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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services Good morning. And welcome to News Breakfast. It's Tuesday. It's great to have your company this morning. I'm Michael Rowland.And I'm Virginia Trioli. Glad you could join us. Making news today: Doomed to fail. The Opposition is set to kill off the Coalition's plan to hold a same-sex marriage plebiscite. Brought to heel: The NSW Premier capitulates on his controversial greyhound racing ban. Another major blow to Donald Trump, as Republicans continue to abandon the presidential candidate. Leading sport, the Socceroos prepare for what could be their most important World Cup qualifier in Melbourne tonight. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's election commitment to hold a same-sex marriage plebiscite looks doomed to fail with the Opposition expected to finally reject the government's legislation. The Labor caucus meets in Canberra this morning to formalise its position. But Education Minister Simon Birmingham has indicated the government could still be willing to compromise. The Liberal Senator says the Coalition might be willing to remove public funding for both the "yes" and "no" campaigns if Labor request it.For more on this, our political reporter Jane Norman joins us now from Parliament House. Jane, good morning. So the decision that will emerge from the Labor caucus doesn't look like much of a surprise today?No. That's right, Virginia. It looks like all signs are pointing to the fact that Labor will reject the plebiscite proposal. We understand Bill Shorten, the Opposition Leader, will advise his MPs during this morning's caucus meeting to vote against the legislation needed on the floor of Parliament. Now, it actually comes as the government releases the exposure draft for this legislation, showing that the government wants to change the definition of a marriage from "between a man and a woman" to "between two people". The government's proposing that it will recognise foreign same-sex marriages and there will be protections in the legislation for religious ministers and civil celebrants, um, who refuse to marry same-sex couples because they have a conscientious objection to gay marriage. But of course this is all academic if Labor does what we expect them to do and reject this plebiscite proposal. So the Coalition is making a last-ditch attempt to get Labor behind this plebiscite and, as you mentioned, one Cabinet minister has even suggested the Coalition could dump the proposal to give $15 million in public funding to the "yes" and "no" campaigns in the lead-up to the plebiscite. So let's have a listen to what Simon Birmingham had to say. We have worked very hard to try to keep the cost of the plebiscite as low as possible to make sure there are safeguards around, um, any government-funded advertising that occurs, so that we can ensure it is respectful. Ultimately, if that is something the Labor Party want to take out in return for support for a plebiscite, well, they should say so and put it on the table. That's an interesting bone that's been thrown to Labor, isn't it? that
Because the argument has always been that a plebiscite would be divisive, that funding the two campaigns would lead to outrageous comments on both side and all rightful comments being made. If you look at the simple argument that Labor has made, they might have to accept that, might they?Yeah, it's a tough one. Because the whole basis of Labor's opposition to the pleb side is exact that, that it will lead to a damaging and divisive campaign. Bill Shorten has raised the prospect of young people struggling with their sexuality could even commit suicide if they see the kind of "no" campaign being moubted. This is an interesting compromise suggested. But it's worth noting that the Shadow Attorney-General and the Attorney-General have already had meetings about this. The two leaders have had meetings about this so it seems unusual that this is the first time this compromise has been put on the table. And yet Labor has been very, um, consistent, really, in its messaging that it's going to reject this plebiscite.Alright. Jane, good to talk to you this morning. Thanks so much. Well, g'day. Well, g'day.How are you? Welcome back?Thank you. Nice to see you. It's been a long month.I know, yeah. I headed off to the hills and did not look back.What did you get up to? How was the break?It was fantastic. I may be the last person in Australia to have gone to the beautiful place called the Sunshine Coast and Noosa.Isn't it fabulous? Oh, my, godfathers, as we say.OMG. Oh, my goodness. Good morning, Sunshine Coast. Why didn't you tell me that you lived in the best flas in Australia. Why did no-one tell me?They want to keep it a well-guarded secret.People have been saying I was an idiot. I'm a total convert. News Breakfast henceforth should be broadcasting from Maroochydore.We might call it ABC Noosa Breakfast this morning in honour of our beautiful Sunshine Coast viewers.Good morning. We had a lovely break. It was yufl, expect for the obligatory medical emergency that you have when you travel with young ones. You know what I've decided about young ones and holidays?Just don't travel with them.Better idea. Or find yourself a serviced apartment next door to a Children's Hospital.That helps. Holiday there. Beautiful. You know the best part of the holiday he remembers? Playing in the playroom of the Children's Hospital.They have good playrooms in hospital.He said yesterday, "I loved that playroom, mum." I'm like, "You were in hospital!"We could write a book on the playrooms in hospitals in Australia and overseas over 16 years.We should do a travel hospitals on great Children's Hospitals to visit around the world. What to do when kids get sick.His projectile vomiting stories on planes are hilarious. I know you're eating breakfast but they'd knock your socks off. Lovely to see you and everyone on the team. Nice to be back.It's good to have you back. Thank you. Now the other news of the morning. This is a big one too. NSW Premier Mike Baird is expected to announce his government will reverse its highly contentious ban on greyhound racing. It comes after intense pressure from the racing industry and the National Party. State cable net will meet this morning where it's likely they -- Cabinet will meet this morning where it's likely they will approve the policy backdown. A Sydney trainer is due to face court this morning after allegedly being caught using live rabbits to train his greyhounds. Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has dealt a major blow to Donald Trump's presidential candidacy saying he'll no longer defend Mr Trump. The most senior elected US Republican urged his party members to focus on their own re-election campaigns, but he stopped short of rescinding his endorsement of Donald Trump. Mr Trump responded by tweeting that Mr fighting
Ryan should not waste his time fighting him. Mr Trump's running mate Mike Pence has refuted rumours that he was planning to withdraw from his party's ticket, telling a rally in North Carolina he's proud to be Mr Trump's running mate.I believe in forgiveness. And we're called to forgive, as we have been forgiven. Last night, my running mate showed the American people what's in his heart. He showed humility to the American people. And then he fought back and turned the focus to the choice that we face and I'm proud to stand with Donald Trump.Mike Pence speaking in the States overnight. Indonesian police say an Australian man on drugs charges in Bali has told them he used hashish after being diagnosed with cancer. 48-year-old Australian Giuseppe Serafino was arresteds on the weekend, along with a 54-year-old British man. Indonesian -- an Indonesian military officer and police officer have also been arrested over the case. Police say they'll seek a maximum 20-year sentence.The family of a Northern Territory teenager who was shackled and forced to wear a spit hood at the Don Dale Detention Centre say they feel left out of the royal commission into youth detention. Commissioners Margaret White and Mick Gooda will begin hearing evidence at public hearings in Darwin today. Dylan Voller's sister, Kirra, says she and her mother were not told about a public consultation in Alice Springs until after the event. She says she's doubtful the inquiry will improve the system for young people. Changes allowing the Federal Government to intervene in the long-running Victorian firefighters dispute have passed through Federal Parliament overnight. The Victorian government along with the CFA and United Firefighters Union have been locked in a bitter dispute over an enterprise bargaining agreement. The Coalition says the change will prevent unions from hampering the Country Fire Authority's ability to manage its volunteers. In Melbourne, a man is in hospital with serious injuries after a tree branch fell on his house. Emergency services were called to the site in Narre Warren just before 1:00am after the branch from a large gum tree fell on to the roof above his bedroom. The ceiling collapsed and the man was hit by falling roof tiles. A new report out this morning into gender equality has found a whopping 90% of Australian girls feel they're not treated equally to boys. The report released to coincide with International Day of the Girl also rarely
found 50% of girls say they're rarely valued for their brains and ability and more for their looks. One in three also believe it would be easier to pursue their dream career if they were male. And now a quick look at the

Vanessa's away today so you'll have Michael and I reading the weather this morning. We're good at that. You'll have Del with your fantastic news this morning.You certainly will. Moments before the close, the Dow was up 0.6%. London's FTSE rose 0.8% overnight. was up 0.6%. London's FTSE rose 0.8%
overnight.

Thank you, Del. Let's get more on the turmoil gripping Donald Trump. Zoe Daniel joins us now from Washington fresh from St Louis. Good morning, Zoe. Big developments overnight concerning Paul Ryan, the most senior Republican on the Hill. Yes, indeed, Michael. This was long awaited. Of course, Paul Ryan expressed some distaste over the weekend in relation to that now infamous tape of Donald Trump saying some pretty awful things about women and this is something that, as you'd be well aware, has rattled the upper echelons of the Republican Party. So we were waiting today just to see how those senior members would respond after last night's debate. Now, Paul Ryan, basically, chaired a conference call with Republican representatives, in which he said that he would no longer defend Donald Trump. He urged those Republicans to essentially worry about their own re-election. He took some backlash for that. Many of those Republicans apparently on the call concerned that he was going to withdraw his endorsement of Donald Trump and there is a belief by some in the party that Donald Trump has been elected as the nominee as part of a democratic process. Therefore it's inappropriate to back away from that. Paul Ryan, apparently, around 45 minutes into the call, came back on and said, "No, I'm not going to disendorse Donald Trump, but I will not be campaigning for him. I will not be defending him." And this is all about thousands down-ballot races. It's a little bit into the weeds, I guess, for an Australian audience, but this will be critical for whoever wins the presidency. Being president is one thing but achieving anything in Washington is dependent on having control over the says
Congress and that's what Paul Ryan says that he's going to concentrate on from here on.A short and sharp response from Donald Trump regarding those comments from Paul Ryan.Yes. Donald Trump tweeted - he can't help himself - he tweeted, "Spend more time balancing the budget, jobs and illegal immigration and don't waste your time on fighting the Republican nominee." That directed fairly pointedly to Paul Ryan. The other thing that's happened this morning, Michael, is that Mike Pence, Donald Trump's running mate, has come out on television and also held a rally. Now, there was some concern in the upper ranks of the party that Mike Pence might actually walk away from being Donald Trump's running mate and that may have brought the whole house of cards crashing down. But Mike Pence said this morning he was never considering doing that. And he's given a very spirited defence of Donald Trump in the wake of the debate last night. Let's take a look.You know Donald Trump, I truly believe - you saw it last night on that debate stage. He literally embodies the Spirit of America - strong, freedom-loving, independent, optimistic, and willing to fight every day for what he believes in and what makes this nation great. You know, it takes a big man to know when he's wrong and to admit it. And to have the humility to apologise and be transparent and be vulnerable with people. And Donald Trump last night showed that he's a big man. (APPLAUSE AND CHEERING) Mike Pence there sticking with Donald Trump despite the nominee throwing him under the bus very publicly on the debate stage last night. What has Hillary Clinton been up to today, Zoe?Michael, Hillary Clinton will speak, actually, this afternoon. We're just waiting to see her speak at a rally. She looked pretty pleased with herself when she spoke with journalists on her plane after last night's debate. Her spokeswoman has been out this morning, also saying that they were happy with Hillary Clinton's performance. And by and large, polls seem to indicate that she won the debate. But that said, Donald Trump convincingly.
didn't lose it particularly convincingly. I think there's a view that he performed better than expected. That said, though, there are some pretty damning polls out today. A new NBC Wall Street Journal poll has Hillary Clinton at 46 points and Donald Trump at # 35 points. So that's an 11-point lead for her. A two-way polls shows 52-38, so a 14-point lead. That poll was taken after the scandalous tape was released, but before last night's debate. So we'll need to wait a little longer to see that flow through into people's voting intentions.With less than a pont to go. Zoe Daniel, thank you very much for that.It was an extraordinary scene watching that debate yesterday. Just quite incredible. You see it in the commentary this morning, about just how low can American politics go. I think it surprised even the most cynical commentators just how rough it got. I was thinking that the toughest that sort of, I guess, we've probably known was the "you, Sir, are no Jack Kennedy" moment where we thought, "Oh, zinger!" It looked like play school.Donald Trump gave the only zinger of the night when he talked about Hillary Clinton being in jail. That's the one being played on rotation. As Zoe said, a victory of sorts for Donald Trump in that he did not implode. He survived to fight another day despite the overwhelming odds he was facing after the release of the tape over the weekend. It will be interesting to see if he will stump up for the third debate, appropriately in Las Vegas, or whether he'll pull out and focus on campaigning.Also amazing that Hillary Clinton had her chance to really, you know, kick him to the kerb.And didn't do it.Did not do it. It seems...She said the parameters on that basis...Take the high road.Quoting Michelle Obama and if she was to deviate from that, she would cop it, so she was going to be criticised either way on that front. She threw her fair share at him on taxes, and other things. She wasn't, you know, completely Libby White in debating tactics but everything that Donald Trump was facing, the fact that he didn't, um, blow up on stage, walk off in a huff - although he's doing plenty of huffing and sniffing, was a pieric victory of sorts for the Pyhric victory of sorts for the Republican nominee.We'll turn now to Australian politics and the co-author of Operation Sovereign Borders has defended the policy and saying Australians should be proud of it.Retired Major General Jim Molan says the detention facilities on Manus Island and Nauru are, in his words, leading the world.I have seen enough information to convince me that if you go to Nauru, you will find the most extraordinary medical facilities that most Australian towns would give their right arm for. If I compare it to Manus, um, um, we should be... We are so far ahead of refugee camps throughout the world compared to Manus Island that it's not funny. There are 14,000 people waiting for weakness on our part to cross... For people smugglers to sell them to cross into Australia. That's the first point. Need. We need Operation Sovereign Borders and that's the new normal. The second point is that -- is that no-one should ever think that Australia is not doing its bit in relation to this. We are the third-largest taker of permanent settlers in the world. We are leading the world. No Australian should feel embarrassed about what we're doing for -- doing for refugees in the world.Former soldier and Liberal candidate Molan there on Q&A last night. Australia's Supermax jail is under review amid concerns the majority of inmates have united behind the Islamic State cause.Senior counter-terrorism officials, who spoke on condition on anonymity, have told 7.30 that young suspects were being further radicalised by extremists behind bar. Physical isolation is there all the time. They're not allowed to associate with more than one person at a time and those associations are carefully monitored and only approved if it is not in any way compromising the security and the integrity of the operation.Anyone in jail can tell you there's ways around any restriction. The classical way would be by shouting under the door, you know, through the backyard, through the cages in the backyard. That's pretty much the easiest way. It's, it's, it's very well organised in there by the brothers themselves.So they're sending messages between inmates who otherwise wouldn't be able to talk to each other.If necessary, yeah, they would do so. Fascinating story on 7.30 last night. Now to the front pages of the major newspapers around the country. We'll start with the Guardian Australia. It's reporting on comentss from government minister Simon Birmingham who says it would be reasonable for Labor to demand that the government drop public funding for the same-sex marriage Labor's
plebiscite campaign in return for Labor's support.Baird brought to heel - the SMH reports the NSW Premier's controversial greyhound racing ban is set to be overturned when State Cabinet meets today.The Daily Telegraph reports that Mr Baird sat down with broadcaster and critic of the ban, Alan Jones, just hours before deciding to scrap the ban.The row over the South China Sea is on the front of the Australian, with former prime minister Paul Keating slamming Labor for being too compliant with US naval interests.The Herald Sun leads on the inquest into the death of cricketer pilly Hughes. The inquest heard yesterday allegations that Hughes of deliberately targeted with short balls.The Mercury says it's carnage and chaos in Tasmania as high winds and fallen trees cut power lines in the south of the state.The Financial Review reports the One Nation Party has indicated support for two of the government's key industrial relations bills, including one to re-establish the commission.
building and construction commission.Strikes by public servants have uld ka the Immigration Departments to fail to meet inspection targets for cargo according to the Canberra Times.The Advertiser says rates for households and businesses could drop by $80 a year if the number of skounals were cut from 68 to 32.The NT News leads with claims a bike war has erupted as two senior Rebels are charged over an alleged violent retaliation: The Courier-Mail is covering the murder trial of Gable Tostee. The court heard his alleged victim Warriena Wright took a selfie with Tostee just hours before her death. Tostee has pleaded not guilty to the charges.The West Australian pictures a paramedic critically injured in a head-on collision.And the US election debate leads the Age. The paper labels it one of the nastiest encounters in US political history. Talitha Cummins received praise for admitting to years of binnage drinking and telling the ABC's Four Corners about struggling to keep it together -- Australian Story's program about how she struggled to keep it together.Near the end, I was a different person. The wheels were sort of falling off the bright, bubbly, shiny Talitha. I realised that people were starting to recognise that. Starting to hold it together was on
becoming a hard act. It was dawning on me that, if I didn't stop, things were going to get really bad. The Weekend Sunrise presenter who spoke with really a disarming frankness about her drinking, about being a high-functioning alcoholic and suggesting - and I think she's probably right - that there are a lot of us out there. She talks about going home on the way home from work, picking two bottles of wine from the bottle shop, putting them away and probably going back for one more or maybe even two more and whacking them away as well but being able to get on in the morning, going for a run and putting on the make-up and getting on with it.She appeared on early-morning TV. We've all been there but perhaps not to this extent. Her own mum was shocked when she, quite candidly and to her great credit, admitted she was an alcoholic. She said she saw alcoholics as a wino drinking out of a brown paper bag in a public park. She says there's a bad stigma addressed to the step. As we all know, you never recover from alcoholism. You have to stay on the straight and narrow all your life and as she said last night, there's always the temptation to go back on the booze and that's exactly what she doesn't want to do.We reckon she's describing not only a particularly Australian phenomenon, but it's international, but one that's very, very common here and maybe one we don't like to recognise, particularly when you're high-profile, when your life seems to be in order, you're paying your bills, getting up, turning up to work. There can actually be a problem. I guess we'd like to share stories this morning of where you've recognised that maybe you've had a drinking problem or someone you know and love is in that high-functioning alcoholic cat bring and just how you get there as someone who seems to have your life in order. We'd love to hear your views today.How many bottles of wine do you drink a night, in other words? Our email address is Budget Direct fest@your.abc.net.au and you could join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. We're joined support sport by the always sober Paul Kennedy. The Socceroos are expected to make a couple of changes for tonight's match in Melbourne. Tim Cahill played five minutes last week against Saudi Arabia wra and may play a bigger role this evening. It's been a little too long between drinks for the Socceroos.When was the last time we beat them?It's been seven years since Australia defeated Japan, but this group is confident they can change that. Yeah, I'd love to but, in saying that, you know, there's a way that we want to do it and there's a way that, um, you know, there's a plan enter and it's about executing that plan.The Socceroos enjoyed a light training run at Docklands ahead of the match under the watchful eyes of contingent.
the 100-strong Japanese media contingent.There's a lot at stake. Japan, obviously, had a slow start to the qualifiers.A quick turnaround following Friday's draw with Saudi Arabia will give coach post post post some selection headaches. -- Ange Postecoglou some selection headaches.We will make some changes but I think we were always going to. The ka. Tain believes the bench will be just as important as the starting 11. The Socceroos' rivalry with the Blue Samurai began with Australia's win against Japan in the 2006 World Cup when substitute Tim Cahill scored two goals. There's hope that 10 years on, the substitutes could have a similar effect on the match. The subs, what sort of impact they made, hits home with how today is in terms of maybe not the same opposition but how important, you know, the subs can be and, you know, particularly in this team. They've always made an impact.An impact that could help Australia on its path to the 2018 World Cup. The surf was too plait for competition last night, so Tyler Wright has to wait another day to claim the World Championship. She's in the semifinals of the penultimate event of the year. If the Aussie wins two more head-to-head contests in France she'll be handed the crown. Katd Lynn Bassett's shooting performance is a big worry for New Zealand ahead of the second contest in Launceston. She shot 47 from 47 lifting her accuracy to 91% this year, 3% above her average of four years. Asked if she was anoids at being substituted in New Zealand, she laughed and said she wanted to do whatever was best for the team. Wednesday night, New Zealand will play -- Australia will play New Zealand in Launceston. A brief update with the trading news. Is started with a splash yesterday with big names in the AFL chooting to go to other clubs. That's the first step and then they'll have to work out if they can get there. Bryce Gibbs was perhaps the biggest name yesterday, telling Adelaide he wants to get over to the Crows and get away from Carlton and a couple of other big ones, Daniel Wells has told the North Melbourne team he wants out. That was predicted in the last couple of weeks and one or two other changes as well, Tyrone Vickery going to Hawthorn. And to the Phillip Hughes inquest, which started yesterday - and there was much evidence handed down - this was concentrating on helmets, ambulance response team and -- time and whether or not there was sledging on the field. That is ongoing. We might talk about that later on in the program.Yeah, indeed. Some really Harrowing stuff there. Nice to see you again, PK. You too, welcome back.Thank you. Still ahead: We all love movie pirates but pirate movies are another matter. Illegal downloads are threatening the Australian movie industry and one group of offenders are among the worst. That's coming up. First the latest headlines. Labor look set to kill off the marriage plebiscite today with a meeting in Canberra to formalise the party's position against any public vote. But there may be move to compromise on the matter after Education Minister Simon Birmingham last night said the Coalition might be willing to remove public funding for the "yes" and "no" campaigns if Labor request it. NSW Premier Mike Baird is expected to announce his government will reverse his highly contentious ban on greyhound racing. State Cabinet meets this morning where it's likely it will approve the policy backdown. Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan has dealt a major blow to Donald Trump's presidential candidacy saying he will not defend Mr Trump. He urged party members to focus on their own re-election campaigns but he stopped short of rescinding his official entoursment of Mr Trump. Indonesian police say an Australian man on drugs charges in Bali has told them he used hashish after being diagnosed with cancer. 48-year-old Australian Giuseppe Serafino was arrested on the weekend along with a 54-year-old British man. Police say they'll seek a charge carrying a maximum 20-year sentence. And in Melbourne, a man is in hospital this morning with serious injuries after a tree branch fell on his house. Emergency services were called to the site in Narre Warren just before 1:00 this morning after the branch from a large gum tree fell on to the roof above his bedroom. The ceiling collapsed and the man was hit by falling roof tiles. Michael, thanks so much. We'll look tiles.
Michael, thanks so much. We'll look at the weather for you now. Brisbane can expect a sunny morning with a pop light shower, a top of 30. Sydney sunny and 21 with a showers a -- shower along the coastal fringe. In Melbourne, a cloudy day, a high channels of showers in the morning and afternoon, a top of 15 there. Hobart, partly cloudy with a high chance of showers, 13. Adelaide cloudy with with a medium chance of showers, 16 Perth sunny and 27, pick of the day. Darwin partly cloudy with a slight chance of a shower in the late with a slight chance of a shower in
the late morning the late morning or afternoon, and a top of 34. Get well soon, Vanessa. And top of 34.
Get well soon, Vanessa. And now the morning's finance news. Global oil prices have jumped sharply after Russia said it was ready to join the organisation of petroleum countries, or OPEC, to curb global output. Russia said it will support a proposal by OPEC to freeze oil production it to reverse the slump in global prices. That lifted the price of oil by as much as 3% overnight with Brent crude hitting a 52-week high. Deutsche Bank shares have dropped overnight on reports that its boss failed to reach a swift deal with the US over lowering a $14 billion fine. The lender saw the biggest drop on Germany ace main stock market before paring back the losses. Talks between the chief executive and the US Department of Justice have reportedly ended without agreement. The bank has been under pressure to negotiate down the $14 billion fine for the bank's misselling of morality-backed securities. Here's the global markets about 30 minutes before the close:

Now, UK-born Oliver Hart and a bank in Finland have won the noble economics prize for their work on contract theory. The two created tools to help determine whether public sector workers should receive fixed salaries or performance-based pay and whether providers of public services should be public lick or privately owned. He's particularly known into research into how contracts and incentives affect corporate behaviour. Judges said the work laid an economic foundation for economic policies. Samsung has announced it is temporarily stopping production of the Note 7 smartphones. The giant had issued new models of the smartphone following complaint of faulty batteries which caused them to catch fire. There's been reports that the replacement phones themselves are also exploding. In a further blow for Samsung, AT&T and T-Mobile have stopped replacing or selling the Galaxy Note 7 which was only launched in August. Finally, Chinese e-commerce giant Ali Baba is teaming up with Steven Spielberg to produce and distribute films across the US. Ali Baba Pictures and Spielberg's Amblin Partners say they'll co-produce movies. They'll work together on the marketing and merchandising of each other's films. The tie-up comes ahead expectations that China will soon overtake the US as the movie industry's biggest market and that's just the way it S you industry's biggest market and that's
just the way it S you have just the way it S you have to reach out and do business with China now in any industry. Can you explain that Nobel Prize winning contract theory again?Do you know how long I sat there trying to understand it to even write that particular story in contract theory.You explained it well.We were all thrilled last night to know that that particular bit of economic theory won. We really were. Michael and I were texting saying, "Thank God they recognised that finally". As for the Galaxy 7 have you noticed flying on planes now they make an announcement.Yes, Del said that yesterday.I was on the plane. "If you own a Galaxy 7, turn it off." And we're all, "What it f it explodes in the locker!" This is not good news for Sam sing. It's great to have you back.Lovely to be here. Thank you. An Australian and a Briton have been arrested on suspicion of possessing hashish on Bali.Police say they're seeking the maximum penalty and possible life behind bars. TRANSLATION: Under article 112.2 of the Indonesian drug law, that carries a penalty of a minimum five years and a maximum 20 years. We are seeking 20 years. They could face a minimum punishment of five years and a maximum of 20 years in jail.In the German Tal of Berlin, a group of Syrian migrants has performed a sold-out gigs.The refugees in concert was an opportunity for many immigrants to embrace the sounds from home and celebrate a culture under threat from years of war. The Hope Choir, a mix of European and Middle Eastern sounds, representing unity. Half the group They've
is Syrian. The other half is German. They've played and sung across Berlin. It was the opening act for a range of Syrian musicses and bands taking the stage for the second ever Refugees in Concert. TRANSLATION: It's important to show German people our Syrian culture and show them a bit of our Syrian music. During this concert, they will learn about Syrian music, about things like Syrian tarab and Syrian pop. Most of the audience has come to the country in the past two years, escaping the devastation and destruction in their homeland. TRANSLATION: I was a little bit happy but, at the same time, I felt sad because Aleppo is being destroyed. My feelings changed between happy and unhappy. TRANSLATION: Despite the war, despite all the people that are dying and all the bloodshed in our country, despite all that, we are happy to show off our culture. We want to let people know there are nice things in our country. We have culture. We have art.In 2015, 890,000 asylum seekers fled to Germany. The greatest number seeking refuge were from Syria. With European borders shutting down and increased hurdles in Germany, in the first nine months of this year, that number is down to 210,000. TRANSLATION: The concert was very nice. It helped me forget my worries and pains. People that live here need this. Some entertainment, meeting people were our own country, listening to our music, and feeling free and safe.For refugees, the concert was free. Beautiful. The Anglican Archbishop of Perth, Roger Herft, has stood aside amid the ongoing royal commission into institutional incidents of child sexual abuse. Roger Herft was Bishop of Newcastle for more than a it decade.He's told the inquiry he let the community of Newcastle down by not acting on claims of abuse. Roger Herft has been Archbishop of Perth for 11 years. He came to the diocese from Newcastle, where he was Bishop from 1993 until 2005, during which time, allegations of abuse were made against priests under his authority. Six weeks ago, the Archbishop gave evidence to the royal commission, saying he couldn't recall conversations about the allegationings, including a meeting with former Newcastle Dean Graham Lawrence, who was later defrocked. The Archbishop said he would have been aware of allegations against notorious paedophile priest Peter Rushton, but didn't report them to police, a decision he accepted responsibility for. In his 3-day testimony, the Archbishop said he had badly let down the people of Newcastle and the
developed a more realistic view of the priesthood. He announced his decision to step aseed in a -- aside in a letter to the Church, saying he wanted to focus on the Newcastle inquiry. He said he was humbled by the courage of child sexual abuse survivors. A spokeswoman for the Perth diocese said the Archbishop was stepping aside temporarily and would attend further sessions of the royal commission next month. The craze that has shaken up several Australian states where pranksters pose as creepy clowns is also making its way across the UK.So proud of our exports. Police are there are warning troublemakers could face arrest after several frightening encounters. If you're afraid of clowns, like I am, look away now. The BBC's Jon Kay reports. Back up! Oh, my God!It started in America this summer, but this practical joke doesn't seem so funny any more.He's chasing us!Over the last few days, there have been dozens of clown incidents reported to the police in the UK.I want to get past. I want to go home. He was stood maybe here.George Birkbeck was confronted by one in this Plymouth carpark late at night. He claims the clown was wielding a hammer.Go on then, yeah.George chased him away but was left shaken. I think it's stupid. People are just jumping on the bandwagon and taking it too far and you've seen reports of them smashing cars. My sister works here. If she walked home, that would have scared the life out of her.You're not joking? You didn't set it up?No. It is what it is.We are taking this seriously, particularly if the report reports of them possessing knives is true. The level of threat that is being exhibited is not something that you would see in a circumstance yours. Police say the craze is being fuelled by social media and is wasting huge amounts of officers' time. At this fancy dress shop in Bristol, they say clowns seem to be around
scarier than anything, especially around Hallowe'en.We have knives through the head, barbed wire, children love it. Show them a clown and they're scared. #7Can you imagine Hallowe'en? Three weeks' time. My kids are already terrified about it. They'll dress up as vampires and princesses, the usual Hallowe'en fare but the creepy clowns, mostly completely harmlings, but they'll be out there. Absolutely. Totally terrifying. Clown or not clown, a lot of it is running
common assault. If someone is running up to your car with a baseball bat and bashing it, I don't care what's on their head. That's just assault. It's nutty. But yes, the Australian tradition of scaring people with scary clowns. Excellent. So proud.Thank you, America, yet again. New figures show young people are the worst culprits in Australia when it comes to film piracy.Movie bosses say illegal downloads are threatening the future of movies but they have a plan that me believe might save the struggling industry. Piracy is said to be the biggest threat facing the film industry.We cannot solve the pyresies problem. There will be no Australian films. Zero.The topic had star billing at the Australian International Movie Convention on the Gold Coast. Last year's released. Mad Max: Fourie Road has been illegally downloaded 3.5 million times in Australia. Where is she taking them?The producer of 2011 film Red Dog says piracy is a plague.Even if you make a great movie that has emotional resonance where an audience, people steal it.The head of Village Road show has offered a 5-step solution. The plan includes legislation to block illegal sites, forging a better relationship with Google, making more content legally available, pursuing legal action against serial offenders and fostering community support. The plan has support. It's a holistic approach to education and legislation, winning community hearts and minds and working with big partners.More than 30% of 12-year-olds to 17-year-olds pirated movie in the past year. There's an entire generation of young Australians growing up not understanding how content needs to be paid for.There is a bright side to this dark issue. There has been a decrease in the number of adult Australians pirating movies. That's being attributed to the introduction of online streaming services including Netflix and Stan, where people can access content legally. The only place film industry bosses want to see pirates is on the big screen. Good luck. I hope it works. Speaking of that generational thing and the fact that we spent time in hospital on holidays, inwas discussing a current movie that is out, Secret Life of Pets and asked whether a mother's child has seen it and she said, "We saw it was out so we went home, downloaded it and it was great and the kids loved it." Unblushingly. You know, this is a current-release film that's out there. I was amazed.And you're still surprised?I really am. I really am. I guess...It's tragic for the industry but it is so, so commonplace at the moment.Exactly. I'm amazed that people can't make the next leap which is, if you keep doing that, you simply won't have the films that you say your kids like. You're going to have to pay for them in some way, otherwise you won't have them. But anyway, enough of that. Let's look at the newspapers. We're joined by Simon Breheny, from the Institute of Public Affairs and former leader of the Victorian Young Liberals. Why such a long title?And federal president of the Young Liberals. Hand me your business card. It's as long as your arm.Went to school in Bendigo.I didn't know that. I was born in Bendigo.We can do the whole bio if you like.Let's talk about the same-sex marriage debate. A big story today.It looks like the wheels are about to fall off the same-sex marriage plebiscite with the Labor MPs being locked into a binding vote against the plebiscite. So it looks at this stage at least like that's not going ahead. There's current negotiations taking place between the government and the Labor Party on, for instance, public funding. I think the position of the government should be the position that, um, the Labor is arguing for, in this case, which is to have no public funding to either side of the debate. I think that's a sensible position that Shorten and the Labor Party have taken and that's something that's on the table in terms of negotiating.But Labor is still rock solid against the plebiscite per se. You can't see the Labor caucus, given everything Bill Shorten has said over the last few weeks, supporting the plebiscite. Yeah, I think it's difficult. I think that most of the language used is that they think going ahead with the plebiscite is not the right thing to do. And then of course there's difficulties on the government side as well, with a lot of backbenchers quite unhappy with where the same-sex marriage debate goes post plebiscite and the changes to the marriage act. So whether or not, for instance, bakeries will be exemptle from discrimination laws which would allow them to, for instance, choose whether or not to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. So those sorts of exemptions from anti-discrimination law is something the backbench is pushing for. The Attorney-General, George Brandis, is putting something to the party room, but it looks as though what is being put to them will not debate,
be enough.Let's look at the US debate, which I'm sure you were as glued to as the rest of us were. You've got a story from the Age but this
in a sense you could pick anything this morning because the coverage and the very emotional response to this debate has been universal. Yeah. And, I mean, this is just the... I was just describing it as the dumpster fire that is the US presidential election. I mean the, um, the... Outrageous language we've seen from Trump this week should come as no surprise. This is, um, this is the way that Trump has always operated. This is 89 same sort of language. It's a continuation of the same sort of language and the same sort of style and subsfans we've seen from Trump over a long time now. So really should come as no surprise but, of course, having Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump on stage debating each other yesterday was, um, riveting television, riveting to watch, entertaining but sad, frankly, and, um, a reflection on how, um, debased politics in the United States has become. You've got a deeply flawed candidate on the Democrat side in Hillary Clinton and someone in Donald Trump who is so far outside the mainstream that he's simply not able to take advantage of those weaknesses. So, um, I mean... The, I think, you know, it's Alien versus Predator. Whoever winnings, we lose. Which one is which? We'll leave that one there.Yeah.I tweeted during the debate - we described the debates between Malcolm Turnbull and Bill Shorten as boring, turgid. Gee, we miss them now, don't we? Sure, they were boring but we had some serious discussionlingses on the issues determining the future of the country.Yeah. And one of the saddest things about all of this is that the United States is seen as being a leader. It will remain a leader for years to come, but, um, the fact that you've got two of these... These two people, these two individuals, fighting out for the most powerful position in the world, um, is just, frankly... Testifiestating. -- devastating.This also fundamentally weakens that leading position of strength well. When the entire body politic is debated in that way. What's the story from the Herald Sun that you're looking at?So yesterday, Malcolm Turnbull made some terrific comments, I think, and he should be, um, applauded for making them. Bill Shorten is also on a joint ticket with Malcolm Turnbull on this one. And that is to say that, um, banning Muslim immigration to Australia wholesale is not a good idea. Um, I think that's a pretty reasonable position to take. I think it's a very Liberal position to take and, I think, it's important that political leaders stand up on issues like these to make sure that we are treating people as we should in the Liberal democracy such as Australia, as individuals, not as, um, a member of a group and, and, painting every member of a group with the same brush. I think this is a really important position that the Prime Minister has taken. I think it's an important position for the Opposition Leader to have supported and I think it's a point that needs to be made more often in the immigration debate. Yes, there are some, you know, you've got to go through the regular security protocols we always have to go to, but treating everyone from particular countries or treating everyone of a particular religion in the same way is utterly illiberal. And the alcohol story that you're looking at this morning is an interesting one, particularly given the discussion we've been having about the Australian Story that featured Talitha Cummins last night and recognition of what it is to be a high-functioning alcoholic.I haven't seen the program but the good news is that we're drinking less over time. Alcohol consumption is coming down over time. Beer is apparently taking the biggest hit and particularly those under the age of 30 are more health conscious these days.That's really interesting.This is something I have to say I've seen in my group of friends. There are people who will go for periods of time without drinking, make the choice to drink less. It's much more an accepted thing these days.Is it fitness related? Cost reasons? What are the factors driving it?Mostly it's health. Certainly for some people it's cost but for a lot of people, I think it's health. Just the feeling that you have of not drinking and feeling healthy and vibrant.And being in control as well.Yeah.I've always been surprised by the number but always the -- also the type of people who do a Feb-fast.Or Oc-sober or Dry July.Yeah, exactly. It's good for us all. Thank you.Last summer, the Great Barrier Reef saw@hottest sea temperatures and most severe coral bleaching on record.As temperatures rise, the fight to save the Great Barrier Reef is heating up. Mushroom corals are, a large solitary type, that don't build reefs, have repeated convulsions, known as pulsed inflation.It's move violent than we expected. Some of the largest expansions were 340% the original tissue.As clouds of algae are pumped into the water, the coral loses its colour and becomes pale. Corals are known for doing this to get rid of sand but getting rid of algae in this way has not been seen before.This is the first time we've documented pulsed inflation as a way to remove this from the tissue. That's the reaction of just one coral in a lab. This is what happens on the scale of a reef. Early in 2016, high sea temperatures over many weeks caused mass bleaching in parts of the Great Barrier Reef. You can watch that story for Catalyst tonight on that show on ABC TV and on iView as well.Whenever you like. Forecasters are predicting a turbulent wet season in the top end with more cyclones than usual expected to form over Territory waters.Residents are warned to prepare for the cyclone season. Batten down the hatches. We're in for a wild wet season. TheThe Bureau of Meteorology is ready for whatever this season can throw at all.The bureau is forecasting higher than normal cyclonic activity this season due to warmer ocean temperatures.The broader pattern is for a longer season, more rainfall overall, but it will come in bursts and breaks.More than 11 cyclones are expected in North Australia this wet season with up to three in the Northern Territory alone. And going on the recent downpours, the wild conditions may not be far off. We do tend to see an earlier start to our cyclone season. We've seen an earlier start to wet season rains. We had a record wet September.It's prompted a stern warning from the man in charge of emergency recovery. Don't be complacent, because this is the time of the year when Territorians, particularly in the top end of the Northern Territory, need to switch on in terms of preparedness.Emergency services say residents should pack their cyclone kits now and have warned waiting for a cyclone alert to be issued before racing off to the shops could leave you high and not so dry.It is highly likely that help may not arrive for anything up to 72 hours. So adidn'ting that attitude of being self-sufficient for up to 720 hours puts you and your family in a much better space.Cyclone season officially starts in November. OK. Vanessa is sadly unwell today. If you're watching, get well because If you're watching, get well because
we're OK. Vanessa is sadly unwell today. we're not good weather presenters. Brisbane mostly sunny morning with a possible light shower and a top of 30 degrees. Sydney - sunny and 21 with the chance of a shower along the coastal fringe. Canberra - mostly sunny and 14. In Melbourne - mostly cloud which with a high chance of showers. Afternoon showers aiming for a top of 15. Down in Hobart - partly cloud which with a high chance of showers, 13. Adelaide - cloud which with a medium chance of showers. Define medium. Perth - sunny and 27. Darwin - partly cloud which with a slight chance of a shower in the late morning chance of a shower in the late
morning or afternoon and a top of 34.Further to the chat on movie piracy, we discussed your experience coming across somebody who thought it was blase to talk about pirating movies. Kim makes a good point. We're not defending piracy at all but Kim says for a family to go to the movies these days, it costs more than $100. It's often cost that drives pirating of movies. I mean I don't pirate movies but I can tell you it is very expensive to take two kids, a family of four, to movies these days.Very true and that's where Hollywood and the industries need to get sensible about the way that they deliver the movies. So you pay less if you want to download T you get a crappier version on your phone, so you pay a buck. If you want to see it at the cinema...Could they sustain the big? ...Absolutely. The head of Dreamtime Pictures made that point a couple of years ago, to have a tiered system of delivery priced accordingly.As for popcorn, we won't go there.That bumps the price up.The smell sucks you in. I know. Let's go to the sporting headlines. The Socceroos can take another stride towards qualifying for the 2018 World Cup when they face Japan at the Docklands Stadium in Melbourne tonight. A victory for Australia would consolidate an important top-2 spot in the group. The Socceroos have not beaten Japan since their last meeting in Melbourne seven years ago. Ange Postecoglou has flagged a couple of personnel changes from the team that played Saudi Arabia last week. We might hear from the coach now. Maybe not. Let's go to the surfing, hey? It was too flat for competition in France last night to sirl Wrights that to wait at least another day to claim the World Championship. She and her rival are in the semifinals of the penultimate event of the year. If the Aussie wins two more head-to-head contests in France, she will be handed the crown. And to AFL now and take a look at the big trade moves that happened yesterday and this was the number one - Bryce Gibbs was the man that said he wanted to go back to Adelaide and go to the Adelaide Crows so Carlton will look at that to try and get the best deal possible for him and Daniel welings is leaving North Melbourne. That was pretty predictable and speculated upon in the last couple of weeks. There will be more on the trade news this... Afternoon and we'll see what the club is talking about in the AFL. I will be talking about of the golf. There's a World Cup of golf coming up in Melbourne and in just over a month's time so I'll talk about that in the next half hour. Hope you join us for that. That's it from me. Thank you very much. Now, we've been speaking this morning about Talitha's extraordinary revelations on Australian Story last night. It's been a point of conversation and comment this morning, recognising - have you got close to that point, do you think, Michael, where you're living your life and functioning fine but you're drinking too much? Personally, no. But lots of people out there are giving us their views on the story last night and we can show you some of those

It's really struck a nerve this morning, which is great.Keep your views coming in. We'll go to Canberra ahead of the Labor caucus room on same-sex marriage. And the author of -- author of This program is not captioned.

This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Welcome back to News Breakfast. Thanks very much for watching. On the program today: Doomed the fail. The opposition is said to kill off the Coalition's plan to hold a same-sex marriage plebiscite. Brought to heel - the NSW premier capitulates on his controversial greyhound racing ban.Another major blow to Donald Trump has Republicans continue to abandon the presidential candidate.Leading sport this morning - the Socceroos prepare for what could be their most important World Cup qualifier in Melbourne tonight. And the world's greatest golfers are heading to Melbourne next month and I'll be speaking with the tournament's director shortly.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's election commitment to hold a same-sex marriage plebiscite now looks doomed to fail with the opposition expected to finally reject the government's legislation. The Labor Caucasus meets in Canberra this morning to formalise its position.But the Education Minister burm birm birm has indicated the government could still be open to compromise.We have worked very hard to try to keep the cost of the plebiscite as low as possible, to make sure there are safeguards around any government-funded advertising that occurs, so that we can insure it is respectful. Ultimately, if that is something that the Labor Party want to take out in return for support for a plebiscite, they should say so and put it on the table.So, a last-minute bone being thrown to the Labor Caucasus as we said. Tanya Plibersek will be joining us very, very shortly to hopefully point towards what the Caucasus will be deciding. It looks to be the end of the plebiscite, Michael.Indeed. What is that, viewers? Yes, she is back.It is great to be here.How was your break?Very, very nice. I am a slow learner, the Sunshine Coast is simply God's own coast.The sunshine never ends on the Sunshine Coast.How did you Gus get that climate? Why wasn't the capital of Australia put there?Why wasn't it? That's what I want to know?! We had a wonderful time. I finally discovered, yes, I know years and years after Kath & Kim I discovered Noosa. I am moving the News Breakfast show there.You can be our correspondent there. ABC News Breakfast. Raring to go, recharged? Yes, wonderful. As we head into the Spring Racing Carnival.Giddy-up. Not so much plebiscites it seems. Apart from the obligatory trip to the hospital you have o to make when travelling with small children. I love. ThatNSW premier Mike Baird is expected to announce his government will reverse his highly contentious been on greyhound racing. It comes under intense pressure from the racing industry. It appears the policy backdown will be approved. A Sydney greyhound trainer is set to appear in court today on animal cruelty and torture charges after allegedly being caught to using live rabbits to train his greyhounds. Scott Ryan has dealt a major blow to Donald Trump's presidential candidacy saying that he will no longer defend Mr Trump. The most senior elected Republican urged his candidates to focus on their own campaigns. Mr Trump tweeted that Mr Ryan shouldn't waste his time fighting him. Meanwhile, Mr Trump's running mate, Mike Pence, has refuted rumours he is going to withdraw from his party's ticket. He told a rally in North Carolina he is proud to be Mr Trump's running mate. I believe nowhere giveness. We are called to forgive as we have been forgiven. Last night my running mate showed the American people he had a heart and humility to the American people and then he fought back and turned the focus to the choice that we face and I am proud to stand with Donald Trump! (CHEERING AND APPLAUSE) Mike Pence speaking overnight. Indonesian police say that an Australian man on drugs charges in Bali told them he used hashish after being diagnosed with cancer. 48-year-old Australian Giuseppe Serafino was arrested on the weekend along with 54-year-old British man. A police officer officer has also been arrested over the case. Police say they will seek a charge carrying the maximum 20-year sentence.The family of a NT teenager who was shackled and forced to wear a spit hood at The Donald say they feel left out of the Royal Commission into youth detention. Commissioners Margaret White and Delta Goodrem will hear evidence at public hearings in Darwin today. His sister, Kirra, say they weren't told about a public consultation in Alice Springs until after the event. She says she is doubtful the inquiry will improve the system for young people.Changes allowing the Federal Government to intervene in the long-running Victorian firefighters dispute have passed through Parliament overnight. The Victorian government along with the CFA and the United Firefighters Union had been locked in a dispute over the enterprise bargaining unit. It will prevent them from hampering the firefighter authority to manage it many volunteers.A man is in hospital with serious injuries after a tree branch fell on his hand. Authorities were called to his house in Nare Warren just after 1:00am after a branch of a gum tree fell onto his house. The ceiling collapseand the mab was hit by falling roof tiles.A new report into gender equality has found a whopping 90% of Australian girls feel they are not treated equally to boys. The report is set to coincide with International Day of the Girl. Girls think they are rarely valued for their brain and ability rather than their locks. One in five said it would be easier to pursue their dream career if they were male.A quick look at the weather for you.

Vanessa is unwell today but here is your finance.I am fighting fit. Let's ta a quick look at the global markets. A moment before the close the Dow is up. London's FTSE rose 8% overnight. The Australian dollar is currently buying US $0.76. Gold is trading at 1209 US dollars an ounce. Thank you, Dell. Turning to our top story - the future of the same-sex marriage plebiscite as Labor is set to meet this morning to decide their stance on that issue. The lib deputy leader Tanya Plibersek joins us from Parliament House in can be. Tanya Plibersek, good morning.Good morning, Virginia.The Government has thrown you a lifeline on the plebiscite saying come up with your conditions to hold one, maybe including the suspending of public campaigns, and they will consider it. Will you?I think this is an absurd last-minute effort from the government to try and suggest that they have been interested in consultation when all the way through this delay have made it very plain, discussions between the Prime Minister and our leader, discussions between the Attorney-General and the Shadow Attorney-General, that they are not prepared to compromise on the most fundamental almosts of this plebiscite, including things like the question. I don't think it is sincere. I think it is very typical of the Attorney-General to release legislation last night at 11:00pm and say, "We want your answer today on what we released at 11:00pm last night." It is not well handled at all.But, just looking at the material of what actually has been put to you - does that not change things for you? If the public funding of the potentially very divisive "yes" and "no" campaigns, if that was taken away and suspends, would that make the prospect of a plebiscite a bit more possible?The public funding is only a very small part of the cost of running the plebiscite. We saw in the explanatory memorandum, the plebiscite we thought would cost about $175 million, in fact will cost $200 million. The public funding is about $15 million. So if we take away 15 million from around 200 million, we still have a huge, wasteful exercise for something that should be determined by the Parliament. The High Court has said that the Australian Parliament is the proper place to determine the plebiscite. We didnt have a plebiscite when we last chained the marriage about. We didn't have a plebiscite when John Howard overturned the NT's voluntary euthanasia laws. We have never had a plebiscite. No matter how hard these social issues have been, extending rights to women, extending freedom of racial discrimination, this is a matter of human rights and discrimination and the idea that we ask the majority of the Australian community to vote on the rights of the minority of the Australian community is not fair to our Australian democraciment it is the cost, it is the absurd making people jump through hoops to get their rights element of this and, finally, Virginia, nothing changes the harm that will happen to people who are, particularly young people, who are just discovering their sexuality, but kids who are hearing that their two mums or two dads don't make a proper family, older Australians have written to me in huge numbers. People who have been with their partner for 10, 20, 30 years who are saying why should the rest of the community get a vote on whether my relationship is a legitimate relationship? I have got one of my constituents who has been with his partner for 49 years this year and he says, "Let's wait and do this properly."So, in a nutshell, a Caucasus will be voting "no".Of course, we will have our Caucasus meeting this morning and I don't announce the outcome of meetings before they happen, but I don't think you have to be a genius to work out where the majority of feeling is in the Labor Caucasus on this. Since George Brandis showed us the legislation, the plebiscite legislation at the end of the last parliamentary sitting week, we have been consulting in our electorates talking to, obviously gay and lesbian Australians, their families and supporters, but also mental health experts like PatMcGorry and also people who are supporters of the plebiscite. In that three weeks, we have, I think, most of us incred our level of 7 concern about the potential harm of this plebiscite, rather than being reassured.OK. You do know that Malcolm Turnbull can't get enough party support for a parliamentary vote, yet you persist in asking him to do so. Is it not if fair for some Australians, at least, to conclude you are attempting to wedge the Prime Minister and playing politics with an issue very dear to their lives and hearts?I think that is completely unfair because Malcolm Turnbull, from the beginning has said that the plebiscite is the wrong way to go. He's only agreed to the plebiscite to get the job of Prime Minister. He's been only allowed to keep the job of Prime Minister because he caved on this and a range of other issues to the right of the Liberal Party. We can't run a government or a country in a way that is all about whether Malcolm Turnbull keeps his job. We need to legislate for the benefit of Australians and the best way to do that is through the Parliament and we know that are people in the Liberal Party who prefer a free vote in the Parliament. Our hope is that those people will continue to assert themselves and perhaps become even and
more assertive overore coming months and demand a free vote from their own party.Just to jump in there, Tanya Plibersek. That was actually the point I was making and you have made it yourself - ultimately, this comes down to not bothering if the Prime Minister keeps his job or not or potentially taking that job from him?Well, I don't think it is fair that we spend $200 million of taxpayers' money because nudge made a commitment to the right wing of the Liberal Party. We need to make decisions in this Parliament that respect Australians, their rights and liberties, and that is about gay and lesbian Australians not being subjected to a debate, that they say will be harmful and divisive and it is about good government. We don't need to spend $200 million on this. I have got health services in my electorate that have been floor 40 years closing because they've had $900,000 of public funding a year cut by the Federal Government. They are closing their doctors. Homelessness health service and we are going to spend $200 million in a plebiscite. We know there are great gaps in drug and alcohol rehab services, our schools, hospitals, roads - all of these things need extra funding, would benefit from extra funding, but we are going to poll
spend $200 million on an opinion poll that doesn't bind the Parliament.On another matter before I let you go, Tanya Plibersek. The former Labor Party Paul Keating criticised your defence spokesman Richard Marles says that the military should be used to navigate through the South China Sea and criticised Labor as being too comPresident Clinton with US interests. Do you share his misgivings?No, I think his criticisms are actually based on a misunderstanding of what Richard said. Richard has been very clear that in any instance, it should be the government that determines whether freedom of navigation operations are held. But the operational details of operations when they are under way, of course they are things that you would allow the military authorities to take charge of day to day. Labor has always had a policy of having good relations with both China and the United States. It is not in our best interestto be pulled back and forth between these two very important partners.Alright. Good to talk with you this morning. Tanya Plibersek, thank you very much.Thank you, Virgin Yes. .From one political storm to another and in the US, a senior Republican is dealt one more blow to Donald Trump's presidential campaign. Zoe Daniel joins us now from our Washington bureau. Zoe, good morning. Yes, the Republican House Speaker Scott Ryan has all but dis-endorsed Donald Trump?Yeah, that's right, Michael. It is quite this
significant. Scott Ryan coming out this morning after a conference call with his Republican colleagues saying that he will no longer defend or campaign for Donald Trump. He stopped short of dis-endorsing him, partly because of pressure from those other Republicans not to do so, but he said that he will concentrate from now onon the down ballot races to try to preserve the Republican majority in Congress. So Scott Ryan, effectively, distancing himself from Donald Trump and, in part, this is being interpreted as an acknowledgement that Donald Trump's unlikely to win the election. That against the backdrop of what has happened over the last few days in relation to this scandalous tapes that were released and Donald Trump's sexual references towards women. The other thing that has happened this morning is Mike Pence, Donald Trump's running mate, has come out strongly saying that he will continue to support Donald Trump. He's suggested that Donald Trump deserves forgiveness. He said that in the debate last night Donald Trump appeared to be repen tent, that everyone deserves a second chance, effectively, and that Donald Trump is representative of what America is and should be. Now, Donald Trump is back out on the hustings today with all of that going on in the background. He seems to have moved on. The rally that he's speaking at, as we speak, is a pretty standard in terms of the sorts of rallies that he holds. He's talking about Hillary Clinton's failures in various policy areas, but also referring to one of the issues that he raised last night - the issue of her missing emails and saying again that he will hire a special prosecutor if he is letted after his suggestion last night that she should be in jail for those missing emails. Let's take a look. Very, very sad. Special prosecutor, here we come, right?(CHEERING) If I whip, we will appoint a special prosecutor.One of the jar moments from last night's debate, Zoe, as we bring up those live pictures again of Donald Trump spoking to his supporters in Pennsylvania. We have the first significant mainstream media opinion poll out after those comments on the bus made by Donald Trump. What does that poll show? Yeah, that's right, Michael. I don't know if you can hear - you can hear the crowd there at the Trump rally shouting "lock her up, lock her up, lock her up!" Which is a familiar refrain and goes to what he was talking about last night. Hint out on the hustings today talking to her supporters and feeling pretty positive, it would seem after last night's debate. She didn't convincingly bet him, but the polls are showing that she did win it. Beyond that, yes, the broader polls, the first ones out since the release of those tapes, but fr be the debate, show that she has a lead on the foreway polling, so that is with the minor party candidates as well of 11 points, 46-35 and on the two-way national head-to-head polling against Donald Trump 52-38. So that is a 14 point lead. Also, her gap is widening in some of though battle ground states. So a new poll out of that vard da, for example, showed her up six points. -- Nevada, for example, showed her up six points.To paraphrase Michelle Obama, one of us went high and one of us went low.(CHEERING) And I'll tell you, what is exciting, what is exciting to me is that we area getting more and more support, not just from Democrats, but from Independents and Republicans! (CHEERING) Hillary Clinton there on the stump. Zoe Daniel, thank you.Now to the front pages of the major newspapers around the country. We will start with the Guardian. They are reporting comments from Simon Birmingham saying it would be reasonable for the government to drop public fund fogger the same-sex marriage plebiscite campaign in return for Labor's support. As you heard from Tanya Plibersek just a moment ago, that doesn't look likely.Baird brought to heel is the headline in the Sydney Morning Herald. The paper reports the NSW premier's greyhound racing ban is, indeed, set to be overturned when state Cabinet meets today.The Daily Telegraph says that he sat down with Alan Jones just hours before deciding the scrap the ban.The row on the South China Sea is on the front of The Australian where former leader Paul Keating has slammed China.The 'Herald Sun' leads on the inquest into the death of cricketer Philip Hughes. They heard that he was deliberately targeted by short balls.The Mercury says it is carnage and chaos in the south of the state.The Australian Financial Review reports the One Nation party has indicated support for two of the government's key industrial relations bills, including one to re-establish the Building and Construction Commission.Strikes by public servants, of course the immigration department failed to meet inspections for cargo. That is according to the Canberra Times.The Advertiser says that rates for sawn households and businesses could drop by $80 a year if the number of councils were cut from 68 to 32.The Northern Territory News News leads with claims that a bickie war has erupted as two senior Rebels are charged after a violent retaliation. The Courier-Mail is covering the murder trial of Gable Tosti. His alleged victim took a selfie with his hours before her death. He pleaded not guilty to those charges. The West Australian shows a paramedic who has been injured in a head-on collision.The US election debate leads The Age. They label it one of the nastiest encounters in his the industry. No-one would argue with that.I had to have a shower after the debate. I felt grubby.I really couldn't quit believe it. Just those normal checks and balances on what you say. You just don't say that! It is all gone. We were remembering before, Michael and I, some of the so-called zingers of presidential and vice-presidential debates gone by. That just sounds like Play School stuff now.It sounds like aero diet political commentary compared to what we got last night.Rough stuff. No holds barred.Cue does to the meadiators. They did a fantastic job trying to rope both of those candidates in. Talitha Cummins has been praised for her honesty. She admitted to years of binge drinking and explained how she hoped to change the stereotypes around alcoholism.I think this is the modern face of an alcoholic. Professional, educated, high-functioning. I hit rock-bottom but it could have been much worse. I think we really need to look at that label and reassess. Really interesting and honest comments from a woman who has got her life become together and got it on track. It was interesting to read so many of your positive supporting comments this morning. Steve says, "Congratulations on reaching this new level in your life. Often telling others we have a problem is a way to accept on a fundamental level that indeed we have an issueand it isn't easy. AA isn't the answer for even and sometimes we need firm support from family and friends. I can say from experience she's made a great move."Terry says, "I've been five months off the grchlingt I have been through the horrors, the DTs, et cetera. A scary place to be and never want to be there again. Well done Talitha Cummins. I talk my hat off to you." Matthews that an amazing story to tell. "My dad was a fantastic dad and provider. Rarely a day off work he provided for five kids. However, he was a functioning alcoholic as well. As a young man I was greatly affected by seeing him under the weather most of the time that he was home. The effect this had on my self-esteem cannot be overestimated."And the effect on his ability to relate to his family and friends do his job, as Talitha pointed out is tremendous as well. We value your opinions. You can join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter as well. Let's go to sport now and PK is on the sports couch. Good morning.Good morning, Michael. Thank you very much. Special guest here this morning and we will be talking about golf in just a moment, but just to remind you the Socceroos can take another stride towards qualification for the 2018 World Cup when they face Japan in Melbourne tonight. A victory for Australia would conle solidate that important top two spot in the group. The Socceroos haven't beaten Japan, just to remind you, since they played in Melbourne seven years ago. The coach reckons there will be a couple of changes. Briefly, some surfing news because you will be wondering what is happening with Tyler writ competing in France at the moment. It was too flat for competition last night so Tyler Wright has to wait at least another day to claim the World Championship. She and her rival are in the semifinals of the penultimate event of the year. If the Aussie wins two more head-to-head wins in France she will be handed the crown. That is before she even heads to Hawaii. Australia will defend its World Cup in golf when they host the rest of the world in Melbourne. There may be trouble in store for the reigning champions because there is a big field here and on the way, I should say. Now, Jason Day has pulled out but we can tell you this New York that -- that we have our commentator here joining us on News Breakfast this morning. How are you, Matt. How are you?Jason Day will be missed and mark Leishman is in.He will be missed. His health is first and foremost important. Adam Scott is the No. 6 player in the world and he picked Mark Leishman. He is a Victorian boy. He plays the Commonwealth coming home and a formidable team playing against the likes of Lee Westwood from England and other great players.You have major winners here. 27 Olympians that competed in Rio. Why is it such a good field? It is being said it is the best field in Australia since the 2011 presidential cup.We have 20 players on the 56 playing are in the top 100 in the world. 15 in the top 50 in the world, 20 in the Top 60. So the field is phenomenal. Hailing from all over the world, Ireland and Shane Lowry and Graham McDowall, a major championship winner and Danny Willet, Jimmy Walker, a major championship winner. What is unique about this event is it is nation versus nation. Players are playing together as a team.They lick that, don't they?They love that. That is a unique thing. Like playing at Kingston Heath, one of the top 20 in the world, having ability to come down and play in a Ryder Cup setting.We saw that recently with the Ryder Cup and of course it was ex emotional this year because of the death of one of the greats of the sport. The players seem to bem when they play together under their national -- beam when they play together under their national flag.Playing for their country and someone other than themselves, that is more so than anything. Golf is an individual sport. Whenever they go out to do that with another teammate or much less, 11 other guys, they really revel in it.What is the format then? It starts lit November? November 23 through to 27 is the week. They play two different formats and it is aggregates stroke play. It is over four days. They play better ball format and alternate shot. Altonne Mate shot Thursday and Saturday and better ball format on Friday and Sunday.It fits in nicely with that season that Australia holds and tries to win a few of these players down for the national tournaments as well. Absolutely. We sit in the middle of two great events in the Australian Open the week before and PGA championship the week after.A quick one on Tiger Woods. He indicated he wouldn't play for the rest of the world. Then he said he would come back. What is the latest?He is withdrawing from the Safeway event this week and evidently he didn't feel his game was up to scch right now. He wasn't sharp. -- scratch right now. He wasn't sharp. He will be back.You think?Absolutely. I hope he does. Golf is better with him in it.The tournament organisers would hope that as well.Without a doubt.Good luck with the World Cup. Appreciate it.That is from the golfing couch.What a great couch it is. Vanessa is away so we are doing the weather. Brisbane is mostly sunny with a possible the weather. Brisbane is mostly
sunny with a possible light sunny with a possible light shower. Top of 30 degrees. Sydney, sunny and 21. Canberra. Mostly sunny and 14 degrees. In Melbourne, mostly cloudy with a chance of showers across the morning and the afternoon aiming for a top of 15 degrees. Vanessa does this so much better. Hobart partly cloudy with a high chance of showers, 13 degrees. Adelaide cloudy with a medium chance of showers. Perth sunny and 27. Darwin partly cloudy with a chance of a shower or two late in the morning or afternoon. two late in the morning or
afternoon. A top in the Top End of 34 degrees.Still plenty coming up on Breakfast this morning including a nab with Duncan McNab. He has written a book on the disgraced detective Roger Rogerson. Having followed his career on both sides of the law for more than 30 years, McNab can finally tell the fallen, often disgraceful story. First here is Virginia with the latest news. Thank you, Michael. Labor looks set to kill off the plebiscite today with a meeting in Canberra. To formalise the position against the public vote, but there still might be room to compromise after Education Minister Simon Birmingham last night said the Coalition might be willing to remove public funding for the yes and no campaigns if Labor questions it. State Cabinet in NSW meets this morning. It's likely they'll approve a policy backdown on greyhound racing. Republican Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan, has dealt a major blow to Donald Trump's presidential candidacy, saying he'll no longer defend Mr Mr Trump. He urged party members to focus on their own re-election campaigns. He stopped short of rescinding his endorsement of Donald Trump. Indonesian police say an Australian man on drugs charges in Bali has told them he used hashish after being diagnosed with cancer. 48-year-old Australian Giuseppe Serafino was arrested on the weekend along with a 54-year-old British man. Police say they'll seek a charge carrying a maximum 20-year sentence. In Melbourne, a man is in hospital with serious injuries after a tree branch fell on his house. Emergency services were called to the site in Narre Warren just before 1:00am after the branch from a large gum tree fell on to the roof above his bedroom. The ceiling collapsed and the man was hit by falling roof tiles. Yes, it's me again.Amazing.Let's go to finance now with Del. Good morning, everyone. Global oil prices have jumped sharply after Russia said it was ready to join OPEC to curb global output. Russia has said it will support a proposal by OPEC to freeze oil production in order to reverse the slump in global prices. The move lifted the price of oil by as much as 3% with Brent crude hitting a 52-week high. Deutsche Bank shares have dropped overnight on reports that its boss failed to reach a swift deal with the US over lowering a $14 billion fine. The lender saw the biggest drop on Germany's main stock market before paring back the losses. Talks between the chief executive and the US Department of Justice have reportedly ended without agreement. The bank has been under intense pressure to negotiate down the $14 billion fine for the bank's misselling of mortgage-backed securities.

The lift in oil prices has helped lift prices overnight.

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now, shares in Twitter have fallen as much as 15% after potential bidders are said to have lost interest in making offers to buy the company. The social media company had attracted interest from Google, salesforce.com and the Walt Disney Company, all of which had consulted with banks on whether to pursue a bid. Now all of Tuesday suitors are unlikely to make an offer for Twitter. On Friday, the company had plained to have a board meeting with outside advisers on a sale but it's reported that that meeting was also cancelled. Twitter has been struggling to grow its user base and build a revenue stream through advertising. Finally Samsung has announced that it's temporarily stopping production of its Galaxy Note 7 smart phones. The South Korean tech giant had issued new pod else of the smartphone following complaints of faulty batteries which caused the devices to catch on fire. But there's been reports that the replacement phones are also exploding. Worldwide companies are suspending replacements of the Note 7 devices. In Australia, Optus and Vodafone have stoppedish ueg the phone and Telstra said it's suss spended it. It will be -- suspended it. This recall will have serious ramifications.
PR disaster. So the days of relatively cheap petrol might be over?Yes, well, let's see.Thank you.Oil prices have started to lift but keep in mind they dropped from $150 down to $35. We've had it good for quite a while.I want it good for a long time. Can you arrange that?People have been complaining that the petrol prices haven't gone low enough. Oil prices have dropped so much. You can't please everyone. Thanks so much. Return to our top story, George Brandis has spoken on AM about the possible plebiscite on same-sex marriage this morning.He says the debate could be solved for good if Labor would agree to hold the vote and let the public decide.I am a member of the first Australian government that has prosecuted this issue. John Howard didn't. Kevin Rudd didn't. Julia Gillard didn't. Tony Abbott didn't. Malcolm Turnbull has done so. And I'm the first Attorney-General in a government that has prosecuted the issue. So it's all very well for the Labor Party to go through the motions of saying they believe in this. We could have this outcome. The public opinion polls tell us very clearly we could have this outcome four months from this today if the Labor Party put the political games aside and really committed themselves to the issue.George Brandis speaking on ABC radio a short time ago. As we have been reporting this morning, an Australian and a Briton have been arrested on suspicion of possessing hashish in Bali.Police say they're seeking the maximum penalty and possible life imprisment for them. TRANSLATION: Under article 112.2 of the Indonesian drug law, that carries a penalty of a minimum five years and a maximum 20 years. We are seeking 20 years. They could face a minimum punishment of five years and a maximum of 20 years in jail. There you go. That's what we're hearing from the Indonesian police. As we know from other stories in history that have involved Australians, they go hard on this stuff. Also reporting today that it will be interesting in NSW politics as Premier Mike Baird prepares to reverse his ban on greyhound racing and maybe save his Premiership. State reporter scombroins us from Sydney. How has it come to this? Yes, well, last week, there was a threat from the Nationals in NSW that they were going to dump their leader, Troy Grant, if he didn't back a reversal from the Nationals. Yesterday, it was leaked that this announcement was going to happen and we have been able to confirm it is happening in Cabinet as we speak, Virginia. And this is all because of a huge revolt in the bush to in ban that people have been deeply unhappy with the process of it. And how it's going to affect thousands of nm innocent people in the industry. But in regards to that Cabinet meeting, I've had some information. This morning, the Deputy Premier, Troy Grant, met with the RSPCA and the greyhound industry to go through to get an agreement and, um, we know that, um, things in the agreement - they'll be capping breeding in NSW to 2,000. They will be reducing the number of tracks. There are 34 tracks around NSW. That could possibly be halved, reducing the number of race events. There will be a $1,500 bond for every dog that's bred. Now, the government will put in tougher penalties, but there will be more funding for RSPCA and other groups to increase the funding for rehoming capabilities of dogs in NSW. There will be no new tax dollars given to the industry for track upgrades, but the industry will fund this through the sale of some tracks. There'll be an oversight body tasked over the next few months to draw up this new structure. So quite a few more details that are coming out there from Cabinet.I guess it all begs the question of why, then, it wasn't the policy decision made by the Premier in the first place after he saw the Four Corners program that clearly affected him and where he announced that blanket ban. How has it been brought to this incredible U-turn?You're right. And even in the report that came out after the Special Commission of inquiry, many of these recommendations were made by the industry and were suggested in that report, but the Premier took the stronger option of shutting down the industry. And at the time, um, while there there was praise and he was applauded from animal welfare groups, the NSW Opposition came out very strongly against this because they just could see how devastating it was going to be. There's a feeling that, um, while, um, nobody supports or condones live baiting and animal cultd, that was the minority in the industry, and there has been a strong feeling in NSW that you simply cannot just turn off the livelihoods and shut down the livelihoods of people in the industry. Ruelty, that was the minority in the industry, and has been a strong feeling in that you simply cannot just turn the livelihoods and shut down livelihoods of people in industry. As one member said, it's an illiberal thing to too. I think that's played on Mike Baird. I think the government underestimated how strong opposition to this was going to be. It's all that people in NSW have been talking about for the past three months.Will this save Mike Baird's Premiership?Well, it's more than two years to the next election. As you Noel, a week is along time in can
politics and if there is anyone that can turn things around, it is Mike Baird. While his popularity has plummeted since the end of last year - the end of last year, he had a satisfaction rating of 60%. In the last Newspoll, it went down to 39%, the biggest drop in the history of any premier in the history of news pop. He has a problem with political capital but the one problem he has going forward is if this is a sign of weakness. He's been telling the Opposition that they lacked principle on this and he was not going to back down, when you're selling yourself as a conviction politics and you -- politician and you make a backflip, it's damaging to your brand.To many of his colleagues in the NSW Police force, he was a dedicated career policemen but Roger Rogerson was also, as we all know now, a criminal mastermind. Someone who followed his activities on both sides of the law is author, journalist and former detective, Duncan McNab. He'sitien a biography that traces Rogerson's downfall and joins us now. Duncan, good morning. Good morning, Michael.You were previously a NSW Police detective for many years. When did you first become aware of Roger Rogerson's activities?First bumped into him when I was a young detective in 1980 or 1981 when he was pin-up boy of the criminal investigation branch and the detective we aspired to be like.Why was he the pin-up boy? Terrific record for bravery, getting results, remarkably large investigations not only in NSW that he was involved in but also in Victoria and Queensland. Um, he was pretty famous at that stage and also utterly charming and took an interest in young blokes coming through. So, um, everyone knew about him. Everyone thought Roger was possibly a bloke who could be the next commissioner in a couple of years down the track. We all wanted to be a bit like him until the magic rubbed off.And that happened pretty quickly. There was the dark side and while presenting that very public hale physical owe well met persona to his colleagues, he was a criminal on the sidelines.He was and a very successful one. Back in his heyday in the NSW Police, he was deeply involved in a lot of criminal activities and also a man who could sway a court as well. He had his... His reach was not only throughout policing and the criminal world but also up into the judiciary.You first wrote about Roger Rogerson back in 2006. The Dodger, has he's known, was still in jail then. He got out soon after the book came out and you had a menacing phone conversation with him. What did he say to you?He went back through some fairly sad parts of our mutual past and I realised what a vicious, dropped
evil bugger he was. The charm dropped very, very quckly. Roger also wants to be in control. Roger always wanted to be portrayed as being the affable rogue, I suppose, when he started to reinvent himself after he got out of the clink in 2006. And my version of events wasn't the one he was very happy with. So it caused a bit of pause for a couple of days. You're looking over your shoulder but Roger perfected one thing and that was the art of the threat. So you feel a little bit apprehensive when you got a call from him.A lot of the book focuses on the 2014 murder of Jamie Gao by Roger Rogerson and his associate, Glenn McNamara. It's a great read by the way.Thank you.It goes into fine detail about what happened. What, in your view, eventually brought down Roger Rogerson?Greed and ego, I think, more than anything else. He went after the one last hurrah which was Jamie Gao. Potentially a lucrative drug deal for both sides but at some point both men decided it was appropriate to kill him and take the drugs from him. He turned up at a storage shed in Sydney's Padstow with $3 million worth of ice which would, um, be quite profitable if taken on to the open market and instead of turning up with the cash, the old boys turned up with the gun and that was the end of poor old Jamie Gao.You say Roger Rogerson is an old-school detective. Speaking about what brought him undone, he didn't care about CCTV cameras. Roger has had a history with that. The first time he went into jail, he was caught on CCTV opening a bank account to deposit a large amount of money he couldn't explain. The second time he was caught lying to a commission of inquiry. In the last incident, they, they, they knew about the CCTV but they hadn't done any research thoroughly and missed a really important camera and after that camera picked up the rendezvous with Jamie Gao, the entire case unfolded in vision for us all. It's probably the most widely recorded and most detailed recording of any crime in Australia's history.It made the prosecution much easier. As we all know, they were both sentenced to life in jail. Based on your extensive knowledge of Roger Rogerson, Duncan, do you expect him to ever repent for his many crimes? I... Roger in court portrayed circumstances.
himself as a victim of circumstances. I don't think there's one sign of Roger repenting for any of. This he still thinks he's in the right.Duncan McNab, thank you for joining us this morning.Thanks, Michael.An incredible part of Australian history. In the German capital of Berlin, a group of Syrian immigrants has performed a sold-out gig.The refugees in concert was an opportunity for many immigrants to embrace the sounds from home and celebrate a culture under threat, of course, from years of war. The Hope Choir, a mix of European and Middle Eastern sounds, represented unity. Half the group is Syrian, the other half German. They've played and sung across Berlin. It was the opening act for a range of Syrian musicians and bands who took to the stage for the second ever Refugees In Convert. -- Concert. TRANSLATION: It's really important to show the German people our Syrian culture and show them a bit of our Syrian music. During this concert, they'll learn about Syrian music, about things like Syrian tarab and Syrian pop.Most of the audience has come to the country in the past two years, escaping the devastation and destruction in their homeland. TRANSLATION: I was a little bit happy, but at the same time, I felt sad, because Aleppo is being destroyed. My feelings change between happy and unhappy. Trabs trans -- TRANSLATION: Despite the war, despite all the people that are dying and all the bloodshed in our country, despite all that, we are happy to show off our culture. We want to let people know that there are nice things in our country, that we have culture and that we have art.In 2015, 890,000 asylum seekers fled to Germany, the greatest number seeking refuge from Syria. But with European borders shutting down and increased hurdles in Germany, in the first nine months of this year, that number is down to 210,000. TRANSLATION: The concert was very nice. It helped me forget my worries and pains. People that live here need this, some entertainment, meeting people from our own country, listening to our music and feeling free and safe.For refugees, the conSirte was free. That sounds like a great concert too. Now, the craze that has shaken up several Australian states where pranksters pose as creepily clowns is also making its way across the UK.Police there are warning troublemakers could face arrest after several frightening encounters, some of them serious. The BBC's Jon Kay reports.Back up! Back up!It started in America this summer, but this practical joke doesn't seem so funny any more. Oh, God, he's running! Oh, he's running! He's chasing us!Over the last few days, there have been dozens of clown incidents reported to the police in the UK.I want to get past. I want to go home. And he was stood, maybe, here. George Birkbeck was confronted by one in this Plymouth carpark late at night. He claims the clown was wielding a hammer.Go on then, yeah. George chased him away but was left shaken.I think it's stupid. People are just jumping on the bandwagon and taking it too far. You've seen reports of them smashing up cars. I just think it's silly. Obviously, like my sister, who works here, if she walked home, a young girl, then, you know, that would have scared the life out of her! You're not joking in No, no.You didn't set it up? Didn't set it up, no. It is what it is.We are taking this very seriously, particularly if the reports that people dressed up as clowns are in possession of a knife. The perception of a clown in a circus tent is not what's being applied here at all and the level of threat that is being exhibited again, is not something that you would see in a circus.Police say the craze is being fuelled by social media and it's wasting huge amounts of officers' time. At this fancy dress shop in Bristol, they say clowns seem to be scarier than anything, especially round Hallowe'en.We have knives through the head, barbed wire, children love it. Show them a clown and they're scared. Nothing scarier than a clown, as someone very famous from Sex and the City once said. I concur. I've reason.
always hated the circus for that reason. I never found clowns funny at all and I do find them creepy and this, this has confirmed it.Hy well, watch out Hallowe'en in three weeks' time.Imagine. Going to be horrifying clowns. There's some horrible thing behind the couch, I'm sure.New figures show young people are the worst culprits in Australia when it comes to film piracy.Movie bosses say illegal downloads are threatening the future of movies, but they have a plan that might save the struggling industry. Piracy is the single biggest threat facing the film strife.If we cannot solve the piracy problem, there will be no Australian films, zero.The topic had star billing at the Australian International Movie Convention on the Gold Coast. Last year's release, Mad Max: Fury Road has been illegally downloaded 3.5 million times in Australia. The producer of 2011 film Red Dog says piracy is a plague.Even if you make a great movie that has emotional resonance with an audience, people steal it.The head of Village Road show has offered a five step solution. The plan includes blocking illegal sides, forging a better relationship with Google, making more content legally available, pursuing legal action against serial offenders and fostering community support. The plan has support.It's a holistic approach to both education and legislation, winning community hearts and minds and working with big partners.More than 30% of 12- to 17-year-olds pirlted movies in the past year.There's an entire generation of young Australians growing up just not understanding how content needs to be paid for.There is a bright side to this dark issue. There's been a decrease in the number of adult Australians pirating movies. Now, that's being attributed to the introduction of online streaming services, including Netflix and Stan, where people can access content legally. The only play film industry bosses want to see pirates is on the big screen. It is a big problem. Film studios hate it for good reason. It threatens the creative future of this country, lots of jobs in the entertainment industry if people illegally download movies. On the other hand, we've been discussing this morning how expensive it is to take a family to go and see the movies. You buy the tickets, you want to buy some food, depending on the size of your family, it can be a $100 outing which many people find hard to take.Look, I can see that and I guess in relative terms to our incomes as the years have gone on, ticket prices have been cheaper, it's always been expensive but you can make that argument about anything. It's expensive to buy a family car if you've got five kids. No-one argues you go out and lift it.You buy a car once every five or six years or 10 years. If you want to take the family to a movie on Saturday afternoon, as PK would agree...Oh! He's lining up numbers against me. Look at. This he's doing his numbers.As Chris said - Bali DVDs, a dollar - a drum screen would do for $9. As not e-most cinemas you pay about $18 for an adult at the moment.There's a way of gaming the system. Most cinemas have cheap days or buy tickets online and get one fry.Tight-arse Tuesday S that what you're saying?I didn't want to sigh that. If you buy online they do a deal where you can redeem a free ticket later on. If you game the system it works well. For me, it's the price you pay to have a lively industry that entertains your children. It's one little expense you have to bear. Movies are so important.Oh it's very important. I love the movie industry. I want if to continue to thrive and prosper in Australia. I don't want to pay a king's ran some going to a theatre to watch fabulous movies.What we've heard over the years from some major Hollywood figures is you're going to have a tiered structure of the kind of screen you see it on and cost accordingly. I think that's the future.But is there any prospect of it this happening?Piracy will lead them to it.Reckon?Yeah. The market will decide because the market is a maurkt of thieves and if they want to lock the thieves out of the castle, they have to chuck them something else.Keep your views coming in. Forecasters are predicting a turbulent wet season in the Top End with more cyclones than usual expected to form over Territory waters.Residents are warned to prepare for the cyclone season. Batten down the hatches. We're in for a wild wet season.The Bureau of Meteorology is ready for whatever this wet season can throw at us. We hope Territorians are ready too.The bureau is forecasting higher than normal cyclonic activity this season due to warmer temperatures.The pattern is for a longer season, more rainfall overall. It will come in bursts and breaks.More than 11 cyclones are expected in north Australia this wet season with up to three in the NT alone. Going on recent downpours, the wild conditions may not be far off. We do tend to see an earlier start to the cyclone season. We've seen an earlier start to the wet season September.
rains. We had a record wet September.It's prompted a stern warning from the man in charge of emergency recovery. Don't be complacent. Because this is the time of the year when Territorians, particularly in the top end of the Northern Territory, need to switch on in terms of preparedness. Emergency services sayress dents should pack their cyclone kits now and have warned waiting for a cyclone alert to be issued before racing off to the shops could leave you high and not so dry. It is highly likely that help may not arrive for anything up to 72 hours so adopting that attitude of being self-sufficient for up to 72 hours puts you and your family in a much better space.Cyclone season officially starts in November. I guess the only good news out of that is that last summer, remember, they missed out on a wet season. There was just, you know, really very little rain in the Top End. Virtually no wet season at all which was terrible for the whole region. I know it's rough but if there is a bit of wet coming, at least that's some unside to it.Michael has chipped in. The cinema-going experience is terrible, expensive, unclean, 30 minutes of ads and previews, make content more accessible. This is your suggestion. Really interesting theory that if you want to get it downloaded to your phone, it would be a buck. To get it to an iPad, it's $5. To the home cinema, let's say, $10. If you want to see it in the most extraordinarily beautiful setting possible at the cinema, that's expensive.What say you, PK? Or you can play shadow puppets at home for nothing. Let's go to the sporting headlines: The Socceroos can take another stride towards qualifying for the 2018 World Cup when they face Japan at the Docklands in Melbourne tonight. A victory would mean that Australia would consolidate the important top-two spot in the group. The Socceroos haven't beaten Japan since their last meeting in Melbourne seven years ago. The coach has flagged a couple of personnel changes from the team that played Saudi Arabia last week.We'll make some changes but I think we were always going to regardless of the travel aspect. I think we've got a strong squad and from my perspective, um, you know, every time I have a two-game window, it's about trying to maximise the tal eptd we've got in the squad.The surf was too flat for competition in France last night so Tyler Wright has to wait at least another day to claim the World Championship. She and her rival from America are in event
the semifinals of the penultimate event of the year. If the Aussie wins two more head-to-head contests in France, she will be handed that crown. R And the trading will continue in the AFL. It started yesterday and there was a big move because Bryce Gibbs said he warranted to go back to Adelaide and join the Crows. Carlton will try to make that worth its while. And also the big move there which was not a big surprise is that Daniel Wells wanted to leave North Melbourne and might land at Collingwood and Tyrone Vickery is heading to Hawthorn it seems. All of that trading will continue today. That's it from me. Thank you. Let's check Let's check the
weather: That's it from me. Thank you. weather: Brisbane can expect

This program is not captioned.

This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Welcome back to News Breakfast. Thank you very much for watching. Our top story this morning: Doomed to fail - the opposition today is set to kill off the opposition's plan to hold a same-sex marriage plebiscite.

Brought to heel - the NSW premier capitulates on his controversial greyhound racing ban.Another major blow to Donald Trump, as Republicans continue to abandon the presidential candidate. Leading sport, the Socceroos prepare for what could be their most important World Cup qualifier in Melbourne tonight.And also ahead - we will take a swim through the oceans of the world with National Geographic photographer Thomas Peschak.

The Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull's election commitment to hold a same-sex marriage plebiscite looks doomed to fail with the opposition expected to finally reject the government's legislation. They are meeting? Canberra to formalise their position.Education Minister Simon Birmingham has said they could be open to funding the yes/no campaigns but today on Breakfast Tanya Plibersek said this was an absurd last-minute effort by the government to win them over and she doesn't think it is sincere. For more our political reporter Jane Norman joins us from Parliament House. This seems over bar the shouting?Y, Labor MPs will meet in their Caucasus meeting to decide on the plebiscite. It seems it is just a normality. Labor has all but confirmed it will reject this plebiscite proposal, meaning the vote will not go ahead. It argues it is a waste of taxpayers' money. There should be a free vote in Parliament to settle this issue and it has raised serious concerns about what it believes to be a harmful and divisive campaign in the lead up to any plebiscite. As you mentioned, the Coalition is still trying to convince Labor to back this plan and one Cabinet minister has even suggested that the government could dump the controversial idea of spending $15 million in taxpayers' funding to fund the "yes" and "no" campaigns, but the deputy Labor leader Tanya Plibersek has done the rounds in the media this morning and while she won't confirm the way that the Labor Caucasus will go this morning on the plebiscite, she's pretty much confirmed that no compromise will be enough. Here is what she had to say. I don't think you have to be a genius to work out where the majority of feeling is in the Labor Caucasus on this. Since George Brandis showed us the legislation, the plebiscite legislation at the end of the last parliamentary sitting week, we have been consulting in our electorates and in that three weeks, we have, I think, most of us, increased our level of Ken about the potential harm of this plebiscite, rather than being reassured.So that is Tanya Plibersek speaking to us earlier. The difficulty is, though, as George Brandis argues, he says, "We know if it was put to a vote out in the public it would get through. You would get same-sex marriage legalised" yet, the Labor Party has to stand up in the face of that and say, "No, we won't let it happen" when we also know that a vote won't take place in Parliament now.George Brandis's whole argument is, the ends will justify the means. For those who want same-sex marriage marriage legalised in Australia, the quickest way that will happen is to hold a plebiscite in February next year. Many members of the public support that so same-sex marriage could be legalised by March next year. In the lead-up to the Caucasus meeting the government is trying to put the heat on Labor. They are saying if you support same-sex marriage how can you turn down this proposal. Here is what he said this morning.Three weeks ago I had a discuss with Mr Dreyfus and Terry butter I said it to them, "What would you like us to change about this plebiscite bill to secure your support?" Nine times they refused to answer my question. So, it is all very well for Tanya Plibersek to speak about her commitment to marriage equality, but when it comes to actually taking the steps to ensure this we achieve that outcome, the Labor Party is nowhere to be seen.George Brandis there. Finally this morning, Jane Norman, what is the
the feeling inside Canberra? Once the Labor Party and the Caucasus reaches its decision, that is really the end of a possibility of same-sex marriage in this country for quite some time?I guess that is the next question for the Prime Minister. The government has been warning that if the plebiscite bill is voted down, then this issue of legalising same-sex marriage will be taken off the agenda for the next three years and that does seem like what is likely to happen. Labor, though, says it will keep up pressure on the government to dump the plebiscite proposal and go for a free vote in Parliament, but, again, it is very difficult to see how this will happen, given that the Coalition had that marathon party room last year where it eventually settled on the plebiscite proposal to settle this issue. Not everyone was happy with that. The Prime Minister being one of then. But since that policy has been taken, the Coalition has been pretty much reluctant to in any way look at any other way of settling the issue of same-sex marriage. Jane, good to talk to you this morning. Thanks so much. Michael has the rest of this morning's news for you. Thank you, Virginia. NSW premier Mike Baird is expected to announce his government will reverse their highly contentious ban on Graham. A revised policy will focus on better management of the industry. It includes breeders paying $1,500 bond for each and every dog and lifestyle management process for all greyhounds, including those unautomobile to race. The number of racetracks and event also be reduced an overnight body will be Tasmania - will be given the task to draw up a new regulatory structure for the industry. Republican Speaker of the House, Scott Ryan, has dealt a major blow to Donald Trump's presidential candidacy saying he will no longer defend Mr Trump. The most senior elected US Republican is urging his own members to focus on their own campaign but he stopped short of rescinding his endorsement of Mr Trump. Mr Trump responded by tweeting that Mr Ryan shouldn't waste his time fighting him. Meanwhile Mr Trump's running mate Mike Pence refuted rumours he is withdrawing from being Mr Trump's running mate.I believe in fer giveness. Last night my running mate showed the American people he had a heart. He showed humility to the American people and then he fought back and turned the focus to the choice this we face and I am proud to stand with Donald Trump. (CHEERING) Mike Pence speaking overnight. Back to our region now. Indonesian police say an Australian man on drugs charges in Bali has told them he used hashish after being diagnosed with cancer. 48-year-old Australian Giuseppe Serafino was arrested on the weekend, along with a 54-year-old British man. An Indonesian military officer and a police officer When works in Bali's narcotics division have also been arrested over this case. Police say they will seek a charge carrying a maximum 20-year sentence. In Melbourne, a man is in hospital this morning with serious injuries after a free branch fell on his house. Emergency service were call to the this
site in Nare Warren just before 1 this morning after the branch from a large gum tree fell onto the roof above his bedroom. The ceiling collapsed and the man was hit by falling roof tiles. A new report out this morning into gender equality has found a whopping 90% of Australian girls feel they are not treated equally to boys. The report released to coincide with the International Day of the Girl also found that 50% of girls say they are rarely valued for their brains and ability and more for their looks. One in three also believe it would be easier to pursue their dream career if they were male. To be easier to pursue their dream
career if they were male. To the national weather now. Brisbane can expect a light shower. 30. Sydney sunny and 21. Canberra, mostly sunny and 14. Melbourne a shower or two 15. Hobart a few showers, 13. Perth sunny and 27 and in Darwin, partly cloudy with a high sunny and 27 and in Darwin, partly
cloudy with a high in the Top End of 34 degrees.Thanks, Michael. Now more on the race to the White House and the two candidates have addressed their supporters, following yesterday's bitter debate where both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump continue to take many jabs at each other.To Parra phrase my friend Michelle Obama, one of us went high and one of us went low! (CHEERING) What is exciting to me is that we are getting more and more support, not just from Democrats, but from Independents and Republicans!

It is very, very sad. Special prosecutor here we come, right? (CHEERING) If I win, we are going to appoint the special prosecutor. Because we cannot allow this to happen to our country. We can't.Donald Trump there doubling down on that major threat made during that debate last night. Tom Switzer is from the US Studies Centre and joins us now from Sydney. Tom, have you recovered from watching this yet? Good morning. Good morning, Michael. It was a dirty debate, no question about it and by historical standards, it was the dirtiest debate we have ever experienced.Now to the news of the morning. As you would be aware, Scott Ryan, the Speaker of the House and most senior Republican in Congress harks all but dis-endorsed Donald Trump. He said that he won't defend him after the repugnant comments on the bus and he is urging every House member and senator the fight their own race and ignore Donald Trump.The speaker is refliting the political reality, the cold reality is that the Trump campaign is imploding. It has been impleading since the Washington Post exclusive story at the weekend, airing those lewd comments by Donald Trump about women. But, it is a reflection of the crisis that Republican Party faces right now. I mean, yes, they want to save the furniture and dedicate as many funds as they can to struggling encumbants in the Congress and the Senate who are facing tough re-election battles in swing states, but the broader problem here is that Republican Party, as I point out in the Financial Review today, is facing its biggest crisis since the Watergate scandal consumed president Nixon in 1974. There are big differences between now and '74. It was bad for Republican Party in '74. They got wiped out in mid-term elections and then in the '76 presidential election. The Republicans rallied around Ronald Reagan and the rest is history. They won three elections on the trot. Today, it is very different. Republican Party is on the cusp of a civil war.And you make some compelling arguments in that piece, Tom. If the polls are correct and Donald Trump crashes and burns on election day and takes the party down with him, can you see any prospect of anything, anybody emerging from the smouldering ashes of Republican Party?The problem with Republican Party, Michael, is it is leadership and unable to have philosophical reflection to be frank. Despite Trump's rude and crowd behaviour and divisive behaviour, he nevertheless has tapped into real grievances and he is far from being a Reagan night conservative. He is more reflective of those insurgency movements throughout much of Europe that are bringing down established parties or threatening established parties. He is an old-fashioned populist, a nativeness and tapping into realsentiments. Republican Party of Reagan has been free trade and markets and activist, interventionist, pro immigration, social Conservative inclusion. Trump is none of those things. The party is on the cusp of tearing themselves up. Ryan represents the pro-business, pre-market wing of the party and Trump is that populist, nativist wing. They are reconcilable.We have a poll since the loud comments made by Donald Trump on that bus many years aing and not surprisingly it shows Hillary Clinton opening up a 14 point lead over Donald Trump. This is a poll from the Wall Street jourm. Is it too late for Donald Trump to correct this?(LAUGHS) As you know, Michael, every time we write-off Donald Trump he is incredibly formidable in the rebound. I think this is term until. If you like, this is the revenge of the experts. The experts have long been saying that Trump's erratic behaviour and divisive rhetoric and lack of core governing philosophy, all of, that taken together with a ground game by the Democrats, they have the electoral arithmatic in their favour. This should mean that the publican party would splinter and African-Americans and Hispanics and women voters and union night the voters for Hillary Clinton. That looks like it will happen. To be fair to Trump, he did better than expected, admittedly from a very low bar. In politics, low expectations are a prisonless political gift. That is not enough for Donald Trump to get there. He doesn't look presidential and I think the campaign is on the cusp of imploding. If it hasn't already.You are calling it now, Tom Switzer. Hint the 45th president of the-out. Sure. That is the conventional wisdom, too. It is not a brave call, Michael.Indeed it is not. Tom Switzer, as always, we appreciate your insights on the circus that is the US campaign.Pleasure.Now to the inquest into the death of Philip Hughes. Lucy Carter joins us from Sydney who is covering the inquest. Before we anticipate what might be heard today, let's go over some of the evidence that was led yesterday, in particular the suggestion that maybe Phillip had been targeted by short balls.Ip had been targeted by short balls. Good morning. That is correct. The game Philip Hughes was playing many before being struck by that fatal ball that killed him was a Sheffield Shield game between SA and NSW. Philip Hughes was form mall write a NSW player but he recently switched sides to bat for SA. There was some talk throughout yesterday's coronial inquest that perhaps his side was targeting him in a number of ways. There was talk about whether the team was deliberately bowling short balls, known as "bouncers "At him and there was talk if his team engaged in sledging and some of the sportsman-like behaviour on The Pitch. One of the first witnesses to take the stand was the NSW captain Brad Haddin. He was the wicket keeper and one of the first to render assistance to Philip Hughes after behe was struck by that detail. Haddin denied any strategy to trg him with short balls and denied hearing any sledging on The Pitch. We heard from Doug boll year who was one of the NSW bowl -- Doug Bollinger who was one of the NSW bowlers. He didn't throw the ball that killed Philip Hughes. There were allegations levelled at him that he said to Philip Hughes or Tom Cooper in the lead-up to that over during the game, he told one of those two batsmen, "I am going to kill you". That was hotly denied by Doug Bollinger but under cross-examination from the Hughes family barrister perhaps he may have said something like that, but he wasn't sure if he had.Who are we expected the hear from today?Today, the first person we are expecting? The stand is Tom Cooper. He was the other young South Australian batsman on the field at the time. He of course was on the other end of The Pitch and again was one of the people who saw this incredibly traumatic event unfold. We are expecting to hear from two of the match officials, two umpires, in that game. We will hopefully get some insight if they believe there was a strategy of short balls and pitches directed at Philip Hughes and also whether there was any truth to these, I suppose, allegations of sledging from the NSW team towards Philip Hughes and Tom Cooper.Lucy Carter, good to talk to you. Thanks so much.The royal commission into juvenile detention gets under way in Darwin today. The public hearings have been set down for three days and up to 10 witnesses will be called, including former and current Children's Commissioner. Reporter Avani Dias will be following proceedings and she joins us now from Darwin. Avani, what are we expecting on the opening day?As you probably know, the Four Corners investigation isn't the first time in the NT we had heard about these incidents and that is what this into
week's royal commission will look into - those previous reports that have been made into both youth detention and child protection in the NT and what actually has again wrong in the implementation of those recommendations. So we will hear this week from the former and current Children's Commissioners of the Territory who published a very alarming report last year this was published in August last year and went into some of the sins the we saw in the Four Corners report, including the tear gassing incident, the transfer of one of the 14-year-old boys to the adult prison, as well as some of those boys being put in solitary confinement for hours. Now, that report made a number of recommendations, things like better training for Correction staff and ensuring that there is a review of the practices in youth detention, but Mick Gooda, the royal commissioner, has said that he doesn't want to cover old ground, but part of the terms of reference is to ensure that the recommendations of those reports are properly implemented so we will hear from other authors of reports, the National Children's Commissioner Megan Mitchell as well as paediatricians and psychologists this week.Also, already some concerns expressed from Indigenous leaders that the timeframe set down for this inquiry is way too short. That's right. We have heard a number of concerns, the most recent being last night at a panel in Sydney on The Donald situation that there is not enough time to look at 10 years of youth detention and child protection in the Territory. So the head of the Northern Land Council, which is one of the most powerful Indigenous organisations in the Territory has said that this risks being a feel-good talk fest and both Commissioners have said over the past few weeks that they want to ensure there are real outcomes from this royal commission. They have been travelling to places like Alice Springs and ten npt creek and holding public consultation with people in the community, but we heard from Dylan Volumer's sister, he was the boy seen in that restraint chair with a spit hood. She said yesterday that she doesn't even know how to give evidence at the royal commission because she missed that public consultation. So some welcome news we did hear yesterday is that the Federal Government is funding an organisation with $1.1 million, a legal organisation up here to give free legal advice to people in need. So that is definitely welcome news in the community.That is a good step. Dice disdice, we look forward to you reporting on this. Thank you for joining us this morning.Another co-author of Operation Sovereign Borders has defended the policy saying that Australians should actually be proud of it.Appearing on Q & A last night retired major Jim Molan said we are leading the world.I have seen enough information to convince me if you go the Nauru you will find the most extraordinary medical facilities that most Australian towns would give their right arm for. If I compare it to Manus, we should be - we are so far ahead of refugee camps throughout the world, compared to Manus Island, that it is not funny. There are 14,000 people waiting for weakness on our part to cross - for the people smugglers to sell them to cross into Australia. So that is the first point. Need - we need Operation Sovereign Borders and that is the new normal. The second point is that no-one should ever think that Australia is not doing its bit in relation to this. We are the third largest taker of permanent settlers in the world. We are leading the world. No Australian should feel embarrassed about what we are doing for refugees in this world.Jim Molan, a former general and Liberal Party candidate speak on Q & A last night. Talitha Cummins has been widely praised for her honesty on last night's Australian Story on the show. She admitted to years of binge drinking and said how she hoped to change the stereotypes around alcoholism.This is the modern face of an alcoholic - professional, educated, high-fupgsing. I hit rock-bottom but it could have been much worse. I think it is just - we really need to look hat that label and reassess. Many of you have had strong responses to that story and her honesty overnight. Lindy says, "I have been alcohol-free since 20th May last year. One morning racked with guilt and self-loathing I realised escape wasn't in the win glass continually topped up until I fell into bed."Alan says, "Go girl! " Some candid and brave remarks from Talitha on Australian Story last night.Many of our viewers admitting they 've had a similar problem and it took a lot for them to look at themselves in the mirror and say "you've got a problem".Now to the finance news. Good morning, Del. Good morning Michael and everyone. Leading the news today global oil prices have jumped shortly after Russia said they were ready to join OPEC to curb global output. Russia said it will support a proposal by OPEC the froze oil production in order to reverse the slump in oil prices. The mood lifted the price of oil as much as 3% with Brent crowd hitting a 52-week high. Shares in Twitter have fallen as much as 15% overnight after potential bidders are said to have lost interest in buyers to buy the company. There was interest from Google, Salesforce.com.au and the Walt Disney company, all of which had consulted with the banks on whether or not to pursue a bid. Now all of the suitors are unlikely to make an offer. Twitter planned a board meeting with outside advisers on a sale, but that has been said that meeting has been cancelled. Google has been trying to build its media stream through advertising. Now to the global markets. The lift in oil prices has helped to best globe l a markets overnight. The Dow and SNP 100 rose. In London, the footy also gained 0.7% overnight. Checking commodity prices.

For more on finance I am joined by Ben Pedley, director of Investments at UCA Funds Management. Good morning.Good morning, Del.The second US presidential debate in the US was held yesterday. It is locking increasingly likely that Clinton is ahead. What impact will either a Trump or Clinton presidency have on the markets?If it was a game of Squabble I would be tempted to go basically and miss a turn and throw my tiles in and redraw. In some ways there are negative things and negative cases you can make about both candidates, but I think the markets are part of the rally that we saw overnight is probably a little bit of relief in the sense that it is becoming increasingly likely that Clinton will win, given the revelations over the weekend surrounding Donald Trump and his misogynist tendencies. That being the case, the election is becoming less of a risk, but, as you say, you never know. When it comes to these elections, I think it will be more so than in recent history, there will be a lot of people out there voting against someone rather than voting for somebody.We were talking about this earlier. A Trump presidency is seen as a big risk for global markets this year.It is. It could be along the lines of Brexit. I think the fact that Bill Farren, of course -- Nigel Farage who is one of the leave Brexit campaigners is now involved in the Trump campaign is probably an interesting aside. I think that the market could receive a shot from that and I think resistance
probably statas quo line of least resistance for the markets would be a Hillary win many which case markets would probably continue as they are.In many ways, while Brexit has already happened back in July, there is still that ongoing uncertainty and nervousness around Brexit especially with Theresa May saying proceedings will start in March next year.Yes, but there are two or three sides potentially for a story and what people are forgetting when they are focusing on the negative aspects of hard Brexit perhaps and the affect on UK exporters, UK asset prices are actually doing pretty well. Consumer confidence is up and that is partly due to the fact that sterling, as a result of this news flow, has actually declined. That is obviously a fillet for the export community and also should be slightly inflationary which is good for things like house prices the like. Just to focus on probably the negative aspects of Poen the ten shally a she-down, down the track, what it does allow, Del, is the UK can set its own agenda. For example, if it wants to attract big multi-nationals like Apple for example who are fed up with the problems they are facing in places like Ireland with transfer pricing, they may, indeed, be welcomed with open arms by Theresa May to the benefit of the UK economy.In terms of Australia, our fortunes are closely linked with that of China. The Chinese economy is doing well so that bodes well for us. What is your take on China at the moment?They talk about a housing bubble in Australia, particularly on the east co. You ain't seen nothing like the housing bubble in China, particularly in the tier 1 cities, Beijing, et cetera. Prices are up 30% during the last 12 months. So as a result there has been a recent mini-construction boom in the residential Housing Sector. This is one of the reasons as to why the big miners in Australia have recovered, so even though we seem a lot of doom and gloom and news flow about China, bear in mind that even though the markets wither closed at its lowest point for six years, you have a such
situation where domestic demand is such that it is picked up, it helped the materials demand, it helped the big miners in Australia. So in actual fact net, net, the Australian economy, bearing in mind the major transmission mechanism is through the material sector, the up a economy is far better placed in terms of its exposure to China than it was just six or even anyone months ago.That certainly is good news. Ben Pedley, thank you. Back to you, Virginia.Thank you so much. Where are we? There we are. Hi. Making a slight studio change here. Thank you very much, Del and Ben. A lot coming up.Indeed, I am not used to this job. I have been away for a few weeks. What are we doing? A fantastic photographer coming up. A bloke who has been snorkeling since the age of six and made his first dive at the age of 12. He went into marine biology as so many kids do. He decided he could make a better contribution to international wildlife conservation by going into photography. He is one of the world's greatest photographers he will be joining us, Thomas Peschak. He will be chatting to us about his beautiful work. He is here in the country talking about his National Geographic images.Looking forward to it. Will he wear a wetsuit?We hope so. It will make great TV.PK is with us for the sport.Good morning. Looking forward to the Socceroos tonight and the big game against Japanment Australia could take a big step towards qalify fog tr 2018 World Cup. The Aussies had a good start to their qalifying stage so far and a victory would mean consolidating that top two spot in the group which is all important. The Socceroos haven't beaten Japan since their last meeting in Melbourne seven years ago. Ange Postecoglou flagged there might be tweaking to the team that played Saudi Arabia last week.You know, I think we will probably make a couple of changes, but I think we were always going to, regardless of the travel aspect. We have got a really - I think we have got a strong squad and, from my perspective, you know, every time I have got a two-game win, though, it is about trying to maximise the talent we have got in the squad.The surface was too plait for competition in France last night so Tyler Wright has to wait another day to claim that World Championship. Wrights Bay and her own rival, Courtney Conlogue from the United States, are in the semifinal of the penultimate event of the year. If the Aussie wins that tournament she will be crowned world champ for the very first time and Conlogue of course, has to win the event and then go on and outperform Wrights Bay in Hawaii to claim the world title. Caitlyn Basset's perfect shooting battle in the constellation Cup test was a big worry for New Zealand ahead of the second test in Launceston that will be held tomorrow. She lifted her accuracy to 93%, 3% above the last four years on average. She asked if she was annoyed being substituted because she was taken off with her personal record in sight. She would have gone past her personal record in the test. She laughed and said she will do whatever is best for the team. The inquest into the death of cricketer Philip Hughes has heard it was inevitable, an injury received from that short-pitched delivery during a match at the SCG would be fatal. Hughes died after being struck in the neck by a ball at the Sheffield Shield. Yesterday's evidence at the cent yell hearing looked at evidence of a sledging threat made against Hughes. The number of short balls bowled the helmet standards as well. As we know, since that day, that awful day, there have been some changes to those types of things. The medical care on hand and also the changes to the helmets, but that coronial hearing is to find out what else can be done and how can this be avoided in the future. I think the examination of the slening, Doug Bollinger said -- sledging, Doug Bollinger said that he didn't threaten Philip Hughes and made a threat he was going to bounce him. He said later he may have but he didn't remember. He said it is unfoot Mate they have to discuss these things, but that is what they have to do. As awful as it was for Doug to be questioned on that and their tactics of short-pitch bowling must be examined. Is there something that could be a problem there. Brad Haddin said there was no pre-plan to bounce out Philip Hughes. I wanted to mention, this is the story in Sports Illustrated this morning. The athletes are fighting back because Donald Trump has impugned all athletes by saying that he was with - Billy Bush was talking about locker room banter. That what happens in locker rooms. Some of the leading athletes in the US are saying, "Nope, we don't talk about sexual assault in the locker rooms" and so the athletes are fighting back on that one. One final story before I go. The AFL is going to make an announcement today that the national bank will sponsor the new Women's National League. There will be a big song and dance about the bank getting behind that league. Now, it has been said in year as again by that the money isn't in women's sport because not enough people watch, not enough sponsors jumped on board and the rest of it. Keeping that in context, I hope that a big chunk of the money, if not all of it, from this new sponsorship deal goes to the players because they are the ones who will be competing? That league.And the grass roots efforts to try to ensure the long-term sustainability of a foam football code.And accountability in showing us whether it would be nice for people to keep an eye on those things. Certainly, if you are winning sponsors, then it is time to Jack the pay up particularly before the ball is bounced.Particularly if the ball is coming off a low base. There is no comparison between the leagues. They will have to work really hard to get the pays up.Low pay is the starting thing, but...What a starting point, though.You are getting a big sponsor onboard. Where is the money going?Show me the money, that is it! You do it better.(LAUGHS) Alrighty. Thanks, so much, PK. We have been reporting that the NSW government is preparing to reverse its ban on Graham. State political reporter in NSW England began began joined us earlier from Sydney.Last week there was threat from the Nationals here in NSW they were going to dump their leader try Grant if he didn't back the Nationals. Then it was leaked this announcement was going to happen and we have been able to confirm it is happening in Cabinet as we speak, Virginia. This is because of a huge resolt in the bush to this ban that people have been deeply unhappy with the process of it and how it will affect thousands of innocent people in the industry. But in regards to that Cabinet meeting, Virginia, I've just had some information. This morning, the deputy premier Try Grant met with the RSPCA and the greyhound industry to go through to get an agreement and we know that things in the agreement - they will be capping breeding in NSW to 2,000. They will be reducing the number of tracks. There are 34 tracks around NSW. That could possibly be halved. That will reduce the number of race events. There will be a $1,500 bond for every dog that is bred. Now, the government is going to put in tougher penalties. There will be more funding for RSPCA and other groups to increase the funding for rehoming capabilities of dogs in NSW. There will be no new tax dollars given to the industry for track upgrades, but the industry will fund this through the sale of sol tracks. There will be an oversight body, tasked over the next few months to draw up this new structure, so quite a few more details that are coming out there from Cabinet.Bridget, it begs the question of why then wasn't that the policy decision made by the Premier in the first place?And Virginia, you are right. Even in the report that came out after the Special Commission of Inquiry, many of these recommendations were made by the industry and were suggested in that report, but the Premier took the stronger option of shutting down the industry and at the time, while there was praise from - he was applauded from animal welfare groups, the NSW opposition came out strongly later against this because they could see how devastating it was going to be. There is a feeling that while nobody supports or condones live baiting and animal cruelty, that was the minority in the industry and there has been a strong feeling in NSW that you simply cannot just turn off the likelihoods and shut down the livelihoods of people in the industry and that it is a very, as one member said to me, ill Liberal thing to do.Brigid Glanville previewing a momentous backflip by the Premier Mike Baird many NSW later today. We can hear now from the opposition leader Bill Shorten who has been given a speech on the State of the Nation conference at Parliament House this morning. Welcome back to Parliament. It is great that you could have me back for breakfast. Ceda has a long and proud tradition of taking the long-term view of bringing intellectual rigour to some of the big questions and at this conference you are turning your focus to the future of our most rapidly changing economy. We live in a time, in a moment, where I believe that many of our fellow Australians feel forgotten by change and unrepresented in decision making. Many look upon the chambers on either side of this hall. Less of an arena where we compete for the interests of people and more perhaps as a hot-house where nothing grows. Now, this is by no means uniquely an Australian phenomenon. Last month in September I visited Canada and the United States and I met with leaders of the centre-left parties from Europe and North America. The two topics dominated the form mall presentations the informal discussions on the margins of the conference. The first was how do we make change work in the interests of middle and working class people? It was a little bit of Anni opener for me talking to the Prime Minister of Sweden or the Vice Chancellor of Germany or leaders in France or Canada or the United States and whilst we may care to believe that our debates in the an tip days in the south may be different to those in the north, there is more similarity in our political debates than perhaps we would first assume. And this question of how we best represent the interests of a squeezed middle class, of a middle class feeling under pressure, and of a working-class not quite sure how they can better themselves and their children's lives. This is, indeed, a big topic in first world nations. But, there was a second major issue, too, which was discussed - perhaps more inform yes. It was the prospect of president Donald Trump. This is a campaign which perhaps started as a de facto reality TV show, has grown into a circus and is now gone beyond farce. Thankfully, with every passing day, every ridiculous and disgusting remark that is uncovered, the possibility of a Trump administration fails. By his own words and his own actions, he's confirmed the worst fears of millions in the United States and beyond its borders that he is entirely unsuit ail to be the leader of the free world. What happens in the United States is ultimately a matter for Americans, but what happens in the US ultimately affects many of us. Trump, like some of the more extreme people in Europe, like extremists from every point on the political cop pass left and right, draw power from people who have felt the rough edges of globalisation and economic change. Workers who have been outsourced, down-sized, rationalised. Families feeling the pinch of flat wages. Widening inequality, fallinglying standards. Marginalised and alienated groups. Being told that migrants, minorities or big government are all to blame. That is the low road of change. Lashing out - the myth of a strong man or a strong woman with simple solutions. We see the scapegoating. But we need to take, in fact, the other path, the high road.Bill Shorten there. He's addressing a Ceda conference there that is taking police in Parliament House in Canberra and addressing the topic dejur which of course is Donald Trump. We will take you to a feature conversation this morning with Thomas Peschak. He was snorkeling at the age of six. By the age of 12 he was already a proficient diver and started to take his first underwater photographs. Now he is considered among the best photographers in the world taking images, such as these, and travelling the world, documenting the oceans. Thomas who is in Australia to talk about his work joins us now from Sydney. Thomas Peschak, good morning. Welcome to Newsbreak fast.Good morning. I apologise for the lack of the wetsuit.I know, we were looking forward to seeing a frog man.Had I known, I would have put on a wetsuit for you guys, no bloob so ever.I am sure your preferred costume would be a wetsuit.I am much happier in a wetsuit than I am in this thing.You anticipated my first question. You are clearly a water person, happier in the deep.I am. Much more comfortable and more inspired than on land.What is interesting is you started life in marine biology and I know a lot of young people do that because of course why wouldn't they? They are inspired by the gorgeous blue deep and wonderful creatures. It is not always a fulfilling career because you end up dealing with statistics more than anything else. Is that what got too dull for you? That is a great question. I think I switched from marine biology to photography because I wanted to reach a larger audience. The circumferences and the statistics, I loved the science but it was minute and with the National Geographic we reach tens of thousands of people every month. I wanted conservation to reach a larger and broader audience. Instead of using statistics, I started to use photography as my visual voice and as a way to tell these ocean stories.How old were you when you started photography and did you have any proficiency in that to begin with?I think I was 12 and I was horrendous. Things out of focus, overexposed. The only way to get a great picture is to shoot a lot of really bad ones to start off with. No, no, not a natural talent at all at age 12. That I can guarantee you. What is the digital field, given you haven't had before with older photography?I switched to digital probably in 2008, 2009 and real will listically I can remain in the water for hours and hours on end without ever having to switch film. The days of switching film under a little towel on a bet, now I can be out on the ocean at eight or nine hours at a time sometimes. So time is a fantastic luxury that the digital roll has opened up for me in recent years.That kind of work out in the open, in the water and, of course, down dope as well, does it take a toll on your body?Not I'llFeel much, much more relaxed in the ocean than I do on land. So being in the ocean, for me, is like meditating. So, no.You inhale deeply and you breath deeply. I love being out there. It invigorates and inspires me. No is the short answer to that. (LAUGHS) Can anyone do the kind of work that you do at the moment and not be someone who is committed to conservation and cognisant of the effect of global climate change?I think the great thing these days is the publishing has disappeared. You can be a great conservation photographer with only your iPhone in the backyard. You can each your own audience so easily these days. So, no, you don't have to be a National Geographic photographer to make a difference from a conservation perspective. You can reach millions on Instagram and Twitter and Facebook and those wonderful outlets. No, not at all. The playing field has been levelled fantastically.But I guess I mean more whether if you are go into this field of this sort of photography, just by dent of the work that you do, do you logically have to be committed to conservation and to be aware of the effect of climate change because of this work? It would be, I would imagine, impossible to ill nowhere?I think so. You know, I see the changes every single day over fishing, impacts of climate change, marine pollution. It is hard to take these images without really being confronted with this. Absolutely you are aware of it every single day and that is why I try to use my visual voice to hopefully really ram home that message that the oceans are - there is a deep issuewith the ocean and the imagery will inspire people to really look after it and take care of it in a ditch way.Thomas, grab a glass of water if you have one.Sorry about. That Yes, of course. You are a water creature. You have been too long out of water. Out of the ocean, exactly. (LAUGHS) Quickly and finally, you are doing a speaking tour in this country. What is the message you want to convey at the same times a showing us some of your stunning images?At the Sydney Opera House on Thursday I want to take the audience on this amazing adventure. Some of the most amazing underwater realms in the world. The remote atolls and the Mozambique and Dhakota oceans in Mexico and mow Zac beak and places like that. The oceans are crucial to survival. They are worth protecting and saving.It will be a wonderful message to hear. It has been terrific having you on Peschak, thank
the program this morning. Thomas Peschak, thank you very much for joins us. All the best to you.That is wonderful. Thank you. Appreciate that.To many of his colleagues in the NSW Police Force he was a dedicated police officer but Roger Rogerson, as you know, was a criminal mastermind.I just went back through some really sad parts of mutual past and I realised what a vicious, evil bugger he was. The charm dropped very, very quickly. Roger always wants to be in control. Roger always wanted to be portrayed as that affable rogue, I suppose, when he started to reinvent hymns after he got out of the clink in 2006. My version of the events wasn't the one he was very happy with. It caused a bit of pause for a couple of days, you were looking over your shoulder, but Roger perfected one thing and that was the art of the threat. You felt apprehensive when you got a call from him.The book focuses on the 2013 murder of Jamie guy by Roger Rogerson and McNamara. It is a great read, by the way.Thank you.What, in your view, brought down Roger Rogerson?Greed and ego more than anything else. He went out for one last hurrah which was Jamie guy. Potentially a lucrative drug deal for both sides but they decided it was appropriate to take the drugs from Jimmy guy and kill him. He turned up at a storage shed with $3 million worth of ice, which would be quit profitable if taken under the open market and instead of turning up with the cash, the old boys turned up with a gun and that was the end of poor old Jamie guy.You say that Roger Rogerson was very much an old school detective. He didn't care about these things called CCTV cameras, Duncan?No, Rogers had a bit of history with that. The first time he went into jail he was caught on CCTV to open a bank account to deposit a large amount of money that he couldn't explain. The second time he was caught lying to a Commission of Inquiry. In the last incident they knew about the CCTV but they hadn't done their research shorely and they missed a really important camera and after that camera picked up, they rendezvoused with Jamie guy, the entire case unfolded in vision for us all. It is probably the most widely recorded and most detailed recording of any crime in Australia's history.It made the prosecution much easier. As we all know Glen McNamara and Roger Rogerson sentenced to life in jail. On your knowledge of Roger, do you expect him to ever repent for his many crimes?Roger in court portrayed himself as a victim of these circumstances. I don't think there is one sign of Roger repenting for any of this. He still thinks he is in the right.Former detective Duncan McNab there. US intelligent officials have cud Russia of attempting to influence the outcome of the upcoming presidential election through launching a series of cyber attacks.Anxiety around Russia's hacking capabilities has increased after a French television station was taken off air last year allegedly by Russian hackers.This weekend, the US made an extraordinary claim - that Russian hackers were trying to influence the race for the White House. American spies say that only senior Russian officials could have authorised the hacking of computers at the Democratic Party headquarters down the road in Washington. The result was an embarrassing leak of emails and resignation of the party's chair woman. President Obama voted early using an electronic voting machine and there is evidence that hackers perhaps Russian, have tried to get inside these type of systems.The only reason I can see why you would want to do that is to sew -- sow doubt about the outcome of the election. If you are in a district where you have to rely on the voting machines and you know the voting machine, the database, has been penetrated, can you really trust the result?It is not just America that has been worried. Here in Britain, during the general election campaign last year, there were fears that broadcasters, including the BBC, could be targeted by Russian hackers. That fear was because a French TV network last April was taken off air in a sophisticated cyber attack. The director general of this TV station showed me around the Paris control room which runs 12 global channels. Last year, all the screens went dark, as a computer virus started destroying the systems.All of a sudden, everything went dark and then the people in charge of digital said, "Also we are not down, but we have threatening messages on Facebook, on our exit exit accounts and on our website." The messages claimed to be from so-called Islamic State, but intelligence officials now believe it was Russia testing its cyber weapons. Russia appears willing to take more risks using its hackers. The question for Washington and others is how to respond. The BBC with that report. Now, last summer the zbraif saw the hottest sea temperatures and -- Great Barrier Reef saw the hottest sea temperatures and worst coral bleaching ever on record.The fight with the Great Barrier Reef is certainly heating up, too.Mushroom corals, a large solitary type that don't build reefs, expel with repeated convulsions, known as pulsed inflation.It is much more violent than we expected. Some of the largest expansions we have seen have 340% the size of the actual original tissue.As clouds of algae are pumped into the water, the coral loses its colour and becomes pale. Corals are known to do this to get rid of sand, but tow get rid of algae in this way has not been seen before.This is the first way we have been able to document pulsed inflation to removal gay from the tissue.That is the reaction of just one coral in a lab. This is what happens on the scale of a reef. Early in 2016, high sea temperatures over many weeks caused mass bleaching? Parts of the Great Barrier Reef. The music is great, isn't it?(LAUGHS) Yes.You can watch Catalyst tonight on ABC TV and iView. A lot of your comments coming in on Talitha Cummins very brave confession on Australian Story last night about her alcoholism. The program was heavily watched. Talitha is a prominent Channel 7 news reader and reporter. She drank up to four bottles of wine a night and got up every morning afterwards and either exercised and went to work as though nothing happened.As someone who didn't watch the program. Is it nightly drinking or weekend drinking?Nightly.During her weekend shifts as well. At least knocking off a bottle or two. Getting up hungover, but just whacking - going for the run, whacking on the face paint and off we go.I couldn't do it. Die yn says, "Thank you for your heart-felt mess -- thank you for your heart-felt messages including this one from Diane. "I loved my functioning alcoholic husband. He never missed work and was a good provider. He drank until he passed out every time we socialised most weekends." Diane goes onto say, "When I started a new relationship. I enjoyed simple things like someone who could drive us home at the end of a social occasion. My former husband never acknowledged he never had a problem and was treated like one of the boys. How sad that a lovely family was destroyed." Probably more common than we acknowledge. A lot of letters coming in and shared experiences and many get to that point. It is a brave point where they can look at themselves and say "I have got a problem" and extend their hand and ask for help.It is a very big step. PK is back with the sport again this morning.A big match tonight against Japan in Melbourne for the Socceroos. They beaten Japan for seven years. Shaking hands with the players on the way out of the plane. We will have to see what Ange Postecoglou does. He has to manage this team that played in very, very hot conditions against Saudi Arabia last week. So he will have a plan, he will be tweaking this line-up and it is well considered that the substitutes will play a big role in tonight's match. Of course, Australia is looking to get that top two spot nailed down in the group before they press on with the rest of qualification to try to get to Russia 2018. The surf was plait last night in France. So Tyler Wright has to wait at least another day to claim that World Championship which seems within grasping distance. She's in the semifinals, but so is Courtney Conlogue from America and those two are the only ones who can win the world title. The young Aussie Tyler Wright is in the box seat. She is ahead on points overall and if she wins the competition, ie wins the semifinal and then the final, she will be world champ. Maybe it will happen tonight. I'll keep an eye on the conditions in France. As if we don't keep an eye on the surf in France most days.We always do.There is football trading.Can't we stop talking about football? (LAUGHS) Yes, we can.I haven't had a chance formally on the record on TV to say well done you and those Doggies. I know you are probably all sick of it. Watching from afar, man!Did Noosa go ballistic?Bonkers. We arrived back in Melbourne just in time. It was fabulous. Such a great effort. Nicely done.Who won the Sunshine Coast competition this year. I will have to do some research.I don't know.The Noosa Tigers won a lot of championships. I wish I had played for them. I lived on the Sunshine Coast.How long for? Working for Channel Ten in a bureau. I lived there for 18 months. Perfect.A beautiful place.Del, you having a go at the weather?So much pressure.It having a go at the weather?So much
pressure.It is cold out there today.Sydney sunny and 21 with a chance of a shower along the coastal fringe. Canberra. Mostly sunny and 14 degrees. In Melbourne, mostly cloudy with a high chance of showers across the morning and afternoon. Aiming for 15 degrees. Hobart partly cloudy.Go the other way.Adelaide cloudy with a chance of showers. What about Darwin?Darwin partly quloud yes.Yeah! You did it!Mt Isa.

This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Today, the same-sex marriage plebiscite looks doomed to fail with the Opposition today expected to finally reject the Government's legislation.A huge wasteful exercise for something that really should be determined by the Parliament.

Also today, NSW Government's new proposals for greyhound racing revealed. The ban set to be abandoned. The first public hearings of the NT youth detention royal commission to begin this morning in Darwin. The Socceroos prepare to take on Japan in tonight's World Cup qualifier in Melbourne.

Hello and welcome to Mornings, I'm Joe O'Brien. Taking a quick look at the weather first in the capital cities:

The Federal Opposition is today expected to finally reject the Government's legislation for a plebiscite on same-sex marriage. The Labor Caucus will meet in Canberra this morning to formalise that position which will deliver a lethal blow to the Coalition's bill. Attorney-General George Brandis says he has been prepared to listen to Labor's proposals but they haven't provided alternatives. For more, let's cross to political reporter Jane Norman in Canberra. Good morning. Labor MPs are about to enter that Caucus meeting. Everything is pointing to a rejection of the Government's proposed plebiscite.It looks like the Caucus meeting is just a formality. Labor has all but confirmed it will be rejecting this plebiscite legislation meaning the plebiscite will not be going ahead. Labor argues it is a waste of taxpayers' money, this is an issue