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ABC News 24 2pm News -

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(generated from captions) York and London, behind Hong Kong. Thanks, Alicia. Let's take you to Canberra now where Malcolm Turnbull is joined by ministers as they are sworn into new Cabinet roles.

... Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.I Gregory Andrew Hunt do swear that I will well and truly serve the people of Australia in the offices of Minister for Health and Minister for Sport and that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, so help me God.

Congratulations, Minister.Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

Your Excellency, I now present Senator Arthur Sinodinos to be Member for Industry, Innovation and Science.Senator Sinodinos, I invite you to take and subscribe the oath of office as Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science.I Arthur Sinodinos do swear that I will well and truly serve the people of Australia in the office of Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science and that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, so help me God.

Congratulations, Minister.Thanks. (APPLAUSE)

Your Excellency, I now present the honourable Ken Wyatt AM MP to be Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health, the first Indigenous Australian to be sworn into the ministry of the Commonwealth government.Mr Wyatt, I invite you to take and subscribe the oath of office as Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health.I, Kenneth George Wyatt, do swear I will well and truly serve the people of Australia in the offices of Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health and that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, so help me God.

Congratulations, Minister.Thank you.(APPLAUSE)

Your Excellency, I now present the honourable Dr David Gillespie MP to be known as Parliamentary Secretary for Health.I invite you to take subscribe and take the oath of office.I David Arthur Gillespie do swear that I will well and truly serve the people of Australia in the office of Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Health and that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, so help me God.

(APPLAUSE)

Your Excellency, I now present Mr Michael Sukhar MP to be Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasurer and known as Assistant Minister to the Treasurer.

I invite you to take and subscribe the oath of executive council.I, Michael Sven Sukhar being chosen and summoned by the Commonwealth General of Australia to be a member of the federal executive council do swear when required advise the Governor-General or the person for the time being administering the Government of the Commonwealth of Australia to the best of my judgement and consistently with the good government of the Commonwealth of Australia and that I will not disclose the confidential deliberations of the council so help me God.

That is the last of the ministerial adjustments being made today in Malcolm Turnbull's government. I will bring in now our political reporter Stephen Dziedzic who is joining us from our Canberra Bureau. Stephen, this is the fourth Turnbull Government ministerial adjustment and not one the Prime Minister probably wanted?No, it is the shuffle the Prime Minister didn't want. It was necessitated by an event that would have been something of a disaster to him, namely, the controversial swirling around Sussan Ley. However, given it was forced upon him, he then basically took the opportunity to put in those faces that he thought were entitled to serve in the Ministry so today, of course, you have seen Michael Sukhar taking the oath there. He has been elevated into the front bench for the first time. Greg Hunt going into the role of Health Minister and Arthur Sinodinos moving from Cabinet Secretary across to a frontline ministry role, taking Industry off Mr Hunt.Of course, Stephen, this sees a slightly smaller Cabinet with one less member?Yes. A slightly smaller Cabinet, a little bit smaller than it was though still a fairly large one in historical terms. Also, of course, of note is the fact that the Prime Minister did lose a high-profile female Cabinet minister so the number of women in Cabinet has gone down. That means the Prime Minister has drawn a little bit of flak from Labor but the Coalition's been quick to point out that, by historical standards, the number of women remains quite high, though it does concede, of course, that five out of 22 is not satisfactory by anyone's record.As you mentioned, a number of changes there. Greg Hunt will become the Minister for Health and the Minister for Sport. What changes can we see under his leadership?Greg Hunt is going to face a real witch's brew of problems. Not only is he facing a fierce campaign from Labor over the Medicare surcharge but he has also got an equally fierce battle on his hands with the medical unions, the doctors unions who have signalled they will fight very, very hard on this issue. Interesting to note some of the other people who have been put forward, Michael Sukhar, in particular, has been given a brief to look at housing affordability. This is an issue that has dogged the Coalition for quite a while. Labor has made hay on it by, of course, promising to curb negative gearing and the Government with its promise it wouldn't touch negative gearing has been keen to look for solutions. So Michael Sukhar, who is often referred to as a conservative up-and-comer is going to be briefed to look at new solutions to try and curb the house growth in the capitals without touching negative gearing. It is a difficult brief but one he said he would throw himself into with a bit of gusto.As we see the gentlemen taking a photograph out the front there, it is hard but to ignore what Ken Wyatt is wearing. He is obviously the first Indigenous Minister in Federal Parliament? That's right. Ken Wyatt today was sworn in wearing a kangaroo skinned cloak. He has worn it previously in Parliament before. It was gifted to him, we're told, by elders of the Noongar people. It also has black cockatoo feathers in it as well. As you say, a small moment or quite a substantial moment here in Australian history. Ken Wyatt, for the first time, ascending to the front bench and becoming the first Indigenous person to occupy a ministerial spot in Federal Government. As Ken Wyatt himself has said, it is astonishing it has taken so long for someone to take that honour and that's his honour today. He will be looking into Indigenous health in particular. He said he wants to pursue a somewhat less paternalistic approach to Indigenous care and Indigenous health, trying to involve Indigenous people in coming up with the solutions which are necessary to improve some of those determinants behind the gap that continues to exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people so a high-profile role for Ken Wyatt and one he will be very keen to tackle and tackle with that little bit of history behind his back.He made some comments, I believe, last week about the fact that he was proud of the number of Indigenous people who are now in federal Parliament as of last year's election?That's right. Over time, the number of Indigenous people in Parliament has gone up, though, of course, it's only now that we have seen them break into the highest rank of government. Ken Wyatt is someone who is quite popular across the political spectrum here in Canberra. He seems to get both respect and goodwill from both sides of politics. Now, of course, as a frontline Minister, he will be in the hand-to-hand combat a little bit more than he was. Will that goodwill last and will he be able to sew together a coalition of groups in that portfolio to come up with changes that are going to result in improvements in the health of Indigenous people? It's a mighty challenge but, as I said, Ken Wyatt says he is up for it.Senator Arthur Sinodinos is taking over as Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science. How critical is that portfolio?It is critical but it's particular interesting, perhaps even more interesting, to see where he's come from. He was originally Cabinet secretary. That was really more of a coordinating role. It was within Cabinet but he was essentially performing a role to make sure that the gears of government were smooth and turned smoothly. Now, of course, he goes into the Industry portfolio with some very difficult questions in particular around the manufacturing industry in Australia. He's already copped a little bit of flak for talking about the fact that the auto industry in particular may be facing its end in Australia. Now, that may be true but it's something that the Opposition has already pounced upon. He is going to have to try and walk a very fine line there. He's got a backbench which is not hugely tolerant to the idea of further subsidies to automakers. He is seeing the automotive sector essentially leaving Australia. Managing that transition is a difficult job and one the Prime Minister believes Arthur Sinodinos is up to.We mentioned briefly at the start of our chat, Stephen, that this probably wasn't the start to 2017 that Malcolm Turnbull was hoping for. This has obviously happened. Now those Ministers have signed on the dotted line. Do you think that Malcolm Turnbull now wants to just look to the future and focus on the issues of the day such as the TPP for example, today?Yes, he will be very keen to try and move past the start that he's had to the year. The expenses killing season, if you like, is always over Christmas so now that's passed, the Prime Minister might feel like he is able to move on to safer ground but it has been a difficult start for the year for Malcolm Turnbull. Not only with the expenses scandal but also with if the controversy over the Centrelink debt problems that have cropped up. So Malcolm Turnbull will be keen to try and use today in particular to try and draw a line under some of those controversies and push forward into territory that he is more comfortable in, in particular, talking about trade and also talking about issues as he did today like cyber security. It has to be said, it is not a good start for the year for Malcolm Turnbull and he will be hoping that today gives him