in whoout Hall today and that that individual has been arrested on the basis of a terrorism charge. Obviously I can't say much more about it because it is an ongoing police investigation.For the second time in just over a month, Westminster was once again on a terror alert, but this time, to the relief of those who work here, and the many visitors, any threat was stopped. No-one was harmed. The suspect is said to have no link to car lid mass soud who launched his murderous assault first with a car and then with a knife. He was shot dead by police. He took the lives of five people, including PK Keith Palmer, who unarmed, confronted him inside the grounds of the Houses of Parliament. Since then, there has been a heightened sense of security here.The fact that he was in a location that has recently been in the location of a recent terrorist attack, that would make the officers think they need to step in about of he causes harm. The fact that he was making his way to Parliament was a very key point, that they would want to take him out while he was least expecting it.The man now in custody is said to be 27 and from London. It is understood he holds a British passport, but wasn't born in the the UK. Counter-terrorism detectives and security service MI5 will have built a picture of him as they monitor his movements. They will now be looking at his mental state, his beliefs and his associates. That report from the BBC's June Kelly.Donald Trump is about to mark 100 days in office. One of his key election promises was that he would revive the nation's dying coalmining industry.North America correspondent Stephanie March travelled to West Virginia, to speak with Roger Ball, a mine saving training and Trump supporter about how his mindset has changed since the hoax.It was down to zero, we were going to lock the doors and walk away. It was gone.And what changed after November 8?Well, a lot of hope, that he was going to do what he said, price of coal doubled. We saw over 300 miners come back that had left this area to go back to work, and then we saw a tremendous increase of new miners that had to take the new miner class. So it went from zero to - we couldn't work enough days.How much of that do you put down to Donald Trump winning the election?All of it. It means everything. Our State was broke, our County was broke, our cities. Bows of the stacks that comes right off the coal, so it means everything - a way to live, a way to pay your bills, a way to eat, tremendous hope and it's still going on.Do you think people are pretty pleased with what Donald Trump has done in their...So far and there is hope that he will continue with everything that he promised. For every miner, woman or man, that has the heart and soul to get up and go out to work on top of that mountain or under that mountain, there are 7 jobs that are working because he or she is working. So it's not just 70,000 people, it was 70,000 times 7 that were affected directly, that had no income, no way to buy groceries, food, so he it means the world. It is everything, you know. So all of us have to hope that is it still stays in that direction.And lots of lookbacks over these 100 days coming up this weekend as the formal commemoration is marked. Moving onto our spe special guest today - sorry, I think she is here with us right now. Yes, no.I this I she is having a bit of a touch-up. OK. Living and working in outback Australia can be hard and dangerous. Three graziers who each lost their husbands in separate tragedies have been left to run ernz sheep and cattle stations in outback Queensland, but as Landline reports, these remarkable women are making it work.

These three women from three different properties look after more than 60,000 hectares of land in outback Queensland. And they do it almost all on their own. Each of their husbands died suddenly. They've all made the choice to stay on and work the land.I used to think it wasn't real. I think it hasn't happened, he will come walking in that back door. He never came back into that back door. Everybody has a sad story and you can't dwell on it, and you can't feel sorry for yourself.Now we must turn it into a positive and we've got to go on and because people depend on us.

Ann Ballinger has come to accept having 12,000 hectares basically to herself.I'm my own boss. I live in a part of the world that there is beautiful blue sky, I'm surrounded by a good environment that has got a lot of animals in it, and I think a lot of the world is clamouring to be in that situation that I'm in. I feel very fortunate to live where I live.And you can see more of that story on Landline this Sunday at noon on both ABC TV and iview, too. Now, being a parent, as you well know, is not without its challengings, but those with autistic children can face even greater tasks, but what happens when these children grow upAuthor Kathy Lette's son Julius was diagnosed with as Perger's syndrome at age 11. Her latest novel is called Best Laid Plans and I'm pleased to say Kathy Lette joins us from Sydney. Very good morning to you.Hello, Michael. Lovely to be on the program. My favourite program. I watch it with my mum every morning.Fantastic. Yes.The character of the mum, Lucy, is trying to solicit a prostitute for her san who has autism. Kathy, I'm far too polite to ask whether that is based on first-hand experience, but it is an overarching story really of the extraordinary lengths, in this case Lucy, but mums and dads generally will go to help their kids who are on the sp ek trum?For anyone who doesn't know what autism is, it is a life long knew logical system, inability to socialise, often OCD, anxiety, but often a very high IQ My own son who was diagnosed when he was 3 is like Wikipedia with a pulse. All these amazing people were on the Australia tis tick spectrum, but too often they end up living in a bedsit on benefits. Only a third of people with autism are in the workforce which is a much lower inclusion rate, because they have no filter, they say what they are thinking, they have a lateral trance den shal, which I find hilarious, but can be off putting, so it's incredibly hard for them to get a girlfriend, they are like a sherbet-winged flamingo flying down the high street, so to be absolutely honest, I did actually consider buying love for my son, because he was so curious, he felt rejected, he was limbo low below Kim Kardashian's by kinly love, but he did meet a girl, fell in love and nature took its course But a few weeks later, I met a man who was picked up for kerb-trawling who was trying to find a prostitute for his son and I thought that could have been me, and I make that the start of the no of develop, if it is funny and accessible, that will help take the stigma out of it.We've just shown some fantastic pictures of your son, Julius who has forged a fantastic life in the UK, but it does help to smash in a very funny wayThank you. Also, every single parent goes through traumas when their children start dating, so he a very tricky time for their parents, but if you have a child with special needs you turn the volume up on that by 100 decibels.Did have a deep many pm -I have to stress the book is not based on Julius. I have a lot of friends in the autistic community and I've taken material from all of them, but they are the most interesting and original people, but socially, with my son, I do sweat more than Donald Trump doing as udoko because you never know what they're going to say, so he that can be quite alarming.Yes, I've read stories about some of the awkward positions you've been in, in No. 10 and other places,Oh, yes.With some ill-timed comments by your lovely son.I once too being my son to 12, took him to Downing stroot and introduced had imto Tony Blair and he said - he was the Prime Minister then, I said, ytion Jules, this is the the Prime Minister Tony Blair." And he said, "Oh, yes, you're the one that my mother calls Tony blah, blah, blah,"How did Tony Blair respond?He didn't look too pleased. I think I was put in Siberia for a while.He was the subject of awful taunts and awful straight-out bullying when he was growing up and you write that this book is yours and his revenge. Tell us about the spectacular work he is doing in the entertainment industry over there? Just to get back to the bullying issue, children with autism, of 5% of kids with autism report serious bullying at school, as opposed to 11% in the neurotypical community, and when he was a young boy, he did come home from school with a sign on his back, sticky-taped on his back saying, "Kick me. I'm a retard." Looking at me with tears in his eyes saying, "Mum, the kids are calling me a retard. What is a retard." You might as well have taken my heart out of my chest and stomped on it, but as he got older, his interests came to acting, with kids with kids on the spectrum feed their desires. I enrolled him in some courses and I used to watch him act and I used to think, "You're really good." And then I thought, no, I've got the Mum goggles on, seeing him through the prism of love, but then he won some awards and he got an agent and then he got cast in a big BBC show called Holby City,s if it is the first time they've had an autistic character Playing an autistic character. He has a huge fan base. When I'm walking down the street with him, people push me out of the way to get an autograph, and I have a secret moment of light gloating thinking," I hope those bullies out there remember how they treated had im." He is putting the artistic into autistic and it has been just the most life-enhancing wonderful experience for all of us, and also gives great hope to other parents out there with autistic children. Feed their obsessions ba us it could lead to all sorts after amazing careers.I've read that Julius got help from one of the be, the late, great Alan Rickman in his acting training?That's true. Alan Rickman was, I hate to use the past tense, a very good friend of mine and he did encourage Jules and help train him and looked after him and we miss him every single day, but Jules is on this show, he has an incredible cast around him. With Gemma Redgrave and Kathryn Russell and all these terrific actors who have come through the Royal Shakespeare Society and they love having him on set. Gem says he is so excited to be there and his enthusiasm is con stage just and she says, "He reminds us how lucky we are to be in this profession."We were talking this morning about how electronic books, e-books are falling or flatlining, depending on the market and there has been this rush back to physical books, and too book Stars. Is that something as an author you've noticed and how your books are selling?I have, I'm so thrilled that's happening for a while there people were not reading anymore. Carrie Fisher said, "The trouble with instant gratification is that it takes too long." And we now live in a Twitter society where everything has to be quick mental macchiato, but we are seeing a swing back towards reading so I'm pleased about that, but for a while, kids were reading with menus and bank balances and tarot cards. But thank god they're best.Say hello to your mum.Say hi to Virginia.Well, say hello now.Hi, Kathy. Lovely to have you on board and thanks for a great conversation.Hi!Autism grows up. We focus so much on children, but we never think about the fact that they are middle-aged andler people in the community as well.All those plane spotters and train spotters out there, you just might have a diagnosis out there waiting for you. Thanks, Kathy. Thanks for that. Yes, great book and it is on sale in both physical and digital form and thank you very much for all of your comments on this. We are asking whether you have stopped buying, if you ever did, books on devices like kindles and are now flocking back to book stores, as figures show, not just in the UK but in Australia, and that leads to a big rise on the books you can read on the beach or the shower - well, perhaps a bath fraps.The bath was always dodgy for me. I always ended up dropping it. Sandra said, "I put myself through university by working in a book store, qund an dra says, "I worked in book stores for many years and I will never give up the feeling of holding a physical book in my hands. ", but I listen to audio books if I'm driving for any length, and at the end of the day walking to my bookcase with a glass of wine is heaven." Can we move in, Sandra. Can we leave our families and bunk with you.Liz says, "I'm addicted to the subtle, sensual pleasures of books, their smell, their tactility.Yes, tactile.Very sensual tweet.Michael is getting a little...The inviting suss racial.That's the sound, this sound.S us s rationWe teach you a new word every day.I know! Keep those views coming in. Someone who reads an awful lot is Del, that's why she is so smart.I try to. Reserve Bank Governor Phillip Lowe has identified the internationalisation of the Chinese currency as one of the key convenients that will have significant implications for the global financial system. China's central banks spent billions last year to slow its decline against the surging US dollar 678 The yuan hit an almost 8.5-year low against the greenback at one point. Phillip Lowe says that China needs to strike a balance between tightening the capital flows out of its economy as that action runs counteraction to its longer-run goal of liberalisation. Meanwhile, a new report says that Australia should focus on trade opportunities with China and India, rather than being derailed by nerves about the rate of protectionism in the United States. Policies of US President Donald Trump and Brexit vote have been said to be two key things. Let's take a quick look at the global markets and in the US, the major indices finished higher overnight:

Nor more on finance, I'm joined by Commonwealth Games Col by, good morning.Good morning.The Australian retail industry is bracing itself for the arrival of AmazonYes.Interesting remarks by Coles.West Farmers boss is the with unwho got a lot of people worried about Amazon, no the that they weren't worried already, that he said so much about t to be aware of the threat, that they had an internal much taskforce getting ready for Amazon, because it is the biggest threat really that the Australian retail market has ever seen, and I think that is taken as a given. If you look the broker's reports and terms of buys and sales and all the stocks that are exposed. JB Hi-Fi, Harvey Norman, for instance, all these stocks are exposed but this morning, at least last night, goid der said, "I might have overegged it. I might have overdone it.""Trying to downplay it And he says that food at least may be protected but they've been under attack from ALDI.I was going to say, there is so much competition within the supermarket sector and Coles has come up with this lowest performance since Wesfarmers took it overYes, completely flat The like for like sales, which is the one that matters, you are looking at one store, and how did that do against the same store last year and it was flat, with a zero in front of it, all the supermarket groups and retail groups are because this week Amazon confirmed at last, if you like, that they will come into Australia, that they will build one of these major facilities.And it has been interesting to see the reverberations of that announcement. Network Ten's results came out and the stock market did not treat that well?Yes, sometimes the stock market gives you a litmus test of a result particularly, so the half-year results came out for Ten and their stock fell 20%, and more than that, apart from the fact that the revenues were down a little bit, but the profits were really down, they are hanging on basically because they have a big loan and that loan is turning over in December, so in their statement, they actually said, they actually bring up the notion of there being a going concern, in other words, Ten will go into receivership unless it gets bankrolled again, by these three big backers it has, and Murdoch, James Packer and Bruce Gordon. No-one knows whether these guys will come to the table again. James Packer has been selling, not buying things, so a question mark as to whether it will survive, again.A big question mark. Finally, James, I wanted to get your opinion on the Prime Minister's approach to the gas industry and potentially incentivising them to keep more gas for Australia. What's your view on that?I think he had to do something. The gas price - the nature of the gas system - we've got loads of gas, its a very healthy industry, it is known around the world. The issue is of course too much of it was allowed to go out and the framework was wrong. Now the issue is that if there is a big heatwave next summer, we could have blackouts. Also, of course, energy costs of industry have gone through the roof. They had to do something. What Turnbull has said is that the gas industry is a carrot and stick. "Look, we are going to review the taxes in your area, we won't. However, I am opening the door that allows the Government to put export curbs on how much you are pushing out into Asia, et cetera." That's not going to go well in the international community. Sovereign risk is often overrated. That is a sovereign risk issue and globally people are saying, what is happening and that will go right around the world He may not have to do it, but he has the measures there if he wants to use it. The infrastructure in the project, maybe they will get involved there, bond aggregation. We will see in the fwud jet in 2.5 weeks.Yes, the countdown is on. Thank you.Michael and Virginia, back to you.Patricia says, one of our older viewers, good morning Patricia, "I read books via my phone." Have you tried reading a book on a phone?So one paragraph per screen?I think soOh, come on. Patricia says her granddaughter has told her grandma is reading old-school.Vrts that's nice.Sam from Martin Place says she reads book, too.Stop it.Very special viewer.Stop it.I read Vos s on one of those tablets.A phone or tablet. Tablet.Kindle.Vos s is hard enough to read on any day.I thought it was about Michael Vos s, the Lions three-peat.Why am I helping feed your gag? I fall into it every single time. Damn! .You can read on those things.At what point of the book did you realise it wasn't about Michael Voss.Towards the end.The building of the three-peat.They went nowhere near the Gabba. Well, speaking of stadia, in Brisbane, to Lang Park, Broncos beat Penrith 32-18. James Roberts was a standout in the first half, scoring one of the tries of the season, but the Origin hopeful was then carried off with an ankle zwrr in the second half. So frowns and smiles there at the Broncos. They are going pretty well overall. Let's take a look at the tries.

COMMENTATOR: He went down straightaway and took no further part in that scramble back towards the Broncos goal line. OfHe can't even walk.

They caught them out!Broncos going well there. Penrith, they were tipped to be one of the contenders at the start of the season. Now 2 and 7, so some problems there for Griffin, the coach and the players. Sydney FC has finalised its preparations for this weekend. The A-League reaching its final stages now and the top team has been one of the best teams in national league history in football in this country. Can you see why the assistant coaches are smiling at least and they are fully fit to play against Perth. Nick vich is back after that injury lay-off and fired up ready to go. Beaten Perth a couple of times, several times already this year, and they will be strong favourites to go through to the grand final. Earlier on the program, we had Caitlyn Bassett, perhaps the world's best netball player tuking about the Super Netball League and it has been - probably not a revelation, we assumed it would be great, but the players have gone to a new standard and even Bassett herself has gone to a new level, working on her leadership with June and Laura and she is looking good. It will be a big match this weekend between The Lightning and the Vicks sense, the top two teams will play tomorrow. Let's hear from Catlin Bassett talking about her move to the Sunshine Coast and also her leadership aspirations.It has been amazing. I needed this for my career, to do something different I had been in Perth for the last 12 years playing netball and to make that change has been the best for my netball, but Sunshine Coast is a region in need of a netball team and the support we've received from the community has been absolutely amazing. Its a fantastic place to live and great to play sport, we've got all the facilities that we need I have stepped up into the leadership role and it has been great with the support of all the players around me and working with two such successful players and their leadership styles has opened my eyes as to how I want to lead and to step out there and captain your country is a massive honour and I've still got a lot of work to do, but I've been enjoying the time working with Sharni and Madison at the Diamonds level.Caitlyn Bassett speaking earlier. The new netball league has been moving with such dime michl that it's been hard to pick up on the sub plots, but the key players for the Diamonds are moving just as much, the England and all of the national teams with great improvement in the the next year. It will probably be the best Commonwealth Games competition of netball that we've ever seen, I think, in ex-year, by the time they get there.Speaking of which, just slightly separate topic but relate, the Victorian Commonwealth Games bid seems to be gathering momentum, the Victorian regional one for a few years hence.Yes, and it will probably have to go on a new level because Western Sydney is making a bid for it.Yes, butting in, too.An organised group of people in Western Sydney trying to urge the New South Wales Government to get into it and they reckon they might even be slightly ahead with the leftover facilities from Sydney Olympics which was only 17 years ago now and by the time the next Commonwealth Games comes around, it will be 30 years old.Good stuff. Let you get back to Voss.You may finish it there one day.I didn't find any mention of Lappin or Akermanis in there either.Don't rise to the bait.What was Patrick thinking. Good morning, Nate.A late-season cyclone that has just snuck in under the wire. Tropical Cyclone Francis has been forecast to intense Foo I to a severe tropical cyclone as it moves west-north-west over the next couple of days. You can see where Darwin is so you can place it there. Francis is forecast to weaken to a tropical low on Sunday just in time for the official end of the tropical cyclone season on Monday, so likely the last cyclone we will see this side of winter. On the satellite picture and you can see the mass of cloud in the north-west, that's Francis producing cloud for WA and for the rest of the Territory. Meanwhile, a high in the Bight is dominating weather over much of the rest of the country. Taking a look around the states, a chilly start for parts of Queensland:

A new report out this morning for the nation's peak energy and science bodies has found Australia can produce electricity with no net carbon emissions if a national policy and a carbon price can be agreed uponBut environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg told Michael earlier the Government won't put a price on carbon.Well, there are lots of mechanisms that you can use to reduce you're missions and as you know, we have been very successful in beating our first Kyoto target, we are on track to beat our 2020 target by 224 million tonnes and we expect to meet the 2030 target which is reducing carbon footprint by 26-28%. And we are doing that through a number of mechanisms including an Emissions Reduction Fund, as well as the work of the clean Energy Finance Corporation and ARENA and we are on the right track, although we continually review our policies.But peak energy body and CSIRO is saying, "Yes, all that's fine, but a carbon price is the way to get to that aim."We won the election over the carbon tax and we were successful in abolishing the carbon tax, we are not going back down that route.Even with this advice from the CSIRO?We are certainly not going back down the route of a carbon tax. That What we will do, though, is look for world's best practice in trying to find the lowest cost of abatement and the policies that we have in place are working. I'm here in the United States exchanging notes with the administration on a range of measures that they are using, whether it's energy efficiency measures, getting more gas into the market because of course gas has half the emissions of coal, or other mechanisms, for example, wind power which they use a lot in Texas where the current US Energy Secretary is from.Josh Frydenberg speaking to us earlier from Washington. Now, it has been described as Australia's biggest art fraud case and yesterday took a rather unexpected term. Two Victorian men were acquitted of creating and selling Brett Whiteley paintings that they had earlier been found guilty of faking.So how do you determine whether a painting is the real deal or not? To discuss this, the Australian arts editor and Brett Whiteley biographer ash league Wilson joins us from Sydney. Ash league, good morning.Hi.Does this acquittal now mean that those Brett Whiteley paintings are real?I Thai that's an important distinction to make. This case unfolded as it did and these two fellows were acquitted but it doesn't follow from that decision that these paintings are genuine at all. They haven't made an artistic verdict here, as it were. But an element of doubt has been brought in about whether they have been faked or not, whether fakes have been passed off as the real thing?Sure. I suppose one of the things might be was that it was an intent of peddling in fakes, but I think there is a great question mark over whether these could ever be considered as real Whiteleys. The providence of artwork is reasonably straightforward some of the times to determine. You look back at when a painting was first bought, say at an exhibition, and then that painting was sold to another person, that painting was sold to another person and then it was sold at auction, for instance, and you have this progression of dates that you can look back on and sort of see the trajectory of its ownership. When you have any gaps in that history, then that's where you have some doubt, and I think when it comes to Whiteley's, there are a lot of works out there of course, and there is a lot of interest and there is a lot of money around him, so there is a great interest in trying to determine what is legit and what's not, basically, because you don't want to devalue what is real.And finally, the question left for so many people who are always nervous and tentative about getting anywhere near the art market is: How can I make sure that I'm not going to be ripped off?Well, I think if you buy at reputable places, then I think you will be OK.If a guy comes into a pub and offers you a Whiteley your answer would be?Unless it is a real one, that shouldn't happen.Thank you. Some paintings, to use that phrase, "look like" someone a little bit young could have painted it. How do you tell the difference between that splash and that splash? You need to go to reputable people all the time.Yes, important warning. Time to exploit the big issues of the week that have been in the headlines, time for the Friday Con fab. This time we are joined by Monash professor Susan Carland.Good morning.And pemp Bani.I'm not a household name but known as "the guy who does the banners."You are a name in some households.Bulldogs households. Woof, woof. We are talking this morning about French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron, a great story in its own right, the fact that he is now in the run-off against Le Pen but lots of commentary that his wife, Brigitte is 25 years his senior, lots of issues to toss around with, starting with you, Danny, but I suppose one of them is so what? If you love each other and if you're kindred spirits, who cares what the age difference isI completely agree. Next topic? Yes, a lot of people say the discussion is why do we rise our eyebrows when it is an older woman and a younger man, when we forgive when it is an older man and a younger woman, but do we? Is anyone looking at Donald Trump and Melania going...I reckon the French who are famously phlegmatic about this stuff, I don't reckon they worry about it too much.No, if anything, some reports say that their relationship is so boring, so in love, so Ma mog mouse.Where is the mystery?Exactly. The French don't care, we care, the John Howard siders care, but the French couldn't careless.My friend a jurmist says she has only ever read about this in English-speaking media.There you go.Maybe if the President was married to a burqa, then that could be 6789 (yellow) Just a burqa, not the person.If you would like to get outraged at this point, you are perfectly entitled to. But at the same time I don't want to categorise you as the person who has to get outragedThank you.Such a fine line to walk.Glad I terrify you.Hugh Jackman and Deborra-Lee Furness.Of course.Emanuel and bridge jiet line, they have the most stable marriages in entertainment history. The age difference had counts for nought.There is Virginia Trioli and Russell - I'm not that older.Well, Hugh Jackman becomes the Prime Minister of Australia.I like the way you think.Imagine if we Wolverine as our Prime Minister.I would vote for Jacky.As long as he can make the gas cheaper.The same stigma when democracy my Moore hooked up with Ashton couch char. But that was ridiculous.WhyWhy? It was a period true love.I don't know, it seemed really strange to me. And then they broke up, so I'm right.Well, a lot of people of similar ages break up as well I think if you like each other and everyone is above the age of consent...Course.Two terrible actors falling in love. It was beautiful.Maybe that's where I was going.I couldn't careless about Macron and his wife, but the only thing that gives me some pause was the fact that he was once her student.MmmYes,Teacher-student. But there are famous hook-ups around that, too, and one that I know of very well, a teach her-student relationship but they've gone on to have a long and happy marriage and three kids.Girls mature faster than guys, so if you think you see an older man with a younger woman, their maturity equals, but if the woman is older, you say, "Oh, that poor woman. They she probably hasn't had a decent conversation in years!" Edelston.Maria Sharapova is back on the court as you know after completing a 15-month suspension for ruring a positive drug teste 2016 Australian Open. Not everyone is so keen about her comeback. Her critics are calling it unfair, they are not liking that she could go bag to her ranking before she was found guilty. But here is the thing: You do the crime, you do the time S that it?I this I it should be. People who are saying she should never be allowed back, then they are saying that if you have been found to have cheated with drugs you should be banned for lifer. But no-one is saying that about the Essendon players, who were caught up in the drug scandal that they should be banned for life. I do think if you do the crime, you do the time and she has done the time. We need to have this thick where you have atoned for what you did and we can all come back from mistakes. Essendon might be slightly different because it was unwitting, they didn't know.Yes, there is a difference, but if people are saying you can't come back, then say, if you do drugs, you are out for life. Zahny? Some who do believe that, once a drug cheat, you can't compete again.Yes, these are other tennis players who she has beaten. This is not news. Next thing you will tell me a rugby league player is a meat head, a basketball player is tall,. It's just not news.And talented.I will call us out here on this couch because I know from time to time we have...Taken performance enhancing substances.Caffeine, and lots of it.But we are not swab, yet. Talking about dope cheats, in particular the tour tore tour, we have been pretty heavy on them and even if they do their suspension and they come back, we are sitting here rather sceptical and the like. We tend not to forgive drug cheats on this couch.I will go out there and saying that Maria Sharapova should be scraubed for lifeBecause of the nature of drug cheating?Yes, and if you've done it once and you can as Pius and say you've learnt your lesson as much as you like, but forever this cloud of suspicion over you, not just the pundits who are unhappy and uncertain that she is back, but to kids.But what about kending the message to kids that you can stuff up and we all stuff up, that you can move on and have another chance, that's also posh for kids.Yes, it is, but sport is the most xwuvl manifestation that the level is equal, we teach our kids that and taking drugs don't fit into that crime.It's not as though she has committed the ultimate tennis crime, she hasn't paid tax, and that's OK.SphooSpeaking about sport.Bulldogs player.Unwittingly. So was char Sharapova, taking the substance.No, I don't think it was that cut and dried with her. Stuart cram ri.The argument rages this morning, we have to leave it with you. Take that one home and fight about it over your Friday night dinner tonight. Great, guys to have you on the program, Susan, Danny. Looking forward to your banner tonight.What does it say? "Don't do drugs"Quick, change it. Get out the crepe paper.That's all you really need.The Simpsons are marking the first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency. Here is their take on Donald Trump's early record.

Don't make him a suit.100 days in office. So many a come Mich leaptments, lowered my golf handicap, my Twitter following increased by 700 and finally we can shoot hibernating bears, my boys will love that.Sir, it lowers taxes for only Republicans.Can't Fox read it and I will watch what they say? No, you have to read it.The new Supreme Court justice Ivanka takes her seat on the bench. You can buy Ivanka's robe with gavel area rings for only 1,000 Republic bells.You said you would replace me with Garland.This is horrible. This was supposed to last me the whole 4 years.Marge, please, give the President of the United States some time. He is only 70 years old.Help, they are taking moo he back to where I came from!Where is that?I don't remember.100 days, we are 6.8% of the way home. Paid for by anybody else 2020.That was really excellent. The dog, little dog, shifting position on the head, as dogs do. That explains everything. He has a magnificent head of hair, though. Books are back, which is a fantastic thing. Sales of paperbacks and hard-covers are on the rise with figures out of the UK showing 2016 -- 2015 was a record year.The BBC's keflin Jones has made a visit to a local London bookshop to find out why.See, the tiger who came to tea. Elaine Davis likes to take her grandson, Harry, to the bookshop most days for his benefit, as well as hers. What's your attitude to reading real books as opposed to electronic books?They are different and I read them at different times, but I love real books, I love the feel of the books, I love to see the book sitting there, so I like books around the house.And Elaine isn't alone. A record year for UK publishing has seen a surge in sales of printed, not digital books. Last year satisfies of physical books rose by 8%, but total digital book sales fell by 3% and sales of consumer e-books, the best sellers you would find in most bookshops were down 16%. Devices like the Kindle promised to spark an upheaval in the book trade with a generation getting used to reading on screens, but now that revolution appears to have stalled manyIn every aspect of our lives, we do work on screens, whether it home or at work, but in the leisure moments, people are wanting to look at a book, a printed version.Harry Potter and The Cursed Child was the best-selling book for 2016Grannies, granddads, uncles are buying books for children to encourage reading, teachers are. Chris Evans Writing competition, all of those things are promoting writing and literacy and the importance of a good story.Academic books are moving online, but it seems the long history of the printed book still has a few chapters left.Very nice to hear. Oh, you old hand. Do you know the fwoo being that is leading the slight uptick in sales here in Australia two years in a row?NoKa irto guess and forget the answer I told you last hour.Paul Kennedy's 15 Young Men.Good call.One of them. It is actually adult colouring-in books I don't know that that's anything for Australia to be proud of, but adult colouring-in books are the books that are helping the publishing industry. I'm so sorry.I've seen a lot of Facebook posts about friends who are into it and find it very therapeutic.A great statement that we are all Des pra the to have that mindful ps, forget your worries.Another form of meditation.Not doing much for literacy, though.No, it's not. Unfortunately.And that's what the UK claims, so hopefully we can make that, too, because volume sales of books have not gone up here, so we are not buying more books, just paying more for them. Do you read online, on Kindle or read the paper version.Yes, I went to e-books 10 years ago because being the sea you have no room. Just when you are away for a long time, you swap all the books and run out, versus having an entire library in that.You shouldn't have time being on board, though.You do have spare moments. Protecting this country, PK #6r7b8g9s I'm the complete opposite. I never did the e-book transition. I'm too old-fashioned.Same.You're one-year-older than me.But 100 years older when it comes to men. You read a lot, PK.As much as I can. I've read about four books on a tablet and then just moved back. Wasn't a big thing. I didn't dislike it as such, but I just didn't plug it in again and recharge it and moved back to books, so I guess that as I take it I prefer books.Let's have a look at weather while we have Nate here on the couch. What can we look forward to this weekend.

A need a quick suggestion for our family movie tonight, Friday night. Don't stay star workforce.Uncle Buck.No, not appropriate.Bulldogs versus night This program is not captioned.

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