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ABC News 24 W'end Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) This program is not captioned. Good morning, and welcome back to Weekend Breakfast. I'm Miriam Corowa. And I'm Nick Harmsen. Making news this morning: Donald Trump labels critics of a US-Russia alliance as "stupid", drawing ire from President Barack Obama.We have to remind ourselves - we're on the same team. Vladimir Putin's not on our team.

Also ahead - scenes of devastation in northern Syria - dozens killed after an explosion rips through a busy marketplace. The latest political disclosure list reveals previously undeclared donations dating back to 2013. Set up by Berisha, and beautifully finished by James Troisi! And - a James Troisi masterclass guides Melbourne Victory to their fifth straight win in the A-League.

Hello. Thanks for joining us. It's Sunday, January 8. It is! It's a very nice day outside, and I would love to be around... Don't talk too much about how it is outside just yet, OK! It would be nice.It would be nice. Let's check the weather in a moment. Coming up on Weekend Breakfast: If you have ever dreaded going on a long road trip with the family, this bird has the longest non-stop migration of any bird - 11,000km. The collective intelligence of the flock helps protect and save energy to keep them on track when migrating and share food discoveries. Dr Karl will be joining us to explain the science behind why birds of a feather flock together. And, in fact, scientists are trying to encapsulate that sort of principle with robotic technology as well. That would be fascinating. Although it's scary. Sounds very Alfred Hitchcock...It does. I found it hard to understand that there's no-one actually determining where they're all going. It's a shared thing. It's like, "Wow, how does that work? Someone's got to be in charge."Sounds like the internet! It does! (LAUGHS)

To our top stories this morning: US president-elect Donald Trump has posted a series of tweets condemning those who oppose good relations with Russia as "stupid". Mr Trump vowed to work with mosqua to solve some of the many pressing problems and issues of the world. His comments came after an intelligence report found Russia's President had tried to aid his election victory. Mr Trump also accused the Democratic Party of gross negligence for allowing their servers to be hacked. The president-elect's tweets have been widely criticised by intelligence groups, who say his actions will only deepen the divide between the incoming administration and the US intelligence and foreign policy community. A former director of the CIA, Dyson Heydon -- Michael Hayden, was scathing in his assessment.It leaves us in a very dark place. I don't want to be apocalyptic about this - I'm looking at it through the lens of the American intelligence community. I said, "This is our best judgement." And he said, "Take a hike." Wow. That's going to reverberate That's going to reverberate
throughout the community. If you find that high-confidence judgements represent insufficient proof for you to move, then you should sell the antennas and let these kids go do something else.At least 43 people have been killed in a bomb blast in the rebel-held Syrian town of Azaz. The explosion occurred outside a courthouse in the town just 7km from the Turkish border. Azaz has recently been targeted by the Islamic State group. The latest blast is the worst since the nationwide ceasefire brokered by Russia and Turkey, which does not include Islamic State. At this stage, no group has claimed stage, no group has claimed
responsibility for the bombing. Investigators say the Iraq War veteran accused of killing five people at Fort Lauderdale Airport appears to have travelled to Florida specifically to carry out the attack. The 26-year-old suspect, Esteban Santiago, has a history of acting erratically. Investigators are probing whether mental illness played a role in America's latest mass shooting. Terrorism has not been ruled out as motive. 5 people were killed and 6 wounded in the attack. Three dozen others were taken to local hospitals with bruises or broken bones suffered in the chaos as passengers ran from the attack. Police have called a disturbance at the Parkville Youth Justice Centre in Melbourne's inner north after a riot broke out last night. The Dog Squad, Critical Incident Response Team and riot police responded to the scene. Fire crews also attended after an alarm was set off, but there was no fire. It's understood about 20 inmates were involved, but no staff members or juveniles were hurt in the incident. A previous riot at the centre prompted the Victorian Government to transfer more than a dozen youths to the adult Barwon Prison. A woman accused of attacking two strangers with an axe in Sydney's inner west is expected to face cower today. A 32-year-old man suffered a serious head wound and a 43-year-old woman has a fractured skull after being randomly attacked at an Enmore service station. Officers say they're both in stable conditions at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. A woman in her 20s has been charged with causing grievous bodily harm. She's been refused bail and is due to face Parramatta Bail Court later today. Two developers and a political fundraising group have revealed more than $100,000 in political donations. The donations were declared in the days leading up to Christmas, but date back as far as 2013. A Chinese developer gave $20,000 to the ALP, and another developer that's previously supported the Liberal Party gave $21,000 to Family First. A secretive Liberal fundraiser entity called the South Yarra Club declared passing on about $70,000 to the party. The deadline for declaring these donations was years ago. The Australian Electoral Commission does have the power to lay charges, but the ABC understands they've never used that power. Environmentalists are considering mounting a legal challenge against a proposed 800-bed development at perisher in Kosciuszko National Park in the New South Wales Snowy Mountains. Perisher has long-approved development plans for seven buildings in the village. A legal challenge is being considered. The Tasmanian creators of a world-first jellyfish safety app are calling for government support. Two Launceston businessmen have joined with a muvene biologist to create the jellyfish app. It allows people to check what jellyfish are in their area, and provides medical advice on how to treat a sting. Creators of the app say they want the State Government to help promote the app by putting it in tourist information centres and schools. Now to sport, with Georgie Tunny. One A-League star is eyeing a huge milestone? Very big milestone, guys. Doesn't get much bigger than 100 goals, but that is exactly what Besart Berisha, the Melbourne Victory superstar, is eyeing off. He added to his tally yet again last night, but he wasn't the only one that played a very important role in Victory's win. The other man was James Troisi - a masterclass from him led Victory to their their 5th straight win in the A-League. The former Socceroo had some help from that gun striker and Victory favourite, Besart Berisha - his cross set up the opening goal of the match, before Troisi returned the favour in the second - the Albanian superstar booting his 92nd - yes, 92nd - league goal, as Victory added more miss tree the reigning champs' season. The Reds have now not one in over a month, still glued to the bottom of the table. Another blistering knock from Kevin Pietersen proved match-turning in the Melbourne derby. KP belted 79 off 43 balls, and that's his ninth BBL half-century in only 20 appearances to steer the Stars to a huge double-century total of 7/200. In reply, the Renegades could only manage 9/154. Spin partners Adam Zampa and Michael Beer doing most of the damage - three wickets apiece. The Stars too good. They won by 49 runs. Karolina Pliskova has taken out her first Brisbane International singles title, defeating Alize Cornet in three sets. The third seed was in complete control, winning 30 winners to 10 in the 6-0 6-4 victory. The win will take Pliskova to number five in the world. Grigor Dimitrov stunned Milos Raonic to win get to his second Brisbane International final, facing Kei Nishikori. Richard Gasquet and Kristina Mladenovic outlasted Team USA in the fast four mixed doubles to clinch their second Hopman title. Nick and Miriam, test summer may be over for our cricketers, and who can forget the cries of "Nice, Gary" that we heard across all of the grounds around Australia? I believe he's been knocked off his perch, Nathan Lyon... Nathan Lyon...He's been eclipsed? His hair is as bright as the sun, so that's a very good example there. This is Mickey Edwards, the substitute fielder for Australia yesterday. The crowd loves him. Already a crowd favourite. He can play cricket as well.(LAUGHTER) He is contracted to the New South Wales Blues. He was contracted to the 6ers last season as well. Has struggled with some stress fractures in his back most recently, but he's back on the field and he's definitely got noticed in a big way. So, new crowd favourite, new cult hero.Couple of weeks ago, he was sitting watching the Boxing Day test with some mates. Now, he's the hero...Everyone will remember him. No-one forget Mickey Edwards - hopefully meek have a bigger influence one day -- he can have a bigger influence one day.He'll be noted for his other abilities as well!That's right.Thank you, Georgie. Thank you for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come: We take a look at the impact of drug criminalisation in the so-called war on drugs. Later - the bohemian town Later - the bohemian town in Tasmania celebrating 35 years of its iconic Folk Festival. Tasmania celebrating 35 years of its
iconic Folk Festival.

Donald Trump's row with the US intelligence community has intensified, after the president-elect fired off a group of tweets in which he criticised the spy agencies. Mr Trump was briefed by intelligence officials on Friday, where he was told Vladimir Putin personally ordered cyberattacks to undermine Mr Trump's rival, Hillary Clinton. The president-elect has rejected the findings.

Former CIA head, General Michael Hayden, is concerned about Mr Trump's casual dismissal of the high-confidence judgements from the intelligence community, and worries that if Trump fails to take action, the community itself will become redundant.What's different here is that the president-elect - for his own reasons - has decided to put this out and make it public. You know, in American football, we've got this ritual we call trash talk, in which you go out and begin to say things to try to get into the head of the opposition in some ways - maybe maybe even to intimidate the opposition. You know, an awful lot of tweets that the president-elect has put out there about the American intelligence community feel a bit like trash talk. This is a covert-influence campaign that I think succeeded beyond all possible expectations on the part of the Russian Federation. At a minimum, you've got me here talking to you trying to explain why there appears to be a war between the president-elect and the American intelligence community. If I'm working for the Russian special services and I'm responsible for that covert influence campaign, I'm go straight go straight to the Win column. Outgoing US President Barack Obama has called for an end to has called for an end to political divisions over the issue.I think that what is true is that... That... ..The Russians intended to meddle, and they Meddled. I'll be honest with you, George - one of the things that I am concerned about is the degree to which we've seen a lot of commentary lately where there were Republicans, or pundits, or cable commentators, who seem to have more confidence in Vladimir Putin than fellow Americans because those fellow Americans are Democrats. That cannot be.Does that include the president-elect?Ah...well, what I will say is that, um... And I said this right after the election - we have to remind ourselves, we're on the same team. Vladimir Putin's the same team. Vladimir Putin's not on our team. US President Barack Obama there. In Syria, at least 43 people have been killed by a massive bomb blast near a busy market in the north of the country. Islamic State is suspected of carrying out the attack. The blast ripped through a central market in the town of Azaz, which lies on the border with Turkey.

Fear, panic and chaos... The aftermath of this morning's explosion. Many were killed, others wounded, by the attack outside a courthouse in a busy commercial district in the centre of the city. TRANSLATION: A car bomb went off in the city centre near civilians. There are no fighters here. All of them are civilians.As rescue workers searched for both survivors and bodies, no-one had claimed responsibility for this attack. But this city is no stranger to such scenes. Azaz is a stronghold of Turkish-backed Syrian rebels involved in a major operation to clear so-called Islamic State from northern Syria, close to the Turkish border. In recent days, Turkish forces and rebels have continued to target IS, which isn't included in the fragile ceasefire covering much of Syria. Azaz has become home to people who have fled fighting elsewhere. Today's attack shows, despite the ceasefire largely holding, people in Syria are continuing to die. Clashes between protesters and government supporters have erupted in southern Sri Lanka, during a rally against a port deal with China. The deal - to develop a port and industrial zone - has angered villagers, who fear they'll lose their land with little compensation. Hundreds of angry protesters tried to storm the inauguration ceremony of the new port project, called the Sri Lanka-China Logistics and Development Zone.

Protesters feared a Chinese colony is being created, and the government will take their land to build industrial zones set up for Chinese investors. Prime Minister Singh has said industrious zones are needed to complement the redeveloped port nearby, and dismisses fears Sri Lanka will lose control to China. TRANSLATION: Sri Lankan law will apply to everyone who comes here, whether it is China merchants, or someone who disembarks from a ship. The law applies. It is after agreeing on this that we signed the first agreement. There are two more being negotiated.China's ambassador to Columbo said Sri Lanka receives the second-highest amount of Chinese loans.With respect, the decision made by Sri Lankan government and Sri Lankan people...The previous Sri Lankan government built the new port at a cost of $1.3 billion, with the help of Chinese loans. Those loans are due for repayment this year. The Minister of Development Strategy and International Trade has been a key figure in the lease negotiations. He told Al Jazeera that there was little choice due to crippling debt.We had to come up with some kind of a plan to make this a viable venture. We couldn't just wait and watch and go down the hill.Sri Lankans everywhere - including demonstrators against the Chinese port project - will be watching to see if the government's debt reduction plan succeeds. Back home now: A woman accused of attacking two strangers with an axe in Sydney's inner west is expected to face court later today. The 32-year-old -- A 32-year-old man suffered a serious head wound and a 43-year-old woman suffered a fractured skull after being randomly attacked at an Enmore service station. Lying badly injured on the floor of a Sydney convenience store after being attacked with an axe...She just came in with full force and swung, and struck the man across the face, and then turned immediately around to me and, again, with both hands, came through and struck me with the axe at the back of the head.Sharon Hacker had been buying milk when she was set upon. As she fell forward, she was allegedly hit again. It was with such force, she was told it could have taken her head off.She was using both hands, trying to use as much force behind it, using the front end of the blade...The woman allegedly behind the axe was also carrying a kitchen knife. Her male victim was so badly injured, he needed surgery.I saw the other victim, and he was bleeding profusely from his head, sadly. He was mainly with facial injuries.Nathan Wood began chasing after the attacker after witnessing the horrendous scene.She appeared to lock eyes with me and started to run across the street. I dashed to the other end of the road and she made an attack at a bloke who was walking behind me.Luke Williams lives next door and said the whole incident was terrifying.I saw a body sort of splayed out on the floor. Um, I was shocked.The attack here in the early hours of this morning was unprovoked. The victims weren't known to each other or their attacker, and one police officer has described it as one of the most random incidents they've ever investigated.I knew it was random, especially after I saw her just immediately run, and anyone she came into contact with, she was swinging. Detectives are still investigating the crime. Summer holidays are typically a time when we see young Australians using more illegal drugs. Sydney alone has experienced a massive drug bust in the past few weeks. Johan Harri is the author of Chasing The Screen. He says society is approaching the war on drugs the wrong way, and the solution is to build a sense of connection with drug users... One of my earliest memories is trying to wake up one of my relatives and not being able to. I was too young, then, to understand why. As I got older, I realised we had addiction in my family. I think I believed that, most for most of my life, I'm guessing what you think of addiction. If we grabbed the first 20 viewers of your show off the street and injected them all with, let's say, heroin at the end of the month, at the end of the month, they'd all be heroin addicts. Their body would desperately need it, and they'd have this ravenous hunger at the end of the month. That's what I thought I had seen in the people I love. The first thing wrong with that story - when it was explained to me, in Britain or Canada, if you get hit by a truck in the street and break your hip and you're taken to hospital, they'll give you a drug called dio morphine for the pain - that's the medical name for heroin. It's been given for quite a period of time in hospitals. If you have a grandmother in England or Canada with a hip operation, they've had heroin in hospital. This has been studied very carefully. It seemed so weird and contrary to everything I've been told - to be honest, I didn't believe it. I only began to understand it when I interviewed an extraordinary professor of psychology, Bruce Alexander, who has done an experiment that changed how we think about idiction. The idea that addiction is caused by the drug comes from a series of experiments that were done earlier in the 20th century. They're simple. Your viewers can try them at home if they feel sadistic. If you take a rat, put it in a cage and give it two water bottles - one is water, the other is water lace would heroin or cocaine. If you do that, the rat will almost always kill itself within about a week. There you go - that's our story, the drugs killed them. In the '70s, Professor Alexander came along and said, "Hang on a minute. We put the rat alone in an empty cage where it's got nothing to do except use these drugs. What would happen if we did this differently?" He built a cage he called Rat Park, which is basically heaven for rats. They've got loads of friends, loads of cheese, they can have loads of sex. Everything a rat could want in life. And they've got both the water bottles. The normal water, and the drug water. Of course, they tried both. They don't know what's in them. This is the fascinating thing. In Rat Park, they don't like the drug water - they almost never use it. None of them ever use it compulsively. None of them ever overdose. You have almost 100% compulsive overdose when their lives are lousy, and none when their lives are good. This tells us something really important. The opposite of addiction is not sobriety, it's connection. It's not the drug that is the primary problem. So, when it comes to, for instance, looking at the 100 years or so of the war on drugs that we've seen in Western society, what do you understand as being the key motive behind that, given that we have - in what you've discovered - a misconception about drugs and addiction?I think it's partly - and you see this in Australia in the last few weeks with the claims about this big drug bust in Sydney. I think there are many reasons. I go into them in the book. One of the main ones is a mistaken belief. It's not an inherently evil or crazy thing to think, "We've got these substances. They harm some people. Why don't we get rid of these substances? Why don't we wipe them off the face of the earth?" You can understand that idea isn't practical. I travelled 30,000 miles, to countries where they tried every single approach. If they tried to wipe it off the earth, if it was going to work, it would have worked by now in the United States. They've been doing it for 100 years. They've spent $1 trillion. They've put millions of people in prison. They've killed hundreds of thousands of people. At the end of all that, they can't even keep drugs out of their prisons. That gives you some idea how well it works. After this massive drug bust, I guarantee nobody in Sydney tonight who wants to get hold of cocaine who can't get hold of cocaine. We've tried that way. We have genuinely given it a fair shot. Everywhere it has ever been tried, it has failed. It has not reduced addiction. It has not reduced drug use. It has produced a whole wave of other disasters. For example, it transfers these substances to armed criminal gang whose commit a huge amount of violence - there's a further wave of violence in Sydney as rival criminal gangs fight for control of the patch of the people who've just been busted. That's one way of looking at it - it's been tried, I've been there, I've seen the results. I've also bib been to the places that tried the opposite approach. Portugal is one of them. In the year 2000, Portugal had one of the worst drug problems in Europe. 1% of the population was addicted to heroin, which is kind of extraordinary. Every year, they tried the approach that your government is taking at the moment more - they arrested more people, they imprisoned more people, they shamed more people. And every year, the problem got worse. One day, their Prime Minister and Leader of the Opposition got together and basically said, "We can't go on like this. What are we going to do?" They decided to set up a panel of scientists and doctors and said, "You guys go away, figure out what wis genuinely solve this problem. We've agreed, in advance, we'll do whatever you recommend." They looked at the evidence from Rat Park that I mentioned earlier. They said, "Decriminalise drugs - the whole lot, from cannabis to crack." But, take all the money we currently spend on screwing people's lives up on arresting and putting them in prison and shaming them, and spend it on turning their lives around. It's not how we think of rehab in Britain and Australia. They do psychological support - residential rehab - but the biggest thing they did was a job-creation program. Everyone who had an addiction problem - say, a mechanic. They go to a garage and say, "If employ this guy for a year, we'll pay half his wages." The goal was to say to every addict in Portugal, "We love you. We value you. We're on your side. We want you back." By the time I went to Portugal, the results were in - it was 13 years, it's now 15 years. It was 13 years, then, since they began this experiment. Injecting drug use was down by 50%. Overdose deaths were massively down. Street crime was massively down. One of the ways it worked so well is almost nobody wants to go back. Journalist and author of Chasing The Screen - very passionate about the issue. It's sure to be a huge conversation that we'll continue to have. Meanwhile, in summer, it's also a time when we are faced with the issue of water safety. This year, it's been a disastrous start to summer, with dozens of people drowning in Australia this festive season. In the Top End, a group of youngsters is preparing for a competition which Foster's lifesaving skills, and they're just about ready to compete... Practising how to save a life - these volunteers are preparing to represent the Northern Territory in this year's Australian Pool Life Saving Championships. The team of 10 is flying to Melbourne next week to compete in simulated emergency rescues.I think just the aspect of going away and competing at the nationals and all the events - I think it's really exciting.Removing fire materials, look, listen and feel for signs of life...They've been getting together four times a week to funess their CPR skills ask beat personal bests in water-rescue events like the mannequin tow, where competitors swim a pool length to a submerged dummy, and then drag it back up.You really have to be very focused when you are doing rescues, and someone else's life is in your hands - their maturity is beyond their years, and they've really done an amazing job in their training. When you bring it up, just get it around - think about how you can do that a bit quicker, OK?Their skills couldn't be in greater need - last year was a horror year for drownings, with 280 people dead across Australia. And the Northern Territory has the greatest per-capita drowning rate in Australia.You never know what might happen. Like, you might just be at the local pool and you might see someone drowning. If you're the first person there, then you're gone to know how to save them.The 3-day competition kicks off on Wednesday, with competitors from all over the country competing in around 80 events. We generally like to go in there and pop up and offer a few little surprises in a few events. We have been known to take out a CPR medal in the past. We've also taken out the odd line-throwing medal too.If any of these team members come back from the championships with a medal, they could be on a pathway to entering the national squad, the junior and silver barras. Tasmania's Huon Valley has been filled by music, with the 35th Signet Folk Festival in full swing. We love this time of year. Organisers say the festival has grown to be a standout on the Australian calendar. But locals still have a firm grip on their backyard event... It's the event that takes over an entire town... You can't swing a banjo in the streets of Signet without hitting some local talent... The banjo is a wonderful, wonderful instrument. It's amazing. I think that's why people hate it so much - because it has so much unconditional love that that scares people, and they want to destroy it.Now in its 35th year, Signet is Tasmania's biggest folk festival.It's grown from a very small community event to sort of just gaining, I suppose, a really lovely reputation.More than 200 performances will play across the weekend. There's a mix of local, interstate and international acts.I used to play larger gigs, and I've kind of wound down a little bit because I get way more out of playing anything local.I think there's something really special about festivals where the stage is starting with performers from the local community, and international acts are later that night.The streets are crammed with buskers. It's cool. It has a nice feel, you can just add more muse took it. There is a reverence and respect for art, and particularly music.I think that's the great thing about folk festivals - you get an eclectic mix of different musicians. It's about getting together, having a bit of a jam, having a bit of fun...Swinging and stomping until Sunday...

A trough moving across South Australia is triggering heavy showers and storms. Northerly winds are bringing a very hot night to parts of Victoria and New South Wales. An active monsoon trough is generating rain and thunderstorms across the NT and Queensland tropical coasts.

The top stories from ABC News: US president-elect Donald Trump has posted a series of tweets condemning those who oppose good relations with Russia as "stupid". The comments come after a US intelligence report stated Russian President Vladimir Putin had sought to help Mr Trump win the presidency. The president-elect said Democrats have shown "gross negligence" by allowing their servers to be hacked. At least 43 people have been killed in a bombing in northern Syria. The explosion devastated a busy market in the rebel-held town of Azaz, along the Turkish border. It's the heaviest casualty toll in a single incident since the latest nationwide ceasefire in Syria started last week. Two developers and a political fundraising group have declared more than 100,000 dollars in political donations in the days leading up to Christmas. But the donations weren't recent - they're from as far back as 2013, long past the deadline to declare them to the Australian Electoral Commission. The ABC understands the AEC has never charged anyone for failing to declare political donations. A James Troisi masterclass has led Melbourne Victory to its fifth straight win in the A-League. The Victory defeated Adelaide United 2-0. It's emerged that the man being questioned over the shooting deaths of five people at a Florida airport has a history of mental health problems. Esteban Santiago, a veteran who served in rake, had been receiving treatment at his home in Alaska. This is the man police say killed five at Fort Lauderdale Airport, opening fire indiscriminately as travellers collected their baggage. He's Esteban Santiago, a He's Esteban Santiago, a 26-year-old former member of the military. His family said he'd been receiving psychological help after his discharge last August. His aunt has said he was never the same after returning from serving in Iraq in 2011.

(SIREN WAILS) (SIREN WAILS) Police say Santiago used a semiautomatic handgun in the attack in the baggage hall, scattering terrified passengers before throwing away his weapon and laying spread-eagled on the ground as police moved in to arrest him. As things started to return to normal at the airport, it's emerged that Santiago had been interviewed by the FBI as recently as November last year. One anonymous source has said he told agents that the government was ordering him to watch videos from the Islamic State group. It was during that contact that the agents themselves noted the erratic behaviour that concerned them and motivated them to call their local authorities to have him taken into custody and evaluated at a medical facility for his mental health. Questions are also being raised about the ease with which Santiago was able to transport and use his weapon in a supposedly secure place like an airport. It's legal to put a gun in checked baggage in the US, as long as it's locked in a case and unloaded. But you can carry ammunition in the same case. Santiago will appear on Monday in court on federal charges. But while his motivations will continue to be broke, there are also serious questions about how a man who had already appeared on the authorities' radar could seemingly go on to commit such a heinous crime. The cost of childcare is predicted to hit more than $220 per day within the next four years - that's according to the latest government forecasts. Left unchecked, that will mean working mothers will have nothing left after paying tax and childcare fees. For more on this, and what else is in today's papers, we're joined by the assistant news editor at Guardian Australia. $223 a day... It's scary. In the next four years, they're forecasting childcare prices to go up by 22% across Australia. That $223 figure is the top rate for Sydney, but it's still $157 in Brisbane, $175 in Melbourne. Obviously the government needs to do something about it. It ties into the battle that's been going on in the Senate where they've tried to increase the rebates, but tying it to cuts in family tax, which Labor opposes. It's going to affect productivity and push people out of work, but the article had a pet peeve of mine, where it said that it would cost a mother all of her income if she goes back to work. Well, it's both parents that are paying for it - a father is paying for childcare as well, it's not just out of the mother's pocket, and it shouldn't be.Obviously, typically, we've found that, in a lot of families, it will be the mother who ends up, you know, opting to stay at home...Or has to, because she earns less than the father and is less financially viable.There's already bias present, isn't there? Workplaces are usually more flexible for women. Well, they're getting more flexible for women but not so much for men, which is a broader issue we should look at as when it comes to childcare.Real issues there. I know the government cancelled their nanny pilot program a little while ago because no-one was taking it up, because people were earning less than they were paying for a nanny.They could have done a lot better with the nanny pilot. When someone hears "nanny", they think it's for rich people, or the CEOs earning a lot of money in the eastern suburbs. But it's a really good program for shift workers. They wanted firefighters and nurses to take it up, people who work nights and weekends. I don't think they did a good enough push on that, did they?The other critical factor - it's been proven children benefit from being able to go through early childhood education programs. If they're finding the pressure to keep kids out of that because it's not affordable, it might have broader implications. Exactly. They might not know how to interact with other children...Your organisation, The Guardian, has had a good look at this white spot disease announced in prawns, announced this week to some fanfare. Should the government have seen this coming?According to the article, they should have seen it coming. There was a report from Biosecurity in 2009 warning about this issue, saying we shouldn't be importing raw prawns. Apparently the industry in Australia has been lobbying for long time not to import prawns from foreign operators. Five farms in Queensland have been affected that could be shut down. This is a $360 million industry that could be devastated by something it seems like could easily have been avoided. It makes you wonder. Australia usually prides itself on being, you know, on the front foot when it comes to biosecurity and preserving the health and safety of our food produce, essentially.This struck me as well, that we seem to be quite lackadaisical on this and ignore warnings for a long time. Maybe the appetite for prawns was just too much!(LAUGHS) Indeed.There's a suggestion in there too that certainly some operators may have been acting very unscrupulously? Yes, that was an interesting detail - some importers... They are tested quite regularly, but they get to select which prawns are tested. They were selecting prawns they knew didn't have white spot and sending them to Biosecurity, knowing their batches were infected.Seems like there are quite a few flaws going on there. Let's turn our attention now to a situation whereby we're seeing, obviously with the push for more housing, more high-rise apartments going up, particularly in cities in urban areas. What does that mean for those who opt to keep their home? There's a bit of a dilemma happening there, is there?It means they can end up with a lot of money from the developers! But there is a dilemma for some people. We're getting 84% more dwellings in the next five years than we've had in the previous five years because of a lot of approvals. Most of that is apartments. It's not new houses. To build the apartments, they've been buying land from people. There's a case study that the Sunday Tele has - there's a bloke who bought a 3-bedroom house in Glanville for $490,000 in 2010. He's been offered $1.2 million, but he's refusing to leave, and says he won't go for $2 million. Have to admit, found it difficult to feel sorry for him! He has apartment blocks going a up around him, and he was talking about how he doesn't want to leave his garden. Obviously there's a huge housing affordability issue, particularly in Sydney, and more apartments is part of the answer.A great little graphical treatment there on the front page for anyone who's seen the Disney film Up, where the old man has his house cut in half...The intro was all about, "In the movie, he ends up being floated away with balloons, but that's not the reality in Sydney..."More of a problem as people move into the 'burns, I suppose.Yeah, and there was an interesting case where a bloke bought a semidetached house and he's now sharing a wall with an apartment block, which is quite an odd thing to happen.One wonders about the development approval process there. Seems strange... People are also getting properly compensated for their homes and offered proper compensation as well. The Sun Herald's had a pretty in-depth look at the issue of mental health amongst the population of people in nursing homes. It's found some pretty horrifying things?Very alarming. Residents in nursing homes can't access psychological services on Medicare because they're technically not seen to be as "in the community." We have literally hundreds of thousands of people in nursing homes with mental illness, and they're not able to access any bulk-billing or medical services for psychologists. It had a figure in there - up to 176,000 people suffering mental illness in nursing homes. It's just a loophole that the Turnbull Government has - it's been around for a few years, and the Turnbull Government has reaffirmed that regulation, that they're not going to allow access to GPs or psychologists under Medicare. There doesn't seem to be any good enough reasoning given for it either.Is it a cost-shifting thing that the Government doesn't want to pay something for something it thinks nursing providers should do?I don't know if the government thinks nursing homes should be paying for it, but it definitely is a cost-saving measure. Maybe they think these people can pay for it themselves out of their own pocked. They don't seem to be too worried about it at all. There wasn't a proper explanation in the article for it.Lots of questions there. Let's look at the situation around nursing more generally. It's traditionally seen as, perhaps, a female-dominated industry. What are the men finding when they join? Apparently there's a study - this is in the Sunday Tele as well - that men don't like being referred to as "male nurses" and they want the profession to be de-genderised. My brother's a nurse. He became an RN last year. He has a real job, as opposed to me. He wanted us to call him "sister" for months afterwards. He was signing cards to me, "Sister Seamus."It raises an issue around midwives and nurses? You can't call them birthers...Male nurses found themselves most uncomfortable when working as midwives because they found that mothers didn't want them to be in the delivery room, which is kind of strange, because all the doctors are men and they're OK with the doctors being men, but they didn't like male nurses therein. I don't think nurse "nurse" is a particularly feminine word. I think we are passed the days of calling "male nurse". Certainly there are other titles that could be changed, I guess.We'll keep an eye on it. Thank you very much for joining us this morning.Thank you. It's said birds of a feather flock together, but is there any advantage to doing so? What turns a shy, green grasshopper into a red, rampaging locust?These are very important questions which Dr Karl has been pondering. The answers bring a new understanding of the many ways the collective principle operates in nature and might one day be replicated in science. The classic case is the birds and the fish flocking. Let's start off with a single bird and see why they flock. The one that's up there near the top is on the top for the long migration - the Alaskan bar-tailed godwhip. I've never seen it. It looks cute in a picture. It does 11,000km in one go. We're talking across the Pacific sort of distances. It feeds like crazy until fat makes up 50% of its body weight, and because it's going to be living on its fat, it doesn't really need its gut, so its gut shrunks to nothing, and the liver and kidneys and various other things - shrinks them away to nothing. Keeps a bit of liver. Then it takes off and manages to get there and survives, and goes to these incredible changes, trying to get maximum efficiency. Then that leads us onto the whole birds in the "V" flock. Obviously they're more efficient, you think, and they keep on swapping the positions with the one at the front...They can keep an eye on one another?They've got a couple of rules - don't get too close, don't get too far, keep near the centre, and whatever they do, you do. If something comes invading from the other side, you'll do it too. Efficiency is hard to define in a bird - it's easier with human jets. In 2002, they got some FA-18 attack fighters, and they had them sort of - one at the nose, the nose of the next one at the wingtip of the other one, and they found 12% extra efficiency, which either means greater range or less fuel burning, which is good. But there are other advantages to being in the flock. One advantage is the statistics. You think, "Really? I'm safer? How can I be safer?" Imagine you're a shark... (HUMS JAWS THEME) Your chances of finding a fish are pretty well the same as finding 10,000 fish in a group. You're finding one thing or another thing. One's a fish, one's a school of fish. Looking at it from the fisher's point of view, if you're the single fish, you're gone - you're dinner. But if you were the school, you've got a 1-in-10,000 chance of being eaten. That's one advantage - the fesh efficiency thing. The other one is the target thing, where it might seem obvious that you just dive for the middle of the group and you'll get something. But there've been so many videos of predator fish and hawk whose - a hawk will dive straight through this flock of smaller birds - dense flock - then come out the other side empty-clawed. Is that a word?I think you've created it if it didn't exist already!You've got to aim for one target. The other advantage of being in a flock, in a group, is being able to suddenly turn around and repel the invader. Even if you're a small critter.Strength in numbers.Safety in numbers. The last one - which I found surprising - collective intelligence.Ohhh.If you've got a small flock, they'll get lost more often than a big flock. The big flock will sort of have a bit more in numbers and a bit more collective intelligence. This arises different sizes in different groups of critters. If you've got the annoying mid-insect, do they bite? I've never been bitten by one, but apparently they do bite, the midge. 10 is a group. When you've got 5, they go anywhere. When you get to about 10, you keep the same number of midges per cubic centimetre and they all keep the same distance apart, so they're self-organising. Then you've got the grasshopper, and I didn't realise until reading - the grasshopper is a locust.Yes, but it depends on their communal arrangement?Yeah. So if you've got fewer than 25 per square metre, you've got this shy, and the word that they use is "cryptically coloured", which I think means "camouflage".They blend in?That's scientific talk for you - "Why not say 'camouflage'?" And they're shy. By the time they've got to 50, they're gregarious, and brightly coloured. The key seems to be if they brush their back legs against each other. If you've done experiments, they stop their back legs from brushing each other and they didn't change colour. When you get to 75, they go, "We are mighty and powerful. We are all going in that direction." Once again, this happens without a leader. Somehow, this collective intelligence arises that they're all going in that direction, and then you've got the plagues of Egypt or the modern-day plagues and they're all terrible. The scientist whose are looking into this are mathematicians, scientists and engineers involved in artificial intelligence.Mm-hmm...They're trying to see what we can learn from nature. One of the old sayings I learned as an engineer - "Do not reinvent the wheel." Nature has had billions of years of evolution to come up with things. If we can follow what nature's doing, maybe we'll work out some way of working with collective intelligence, with artificial intelligence. Then people like Stephen Hawking say, "No! They'll do bad things to us." I don't know. What do you reckon?It depends on who's in charge, doesn't it?Nobody's in charge.There's got to be some in-charge factor, surely. Mmm. Yes? No. Look at elections. I don't know. It's too hard for me. I'll just sort of - as I go off on the Christmas holidays and I do my little migration, I'll feel sympathy for the bar-tailed godwith going 11,000km.Especially when we're talking 50% body fat! Thank you very much. I don't know if I'm any the wiser on this collective-principle business. Maybe we can refer to a sporting expert. Georgie Tunny joins us now. Australia completed the clean sweep? A dramatic turnaround in form, especially for the test summer, as it came to a conclusion. Shorter forms of the game still to be enjoyed, though. Test cricket for the summer is over, but with the upcoming 1-day series and Big Bash League ongoing, fans saw more boundaries than ever before, and that is important - one player is making sure those lofty sixes count off the pitch as well as on it. Founder and Sydney Sixers batsman Ryan Carters joins us on Weekend Breakfast. Thank you so much for being here. Take us through exactly what Batting for Change is, what it strives to achieve, and how you came up with the idea?Sure, Georgie. No problem. I guess I've been really lucky as a young cricketer - I'm now 26, but in my early 20s, experiencing different cultures around the cricket-playing world. So many people live in extreme poverty, in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal. I travelled through the slums and saw the way people live, barely with a roof over their heads, let alone money for decent food, clean water and, of course, good education. I partnered up with a charity called the LBW Trust. We came up with a fun idea. "How about we ask people to make a pledge on battingforchange.com.au, pledge $1 or $2 for every six my team hits during the BBL, and at the end of the season, we'll work out how much money we can raise for women, in particular, in these communities. Women traditionally have not had the same education levels as men, so we're trying to level the playing field.You were able to raise $30,000 the first year. How have you seen Batting for Change grow subsequently, and what is the goal for 2017?Our first goal - to raise $30,000 in the first year, as you said - we hit that exactly. We were stoked. We thought that was amazing, allowing us to build three new classrooms at a school in Kathmandu, Nepal. Tee we are built those classrooms and extended the school population. We thought, "How much bigger can this get?" To this date, we've supported the education of over 1,000 women in Mumbai, Sri Lanka and Nepal. This year, we're really excited to launch a new program in Kenya, where the women not only will have their education supported, but they're prevented from entering into child marriage and also preventing female genital mutilation, which is a sad thing that happens to lot of young women in this particular part of Kenya. Been order to do that, we need to hit our target of $150,000 this year, a big step up from where we were a couple of years ago. That would allow us to support the education of 600 women. I think it's amazing - although that's a huge amount of money, it is amazing how far that money goes in these countries. If people at home want to get onto battingforchange.com.au and donate, your small change does change a life. It relies on small donations adding up - that will give us the best chance of reaching $150,000.What has it been like seeing how far those donations go in person? You've travelled to India, Nepal and the likes. What's it like seeing that firsthand?I came back - every time I go, I come back doubly inspired. The women there are really the most amazing thing. A lot of them have grown up - apart from conditions of severe poverty - they've been grown up being told that the woman's place is in the household, and that they don't deserve to be educated beyond, I don't know, the age of 14 or 15. For them to actually stand up and say, "I've got a dream to go to university" is such a big deal. For us, it's about providing the financial opportunity to do so. They're the ones who have the dream in the first place. Our money can help make that dream a reality. You've got some great ambassadors this year. I have to ask, in light of one man in particular's BBL form, Chris Lynn, in belting boundaries and sixes with essentially every delivery, have you thought about getting him to come onboard? I know he's a Brisbane Heat player!Chris Lynn has actually hit more sixes than the Sydney Sixers combined so far. We'll have to do something about that tomorrow night against the Renegades. He's certainly in sublime form. Maybe the Sydney Sixers can sign him up, then he can be a part of Batting for Change too. Before we let you go, such an incredible initiative, but I wanted to go through a bit of a lighter note at the moment with the test cricket summer coming to abend yesterday. One of your New South Wales Blues teammates, Mickey Edwards, has made all of the headlines today because of a certain cameo that he made yesterday by being the substitute fielder. What's he like? We know he can actually play cricket as well!He's a very promising fast bowler. He's had a couple of injury troubles which have probably kept him off the field until now in his early career. But I think he's gonna do exciting things in the next few years. As you might guess, taking a look at him, he lives on the northern beaches of Sydney.(LAUGHTER) When he's not playing cricket, he works part-time for Budgie-Smugglers, a swimwear company, as it sounds. He fits that well.Maybe another potential ambassadorer for your charity, Batting for Change. Ryan Carters, thank you so much! Such a good initiative. And good luck batting more sixes.Thanks, Georgie. Thanks for supporting Batting for Change. Amazing initiative. Hopefully everyone can support it, especially with the rise of BBL. It will get bigger and bigger. Thank you, Georgie. Stay with us on Weekend Breakfast. We'll be back shortly with more news, sport and all the rest.

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Good morning and welcome back to Weekend Breakfast. I'm Miriam Corowa.I'm Nick Harmsen. Making news this morning: Donald Trump labels critics of the US-Russia alliance, drawing -- as stupid, drawing ire from President Barack Obama.We have to remind ourselves we're on the same time. Vladimir Putin's not on our team. Also ahead: Scenes of devastation in northern Syria. Dozens killed after an explosion rips through a busy marketplace. The latest political disclosure list reveals previously undeclared donations dating back to 2013. Set up by Berisha! And beautifully finished by James Troisi! And a James Troisi masterclass guides Melbourne Victory to their fifth straight win in the A-League.

fifth straight win in the A-League.
Thanks for joining us. It is Sunday 8 January.I can't believe it's the middle of January already!We're getting there, aren't we?Also coming up: After successful season in Brisbane and Melbourne, the hit musical Ladies In Black has come home to the city that inspired it all. # Ladies in black # It's tough coming back! # Cause it never went away # We knew it was here to stay # Ladies in black!Set in a bustling post-war Sydney, the musical tells the story of Lisa Miles who, after finishing school, gets a summer job at a department store. Loosely modelled on David Jones. Working alongside the women in the fashion section who were known for their black outfits. We catch up with two of the key creatives Hillary Clinton this latest show business success. That, of course, involves the musical genius of Tim Finn, known for Split Enz and Crowded House, but he took his turn with musical theatre. We get to speak to Simon Phillips, of corks who has had a hand in such hits as Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert and Love Never Dies. You can't go wrong with the likes of Simon and Tim. We'll

To our top stories this morning: The US President-elect Donald Trump has posted a series of tweets condemning those who oppose good relations with Russia as "stupid". Mr Trump vowed to work with Moscow to solve some of the many pressing problems and issues of the world. His comments came after an intelligence report found Russia's president had tried to aid his election victory. Mr Trump also accused the Democratic Party of gross negligence for allowing their servers to be hacked. The President-elect's tweets have been widely criticised by intelligence groups, who say his actions will only deepen the divide between the incoming administration and the US intelligence and foreign policy community. Former director of the CIA Michael Hayden was scathing in It leaves
his assessment. It leaves us in a very dark place. Frankly, I don't want to be apocalyptic about this - I'm kind of looking at this through the lens of the American intelligence community - it's, "That's my best shot. That's a high-confidence juments," and he said, "scan take a hike." Wow. That's going to reverberate throughout the community. If you find that high-confidence judgements represent insufficient proof for you to move, then you should sell the antennas and let these kids go do something else.At least 43 people have been killed in a bomb blast in the rebel-held Syrian town of Azaz. The explosion occurred outside a courthouse in the town, just 7km from the Turkish border. Azaz has recently been targeted by the Islamic State group. The latest blast is the worst since a nationwide ceasefire brokered by Russia and Turk ia, which does not include Islamic State. At this stage, no group has claimed responsibility for the bombing. Investigators say the Iraq war veteran accused of killing five people at Fort Lauderdale airport appears to have travelled to Florida specifically to carry out the attack. The 26-year-old suspect, Esteban Santiago, has a history of acting erratically and investigators are probing whether mental illness played a role in America's latest mass shooting. Terrorism has not been ruled out as a motive. Five people were killed, and six wounded, in the attack, while some three dozen people were taken to local hospitals with bruises or broken bones suffered in the chaos, as passengers ran from the attack.The President of the Ivory Coast says the government has reached an agreement with disgruntled soldiers to end a 2-day revolt. The uprising began early on Friday when the army mutinied and seized control of the West African nation's second-largest industry. Over -- city. Over the next two days, soldiers at military camps in cities and towns, including the commercial capital, Abidjan, joined the mutiny. The revolt came two years after hundreds of soldiers barricaded roads and cities across Ivory Coast, demanding back pay in a near-identical uprising.Police have quelled a disturbance at the troubled Parkville youth justice centre in Melbourne's inner north after a riot broke out last night. The dog squad, critical incident spobs teadge and riot police sponalded to the scene. Fire crews attended after an alarm set off but there was no fire. It's understood about 20 inmates were involved but no staff members or juveniles were hurt in the incident. A previous riot at the centre prompted the Victorian Government to transfer more than a dozen youths to the adult Barwon Prison! A woman accused of attacking two strangers with an axe in Sydney's inner west is expected to face court today. A 32-year-old man suffered a serious head wound and a 43-year-old woman has a fracture skull after being randomly attacked in Enmore. Officers say they're in stable conditions in hospital. A woman in her 20s has been charged, refused bail and will face Parramatta bail court later today. Two developers and a political fundraising group have revealed more than $100,000 dollars in political donations. The donations were declared in the days leading up to Christmas but they bate back as far as 2013. A Chinese developer gave $20,000 to the ALP. Another developer that's previously supported the Liberal Party gave $21,000 to Family First. A seek live Liberal Party fundraising entity called the South Yarra Club declared $70,000.Environmentalists are considering mounting a legal challenge against a proposed 800-bed development at Perisher in Kosciuszko National Park in the New South Wales Snowy Mountains. US ski giant Vail Resorts bought Perisher from James Packer last year and with it came long-approved concept plans for a seven-building development in the vinal. The coallong Foundation for Wilderness has engaged the environmental defenders office and is considering a legal challenge. Tasmanian creators of a jellyfish app are calling for government support. They've joined with a marine biologist to create an app to allow people to check what jellyfish are in the area and provides medical advice on how to treat a sting. Creators of the app want the State Government to promote the app by putting it in tourist information centres and schools. Sport now. Georgie, Melbourne Victory keep on winning. Victory by name and by nature, most recently anyway. Besart Berisha was back at his best but a teammate has stolen headlines this morning. A James Troisi masterclass has led Melbourne Victory to their fifth straight win in the A-League. The former Socceroo had some help from that gun striker and fan favourite, Berisha. His cross set up the first goal of the match before Troisi returned the favour in the second. The Albanian superstar booted his 92nd league goal as Victory added more misery to the reigning champs' season. The Reds haven't won in over a month, still glued to the bottom of the table. Another blistering knock from Kevin Pietersen proved match-turning in the Melbourne derby. KP belted 79 off 43 balls, his ninth BBL half century in only 20 appearances to steer the Stars to a huge double-century total of 7/200. In reply, the Renegades could only manage 9/154. Spin partners Adam Zampa and Michael Beer doing most of the damage with three wickets apiece. The Stars too good, winners by 46 runs. Karolina Pliskova has taken out her first Brisbane International singles tighting, defeating Alize Cornet in straight sets. The win takes her to world number five. In the men's draw, Grigor Dimitrov stunned defending champ Milos Raonic to progress to his second Brisbane final where he will face Kei Nishikori. France has won the 2017 Hopman Cup. Richard Gasquet and Kristina Mladenovich outlasted Team USA in a fast-four mixed doubles to clirchg their second Hopman title. We've been reflecting on the test summer of cricket that was all morning. There was another highlight added to the book yesterday, particular chapter. We're going to call it mickey "Goldilocks" Edwards and this is why. He's the latest cult hero. "Nice Gary" is now only an echo for Nathan Lyon. The crowd loved him so much they didn't want David Warner back on the pitch. If you can achieve something like that, you're future can only be bright, surely. That's right. Particularly if you've got the skills to follow up the looks.Hopefully, yes.Yeah, yeah, yeah. Let's hope. It sounds like we've got a lot of memorable moments to draw on there. Who would have thought with a haircut like that he plays club cricket for Manly.What a sthock! What a shock! Residents of the Northern Beaches. I would not have guessed it!There you go. The secret's out. Thanks, Georgie. Thanks, guys.Thank you for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come: tweeter-in-chief Donald Trump takes to social media yet again to attack his critics.Also ahead: We'll by joined by Shadow minister for climate change and energy, Mark Butler, to discuss the challenges facing the National Power grid and what role renewable energy could play.And later: When enough is enough. Why buying more stuff is not always the answer to happiness. Donald Trump's row with the US intelligence community has intensified after the President-elect fired off a group of he tweets in which he criticises the spy agencies. Mr Trump was briefed by intelligence officials on Friday, where he was told Vladimir Putin personally ordered cyberattacks to undermine Mr Trump's rival, Hillary Clinton. The President-elect has rejected the findings.

Former CIA head Michael had yelp is concerned about Mr Trump's casual dismissal of the high confidence judgements from the intelligent community and worries that if Mr Trump fails to take action, the community itself will become redundant.What's different here is that the President-elect for his own reasons has decided to put this out and make this public. You know, in American football we've got this ritual we call trash talk in which you go out and begin to say things to try to get into the head of the opposition in some ways, maybe even to intimidate the opposition. You know, an awful lot of tweets that the President-elect has put out there about the American intelligence community feel a bit like trash talk but this is a covert influence campaign that I think succeeded beyond all possible expectations on the part of the Russian Federation. At a minimum, you've got me here talking to you trying to explain why there appears to be a war between the President-elect and the American intelligence community. If I'm working for the Russian special services and I'm responsible for that covert influence campaign, I'm going, "In the win column." Meanwhile, outgoing US President Barack Obama has called for an end to political divisions over the issue.I think that what is true is that the Russians intended to meddle and they meddled. I'll be honest with you, George, one of the things I am concerned about is the degree to which we've seen a lot of commentary lately where there are Republicans who are pundits or cable commentators who seem to have more confidence in Vladimir Putin than fellow Americans, because those fellow Americans are Democrats. That cannot be.Does that include the President-elect?Well, what I will say is that, um - and I said this right after the election - we have to remind ourselves we're on the same team. Vladimir Putin is not on our team. At least 43 people have been killed by a massive bomb blast near a busy market in northern Syria. Islamic State militants are suspected of carrying out the attack.The blast ripped through a central market in the town of Azaz, which lies on the border with Turkey. Fear, panic and chaos. The aftermath of this morning's explosion. Many interest killed, ours wounded, by the attack outside a courthouse in a busy commercial district in the centre of of the city. TRANSLATION: A car bomb went off in the city centre near civilians. There are no fighters here, all of them are civilians. As rescue workers searched for both survivors and bodies, no-one had claimed responsibility for this attack. But this city is no stranger to such scenes. Azaz is a stronghold of Turkish-backed Syrian rebels involved in a major operation to clear so-called Islamic State from northern Syria. -- Syria, close to the Turkish border. In recent days, Turkish forces and rebels is continued to target IS, which isn't included in the fragile ceasefire covering much of Syria. Azaz has become home to people who have fled fighting elsewhere. Today's attack shows despite the ceasefire, large -- ceasefire largely holding, people in Syria are continuing to die. Well, amid the destruction and chaos in Syria, there is a man broadcasting messages of home to -- hope to those trapped in the wartorn country. Sami al-Joundi fled from Syria in 2014 amid fears for his safety and that of his family.Radio Alwan was started with a portable transmitter on the back of a pick-up truck and it continues to give home to -- hope to those who remain in the wartorn country.Well, first, we're not based within the Syrian borders, because we had to move out from Syria for a period of time. ISIS took control in... Of Idlib, where the radio has started. The founder of the studio had to go out of Syria and he was wanted by Daesh. So we established the city of Istanbul and we started operating and producing the content from here and transmitting it to inside Syria. We're getting our content from our team. We have a big team inside Syria, a team of correspondents. We have also presenters, producers, studio technicians over there. We also have actors and journalists who write and produce the couple of our drama and comedy sketches that we present on the radio. It must a difficult task keeping in touch with those correspondents and also keeping a watch over their safety.Yeah, it is very difficult, because, um, we have two issues to address here - first that our team of correspondents are not professional journalists. They don't have the experience and the academic background to do it. They just learn it by practice after the revolution started, and it developed to a war in Syria. They, um... We are trying to train them to give them tips to develop them, but all this through Skype calls, Whatsapp calls, Facebook Messenger calls, all the tools we can use through the internet and it's hard to get stable, good internet connection so we also face technical difficulties with our team as well. So this is very challenging. And the second thing is they are living in a difficult circumstance, they are living in a war zone, so they are subject to constant danger all the time. Them and their families and their loved ones. We have faced cases where our correspondents or our team members have lost family members, wives, kids, or they have lost their house during bombings or attacks. So it's really difficult for them to work and give us the good content and the accurate content, and good and accurate information that we are broadcasting and it's as well, it's hard for them to... You know, to cope with these circumstances. And for us as well it's hard because you need to always be supporting them emotionally and checking on them and we ails worry about their safety and when we lost connection with one of them, we always wait very anxiously to get in touch with them again, because we always have the possibility that we might lose them forever. So, yeah, it's very difficult.Mmm. The stories the world hears out of northern Syria in particular are just horrific. How do you go about producing radio programs for people who are living in a war zone? What sort of news do you give them? And how do you offer them tomorrow relief from the situation that they find themselves in?Well, um, for us, Alwan is - in our case, Alwan is a community radio. It's not news-based radio, so we... We have a news program, but it's not our main focus. And our program -- in our programming, we have light, informative programs. It contains information and a news and stimss entertainment that people need -- sometimes entertainment that people need, especially inside Syria. They don't have access to no, like, different, light - needed information sometimes about technology, sometimes about ways and techniques that you can use the resources around you, especially in areas that are under siege, how you can best use the available resources that you have. Medical and health information and tips. We provide that through doctors and specialists. Comedy sketches and drama as well. People need that to go on with their lives, because this war has... Like, it's been going on for now, for six years. So people need something in their lives apart from listening to news to know the number or how many people were killed and injured. Of course they want to know that but as well, they need other information to go on with their lives. They need to laugh. They need to listen to a piece of music that they can relate to.Sami, I'm interested in what sort of audience feedback you get. Do you get phone calls? Emails? Do you have evidence of people who have fled Syria who continue listening to you? Are there people in refugee camps or who have resettled elsewhere in the world?Yeah, well we have... Like, our live broadcast, during our live broadcast, we have phone-in programs, we have communication and interaction with the audience through Facebook combhents and Facebook Messier -- comments, and Facebook Messenger, Whatsapp and Viber, people can call us from anywhere around the world. We have listeners from refugee camps either in Turkey or Lebanon. We have a lot of people who kept listening to us who are now in Europe and who are now refugees in different parts of Europe. So, yeah, we have this kind of interaction and communication with the audience. That's Sami al-Joundi with the Syrian radio station Radio Alwan. Well, it's just barely a week in and already 2017 is threatening to pose big challenges for the National Power grid, which links the eastern states. The expected closure of the Hazelwood brown coal plant in Victoria is tiptd to drive up bills for consumers and there's little sign that power companies are willing to invest in new base load generation to replace it.Shadow minister for climate change and energy Mark Butler joins us now to discuss this issue on the line from Adelaide. Mark Butler, good morning and welcome. You've been talking about an emissions intensity scheme needed to ensure new investment in the power sector. For the uninitiated, can you take us through what an EIS actually is?Essentially it's a strong signal to investors about a commitment by the national government to see new generation capacity built in Australia that is as clean as possible. It's not just Labor that's been talking about this. We picked this up from Energy Markets Commission which came up with the concept in 2015. This is the body that oversees the national electricity market. And over the course of the last several weeks of last year, you saw it recommended by the Chief Scientist, by the Climate Change Authority, by all state governments, Labor and Liberal alike, and by the industry itself along with the CSIRO. So pretty much everyone who is focusing attention on future energy policy has come up with the idea that this emissions intensity scheme - as I said, not a creature of the Labor Party's thinking but an idea from the energy markets commission - is the property centrepiece of a national mod needation plan for electricity. Now, just before Christmas, Josh Frydenberg, the Energy Minister, indicated that the Federal Government would think about adopting this, and that's a good thing. Because there would then be the possibility finally of some bipartisan national energy policy. But after a very strong reaction from the right-wing of his own party - Tony Abbott, Cory Bernardi and the like - Malcolm Turnbull inexplicably - and very foolishly, I think - decided to walk away from the emissions intensity scheme, in spite of the fact that the energy markets commission said a failure to introduce this scheme would cost households $15 billion in increased power bills over the next decade. You mentioned this was not a creation of the Labor Party. If we back to history to when this was first put forward in 2009 by the Commission Danny Price in a report commissioned by the now prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, and Senator Nick Xenophon, your colleague penny Womg described it as a mongrel. She said it wasn't a credible alternative, it was a smokescreen and has the distinct taste of magic pudding. Why should we believe this is the way forward now?Over the course of 2015 and 2016, I spent some months consulting deeply with the energy industry, consumers, businesses, big users of energy - mostly the manufacturing sector - and we came to the view that the proper thing to do was to adopt a comprehensive plan that looked at building new renewable energy to replace the ageing coal fleet, three-quarters of which is operating beyond its design life and an emissions intensity scheme which was a follow I that we thought had the best chance of gaining consensus between the major parties but also with the electricity industry, the old thermal generators - the coal- and gas-fired generators - but also with the energy users. Things were looking good into early December last year that finally we might have a bipartisan energy policy that had the support of all of the state governments, Labor and Liberal alike, the support of the industry, the supportle big energy-users and finally send a strong investment signal to businesses that would allow them to start building the new generation that Australia is going to need over the next couple of decades. Because I think it's often lost, Nick, in the debate that three-quarters of our coal and gas-fired generators around the country are already operating beyond their design life. It's not a matter of choice about replacing them. Inevitably, they will close over the next decade or decade-and-a-half. And even if there wasn't this debate about climate change or a renewable energy revolution, Australia would anyway be now at the position in its history of having to renew all of those generators that were built mainly in 1960s and 1970s. But until the investment community has a strong signal from the national parliament and the national government that preferably is bipartisan, there is simple -- they're simply not going to build that. What you'll see as a result, as Danny Price said before Christmas, you'll see less energy security, more black-outs and brown-outs and increasing power prices for households and businesses. Only a couple of weeks into January, we're already seeing that.I suppose the big question is what are you going to replace the ageing coal plants with? You spoke about gas. We've seen big hikes in gas prices at the moment, with a number of state governments putting bans and moratoriums on exploration. Isn't the reality here that if we're to meet our Paris climate change targets we're going to have to pay more.Well, what we need to do is build a new generation of generators. A new fleet of generators across the country that is as diverse and as clean and modern as possible. Now, we'd like those to be new, modern, renewable energy generators as far as possible, but gas is going to have to be a very important part of our mix for a considerable period of time.
We don't think that there is any appetite in the investment community to build new coal-fired generators, although I did notice that the Resources Minister in the Turnbull Government last week said that his preference was for Australia to build new coal-fired generators. I think this is the sort of discussion we need to have with the business community, particularly those parts that are going to fund these new generators. They won't do it without a clear signal from the national government, the sort I thought we'd get with an emissions intensity scheme.One state already has a high gas and renewable energy mix, your home state of South Australia. We have the highest wholesale prices in the nation there and statewide black-outs. Is this a portent of things to come for the rest of country?It's important to separate exactly what has happened over the last 12 months, Nick. There was a statewide black-out that all the of the energy market operators and experts in the field said was clearly the product of a once-in-100-year storm that blew down 23 transmission towers. It wasn't about the nature of the generation fleet. The Chief Scientist said at a summit in South Australia a week or so after the black-out that this sort of thing would have happened even if there were a much higher reliance on gas-and coal-fire generators that there is in South Australia. Let's be clear about what happened with the statewide black-out. It is true that South Australia is at the pointy end of the transition to a modern fleet of generators. South Australia has been badly let down by the lack of strong national energy policy. First of all, a strong investment signal of the time that Danny Price and the CSIRO and others have talked about getting from an emissions intensity scheme, but also we have utter chaos in our gas market. Because of the new LNG operators operating out of Queensland, sending gas off to Korea and to China and Japan, we've seen a tripling of demand in the eastern markets for gas and we're not getting enough gas supply into our electricity generators that are keeping prices down. So the price sparks you've seen over the last 12 months in places like South Australia, but elsewhere in the national electricity market as well are overwhelmingly the product of very big spikes in the price of gas. We've seen nothing over the last three years from the Turnbull and the Abbott government to really introduce some sort of order into a gas market that is profoundly different after the introduction of those LNG export operations.Mark Butler, if I can turn to the issue of parliamentary entitlements and Sussan Ley's apartment on the Gold Coast, that issue is yet to fully play out. Weaver seen a number of these scandals in the past couple of years and even a review of parliamentarians' entitlements. Is it still too easy for MPs to take the tax pair to or a ride?It shouldn't be and there are serious questions for Sussan Ley to answer about what she and her husband were doing that day on the Gold Coast. The answers we have got - not from the minister herself but were her office - are changing almost on a daily basis. We were originally told she was meeting with health stake-holders, so presumably doctors or nurses groups or a visit to the Gold Coast Hospital or something. After we - quite reasonably I think - asked about details on the stake-holder meetings, she changed the story and said she was meeting with individual patients. And that of course would be secret and too personal to divulge to the Australian community so we'd have to take her on trust. We're also expected to take on trust this story apparently that in between this busy series of meetings, the minister was taking a short stroll on the streets of the Gold Coast and stumbled upon an auction and without apparently any sort of finance pre-approval or a building inspection or perhaps even looking through the apartment very closely at all, on an impulse she bought a luxury apartment of $795,000 with her husband. I mean none of this holds water.Isn't the issue that there are rules - and we've seen this with donations this morning as well - there are rules in place that require things to be disclosed and that require ministers and parliamentarians to follow rules, but they're not enforced. They are. We saw last year when Stuart Robert mixed up his private and public responsibilities as a minister in the Turnbull government, he to go. We've seen that in the last few years particularly with the Abbott-and-Turnbull governments. We're getting stonewalling from this minister. She's gone into hiding. The Prime Minister is not doing anything to present some detail and some evidence to the Australian community that the inial standards that are much stronger than the usual standards that apply to public officials, they apply to ministers for good reason that there must be a clear delineation between your public life and your private life. And there are serious questions for either the minister or the Prime Minister to answer quickly because all the evidence points to a clear conflict of interest and the only conclusion that you can draw, really, based on the evidence and the usual sort of assumptions that people would make about the nature of impulse-buying, is that the minister and her husband were there with the purpose of buying a luxury apartment. Until she provides some evidence to the contrary, the only conclusion I think reasonable people can make is that there was a breach of ministerial standards that mean that this minister has to go.Mark Butler, briefly, if I can ask you to comment on reports in the News Limited papers this morning on childcare costs, a 22% rise over the next four years, a top rate of $223 a day in Sydney in four years' time - is that warranted? And what can be done about it? SoWell, um, I think Kate Ellis has said that from the time that the government under Prime Minister Abbott then, promised to make childcare more affordable, to any possibility of delivery on the Federal Government's policy on childcare, a baby born at the time the promise was originally made will already be in school by the time that the Government actually introduces in changes to the system. We've seen utter inertia in this area, which is placing real pressure on working families, to find the places that they need and to be able to afford childcare if they're lucky enough to find a place. This is the most basic of economic laws of supply and demand. This government needs to do more toll create more places for childcare in all of the major cities but in regional Australia as well. But also to stop holding childcare policy hostage to their insistence that they would cut family payments to hard-work really single-income families to pay for new childcare policy. I can't imagine a clearer case of robbing Peter to pay Paul than that. Shadow minister for climate change and energy, Mark Butler, thank you for your time this morning.Thanks, Nick.

A trough moving across South Australia is triggering heavy showers and storms. Northerly winds are bringing a very hot night to parts of Victoria and New South Wales. An active monsoon trough is generating rain and

The top stories from ABC News: the US President-elect Donald Trump has posted a series of tweets condemning those who oppose good relations with Russia as stupid. The comments come after a US intelligence report stated Russian President Vladimir Putin had sought to help Mr Trump win the presidency. The President-elect said Democrats have shown "grows knowledges" by allowing their servers to be hacked. -- "gross negligence" by allowing their servers to be hacked. An explosion has devastated a busy market in the rebel-held town of Azaz along the Syria-Turkey border. It's the heaviest toll in a single incident since the latest nationwide ceasefire started last week. Three groups have declared $100,000 in political donations in the days leading up to Christmas but the donations are from as far back leading up to Christmas but the
donations are from as far back as 2013, long past the deadline to declare them to donations are from as far back declare them to the Australian Electoral Commission. The ABC understands the AEC has never charged anyone for failing to declare political donations. And a James Troisi masterclass has led Melbourne Victory to their fifth straight win in the A-League. The Victory defeated Adelaide United 2-0. This time of year, many of us might find our houses bursting with the -- at the seams with Christmas gifts and Boxing Day purchases. We may be questioning whether it's necessary. Indeed. As well as impacting your wallet and cupboard space, overconsumption can have huge environmental consequences. When should we say enough is enough? Anthony James from Swinburne University might have some answers and joins us now. Thank you for taking the time to speak to us. Anthony James, how did we get ourselves into this situation in the first place? You know, do you think we can lay some of the fault at least, aside from our personal choices - can we lay some of the fault with advertising and economic imperatives of modern society?Yeah. That's a terrific point, Miriam, and good morning to you. That's the ultimate good morning to you. That's the
ultimate point. What we're sealing ultimate is not only the evidence that past certain points of consumption and energy use and all that, that happiness doesn't increase. After these years that we've known that, we've seen more and more people want to get off the consumption train, not to be in so much debt, not to be so stressed, not to see so much inequality and climate change and other environmental issues, but that narrative of more is better and that economic imperative - I mean we're still constantly implored to buy more for the good of the country. So that's really a key point, I think. How can we, um, individually make different choices to sort of strengthen the licence for more of us to get off that train? But then, as a country, start to ask questions like what's our optimal GDP per capita or what's our optimal energy use level per capita. Not just changing the supply of energy, like you had on before, but what's our optimal energy use percap tarks the sweet spot, if you like, of quality living. We don't even ask that question but if we did, I wonder what possibilities it would open up. Well, in having asked that question, can I ask you have we actually endeavoured anywhere in the world to assess what is perhaps the optimal range within which we consume our energy and other products? Are there places where they've zeroed in on the issue and come up with clear guidelines for that?Yes, yes. There are heavy responses there too.

The guidelines, process and outcomes are still emerging but there are places around the world - notably, Canada, the UK, Bhutan and its national happiness which has got a lot of press over the years - but also broader projects from the OECD and the UN and the like getting at this stuff too. The Genuine Progress Indicator is an old one but highly valuable in what it piloted and Australia had efforts going too. The ABS was doing some terrific work. We only received the sad news in the last month or so that Australia has dropped its official effort to develop the - what it is basically looking to develop better measures that we can gauge when our economy slows, does it matter so much if our quality of life is improving? At the moment, we've really got no way of telling and so we just keep focusing on gross output but if we develop the right measures and if we do that together in a democratic process, we can constantly resist what -- revisit what are we valuing most, what is most important to us at any point in time, and put that in terms that we can track and alter our behaviour, alter economic activity, alter our plans and get away from the dynamic of being so desperate to keep growth-going for its own sort of reason and really get to the heart of the matter of what we're growing for or, indeed, what occasionally we might be happy with growing less for.Anthony James, I am going to put you on the spot. You mentioned Bhutan with its measure for happiness, how do we measure happiness? Is there a way of, um, actually quantifying what that is? Should happiness even be the goal? This is the debate which would be awesome to have. A national dialogue around what does quality of life mean? How do we define quality of life now we've covered our basic material needs? That would be terrific. And we could answer some of these questions together. There's a project #k5u8d the Australian National Development Index, which is to get the dialogue off the ground and looking to become our primary set of accounts, to do just that. We know that all the research on what they tend to call in academic speak subjective wellbeing rather than happiness, what we know is that consistently over decades now, it has not improved much in Australia and industrialised countries. In non-industrialised countries, there are gains to be had in subjective wellbeing when the economy grows and income levels and energy use grows. We're in a situation in countries like Australia where we need to look at what comes next, what does the country look like after we've satisfied basic needs and refine our ultimate benchmarks of human development no less. Those studies are done at microlevels consistently and now we're starting to flesh out at national and international levels. There's two tasks, really - one to back those in and two to individually take more licence to make those choices in our own lives around what is optimal, our optimal, personal optimal level of income, energy use, water use, work hours, that sort of thing, just to help this process along and get us out of some of the big pickles that overconsumption is causing.Some very good questions and insights there for us all to consider as the New Year begins. Anthony James with Swinburne University, thank you for your time with us.It's been a pleasure. your time with us.It's been a
pleasure. Thanks, Miriam.I have to go home and throw some things out, I pleasure. think! Maybe share. We could do a little bit more of that.Teach the kids to share their toys!Nice.Since opening with its world premiere in Brisbane in November 2015, Ladies In Black has quickly won over adoring crowds around the country and now it's the turn of snirtds to give the musical a homecoming in the city that inspired the original novel the production is based on.While final preparations were getting under way last week for its Sydney Festival debut, I

We've been waiting to bring it to Sydney. It's set in Sydney in 1959 and our department store is a thinly disguised DJs, Lisa turns up for work and on we go. It's just before Christmas.Not only here in Sydney but at the time when the January sales happen in the show and they've just happened, you know. They're happening right there so it couldn't be more an sit. Not for the faint-hearted, our January sales.Tim, we're often told not to judge a book by its cover but in this case you proved them wrong. Well said. I did like the cover. I saw a few blushes from people like Helen Garner and people -- bul -- blurbs like Helen Garnor and Barry mum industries. It's full of songs without even thinking it would be a musical. I thought I'd give it a 'and see what comes. # Christian Dior # He designs clothes that every woman adorse... The journey took a year from me finding the book to getting into the workshop but that's pretty quick, I think, for music theatre.You work well together?I think so.I reckon. Yeah. We enjoy each other's company and we have equal and opposite skills, let's put it that way. I have no musical skills at all and Tim can't direct so there's no competition between us.That's right! Yeah.What was it like working with Tim in developing the story?By the time we talked to Tim, he'd written eight songs or so, and it was easy in that sense because we didn't have to nut out the story. The story was there for us. So Tim had responded to the story, so the songs he had written were obvious high points within the story. So then Caroline started, you know, took the songs and the book itself and started weaving that together. My job really is just to make sure that I feel it's going to make a cohesive theatrical whole, that, um, that there are... That the flow will work theoretically and I can see a vision for it happening in a theatre.
# The colour black goes way back to the cave walls of BC # And still looks good today on you and me # Coco Chanel in '26 with her classic LBD # Audrey Hepburn dressed by Givenchy # Ladies in black! # It's not coming back # It never went away # We knew it was here to stay # Ladies in black... Ladies In Black has been incredibly well received. I don't think I'm wrong in saying I've seen reviews that credit it as being the best thing Australia has produced since, say, Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert. How does that feel?Getting the Helpmann for best new Aussie work was a huge affirmation and recognition from the peer group, you know? For me, stepping into this world, it was really beyond any expectations. And the word of mouth has been great. People are responding to it as an Australian story. But not just that, you know. There is universal stuff going on. We have age groups - you have a grandmother, a mother and a daughter and at various moments there'll be tears and a bit of laughter and it's all these touch stones that seem to be happening. We did a work sthop in Brisbane. At the end of it, a tech guy who was trying to record it for us - none of us had spoken to him much apart from how are you going - he had a tear and he said Frank, who comes right at the end, is a dysfunctional character, standard-issue bastard - I had to write that song - I comes right at the end. His life works out. This guy who we thought wasn't even noticing was drawn in.So not just for the ladies?It seems to speak to everyone. The fashion side of it is so beautiful so there's a lot to respond to in that way. But I think it deserved to be a success because the story is touched with a humble magic. It's really about the aspirations of the characters. They're not enormous. They want simple things in life that happen to be eluding them at the beginning of the story. At the end, they're fulfilled. It dares to be full of unqualified joy by the end and that touches everyone. Anyone who has a daughter leaving home will respond to it, male or female. Anyone who wants to have a baby will respond to it. It's simple stories that are lovely.Anyone who has perhaps ever known a bastard. # He's a bastard # A bastard... What does it take to pen a song like He's A Bastard? Great. A ripple of laughter started up and it became a chuckle and open laughter and I've never had that experience as a songwriter, writing something that makes people laugh. # A standard-issue bastard # Ba-bastard.I thought, "I want to do this again and again and again." Getting the laughs, I think...It's more rewarding. In a preview last night when the bastard song was reprised, a group of women started to clap along with it.It's becoming a cult.If we'd given people cigarette lighters, we'd have been away.Many women I know want it for a ring tone. We haven't recorded it yet. You had a bit of inside running in developing the story. I believe your mother-in-law worked at David Jones. Is that right?Who told you that?I don't know.I know who told you! I told my wife last night. She said, "What?! You said what?!" Her mother, who is a delightful person - I think she's actually finished up now - but she did work on the floor at DJs with the perfumes and make-up department. I always wanted to use - she would have been extremely funny and very enticing to have put in front of a camera to talk about her life at DJs but it's not going to happen. She doesn't know I've even talked about her yet.So a world in and of itself and of course who is on which counter, what place do people have.There's a great deal of interdepartmental competition in our story, definitely. The women who go in, Magda, our 40-year-old Hungarian character, says at one stage, not looking to buy a dress, they're looking to buy a new life - I'm paraphrasing. It's not about the body. It's about the mind. So the air is filled with that kind of desire for transformation that is pure theatre really. # Ladies in black # Ladies in # Ladies # Ladies in black! Thank you both very much for your time and chukkas for the show. Thanks. Well, there issome musical genius at work there, I think it's fair to say.It looks like the sort of musical you could get into, even if you're not into musicals. Absolutely.Let's talk sport with Georgie. The Aussies have moved on pretty quickly from the whitewash in the test series.They have. They may have celebrated pretty hard last night but focus has already shifted for them. We have have to reflect on what has been a pretty miraculous test summer for the Aussies. Of course, humiliated only a few months ago. In November in Hobart, a lot of changes and they made an impact. Off the back of five straight test losses, it's been four straight test wins for the Aussies to finish the summer of cricket. We'll say test cricket because there's a lot more to come. The Aussies may have only wrapped up the clean sweep series win over Pakistan yesterday. Talk has already turned to the upcoming one-dayers with BBL form rewarded. Veterans Aaron Finch and George Bailey have been dropped in favour of Queensland big-hitter Chris Lynn, fast Australian fast -- South Australian fast bowler also. A knock from Kevin Pietersen proved match-turning, belting 79 off 49 balls, his ninth BBL half century in only 20 appearances to steer the Stars to a huge double-century total.
Oh, wow! Innovation class from Pietersen. That's full and dispatched without bouncing before that rope again. Another six.In reply, the Renegades could only manage 9/154. Spin partners Adam Zampa and Michael Beer doing most of the damage with three wickets apiece. Stars won by 46 runs. In our batting performance, we had the ability with swiny and KP and at the end we had 20 overs with a guy going the whole time. If that occurs, you're hard to peat. It was great batting and great to bowl to a total like that. The competition seems to open up every year. A James Troisi masterclass has led Melbourne Victory to their fifth straight win in the A-League. He had help from gun striker and Victory favourite Besart Berisha. His cross set up the opening goal of the match but Troisi returned the favour in the second. The Albanian superstar booting his 92nd goal.In by Troisi and it's two and it's Besart Berisha! He got the A-League goals record against the Newcastle Jets. And he's now inching ever closer to 100 A-League goals.More misery for the reigning champs this season. The Reds haven't won in over a month. They are still glued to the bottom of the table. He's been improving, you know, week in, week out, and, you know, I still throw the challenge down to him. I speak to him all the time. I still think, you know, he's going to get better. We cot have got the ball to Jimmy a lot more than we did. When we did get it to him, everybody comes alive round him.Overseas and Manchester United striker Wayne Rooney equalled bobby Charlton's club record of 249 goals as the Red Devils romped to a 4-0 win over Reading in the FA Cup. Charlton was in the stands to see Rooney strike the opening goal of the match in the seventh minute before a brace from young gun Marcus rash Ford proved to be the finishing touch. They're comfortably through to the fourth round. Karolina Pliskova has won her first Brisbane International singles title, defeating Alize Cornet in straight sets. She notched 30 winners to 10 in the 6-0, 6-4 victory, taking her to world number five. Thank you, guys, for coming, inmean, every day. It's full for every match. I've been enjoying to play here in front of you and I love to coming back and I hopefully going to be back nects year.In the men's draw, Grigor Dimitrov stunned Milos Raonic to progress to his second final where he faces Kei Nishikori in the decider. And France has won the 2017 Hopman Cup. Richard Gasquet and Kristina Mladenovich outlasted Team USA in the fast-four mixed doubles to claim their second Hopman title. The Perth Wildcats have unveiled another star import, Bryce Cotton breaking a club record for the highest number of points scored on debut in the win over the Kings. He hit seven of eight shots to notch a game-high 26 points which led the reigning champs to a decisive 80-74 victory.
Nick and Miriam, unfortunately, the test cricket of summer is over. But rest assured there is plenty more around with the BBL and the opening 1-day international kicking off next Friday.Excellent. Thank you, Georgie.Coming up in the next hour on Weekend Breakfast: All the day's news, sport and weather. Stay tuned.

This program is not captioned.

This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Good morning, and welcome back to Weekend Breakfast. I'm Miriam Corowa. And I'm Nick Harmsen. Making news this morning: Donald Trump labels critics of a US-Russia alliance as "stupid", drawing ire from President Barack Obama.We have to remind ourselves, we're on the same team. Vladimir Putin's not on our team.

Also ahead: Scenes of devastation in northern Syria - dozens killed after an explosion rips through a busy marketplace. The latest political disclosure list reveals previously undeclared donations dating back to 2013. Set up by Berisha, and beautifully finished by stroice -- by James Troisi!And - a James Troisi masterclass guides Melbourne Victory to their fifth straight win in the A-League. Hello. Thanks for joining us. It's Sunday, January 8. Hope you're enjoying your Sunday morning as much as we are. Absolutely!Coming up on Weekend Breakfast - you don't typically think of boxing fans as people who enjoy theatre and plays. But Prize Fighter combines those two things... (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE) I just want a nice, clean fight, guys. Touch gloves and go back to your corners.It is called Prize Fighter, and it tells the story of a Congolese boy orphaned by war who resettles in Brisbane and finds purpose in boxing. Well, coming up, we'll be speaking to the playwright who's turned his real-life experiences into stage hit, and the actor who's taken on the challenge of the role. Had has brought standout performances - some of the reviews I've read include accolades such as it being called the most perfectly structured, brilliantly produced and best-acted new play to open in Brisbane when it premiered there in 2015. Very much looking forward to seeing what they've brought.High praise. Apparently they've turned the stage into a boxing ring - interesting setting, I reckon!Cinema in the round!Indeed.

To our top stories this morning: US president-elect Donald Trump has posted a series of tweets condemning those who oppose good relations with Russia as "stupid". Mr Trump vowed to work with Moscow to solve the many problems and issues of the world. many problems and issues of the
world. It came after a report

The president-elect's tweets have been widely criticised by intelligence groups, who say his actions will only deepen the divide between the incoming administration and foreign policy. Former CIA director Michael Hayden was scathing in his assessment.It leaves us in a very dark space. I'm kind of looking at this through the lens of the intelligence community. That's my best shot. That's a high-confidence judgement, and he said, "Take a hike." Wow. That's gonna reverberate throughout the community. If you find that high-confidence judgements represent insufficient proof for you to move, maybe you should sell the antennas and let and let these kids go do something else. At least 43 people have been killed in a bomb blast in the rebel-held Syrian town of Azaz. The explosion occurred outside a courthouse in the town, just 7km from the Turkish border. Azaz has recently been targeted by the Islamic State group. The latest blast is the worst since a nationwide ceasefire brokered by Russia and Turkey. That ceasefire does not include Islamic State. At this stage, no group has claimed responsibility for the bombing. Investigators say the Iraq war veteran accused of killing five people at Fort Lauderdale Airport appears to have travelled to Florida specifically to carry out the attack. The 26-year-old suspect, Esteban Santiago, has a history of acting erratically, and investigators are probing whether mental illness played a role in America's latest mass shooting. Terrorism has not been ruled out as a motive. Five people were killed and six were wounded in the attack, whilst some three dozen others were taken to local hospitals with bruises or broken bones suffered in the chaos, as passengers ran from the attack. The President of the Ivory Coast says the government has reached an agreement with disgruntled soldiers to end a 2-day revolt. The uprising began early on Friday when the army mutinied and seized control of the West African nation's second-largest city. Over the next two days, soldiers at military camps in cities and towns, including the commercial capital, joined the mutiny this comes after a near-identical uprising two years ago. Police have quelled a disturbance at the troubled Parkville Youth Justice Centre after a riot broke out last night. The Dog Squad, Critical Incident Response Team and riot police responded to the scene. Fire crews also attended after an alarm was set off, although there was no fire. No staff members or juveniles were hurt in the incident. A previous riot at the centre prompted the Victorian Government to transfer more than a dozen youths to the adult Barwon Prison. A woman accused of attacking two strangers with an axe in Sydney's inner west is expected to face court today. A 32-year-old man suffered a serious head wound and a 43-year-old woman has a fractured skull after being randomly attacked at an Enmore service station. Officers say they're both in a stable condition at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. A woman in her 20s has been charged with causing grievous bodily harm. She has been refused bail and is due to face the Parramatta Bail Court later today. Two developers and a political fundraising group have revealed more than $100,000 in political donations. The donations were declared in the days leading up to drims Christmas, but date -- Christmas, but date back as far as 2013. A developer gave $20,000 to the ALP. Another that's previously supported the Liberal Party gave $21,000 to Family First. A secretive Liberal Party fundraising entity the South Yarra Club declared passing on about $70,000. The deadline for declaring these donations was years ago. The Australian Electoral Commission does have the power to lay charges, but the ABC understands they've never used that power. Environmentalists are considering mounting a legal challenge against a proposed 800-bed development at Perisher in the Kosciuszko National Park in the New South Wales Snowy Mountains. US ski giantVale Resorts bought the ski resort from James Packer last year. With it came long-approved concept plans for a 7-building development in the village. The colong foundation for wilderness has engaged the environmental defenders' office and is considering a legal challenge. The Tasmanian creators of a world-first jellyfish safety app are calling for government support. Two Launceston businessmen have joined with a marine biologist to create the jellyfish app. It allows people to check what jellyfish are in their area, and provides medical advice on how to treat a sting. The creators of the app say they want the State Government to help promote the app by putting it in tourist information centres and schools. Time now for sport with Georgie Tunny. Georgie, in the A-League, Melbourne Victory keep on winning? They certainly do - making a habit of this. It's their big guns that keep fighting for them, which makes Kevin Muscat a very happy coach at the moment. A James Troisi the moment. A James Troisi
masterclass has led Melbourne Victory their fifth straight win in the A-League. He had help from gun striker and fan favourite Besart Berisha - his cross set up the opening goal of the match, before Troisi runned the favour in the second. The Albanian superstar booted his 92nd league goal as Victory added more misery to the reigning champs' season. The Reds haven't won in a month, glued to the bottom of the table. Another blistering knock from Kevin Pietersen proved match-turning in the Melbourne derby. He had a half-century, his ninth in only 20 appearances. The Renegades could only manage 9/154. Spin partners Adam Zampa and Michael Beer did most of the damage, with three wickets apiece. The Stars too good, winners by 46 runs. Karolina Pliskova has taken out her first Brisbane International singles title, defeating Alize Cornet in straight sets. The third seed was in complete control, notching 30 winners to 10 in the 6-0 6-4 victory. The win will take Pliskova to world number five. In the men's draw, Grigor Dimitrov destunned defending champ Milos Raonic to go to his second Brisbane final. He'll face Kei Nishikori in the decider. France has won the 2017 Hopman Cup. French pair Gasquet and Kristina Mladenovic outlasted Team USA in the fast four mixed doubles to clinch fast four mixed doubles to clinch
their second Hopman title. Nick and Miriam, for the final time this morning, let's pay tribute to the new cult favourite of Australian cricket, Mickey Edwards! He was a substitute fielder yesterday at the SCG before Australia wrapped up their clean sweep series win against Pakistan. Not that most of the crowd really cared, because it was all about this young man here. Very recognisable, for sure.Filling out that baggy cap in style.Isn't he just! Very much so. But whether or not he will keep them seems to be an issue. This is what he had to say following his all-too-brief appearance. What was his highlight from it...?Coming off again, so the ball wouldn't come to me anymore. I was terrified! I was hoping it wouldn't come to me. These people want photos and autographs and stuff. I'm like, "There's 11 guys who've won a test match, and I haven't done anything!" Nate tried to cut my hair a few weeks ago. I'm glad he didn't. I was looking at it on the big screen, and it looked like a big mullet. I thought, "This has got to go."Say it isn't so! Save the locks! Thanks, Georgie. Thank you for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come: Tweeter-in-chief - Donald Trump takes to social media yet again to attack his critics. Also ahead - how to encourage more sensible sensible drinking habits in young people. And everything old is new again - the Gold Coast surf competition And everything old is new again -
the Gold Coast surf competition that only allows retro boards. To our top story: Donald Trump's row with the US intelligence community has intensified, after the president-elect fired off a group of tweets in which he criticises the spy agencies. Mr Trump was briefed by intelligence officials on Friday, where he was told Vladimir Putin personally ordered cyberattacks to undermine Mr Trump's rival, Hillary Clinton. The president-elect has rejected the findings. He tweeted:

Former CIA head Michael Hayden is concerned about Mr Trump's Kensington Palace dismissal of the high-confidence judgements from the intelligence community, and worries that, if Mr Trump fails to take action, the community action, the community itself will become redundant.What's different here is that the president-elect, for his own reasons, has decided to put this out and make it public. You know, in American football, we've got this ritual we call trash talk, in which you go out and begin to say things to try to get into the head of the opposition in some ways - maybe even to intimidate the opposition. You know, an awful lot of tweets that the president-elect's put out there about the American intelligence community feel a bit like trash talk. This is a covert influence campaign that I think succeeded beyond all possible expectations on a part of the Russian Federation. At a minimum, you've got me here talking to you, trying to explain why there appears to be a war between the president-elect and the American intelligence community. If I'm working for the Russian special services and I'm responsible for that covert influence campaign, I'm going - going - in the Win column. Outgoing President Barack Obama has called for an end to called for an end to political divisions over the issue. I think that what is true is that the Russians intended to meddle, and they Meddled. I'll be honest with you, George - one of the things I am concerned about is the degree to which we've seen a lot of commentary lately where there were Republicans - or pundits, or cable comment darths who seem to have more confidence in Vladimir Putin than fellow Americans, because those fellow Americans are Democrats. That cannot be.Does that include the president-elect?Ah, well... What I will say is that, um... And I said this right after the election - we have to remind ourselves, we're on the same team. Vladimir the same team. Vladimir Putin's not on our team. At least 43 people have been killed by a massive bomb blast near a busy market in northern Syria. Islamic State militants are suspected of carrying out the attack. The blast ripped through a central market in the town of Azaz, which lies on the border with Turkey.

Fear, panic and chaos... The aftermath of this morning's explosion. Many were killed, others wounded by the attack outside a courthouse in a busy commercial district in the centre of the city. TRANSLATION: A car bomb went off in the city centre near civilians. There are no fighters here. All of them are civilians. As rescue workers searched for both survivors and bodies, no-one had claimed responsibility for this attack. But this city is no stranger to such scenes. Azaz is a stronghold of Turkish-backed Syrian rebels involved in a major operation to clear so-called Islamic State from northern Syria, close to the Turkish border. In recent days, Turkish forces and rebels have continued to target IS, which isn't included in the fragile ceasefire covering much of Syria. Azaz has become home to people who have fled fighting elsewhere. Today's attack shows, despite the ceasefire largely holding, people in Syria are continuing to die. Amid the destruction and chaos in Syria, there is a man broadcasting messages of hope to those trapped in the war-torn country. Sami al-Joundi fled from Syria in 2013 amid fears for his safety and that of his Tamilally. The station radio Alwan was start would a portable transmitter on the back of a pick-up truck. It continues to give hope to those who remain in the war-torn country.Um ..well, first, we're not based within Syrian borders because we had to move out from sir grua period of time. ISIS took control of Idlib where the radio started, and the city of Taraqkud, and the founder of a city had to leave Syria and was wanted by Daesh. So we established the office here in Istanbul and we started operating and producing the content from here and transmitting it to inside Syria. We're getting our content from our team. We have a big team inside Syria. A team of correspondents. We have also presenters, producers, studio technicians over there. We also have actors and screenwriters who produce a couple of the comedy sketches that we present on the radio.It must be a difficult task, keeping in touch with all of those correspondents, and also keeping watch over their safety.Yeah, it is very difficult because we have two issues to address here. First - that our team of correspondents are not professional journalists. They don't have the experience and the academic background to do it. They just learned it by practise after their solution started and they developed to war in Syria. We are trying to train them, to give them tips, to develop them. But all this through phone, Skype calls, WhatsApp calls, Facebook Messenger, all the tools that we can use through the internet. It's hard to get a good, stable internet connection, so we also faced technical difficulties with our team as well. So this is very challenging. And the second thing is - they are living in difficult circumstances, in a war zone. They are subject to constant danger all the time. Them, and their families and their loved ones - we have cases where correspondents or team members have lost fammies members, wives, kids, or lost their house, doing a bombing or attacks. So it's really difficult for them to work and give us that good content and I could look at that adjusted information that we are in broadcasting, and as well, it's hard for them to cope with these circumstances. For us as well, it's hard, because you need to always be supporting them emotionally and checking on them and we always worry about their safety. When we lost connection with one of them, we always were very anxious to get in touch with them again, because we always have the possibility that we might. So, yeah, it's very difficult.Mmm. The stories the world hears out of northern Syria in particular are just horrific. How do you go about producing radio programs for people who are living in a war zone? What sort of news do you give them, and how do you offer do you offer advice for the situation they find themselves in? Well, firstly, I was on Community-Black Radio, not a new program. In our programming, we have light informative programs that contains information and annuals and sometimes entertainment that people need, especially inside Syria - they don't have access to - no, like, different light needed information sometimes about technology and ways and techniques that you can use the resources around you, especially the areas that are under besieged and how you can best deliver the resources that you have. Medical and health information and tips, we provided through doctors and specialists. Comedy sketches and drama as well - people need that to go on with their life, because this war has... It's been going on now for six years ..so, people need something in their life apart from listening to news to know the number of how many people were killed - they want to know that, of course, but as well, they need other information to go on with their lives. They need to laugh, they need to listen to a piece of music that they can relate to.I'm interested in what sort of audience feedback you get. Do you get phone calls? Emails? Do you have evidence of people who have fled Syria who continue listening to you? People who have resettled in refugee camps or been resettled around the world? We brought across a phone in our the program - we had communication and interaction through Facebook messages, WhatsApp messagers, from Kik -- from Vine as well. We have Turkey and Lebanon - a lot of people who kept listening to us who are now in Europe and who are now refugees in different parts of Europe. So, yeah, we have this kind of interaction and communication with the audience.Sami al-Joundi from Radio Alwan there, which is now, for safety reasons, based in Turkey but continues to broadcast into Syria, and tells a lot of stories within Syria's borders. Several political groups have declared donations to the Australian Electoral Commission, totalling more than $100,000. The declarations were made prior to Christmas, although the donations date back to 2013. It's either the Christmas spirit, or an early New Year's resolution to get the books in order. But in the days leading up to Christmas, more than 110,000 were declared to the Australian Electoral Commission. But the donations weren't recent - they're from as far back as 2013. A Chinese developer gave $20,000 to the Labor Party, and another developer that's previously supported the Liberal Partip declared it giving $21,000 to Family First. A secret chief Liberal fundraising party entity, called the South Yarra Club, declared pag passing on about $70,000. The deadline for declaring these donations was years ago, and the Australian Electoral Commission does have the power to lay charges - but the ABC understands they've never used that power. The Health Minister, Sussan Ley, is still under pressure for purchasing a luxury apartment while on a taxpayer-funded trip. While on the $3 -- She claims the purchase of a $2 million property was a spur-of-the-moment purchase.I think there are serious questions Sussan Ley has to answer about what she and her husband were doing on the Gold Coast. The answers we have got - not from the minister herself, but from her office - are changing almost on a daily basis. Originally, we were told she was there to meet health stakeholders - a visit to a Gold Coast Hospital or something? - we and we, quite reasonably, asked for details about those stakeholder meetings, she changed her story to meeting with patients, so it couldn't be shown. This story in between the busy series of meetings, the minister was taking a short stroll on the streets of the Gold Coast and stumbled upon an auction. Without apparently any sort of finance preapproval or a building inspection or perhaps even looking through the apartment very closely at all, on an impulse, she bought a luxury apartment of $750,000. None of this holds water. We saw when Stuart Robert mixed up his private and public responsibilities as a minister in the Turnbull Government, he had to go. We've seen that in the past, particularly in the last few years with the Abbott and Turnbull governments. What we're getting, though, is stonewalling from this minister. She's gone into hiding. The Prime Minister's not doing anything to present some detail and some evidence to the Australian community that the ministerial standards that are much stronger than the usual standards that apply to public officials - they apply to ministers for very good reason. That there must be a clear delineation between your public and private lives. There are very serious questions for either the minister or the Prime Minister to answer very quickly, because all of the evidence points to a clear conflict of interest. The only conKluge that you can draw, really, based on the evidence and the usual sort of assumptions that people would make about the nature of impulse buying, is that that the minister and her husband were there with the purpose of buying a luxury apartment. Until she provides some evidence to the contrary ..the only reasonable conclusion I think people can make was there was a breach of ministerial standards that means this minister has to go. Mark Butler there. Many Australian parents subscribe to the European practice of introducing kids to alcohol at the dinner table from a young age, hoping to encourage more sensible drinking habits. Scientists have studied nearly 2,000 children and their parents in a bid to find out where it really works. Professor Richard Mattick from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre says giving children alcohol doesn't reduce their thinking, but parents monitoring and setting limits on drinking can help. We were hoping to discover whether the children who are being given alcohol drank differently from those who weren't given alcohol by their parents. It came from health ministers asking where kids were getting their alcohol from. A third of adolescents get alcohol from their parents, which doesn't surprise many of us, because we're used to discussions about, "Maybe I should take some alcohol before going to the party." We discovered that giving alcohol didn't moderate drinking, it made kids more likely to drink less. If you want to moderate your child's drinking, giving them alcohol is not a good idea. That's what we discovered. There were some other interesting findings, but the main one was that - if you introduce your child to alcohol earlier, you permit them to drink, and they will drink. And they'll drink more than they would have... That was the simple finding, which contradicts the Mediterranean trial a bit. The children are about 19 now. The parents who were monitoring their kids, watching their kids' activities and who they're going out with, and setting rules about alcohol, did better in terms of reducing alcohol consumption. I think that makes a fair bit of common sense. If you want to help your child, you might set your rules and say, "This is what you should drink at moment," and you. The kids in the playground tended to act out to get it more out there, much more likely to mix with kids like them who smoke and drink. If parents have a child like that, perhaps it's worthwhile thinking about how to deal with that particular situation and reduce their risk.

A trough moving across Australia is triggering heavy showers and storms. Northerly winds are bringing a very hot night to parts of Victoria and New South Wales. An active monsoon trough is generating rain and thunderstorms across the NT and Queensland tropical coasts.

The top stories from ABC News: The US president-elect, Donald Trump, has posted a series of tweets condemning those who oppose good relations with Russia as "stupid". The comments come after a US intelligence report stated Russian President Vladimir Putin had sought to help Mr Trump win the presidency. The president-elect said Democrats have shown "gross negligence" by allowing their servers to be hacked. At least 43 people have been killed in a bombing in northern Syria. The explosion devastated a busy market in the rebel-held town of Azaz along the Turkish border. It's the heaviest casualty toll in a single incident since the latest nationwide ceasefire in Syria started last week. Two developers and a political fundraising group have declared more than $100,000 in political donations in the days leading up to Christmas. But the donations weren't recent - they're from as far back as 2013, long past the dead declare them to the Australian Electoral Commission. The ABC understands the AEC has never charged anyone for failing never charged anyone for failing to declare political donations. And a James Troisi masterclass has led Melbourne Victory to its fifth straight win in the A-League. The Victory defeated atted Victory defeated atted all United 2-0. It has emerged that the man being questioned over the shooting deaths of five people at a Florida airport in the US has a history of mental health problems. Esteban Santiago, a veteran who had served in Iraq, had been serving treatment at veteran who had served in Iraq, had
been serving treatment at his home in Alaska. This is the man police say killed five at Fort Lauderdaler Airport. He's Esteban Santiago, a 26-year-old former member of the military. His family said he'd been receiving psychological help after his discharge last August. His aunt has said he was never the same after returning from serving in Iraq in 2011. Police say Santiago used a semiautomatic handgun in the attack in the baggage hall, scattering terrified passengers Before I Go To Sleep throwing away his weapon and laying spread-eagled on the ground as police moved in to arrest him. As things started to return to normal at the airport, it emerged Santiago had been interviewed by the FBI as recently as November last year. One anonymous source has said he told police he was being forced to watch Islamic State videos.They were motivated to call the local authorities to have him taken into custody and evaluated at a medical facility for his mental health. Questions are also being raised about the ease with which Santiago was able to transport and weapon in a supposedly secure place like an airport. It's legal to put a gun in checked baggage in the US, as long as it's locked in a case and unloaded. But you can carry ammunition in the same case. unloaded. But you can carry
ammunition in the same case. Santiago will appear on Monday in court on federal charges. But while his motivations will continue to be proved -- probed, there are also serious questions about how a man who had already appeared on the authorities' radar could seemingly go on to commit such a heinous crime. Clashes between protesters and government supporters have erupted in southern Sri Lanka during a rally against a port deal with China. The deal to develop a port and industrial zone has angered villagers, who fear they'll lose their land with little compensation. Hundreds of angry protesters tried to storm the inauguration ceremony of the China-Development Zone. Protesters feared a Chinese colony is being created, and the government will thark land to build zeal zones set up with Chinese investors. The Prime Minister says industrial zones are needed to complement the redeveloped port, and dismisses fears Sri Lanka will lose control to China. TRANSLATION: Sri Lankan law will apply to everyone who comes here, whether it is China merchant or someone who disembarks from a ship. The law applies. It is after agreeing on this that we sign the first agreement. There are two more being negotiated.China's ambassador to Colombo said Sri Lanka receives the second-highest amount of Chinese loans.We would respect the decision made by Sri Lankan government and Sri Lankan people.The previous Sri Lankan government built the new port at cost of $1.3 billion, with the help of Chinese loans. Those loans are due for repage this year. The Minister of Development, Strategy and International Trade has been a key figure in the least negotiations. He told Al Jazeera that there was little choice due to crepeling debt.You had to come up with some kind of a plan to make the survival venture. We couldn't just wait and watch and go down the hill. Sri Lankans everywhere - including demonstrators against the Chinese ports - would be watching to see if the government's debt reduction plan succeeds. Japan's vast network of modern, efficient and clean trains is lauded the world over. But the country's female population's train travel could hold a significant threat. The risk of being groped in a commute is a longstand and common problem that's still being ignored. Crowded trains are fact orlife in Japan's big cities. During the mornings, the crowds present a hidden danger for young women and schoolgirls. TRANSLATION: It became very crowded as more and more people good got on the train, and one man was standing right in front of me. He came very close, and he touched me. Fumie had never been warned by her parents or teachers about the risk of being groped. TRANSLATION: Rather than asking for help, I felt anxious, thinking, "Why me?" I tried to put him away by putting my arm in front of my body. Police lay very few charges for grope - the threat of a wrongful accusation often prompt police of talking the young women out of taking it any further. Hurinda says women are treated as second-class citizens in Japan, and not enough is done to protect female commuters and de ter gropers. TRANSLATION: In Japanese society, women should keep quiet. If a woman is groped, people will say it's her fault, so it's important she doesn't talk about it.Yasia has become an activist in the field and has made badges to wear on their bags, warning gropers to stay away, and that any crime they commit will be reported. TRANSLATION: Mothers tell children not to follow strangers, but parents don't tell students that travel via train that they could be groped. This is very strange.She's said the badges have had success so far badges have had success so far in keeping the gropers at bay. Police in Tokyo run public awareness campaigns once or twice a year, putting up signs that read, "Be careful of gropers." Very little is done to track down the offenders, even though they're often even though they're often catching the same trains every day. The play Prize Fighter tells the story of Isa, a colonies boy escaping unimaginable horrors. In this inventive and physical production, the theatre becomes a boxing ring. As Isa fights for the title he must past as much of his past as he can with his opponent, and ultimately, profoundly, it is an uplifting play. Pacharo Mzembe joins us now. Welcome to Weekend Breakfast. Wonderful to have you here. Thank you very much for taking the time.Thanks.This play, Prize Fighter, opened to wonderful acclaim in Brisbanet we now have it in Sydney as part of the Sydney Festival.Yep.How are you enjoying the process of being involved? You yourself originally are from Africa as well, aren't you? You've travelled that journ aa bit yourself, haven't you?Yeah. From south-east Africa, born in Zimbabwe, of Malawian origins. I came to Australia in 1993. It's definitely a future story. I'm an actor and I just inherit it and use a bit of what's inside me with it. Yeah, it opened up to Brisbane very well, and we opened last night here in Sydney at Lelfire and it went well.How do you prepare yourself for this sort of role before? You have to get in pretty good condition.I was doing cardio, two hours every single day. But I've been infatuated with boxing since I was 12 years old - Muhammad Ali, Mike Tyson, Floyd Mayweather recently. Boxing is important, but acting first, second - boxing. Prep was easy - not staying too fat.You faced your brother in the ring as well - that's unusual. You don't normally see that in a theatrical production!It's fun. Acting with my bro is probably the best thing I've ever done on stage. I think there was some pent-up anger, maybe a 30 years' worth.Channelled a bit of that!Keen to throw in a few real ones therein?Well, it's real. The punches are real. If I don't get out of the way, um, I'll be knocked out on stage. Take us through the character. Tell us about his journey as he comes through this play.He's a child soldier. Well, before that, he's not. But he has his innocence taken away from him, and it explores that. Some people have probably seen Beast Of No Nation or Blood Diamond, which tackles similar issues. He does something when he's really young, and gets refugee status in Australia. As he tries to bewin the Australian title and so forth, he battles with these Demons. It gives him strength, but also takes a lot from him. Within the ring, Todd McDonald's done great job of keeping us in Brisbane. Then we go back to Kenya, then we go to the Congo, and so forth. So yeah, it's that journey of, I guess -- an empowering person. The title is Prize Fighter - what do you think the "prize" is that Isa is fighting for here?I think peace of mindf everybody wants to be - peace of mind. I won't give too much of the play away, but I think somebody wants some sort of reception. But I tols think of this thing he did when he was younger.Looking at pictures of the stage set-up - in the round, the boshing ring. Does that present challenges as an actor? Had you done plays of the round before?Yeah, I think I'd done two or three there - in the round is easier because you never have the opportunity to switch off. Everybody can see you throughout the whole place. You're in in Belvoir - you can't switch off on. It's not completely in the round - it's three-quarters. In the boxing ring, it's like the round. Particularly when you're having punches flying at you...Yeah, definitely.You tap into the same experience of having come from Africa to Australia - do you identify with some of the challenges? That tyranny of distance, I suppose? Being somewhere so different from where you come from?I was lucky enough to come when I was a little younger - 6.5, I came. So I got to experience, you know, a lot of primary school, and then off to secondary school. Some of my friends would become a little bit older. They feel it a bit more. But of course I do. All my family is there. I have my brother, sister and my dad here. Yeah, you feel distant here and there, definitely. For sure. Home is home, but I'm grateful for all the opportunities Australia's given me.You're playing at the Sydney hestful. Any chance of taking it further Sydney Festival it done a great job of seeing it here. I hope it keeps happening live. Maybe not when I'm a lot older, because it's a tough one to keep up...!(LAUGHTER) We are sure that you are destined for more roles in the future and, of course, it would be great to see Future's work continuing along as well. It must be great working with him.I met Future 4-5 years ago at the beginning of this jersey, and he's always doing short films. I'm pretty sure he's writing right now for the feature film of this. We both live up in Brisbane. We talk a lot over the phone. He's kiting. This, like I said - come watch it. It's his poetry, his words. I July bring my boxing and acting to it as well.Looks like a fascinating play. Hope it goes well for this festival for you.Thank you very much.Now, sand, ceref and chiy perhaps maky at the beach in Australia. A new phone app hopes to stop the stinging part of that combination happening. A Tasmanian app identifies almost any jellyfish in the world and provides potentially lifesaving advice... A nasty jellyfish sting can ruin a good day at the beach...I've been stung by blue bottles, been up in North Queensland swimming. It's a bit of a worry.When you get those little wet ones or great big blue bottles and you're not expecting them to be there. Beachgoers now have a way of checking if there's a jellyfish in their area.It would be hand handy information if you're allergic to any sort of species... It was conceived on a plane trip in 2015. Renowned jellyfish expert Lisa-Anne gurgen with was seated next to them on a flight.I said, "Who has money for an app?" They said, "Well, we do."The app lists 280 different species of jellyfish from around the globe. For example, the blue bottle is found in waters throughout Australia and is extremely stingy. If you're swimming in Queensland's Great Barrier Reef region in the warmer months, you could encounter an ircadgy. These jell -- Irukandji. They are life-threatening.The surf-lifesavers, the fishing industry...It's really designed to put the main part of scientists' knowledge about jellyfish right at your fingertips so that you've got that information to be more safe. The app's creators hope it will not only satisfy curiosity, but also save lives.

Staying in Tasmania now: The Huon Valley has been filled with music for the 35th Cygnet Folk Festival, which is in full swing. Organisers say the festival has grown to be standout on the Australian calendar. But locals there still have a firm grip on their backyard event... It's the event that take over an entire town... You can't swing a banjo in the streets of Cygnet without hitting some local talent. The banjo is a wonderful, wonderful instrument. It's amazing. I think that's why people hate it so much - because it has so much unconditional love, that scares people. And they want to destroy it.Now in its 35th year, Cygnet is Tasmania's biggest folk festival.It's grown from a very small community event to sort of just gaining, I suppose, a really lovely reputation.More than 200 performances will play across the weekend. There's a mix of local, interstate and international acts.I used to play larger gigs, and I've kind of wound down a little bit because I get way more out of playing anything local.I think there's something really special about festivals where the stages start with performers from the community, and then the international performers are on the same stagelier that night.The larger acts are ticketed, but the streets of Cygnet are crammed with buskers.It's cool. Has a nice feel, so you can add more music to it. There is a reverence and respect for art, and particularly for music.You get different musicians, it's about getting together, having a bit of a jam, having a bit of fun... ..Swinging and stomping until Sunday.

Well, now a group of history-loving surfers on the Gold Coast are running a competition to test the skills of modern riders on retro boards. They hope it will lead to boards from the '60s and 'skeavets making a more lasting comeback. -- is '70s making a more lasting comeback. These competitors have ditched modern equipment for boards made in the '70s and. He tracked down the last board his late father surfd in 1973.No joke, they are hard to surf. But I remember dad doing cracks at Greenmount Point, and buggered if I could surf that well. The older boards have a single fin, rather than three on the modern boards. Most surfers agree they're hard aer to ride.With single-fin, you've got to do rail to rail and flow more. You've got more in touch. The board's more in the wave -- board and wave are more in charge than you.The competition was a chance for current surfing legends to try their luck - old school.Some of these boards down here have some some of Australia's most iconic feet put on them. The best surfers from all around this country - I probably rode these boards at some point in time...While these older boards are still harder a to manoeuvre, still plenty of surfers would like to see them make a comeback.There are a few hipsters that won't ride them, and a lot of guys like riding them and cruising and feeling the flow, rather than throwing everything they've got at the wave.And the younger fans are onboard.Kind of makes you more of a slower-paced surfer, I feel. I feel like I'm not as quick with the manoeuvres through my turns. But I'm getting there.A swell time for young and old!

Wish I could do that! Time to talk sport now with Georgie Tunny. One of Australia's best this test summer is backing up a pretty strong performance in the upcoming one-dayers?He's a new face in the 1-day team as well, Usman Khawaja. We know him as the number three in Australia's test batting line-up. Here they are earlier this morning making the trip out of Sydney after their successful clean-sweep series win against Pakistan. They're heading to Brisbane for the opening 1-day international which begins on Friday. Other than Usman Khawaja, who's been added to the squad, a couple of new face - namely Chris Lynn - his exceptional BBL form has been rewarded. And South Australian fast bowler Billy stanlic - it's OK if you don't know who he is. He's backing both of the inspiring debutants to have a significant play. He's saying he's got a couple of physical attributes that definitely help him.He's very tall and bulks really fast - two -- bowls really fast. They are two commodities you don't normally get together. He can do both, which is quite impressive. It's unbelievable hitting. Good mates with Lyny. Really good to see. Hopefully he can keep getting better and keep doing what he's doing. Right now, the consistency is showing in the way he's hitting the ball. It's one of the best things I've seen. Definitely one of the scenes I've seen most recently. And 11 sixes in a BBL clash recently, finishing on 98 not out off only a few balls too... The BBL last night was the Melbourne derby. We had the Stars up against the Renegades. Kevin Pietersen starred the other day, and again last night. He belted 73 off only 46 balls, again making a habit of this. Huge hitting from him. That's what we've seen all BBL season, really. It just gets better and better. They need to make the crowds bigger, I think, guys. 7/200 was their total that they were able to post, the Stars. The Renegades fell quite short - 9/54 was the best they could do. Brilliant spin bowling by the partners in crime Michael Beer and Adam Zampa - Adam Zampa will be joining the Aussies in the 1-day international squad. Great to see that the Stars are once again on the winning track too. David Hussey had a nice cameo with the bat too. Sounds fantastic. Of course, we love our cricket, but there is other sport happening out there, isn't there?We can't neglect the A-League, because Melbourne Victory is in unbelievable form. Tah they have a number of names to account for that?Two in particular - and they are fan favourites, especially one one Albanian striker - Besart Berisha. I don't think we can get tired of playing this game. Whenever he plays, he's on the score sheet. He was able to set up a goal for James Troisi, former Socceroo. He was in every play last night and was brilliant, paying special tribute after the match as well. That was your opening strike. Then he backed it up by getting it nice into that man, Besart Berisha. He is fast approaching the 100-goal mark in the A-League, which is insane. He was able to break the all-time lead record against the Newcastle Jets thought too long ago. That was his 92nd goal in the competition. So he's just carried on. We know how good he was for the Roar. Unfortunately for Unfortunately for the Reds, they are still struggling. Haven't won in over a month. It doesn't get easier! I want to know what happens when you score 100 goals. Everyone runs on the field, like in Aussie rules? That would be good fun.There should be a celebration for it.Let's touch on the tennis. A new name to watch in the women's side of the tournament?Yocked you could say last year was her break-out season. Karolina Pliskova was able to take out the Brisbane International last night, straight-sets victory over Alize Cornet. She took out the first set in 18 minutes. A big threat ahead of the Australian Open. Thank you, Georgie. That's all from us here at Weekend Breakfast. Have a wonderful afternoon. I'm Miriam Corowa. I'm Nick Harmsen. Join us again next weekend.

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