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Good morning and welcome back to Weekend Breakfast. I'm Miriam Corowa.I'm Ben Worseley. Making news - thousands without power in WA's south-west after a severe storm sweeps through the region.

Also ahead, towns under threat as SA's flood emergency continues with fears of more rain on the way. Air strikes on the Syrian city of Aleppo hit the area's largest hospital for the second time in days.The celebrations continue for the Western Bulldogs after their historic grand final victory over the Sydney Swans. Hello. Thanks for joining us. It is Sunday, 2 October. Also coming up on Weekend Breakfast - this week's power outages across SA sparked a political storm with some hastily linking outages to the State's use of renewable energy. South Australian Senator Nick Zenophon was among those calling for an independent inquiry into the black-out, questioning whether the energy combination in SA makes the State's power system more vulnerable. Later this hour, Senator Xenophon will join us here on Weekend Breakfast.We saw yesterday on the show just how passionate people get about this debate.Yes, and I guess we are still questioning exactly what was going on there. We have some saying that because we didn't have enough redundancy in the system that that was a feature of it but then of course you can't deny the fact that towers were essentially knocked over so still a lot of questions and concerns about how we get power delivered.And politicians don't like to let a crisis go to waste so I think this is a good example of that. Let's check the weather in the capitals:

Xenophon To our top stories - SA bracing for more wet weather as floodwaters north of Adelaide finally begin to recede. Flooding an the Gawler river remains the most pressing concern with damage to a number of market gardens and semi rural properties. More than 60mm of rain is expected today and tomorrow in the saturated river catchments of the Mount Lofty ranges. South Australian Premier Jay Weatherill says with only one powerline supporting the entire north and west region, there's the possibility of further outages.In WA's south-west, more than 28,000 people are still without electricity after a severe storm there cut power supplies on Saturday. The most affected towns in the region are Bunbury, Wallpole and Denmark. The outages came as strong winds peaked over 110 km/h and brought down powerlines.Thousands of State Emergency Service volunteers in Victoria are an standbuby ahead of severe -- stand-by ahead of severe weather. They've urged people to sprepair properties by securing loose outdoor items with strong winds forecast. The wild weather has passed over Tasmania but the Weather Bureau says there are still many flood warnings in place.NSW is boosting the number of drum lines being dropped off the State's beaches in response to the latest shark attack last week on the north coast. Primary Industries Minister Niall Blair says a further 85 smart drum lines will be deployed, taking the total number to 100. So far, 31 white and 5 bull sharks have been caught by 15 smart drum lines being trialed with the animals being tagged and relocated. Mr Blair says the latest ral roll-out will lead to the creation of new jobs.Police have praised party-goers at the Listen Out festival in Sydney's centennial park even though 116 people were charged with drug possession. 13 people were also charged with supplying drugs. Another three were taken to hospital with suspected drug-related issues. The arrests were part of a high-visibility police operation for the event which wastonied by around 25,000 people.Adelaide police are still trying to piece together the motivation for the murder of a woman during a violent attack yesterday. The 57-year-old was killed and her daughter-in-law bound and gagged in the attack at a home in Valley View in the city's north-east. Police believe the murdered woman was followed home and say the attack does not appear to have been motivated by any kind of criminal activity on the part of the victims. Overseas now in Syria, fighting is intensifying around the rebel-held areas of Aleppo. There are reports the largest hospital in the east of Aleppo has been hit by at least two barrel bombs. It's the second time in four days the facility has been targeted. In the past week, it's thought around 400 people have been killed in Aleppo, including more than 100 children. They've also - there have also been reports of Russian-backed Syrian Government forces pounding Aleppo's historic Old City.Hungarians will vote in a referendum on European Union refugee quotas later today. Polls are showing broad support for Prime Minister victor ol Ban's call to reject mandatory resettlement. He has been at the forefront of opposition in the EU to the position taken by Germany's chancellor who says Europe has an obligation to take in refugees. He's sealed the border with a razor hadwire fence and 8,000 security forces.We do not agree with the quota, of course, because it would let people, you know, coming into the country without any control, and although we would like to try to help the refugees, but still, you know, not like this, so I mean, it has to be some kind of a control to let the people in so the referendum is really important otherwise it is going to change the culture of the nation.In Poland, thousands of people have rallied to protest against a proposed complete ban on abortion including for victims of rape. Speakers at the protest in front of the parliament buildings in Warsaw said such a ban would be barbaric. They said the goal of fewer abortions could boo achieved by better sex education and easier access to birth control. Poland already has one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the European Union. The council of Europe has described the proposals as serious back-sliding on women's rights.Pakistan and India have exchanged fresh fire along the de facto border that divides the disputed region of Kashmir. Both sides say their actions were retaliatory. The Pakistan military said Indian troops fired using small arms and mortar shells. An Indian news agency has reported some villages on the Indian side had faced heavy pab Paki firing. Nationalist rhetoric in both countries has risen after India climbed its army conducted surgical strikes against terrorist launch pads on the Pakistani side.One of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes in recent history has weakened a little as it drenched coastal Colombia and roared across the Caribbean. The US national hurricane centre says Matthew reached its top Commonwealth Government 5 yesterday but it is now back --its top Category 5 yesterday but it is now a Category 4 storm, packing winds of 250 km/h. The storm is expected to make landfall tonight.To sport with Georgie Tunney and the fairytale is complete for the Western Bulldogs?It certainly is. A fantastic performance yesterday against the Sydney Swans T. Could be a double fairytale weekend with Cronulla against Melbourne later tonight in the NRL decider. Staying with AFL, Western Bulldogs coach Luke Beveridge believes their first premiership in 62 years is just the starting point for his young side, sending an ominous warning to the rest of the competition to expect more success for the sons of the West. Down at the main break, the Doggies outbooted Sydney 6 goals to 3 in the second half to break one of the AFL's longest premiership droughts and complete the most unlikely finals run of all time. Jason Johannisson won the Norm Smith Medal with 33 possessions as the Western Bulldogs, this year's AFL champions, achieved what no other team has done in history, seventh spot to 2016 Premiers.To the hundreds othousands of other Bulldogs faithful who've stuck with us through years and years of never seeing that day come, this is a dream come true. This is one of those big days in life and one that most of us will never forget. One of the happiest days in life for all Bulldogs fans so what does it feel like? It feelst bloody fantastic. One team hopetling is a fairytale rounds of football in general is Cronulla who this evening take on Melbourne for their chance to win their maiden NRL premiership. If history was again made t would complete a remarkable comeback from null. Just two years ago the team finished last and captain Paul Gallen and nine other players accepted back-dated doping bans. Since then, the club has undergone a huge transformation that could reach its climax at the Olympic stadium tonight. And the Wallabies drought in Pretoria continues. Boks veteran Morne Stayne booted all 18 of South Africa's points and Australia remain winless against the Springboks in their seven attempts at Loftus Versfeld. The 8-point loss snapping their 3-match winning streak in the rugby championship. One drought ends in the AFL, another continues for the Wallabies there in South Africa. Not the most entertaining game, it must be said. South Africa won 18-10, however, all of those points did come off one man's boot in terms of drop goals or penalty goals as well. So it's always interesting when it's a game where the team that scores a try doesn't end up winning. Yeah, OK. We didn't fair too well against South Africa in the cricket as well. We've got work to do there. It might be catching. That's a bit worrying.Thank you, Georgie. Thank you for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come, a hospital in Aleppo's rebel-held east is bombed for a second time in a week as fighting in Syria intensifies. Also ahead, Senator and NXT party leader, Nick Xenophon joins us in the studio to discuss the week in politics.Later, hip hop in India. Our south Asia correspondent means Divine, the Mumbai rapper trying to turn Bollywood ballad fans to lyrics about life in the slums.In Syria, the largest hospital in the rebel-held east of Aleppo has been hit by at least two barrel bombs. It's the second time in four days the facility has been targeted.In the past week, it's thought around 400 people have been killed in Aleppo including more than 100 children.TRANSLATION: Once again, Russia and the Syrian regime are targeting the field hospitals in the city of Aleppo. This is a field hospital in the east of the city. It was targeted early this morning by seven aerial raids. These are the spots where the rockets and barrels landed. Severe damage, as you can see. One of the rockets just landed in front of the main entrance of the hospital near inemergency entrance. The hospital has suffered severe damage.TRANSLATION: This area has been the target of seven Russian aerial raids. The hospital is no longer operating. We have people killed because of the raids, including two people who were admitted earlier to the hospital. The Ambulance Services have stopped, despite the siege, the world has given the regime a green light to kill the Syrians and the regime now concentrating on Aleppo.As you can see, the bodies of the dead people are still here. They were killed as a result of these raids. They were patients here, just before the strike. The hospital is no longer operational and most of the wounded people have been e vacuated to other-s but the question on people's minds here: Are other hospitals a safe place for these people? Returning home and the Tasmanian Government is pushing ahead with changes to the anti-discrimination act despite the unlikelihood of a plebiscite on same-sex marriage. The Greens say the Government should scuttle the bill.The Government says changes to the act are not solely about giving exemptions to religious groups but also about streamlining the complaints process for business.Proposed changes to the anti-discrimination act conjured impassioned debate in State Parliament last month.A shameful piece of legislation.They will unleash the hounds of hell.The State Government wants to exempt religious groups from some provisions of the act. It argued there needed to be more freedom of speech leading up to a national plebiscite on same-sex marriage.Now that that plebiscite looks set to fall over, it's really important that this Government removes this bill. It was a bad idea.No, we won't. We're proceeding as planned. Tasmania's lower house will resume debate on the bill later this month. This is not just about the plebiscite. This is about religious groups in particular being able to express their views on issues such as same-sex marriage, it's also about streamlining processes.The Attorney-General says there are particular concerns about the impact of the anti-discrimination compliance process on business.It's cost them time, effort and money in the meantime. I have even heard of one business proprietor who walked away from their business because of their experience with this.Both the Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the small business council say they're not aware of examples of owners getting caught up in the complaints process but many small businesses are said to be nervous about the current laws.Because of the myths and the uncertainties and the lack of knowledge about anti-discrimination, I fear that many, many small business people choose to not employ somebody with a disability just in case they got caught up in the system.The Hodgman Government will use its numbers to pass the amendments in the lower house. The trouble will be in the upper house with MPs there indicating they'll put off the debate until next year. South Australian Senator Nick Xenophon was among those calling for an independent inquiry into this week's black out in SA. He's questioned whether the State's focus on renewable energy has made the power system more vulnerable. Senator Nick Xenophon joins us this morning. Thank you.It's early, it is daylight saving, missed an hour.It is. Well done for joining us.Is this a genuine debate about facts or simply politicians exploiting an issue to further their own interests and arguments?It is a genuine debate about facts for this reason - I want to make this clear because I've had a lot of hate mail this week after I made the comments. I support the Renewable Energy Target, I support what Australia wants to do at the Paris agreement. We need to be at zero carbon emissions by 2050, if not earlier, but we need to look at the issue of energy security and if we don't plan properly, get the science and physics right, that's going to cause problems. There are legitimate questions to ask as to whether we've planned this properly in terms of network security to ensure reliability of supply. I don't think these are unreasonable questions to ask.The transmission network was taken down, the powerlines came down, the towers came down so how does it make any difference how the power is created if the network that distributes it is down?OK so firstly, in terms of the transmission towerses, there's interesting questions there as to whether they were robust enough, whether they were maintained sufficiently because if you saw the footings, it concrete footings of those trans mission towers, someone told me the Mafia uses more concrete in their boots than they do with the transmission towers.That's nothing to do with renewable sphzNo, it is a separate issue. The difference between gas fired generators and wind power is one is synchronous power and one is asynchronous and how how they blend together can be problematic as to how quickly you get up and running. The question to ask is would the black-out have been as widespread, a cascading State-wide black-out, if there was, in terms of that, if we had more thermal generators in the mix at that time?Speaking of experts, and you get the feeling in the Australian debates, political debates about the environment, that experts are often ignored. The deputy director of the research school of physics and engineering at ANU, "There is almost unanimity of views among experts in the electricity sector that this black-out had nothing to do with the high level of renewable energy."Erous "the problem would have been exactly the same if SA used coal or nuclear power to provide all its electricity," the list goes on. They're being ignored. I'm not ig ignoring them. I have other experts who have worked in the power systems, have worked with transmission, have had senior executive roles around the country who haven't gone public yet and I think they feel constrained because perhaps of confidentiality agreements they've signed in the past who say there are real issues here. I think we need to learn from this because we need to have strong renewable target but how do you avoid the physics of that? If there is an issue between the two, we need to address that and the other issue is are I don't think as a nation we've looked at security of supply sufficiently and whether the technical rules maximise that security of supply.In that instance, should be looking more broadly across the whole of the country not just specifically about the situation that's happened in SA? Sure, although the situation in SA is that it's been unprecedented. The last time there was a State-wide power black-out was when the Beatles came to town in Sydney. I'm sure the Beatles had nothing to do with the power black-out, there weren't too many renewables around in 1964 but we need to learn from these lessons. What is the great line from the former New Zealand Mike Moore who criticised by saying, "Your problem is you quoted what I said not what I meant." Maybe I should be clearer on what I meant.Another issue concerning SA is proposal to build two new oil wells off the coast, the Great Australian Bight. We've seen reports suggesting safety measures there involving the use of State caps, which would have to be brought from Singapores in the mix with this proposal. That may have taken up to 5 weeks. Should we be considering infrastructure like oil wells where we don't have-Can I just say, after the hate mail from those who support renewables, which I spore, I'm going to get hate mail from the oil lobby because I have cosponsored a Senate inquiry with the Greens into drilling in the Great Australian Bight in the previous parliament and this parliament. There are real issues here. If something goes catastrophically wrong, the modelling shows we could have an oil spill going up 4,000km of coastline, all the way to Victoria and beyond, so you've got to analyse the risk. Even if the risk is low but consequences are catastrophic we've got to be cautious and I'm not satisfied there are sufficient safeguards.Pokies. You-Thank goodness we're talking about something that I feel comfortable about.I see you face muscles relax. You, Andrew Wilkie and Larissa Waters early this week launched Poky Leaks, a call out to whistle blowers to give you confidential information about the poky industry that you would release in parliament under parliamentary privilege. What sort of response - I know it's early days but what sort of response have you received?In the lead-up to this I have been given a disc of the design of a USB drive of a design of a poky machine which experts will be looking at to see if it provides useful information. There's three types of leaks - those at the front line, those people that have lost money on poker machines where there's been aggressive behaviour by the venues, if they've been given alcohol to the point of intoxication, those sorts of things that lead to potential or regularory action against the hotel. The second type is what we saw with the ABC report yesterday on AM and other ABC outlets, was in relation to a person who worked in the casinos, at Star City casino, where there was very aggressive behaviour, where the allegation was that people in trouble were ignored and that the management - the allegation is that management's exultation to those employees is keep pushing them to keep playing. If that's true, it's something the regulator should look at. The third one is machine design. Are you concerned at connections between the industry, the poker machine, the gambling industry, and Government and members of parliament?When I was in the South Australian parliament I had two senior politicians, very senior politicians on both sides said to me they hate poker machines, don't like them, but there's no way they'd speak out against them because if that happens then their opponents at that election would get funded up to the eyeballs to run against them or they would have a very well-funded campaign against them. So it's not just the donations that pollies get, it's also the fear of the campaign that will be unleashed against them. That happened to you, didn't it, they targeted your seats specifically?There was this wall-to-wall campaign not on pokies or dpambling but a very misleading campaign on penalty rates which was fundamentally untrue. We'll find out in February how much money the hoteliers gave to the political parties but I reckon it was a lot. They were saturation ads.The AHA represents more than a quarter of a million employees in Australia, they've got ta-a right to be involved in the political process? Absolutely but it should be transparent and we need to to look at the issue of a safe product, whether it's a safe product or noty don't believe it is. This is a product that causes enormous damage to hundreds of thousands of people. Something like in the order of 120,000 people with severe gambling problem, most on pokies, another quart ora million-plus, well on the way to developing a gambling addiction. Each problem gambling addict affects seven others on average. It is a big issue potentially.Can I turn attention to the ongoing debate around education? We've seen reports out in the past week indicating we're seeing overspending - quite significant overspending in a number of schools and underspending in others and that a commitment even from the days of the Gillard Government to not seeing any school lose any funding has got us into quite a conundrum. Are you convinced that we have the will power to actually right the system and see fairer funding?It is going to be tough and it was interesting that Simon Birmingham, the Education Minister on qua qua, threw that out there. I'm sure he is a very clever man, Simon, to throw it out there. Some say he unleashed his inner Frances Underwood but I'm sure he's nothing like that. Just to get the debate out there, education funding should be based on a needs basis, those schools that need it most, those schools with disadvantaged students, to lift them up to a decent national standard, so if some schools are getting more - that aren't getting funded on the needs basis, I think we need to look at that. At this stage, the debate is binary one - should this school be cut or not - I think we need to be more nuanced about it.How are you getting on with new Senators? Interesting bunch.I thought you were going to say a wild bunch. Even if you fundamentally disagree with someone in the Senate, you need to work with them. I fundamentally dis agreed with many of the things Paulinance happen said in her first speech --Pauline Hanson said in her first speech but in so far as Australian jobs and Australian made, I'll work with her but won't hold back in expressing my concerns about what she said about race and migration and religion. I think she's wrong.And we can see that that's been countered by a lot of the other maiden speeches that were presented as well?That's right and it was - it's been quite a contrast. Nick Xenophon, thank you.Is that it?That's it.I got out of bed an hour early just for this!You're not blaming us for daylight saving. That's a bit unfair. Nearly 40 years on from the moment that captured the imagination of a nation, Ken Warby is at it again. He broke the world water speed record on a dam in the Snowy Mountains all those years ago. A mark that ha yet to be surpassed. Now he is helping his son attempt to supersede him in a new speed boat that the two are working on in the NSW city of Newcastle.It's a world record that's stood for almost 40 years. Ken Warby reached a speed of over 500 km/h on a dam in the NSW Snowy Mountains. It's a feat which saw him crowned the world waterspeed Snowy Mountains. It's a feat which
saw him crowned the world waterspeed record holder.It was quite amazing and in my wildest dreams I never thought I would hold the record this long and in fact it was an ease ea run, with the power that we had in the engine at that stage, it was pretty much a walk in the park and the boat behaved perfectly. It was a dream that I'd had since I was a teenager, of breaking the world waterspeed record, and to achieve it, that was the pinnacle of my life. It really, really was.10 and his son David are putting the finishing touches on a power boat they've spent the last three years building at a property in Newcastle. In the not-too-distant future we'll break the world waterspeed record with it but as I get older I appreciate watt he's done and it's amazing to have him next to me while we're building a boat to break his record.It is a highly dangerous pursuit but the father-and-son team is committed to making history.The watered she record was got an 85% death rate and for a long time I tried to talk him out of it. I said go play with jet cars or do something else but don't get into the waterspeed record but David's been building boats for a while and had circuit boats. I can understand what he wanted to do. I've been there, done that. We had a long talk about it and decided, OK, maybe it's time.If you just jump in a jet boat and go to break a world waterspeed record - and people have in the past - that's how you kill yourself. We'll have a test program. We've got good people who were in the original team where dad broke the world waterspeed record, we'll have a good test program and schedule in place. I'm not that phased by the issues. I know what I've built and I'm confident I will be able to drive it and get the job done.In the coming months, the pair will test their power boat with the hope of attempting the record later this year.There's no doubt I want David to break the record. The record should never live forever. I hoped early on that people would have broke my record but nobody did. But, no, look, I'll be there to support him in every way that I possibly can and if he gets it and when he gets it or whatever it turns out, I'll be a proud father, oh, yeah. it or whatever it turns out, I'll be
a proud father, oh, yeah.

Lets take a look at the satellite. A low-pressure trough is producing areas of rain over northern WA and Western Queensland with thundery showers over the Northern Territory. A trough is producing thunderstorms over SA. Unstable air flow following a front is generating gusty cold showers and storms over southern WA. Looking around the country:

The top stories from ABC News: Parts of Western Australia's south-west are without power after a severe storm swept through the region. Winds of over 110km/h brought down power lines, cutting electricity to over 28,000 customers. The most affected towns are Bunbury, Walpole and Denmark. Power has been restored to properties in Perth. Meanwhile, South Australia's flood emergency is continuing to unfold amid fears more rain could exacerbate the situation. Residents of Lewis tonne, Virginia and Port Wakefield continue to sandbag with several hopes already inundated. The State Emergency Service says flood levels have stabilised you but volunteers remain on the ground protecting homes. An air strike on the rebel-held eastern half of Aleppo in Syria hit the ARIA's largest hospital, for the second time in a matter of days. Doctors say so people were injured when the hospital was hit, with barrel bombs and a chlorine bomb. The Western Bulldogs are basking in the club's first premiership in 62 years, following their 22-point win over the Swans. It's only the second premiership ever in the club's history. Pakistani army commanders say there has been another exchange of fire with Indian troops across the unofficial border in Kashmir. The United Nations is calling for calm in the region disputed by both end an and Pakistan where renewed fighting is forcing thousands from their homes. Villagers near the line of control in Indian administered Kashmir feel frightened and vulnerable. TRANSLATION: We made trenches in the 'it 0s but they were destroyed. Unlike the army, whatever no trenches to protect our women and children. All around us there is devastation. If there is a war, it will be the ordinary people who suffer the most.Kashmir has been divided between India and Pakistan since 1947. These latest troubles threaten a cease-fire agreed 13 years ago. TRANSLATION: We don't want war because nothing goodwill come of it. People from that side of Kashmir and this side of Kashmir will die. That's why they should sit and talk. Only dialogue will resolve this issue.Tensions flared after India military commanders launched what they called surgical strikes on suspected fighters in Pakistan-administered Kashmir. Pakistan denies the operation even happened and accuses India of deliberately stoking tensions between the two countries.Having verified everything on ground, checked everything on ground, I am, once again, reporting this claim vehemently - there is no such thing like a surgical strike or physical violation.400 kilometre away from Kashmir is the city in Pakistan, one of two soldiers killed in cross-border fire on Thursday has been buried. The crowd of mourners chant, "Long live the Pakistani army." Feelings are running high on both sides. The UN says it is working on ways to stop the fighting.The Secretary-General urges the governments to exercise restraint and address the outstanding issues peacefully threw I do log.Political tensions between India and Pakistan are spilling over into popular culture. In a show of solidarity with their armed forces, some Indian film producers have banned Pakistani actors and singers from working in India. Others, though, disagree with that. TRANSLATION: These are artists. These are two different subjects. They were terrorists. These are artists. What do you think? Is an artist a terrorist? It's the Government who gives them work permits.In Pakistan, Bollywood films are being boycotted by most major cinemas. Time to look at what's in today's papers. We are joined by James Arvanitakis from Western Sydney University. Good morning to you. Wonderful to have you with us. Especially extra early today! Let's start, shall we, with millenials and how they are seeing the issues that are coming out of the US presidential contest. What Facebook is able to tell us?Yeah. Facebook has this algorithm that reflects the politics - the things that you like to read, right? So if you have, say, progressive politics or left-leaning politics, then you are going to get a feed that essentially gives you information about that. If you have conservative or right-ring politics you will get a feed that confirms everything you believe on that. This gives rise to the concept of confirmation bias - that is, confirm what's you believe, right. The specific article in the guardian - a great article during talks about how... If you are anti-Trump, then over the last, say, eight months, nine moss, you would have read about 30-40 times that Trump's election is dead. Hence he goes on. The bigger question is - how do we read news when everything we read is essentially reflecting our own views, and what are the consequences of that politically?It sounds like if you only are getting your news in these sorts of streams, you would be living in a bit of a bubble.Yeah. That's the thing. Look, Google does the same thing, the Al go Robbie Williams ex-- algorithm picks out what youer -- what you search for. It is interesting, because all our search engines, they contain... They keep what we search for in their memory. So, again, it feeds back... Usually what you like to read. It knows what you like to click on, knows what you spend time on, and essentially gives you more...Don't people do that anyway? Don't people seek out Fox News if they want that or the Guardian if they want that? Isn't that normal?We can go back to, I suppose, a generation ago, before the internet, where we... Before sosht of even we had access to cable news, you know, different newspapers catered for different sort of segments of the market. I suppose it's the extent of that confirmation that is raising concerns. You know, there was a survey done a while ago that looked at young people, say, between 18-25 and where were their most trusted source of information from was. One... I think 40% actually rated the internet as more trusted than their parents, teachers and their siblings. I suppose if we continuously are getting information that echos what we believe the chances of expanding or challenging those beliefs becomes limited. I suppose, it gives rise to a consent of having to sort of get... Especially at high school and even younger... Getting students to think about literacy, not in the terms of just reading and writing but actually being able to critique the information.Critical thinking. Let's have a look at someone who perhaps is wanting to have a little bit of a specific focus on the media, according to an article in today's Sydney Morning Herald. It's the Immigration Minister Peter Dutton, who is under scrutiny for his spend on public relations.Yeah. This is running across the Fairfax papers. $8 million per year looks like is what Mr Dutton is spending on media advice and so-called spin doctors, including people that monitor the 24-hour news cycle82 communications staff within his department.Wow!That sounds like a lot. He cough contacted me and I would have done it for half the price if he asked politely! (LAUGHTER) It is a complex portfolio. We know that. I suppose there is two questions arising - one is is this how we want our public money to be spent. Is answer - most of us would agree - is no. The other question that emerges - this is talked about by a lot of politicians and was discussed by Senator Conroy when he retired, is how do we manage the 24-hour news cycle when we expect our politicians to respond quickly to any development around the world. You know, maybe... I am not justifying this, but maybe this is a sort of a spin-off of that. We think about, well, someone needs to be there, someone needs to be ready to respond, especially around immigration portfolios.If they are monitoring 24-hour news they will be watching us thong so we would like to say hello to the Immigration Department.I wonder if they got to get an extra hour's sleep because of daylight savings!An article in the ka bra Times about the -- Canberra Times about the money the children of temporary residents have to pay in the public school system.This is a big issue for a lot of national students in the university sector. Specifically if we look at international students, $20 billion, our third biggest export industry is international students coming to Australia. It isn't a cheap... It isn't cheap. On top of that, there is the associated expenses, including healthcare and other expenses. When I spend time talking to potential international students around the world, they ask me the cost of rent. I say look at spending about $350. They say that's not bad for a month. I am saying, "No, no, that is for a week." That is living in Australia, especially in the capital cities, is expensive. This article in the Canberra Times raises the issue that on tonne of that, they have to pay school fees, quite large school fees to attend public hospitals, which means a lot of the temporary residents, including international students, are forced to leave their children back at home to be cared for by others, creating, I suppose, breaking-up or separating families, which is problematic for a whole bunch of issues that we - that are obvious, I think. If we do want to keep on expanding that education sector, then these are kind of the associated costs that the Government and the universities, I suppose, my sector, needs to think about, "What are the true costs, not just the cost of the fees but the other associated costs with living in a country like Australia?"Another sector looking at its bottom line is healthcare. This is an industry that is booming and has great potential. Yes. An interesting article in the - I think it was the Herald by Matt Wade. He talks about how one in eight new jobs is emerging from the healthcare sector. This is a... And the cost of the healthcare sector, how they are growing. This is, I suppose, a number of factors coming together. One we live longer and so we need more sort of medical attention. Two, the massive breakthroughs in health and the technologies that are associated with that. And so what is happening all of a sudden is... And then the people that actually manage that business is growing. So, this is a booming industry and it looks like it isn't going to... It isn't going to slow down any time soon.No. Specifically - especially with our ageing population, where our call on the medical sector is going to be growing.Quickly, the Sunday Tele, talk of plotting against or rumours of balloting against the NSW Premier Mike Baird and he is tealing colleagues, according to the article, he isn't going anywhere, not quitting.Yeah. I mean, not that long ago Mike Baird was untouchable. There's been a couple of issues that have really hurt him in the polls. One is the sort of the ongoing controversy around the impact of the late-night Sydney ban, the lockouts. The big one that is impacting The Nationals is the crack down on the greyhound industry and potentially - and shutting it down. So, the polls are reflecting this, and there seems to be plotting. The election is still, I think, what three years away. It is a long time to go in politics, as we know. It looks like he is under pressure. His position is, "I'm not going anywhere."OK. Watch this space. Always great to have you with us. Thank you very much.My pleasure.Communication can be a tricky business. Especially if you want to keep your information to a restricted audience. Now, with the advent of computer technology and the internet, the ability to share has increased exponentially. So it's no surprise that to keep us with this incredible mathematical minds have been devising ways to preserve the privacy of our most personal details. Dr Karl has been crunching the numbers on asymmetrical encryption.Something we use all the time, when you pay with with something on a credit card, on the internet, and you will notice that in your browser - you may not notice - a padlock pops up. Pretty well nobody can bust that.What is the padlock? What is that about in.That is telling us that it's encrypted. Let's go back in history about keeping secrets. Of course, everybody should love each other and there shouldn't be wars but people do want to keep secrets and have white lies. So, there have been people like jewel Yass see car -- Julius see car, 2000 years ago, who used cryptorgarphy. Insaid of saying Miriam can we meet for a coffee, you Miriam can we meet for a coffee, get the M and shift it up by one. . Right. When you get it, you think what is this? I will shift it back one letter, and then you have got your key, "We will have a boring coffee." There is another one, where a tree trunk, which may be bumpy. They would wrap a piece of animal gut or paper equivalent around it.

Then they would write a message across. Then they would unwind the bit of paper, and you could wind it around the wrong sort of road and you couldn't get anything. around the wrong sort of road and
you couldn't get anything. If you couldn't get anything. If you had the exact... The right shape and size. .There has been a desire to keep secrets. Most of the stuff is what they call sim metric. Then they went into in 1976, I remember reading this at the time, going this is blowing my mind. This is in the Martin Gardener game section. Asemi-metric.What is the difference.Once you know the key, sim metric, you can uncode it. In the case of asemi-metric, you can't uncode. Syme multiplication is not sim met trick, suppose I got a 400 digit number and I multiply it by another 400 digit number - they are both prime numbers - I get a huge number, 800 digits long. Now, it might take me a couple of hours or a day or something to go through it, or if I have a computer, a few seconds to go up to this 800-digit number, made by multiplying only two prime numbers together. It would take me a couple of hours. Going back it would take all the computers on earth longer than the age of the universe.OK. That is serious code! Yeah. Basically that is called computationally difficult. Brute force. You guess. You may guess obviously the answer is this. If you guess the right thing, you got the answer straight away. You have to keep on doing 4 million guesses a second for all of the seconds that exist from now to the beginning of the universe and mull ply that a couple of million times. You may be lucky but it is called computationally difficult. This started off become in 1976. Diffian Helman said we reckon it is possible but we don't know how to do it. This is mathematicians for you. Two years later other Meagher televisions -- mathematicians RSA, you will see that in Cripping to any, they did it. They introduced the first asemi-metric cryptography. This ties back to the padlock and what is called public private cryptography. If you want to send me an email, download something PGP, stands for pretty good good privacy. It can be bust good somebody spends a lot of time and money. Lit do for most things. Then you generate a private key and a public key. You are the only person in the entire world who has the private key and you use that private key to encode, "Hey, Karl, love to meet you for coffee." Then you send out via email to every person in the world the public key. And then they can deencrypt that with a public key. Everyone has access but they can't go back the other way. It is one-way trip. You are the only person who can encode it. If I have the same thing, I can have my own private key and I can say, "Yeah, love to meet you." I can send it. If I send it using your public key, you as the private key are the only person who can decode it. Everybody in the world has got that public key, and everybody can try and send you a message and they can send you a different message but nobody can deencode it, you are the only person we can.We all this at our fingertips.If you download PGP, you can send private messages say, "Get milk." "Yeah." Whenever you do a credit card transaction and you go to a website and the website has the beginning - instead of HTTP, it has HTTPS, for secure. There is that padlock. What's happened is the web browser at the mothership, Google, and your web browser have had a private conversation that you didn't even know about, they generated a public and private key and nobody can get in. So you can then give your credit card details and they go into the computer, and then out they go and nobody can decode it. Part of the world we live in now. I had no idea that the padlock involved that encryption.Our minest mathematical minds are keeping us safe.Even finer minds are trying to bust it as well! So is the continue use war! Sounds like that will have to be an incredible mathematical mind to do that. Thank you so much.Thank you very much.A hip-hop artist is setting his sights observe luring fans away from their love of bodiwood bad hads.Devine waxes lyrical about growing up in his home city of Mumbai. James Bennett reports.Meet Mumbai taxi driver Hussain Khan. The 40-year-old father of three mightn't be your stereo typical hip-hop fan. But rapper Devine's musings on Mumbai are speaking to him. Devine says his music is about his life.I was born in the proper supplement.After falling in love with hip-hop he began rhyming in English but realised it was the language of the streets and alleyways that would unit.You know, they can understand me, the driver can understand me or a stock market guy can understand me.He ignores traditional American rap theems of sex and fast cars, in favour of Mumbai's gritty realities. It means joy learn to swim in deep waters. That is why there is depth to my feelings.The story he is telling is about growing up on the streets. They are resonating. That is significant because for a generation of artists who aspire not to break into Bollywood, but away from it, it means that now there is an audience. Amid the hype, there is plenty of room to grow. Consulting firm KPMG estimates Bollywood music still accounts for 80% of Indian sales. Piracy remains a major issue too. The recording industry believes new markets are emerging, with fans growing in number and diversity. Time to talk sport with Georgie Tunny. The Footscray faithful must still be celebrating.I think you are right. But just to double-check, why don't we actually head now to Whitten Oval where Ben Lisson is. What have the last 24 hours meant to the Western Bulldogs?Good morning. It has been a monumental 24 hours for Bulldogs fans. They can hardly believe the position they find themselves in after the grand final win yesterday over the swirns. They went into that match -- Sydney Swans. They went in understood dogs years.
and won for the first time in 62 years. A few dozen are at the front office at the moment, getting ready to take if family day, which is set to get underway in a couple of here
hours. There should be thousands here once that gets underway. There is a bit of debris from the night before, a few empty beer cans. It's been a long night. They have celebrated properly.There are few old-timers running around yesterday. Most of them are a young team. There is no reason they can't be a strength in the AFL for couple of years to come.Absolutely. You have to consider they had a number of injuries coming to finals. They dealt with them throughout the year. What they were able to do - and what was astounding - was that they just kept delivering despite the fact that key personal went down almost weekly at one point. We know that injured captain Bob Murphy was unable to take part. There are a couple of others players who will come back into the side next year - the way they play is something that a lot of other clubs are going to have to start modelling themselves on. It is a style of play that delivers results regardless of who is in the team. It is a structure that coach Luke Beveridge has implemented that's been very successful quickly. A lot of other teams are taking notice.We saw a fantastic moment at the end yesterday afternoon's match, with Bob Murphy, receiving a premiership medal from the coach, Luke Beveridge. Just how important a figure for the Bulldogs faithful is Bob Murphy?Well, he, I guess, e pet Mount Isas the row plant civil of the club -- row plant tick view of the club. They have been the hard luck team who never has things go its way. He's always been a level-headed approach to that and he's... Remained with the club throughout the year, despite the injury he suffered in round 3. He acted as a bit of a mentor to younger players and almost, I guess, a sounding board for some of the coaches. He's remained very much in touch with this team. I guess that medal going to him from Luke Beveridge was, I guess, a symbol that he has - was just as much a part of the premiership as any of the other players as well. from
Definitely. We saw a lot of emotion from him and as well as the other players too. Everyone at the MCG. But there was a lot at Whitten Oval where you are, the spiritual home. I know this is family day and they had a lot of functions - official functions - after the match last night. Can we expect an end to any of the celebrations any time soon? (LAUGHTER) Oh, I think if you ask anyone around here they are hoping not! I don't know what the work productivity levels will be on Monday! It will be celebrated properly this weekend. They, more than any other club, do know it could be a long time before the next one. They will enjoy it.Thank you very much for joining us. What an incredible day! He will eventually have to experience this afternoon as well at Whitten Oval, all of those fans... I am sure there will be thousands there. They had about 10,000 there just for their open training session on Thursday now they welcome them back home with the premiership Cup. That is not a bad piece of silverware. I believe they will be clinging to the rafters. Guys, when it comes to the game, it was a really good performance from the Bulldogs. Very tight in the opening stages. The Swans booted the first goal but they did have a couple of key moments that did hurt them. Within the first five minutes unfortunately Buddy Franklin went down with a rolled ankle. He did receive treatment. He had to go back into the sheds. Unfortunately he just lost that bit of speed. The speed that he has off the mark. He was still able to push his defenders off guard, take markets, boot an important goal, which got them back to within one point. But he just lost that bit of impact. We knew that if the Swans were going to swing Buddy Franklin needed to be at his absolute swing Buddy Franklin needed to be at
his absolute best and playing well. There was also another injury to Dan Hannebery. A collision with the stand-in captain from the Bulldogs Easton Wood. That hindered his lateral movement, couldn't move from side-to-side, only straight. He did haven't the impact he was after in the latter stages either. The Bulldogs, they did capitalise on any opportunity that they did receive. A lot of their fans would still be, I think, celebrating long and hard. They probably aren't gone to bed.I think there is a few sleepless people there.I think there is a few sleepless
people there.I think so! Fantastic to see that. We do love a fairytale and 22-point winners are the Western Bulldogs.I may have become something of a supporter, just for a little bit!The Swans land in Sydney at about 1:30 this afternoon. I gather they have cancelled their events. Other than arrivaling.I am sure they will be forlorn but I am sure the Sydney faithful will be there to support them. Their respectful and... At the end of the match.Alright. Thank you. That is all for ABC TV viewers for this morning. Thank you for joining us.We will be back at 10am eastern on ABC News 24 with all the day's news, sport and weather. But stay with us for Insiders.

This program is not captioned.

The threat of gooding as eased in South Australia with emergency services focused on preparing for the next band of rain forecast for the state. Properties were flooded yesterday and overnight at Virginia north o Adelaide while extensive sandbagging by crews in Port Wakefield prevented major damage. NSW is boosting the number of drum lines being deployed off the state's beaches in response to the latest shark attack last week on the North Coast. So far, 31 great white and five bull sharks have been caught by 15 smart drum lines being trialled. An air raid on the rebel-held eastern half of the Syrian city of Aleppo has hit the area's largest hospital for the second time in days. The Syrian American medical society cam 2 which supports the say it's been struck by two barrel bombs. AFL premiership winners the Western Bulldogs have spent the night celebrating with family and friends. Ex-players and staff as well. The Bulldogs broke a 62-year premiership drought with a 22-point win over the Swans and coach Luke Beveridge says the club's next goal is prolonged success. Stay tuned now for Insiders.

Is This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Good morning, welcome to Insiders. How did a once in a 50-year windstorm in SA set off a political storm even before they got the power back on? Why were the politicians bickering as the emergency service workers were still flat out doing their jobs? Because, it seems, they were spoiling for a fight over renewable energy. And though the experts are yet to make the link between the two, that didn't stop a lot of nonexperts.

The incident occurred at 3:48pm today causing the failure of the SA electricity network.This is a super storm.An extreme weather event.An unprecedented perfect storm, if you like.80,000 lightning strikes.It's obviously been a pretty dramatic event.Two tornados ripping through the centre of our State. 20 massive power towers blown over because of the velocity of the winds. And that was the immediate cause of the blackout.I can't believe that my State is in darkness at the moment. How in 2016 in a first world country, we could lose the power for 1.7 million Australians.This is a disgrace. How did this happen?This would happen to any system anywhere in the world if they had a similar circumstance.Clearly when you lose power across the State there's going to be a number of dramatic consequences.If heads have to roll, so be it.

Obviously we are not playing politics at this time.I regret to say that a number of the State Labor Governments have, over the years, set priorities and renewable targets that are extremely aggressive.SA gets 41% of its power from predominantly wind.We have relied too much on wind rather than base load renewables.Extremely unrealistic.What I'm not going to do is allow this Government to blame renewable energy for cyclonic winds and for a super storm.This was a weather event. This was not a renewable energy event.The generators don't work when the wind is blowing too hard.Theout blackout shows us we need more renewable energy not less and those storms were fuelled by global warming.If you are stuck in an elevator, if the lights won't go on, you are not going to be concerned about the particular source of that power. It's regrettable that people would leap to a political criticism at this time.I think it's disgraceful. It was ignorant rubbish.You've got Barnaby Joyce out there with his jihad againsts wind farms.Wasn't working too well last night because they had a blackout.Let's end the idology, focus on clear renewable targets.He used to be a champion on taking action on climate change. He's now doubling down on climate sceptic policies.

We need answers, there needs to be an independent inquiry, independent of government.A lot of politicians are going to duck for cover.We're up for discussion about the efficiency of the national energy market, absolutely up for that discussion.Whether it is hydro, wind, solar, coal or gas, you want to know that the energy is secure. SA was the laughingstock of the nation because we didn't have power. Of course there will be elements which had not worked perfectly and we will review each of those things. Energy security is this Government's number 1 priority.We've got to make sure you keep the lights on.And we're having some power issues here this morning as well so maybe any energy security is the number 1 issue. But ahead of issues like national security, budget repair, climate change, maybe not. We'll look at all that this morning with the panel and our guest here in the studio is the Foreign Minister, Julie Bishop. But first, we'll check out the Sunday papers with our panel, Laura Tingle, Andrew Probyn and Fran Kelly and predictably, particularly in Melbourne, as you'd expect, it's all about the Bulldogs' first premiership in 62 years. The Herald Sun's wraparound goes for 15 pages before you get to page 1 and then when you do get to page 1 it's about football anyway. The political story after the wraparound, if you go to The Age on page 1 of The Age is another negative story, Andrew, for Stuart Robert, the Government MP who, of course, lost his job as a Minister.What a game yesterday, firstly, though. Yes, Stuart Robert, he's a most curious controversy magnet and he's done it again. Adam Gartrell has written a story talking about Stuart Robert's ties to an antigay African church. Now, you know, there are good reasons why people have associations with all sorts of groups but turns out that this particular church he's visited and been - he's had a directorship of previously, but the leader of it, a guy called Mr Skinner, says homosexuality is degrading and an inhuman sin that brings disease and destroys lives. Now it turns out that taxpayers who have paid, you know, he's charged taxpayers to visit the church. He's also gone on his own coin. But I suppose this, again, goes to disclosure. You know, donation disclosure and some of these things he has disclosed but, you know, Stuart Robert is going to consistently be in the spotlight, it seems.He did lose his job as a minister other a visit to China when it was alleged he'd abused his position and then last week, again revived this story that he allowed a lobbyist for a property developer to write part of a speech which he then delivered to the Parliament and that lobbyist donated money to the Liberal Party around about the same time. So of course the cash for comment issue came up again. Here's Bill Shorten.Mr Turnbull was pretty quick to give advice to the Labor Party when he thought there was any issues for cash for comment. But he's gone suspiciously silent when it comes to judging cash for comment in his own ranks.Where does it go, though? He's not a minister. Sam Dastyari held a position even know he wasn't a minister, there was something to focus on but not here. I think it goes to more than disclosure. I think it goes to judgement. If, you know, Stuart Robert's interpretation of the speech was that he wanted to make sure he got the facts right so he took some facts from that speech and took some facts, you know, I imagine a people do a lot of time but again it's a judgement call and this is a judgement call. Of course you can have links to a church but how close should an MP be to a church that has such a putrid antigay agenda as this church apparently has, according to Adam's piece.Laura, from Tuesday the banks start fronting up to the parliamentary inquiry. It will be the Commonwealth Bank on Tuesday. So Ian Narev will lead off and then, I think ANZ Wednesday and Westpac and NAB on Thursday.3 hours each. This is obviously one of the mechanisms that the Government's used to try to stave off the course for a royal commission into the banks. It's a House of Representatives committee so it has the numbers - the Government has the numbers on the committee. The committee's headed by the Member for Banks, ironically, and one of the MPs on the committee is Julia Banks, but you know, we shouldn't read anything into that. I think the interesting thing about it is there is going to be a huge number of issues running here. There's the retail issues, the rage against the banks, the various things and the questions about who should cop the cost of a higher cost of capital for the banks? Should it be shareholders, should it be borrowers? The Reserve Bank Governor has told us it's mainly been the borrowers in the last few years. We'll just go back to football and look at this photo. This person is described as a dejected Sydney Swans fan.I saw that photo as and I know that look I thought hang on, I know that guy. It's Antony Green. The ABC's electoral analyst. Bad luck, Anthony. Congratulations the Doggies, a great game.You feel what he feels.I feel what he feels. That's the Sunday papers. Up next our program guest Julie Bishop. While she joins us, here's some reaction to the news that former MP Wyatt Roy visited the front line in Iraq.There was about 15 Daish terrorists, they were less than a kilometre away and they were shooting RPGs. It was a very dangerous environment. It's not one I expected to be in.This is profoundly stupid, profoundly selfish. We're talking about a war zone. This is not a Contiki tour here.It is certainly not a tourist destination.It looks like he was trying to act out some top gun fantasy but frankly this is irresponsible behaviour.It was stupid, it was foolish of him.I'm sure our friendship will endure beyond what is clearly a strong disagreement.Julie Bishop, good morning, welcome.Thank you.The Courier Mail headline on Friday read "ISIS almost killed me". The story pointed out that Wyatt Roy came under fire from ISIS. He came under fire from you as it turned out, you're clearly not impressed?Mr Roy travelled to Iraq as a private citizen. He was not there in any official capacity, he was not there for work purposes. He was essentially a tourist and by travelling to northern Iraq it is one of the most dangerous hot spots on Earth. He put himself at a very high-risk of injury or death or capture by this terrorist organisation ISIL, and we know what this organisation has done to those that it captures. And I think there would have been a very significant, and justifiable public outcry, if Australian Government resources had to be diverted from the fight against ISIL in Iraq to rescue or evacuate Wyatt Roy because he was in such a dangerous situation.And given that until very recently he was a member of Parliament, what sort of a message does that send more broadly?I have been consistently warning Australians not to travel to Syria and Iraq. Indeed, there are parts of both countries that are out of bounds for Australian citizens. It's an offence to travel there and I do not want to encourage any thrill seekers to go over to Iraq and Syria and observe what is going on. This is a war. There is a conflict of mammoth proportions in both Syria and Iraq and our formal official government advice is do not travel there.Is that what he was? A thrill seeker? Well, I'm yet to understand the justification for him going to the northern part of Iraq, to the front line of the war between ISIL and the Peshmerga.Alright, let's talk about the MH-17 safety investigation, the safety board investigation. The interim report shows that the missile launcher was brought in from Russia and returned to Russia the next day. You now have that information, you have it confirmed and on the record, what should happen next?The joint investigation team is made up of investigators from Australia, Malaysia, Ukraine, Belgium and the Netherlands. And this is a very meticulous and thorough investigation. The Dutch safety board did the first part of inspecting the plane to confirm that it wasn't an internal combustion, that it was actually an external impact. Now, the joint investigation team has confirmed that it was shot down by a Russian missile that came in from Russia to eastern Ukraine, to the Russian-backed separatist area and that's where the plane was brought down. The next step is to identify those responsible, the chain of command within the Russian military and all those who were involved in making the decision and actually operating that missile. That is under way and I expect that by the end of the year, maybe early next year, the list of those that we believe should be held accountable will be confirmed and then there must be a prosecution.Because they say, don't they, that there are 100 people that might have been in some way involved and they know their namesThat's right.And they know the nationality but they can't do anything about that just yet?Well at this point we're calling on Russia to cooperate, to ensure that it provides all assistance possible to the joint investigation team so that those responsible are held to account. Now the next step is to determine the prosecution method and I had a meeting in New York with the foreign ministers of the countries involved in the joint investigation team. There are a number of options available to us. I wouldn't rule out going back to the UN Security Council for backing but Russia has indicated that it will veto attempts to do that.They will, won't they? They will just veto it again?I believe we can assume they will but I don't rule it out but there are other options. There can be a Lockerbie style prosecution, a tribunal that's set up by the international community or there can be domestic prosecutions in say the Netherlands and as long as they had the powers of extradition and the like, a prosecution could be mounted successfully in a domestic jurisdiction, but that would cover the interests of the 298 victims aboard that flight. So if the veto happens in the UN, which would you favour, the Lockerbie style or a Dutch-based investigation? At this stage both have positive and negative attributes. I think a domestic style tribunal would possibly be easier to establish but you'd have to make sure that it had all the necessary powers. For example, extradition to be able to absolutely hold those responsible for this atrocity to account.Now, you mentioned the chain of command, they made no findings on that to this point about whether Russia, as a country, was in any way implicated but where does that leave Putin in all of this?The investigation has confirmed that it was a Russian military Buk missile that came in from - they know where it left in Russia and they know where it ended up when it went back to Russia.That could have been a rogue act, and not in any way associated with the country as such?I will leave that to the final investigation. You're right, there could be other possibilities but I think from the outset the Australian Government has been of the view that Russia has questions to answer. And this puts the spotlight back on President Putin. They are already trying to discredit the investigation, in fact they've been doing that for some time. And seeking to deflect focus from Russia on others, their theorys are improbable, implausible.Now on Syria and the bombing of Aleppo in particular and the suggestion that the Russians have been involved in that, what is the relationship now between the US and Russia?Well, I witnessed two meetings between the Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and the US Secretary of State John Kerry. Let me say that all trust has broken down. Neither side trusts the other side and while ever the Assad regime, backed by Russia and Aroon, believes that it can win militarily over the opposition groups backed by the US and the Gulf countries, the killing and the war will continue. Like wise, the opposition groups believe that they can defeat the Assad regime militarily. I believe that all options have to be on the table. It seems that Russia has given up any pretence of a ceasefire at this point and the violence and the atrocitys going on in Aleppo are unprecedented.But if all trust is broken down, will they continue to talk?They must. They have to continue to talk because the indiscriminate bombing is killing thousands of civilians. It is a humanitarian disaster on an unprecedented scale. Nothing we've seen in our lifetime. And the international community is willing both Russia and the US and their supporters to sit down and try and find a way through this. A ceasefire is absolutely central so that humanitarian relief can reach those in need. But we need to find a political solution to what is essentially a civil war and then, of course, ISIL is operating in the vacuum.Are we anywhere near a point where the US might start bombing the asaid regime and what would be the consequences of that?That would be an all-out war. We are currently seeing a proxy war between Russia and the US and other players in this disaster but I urge all of the parties to continue to talk. There has to be a diplomatic and political solution, not just a military solution. In fact I don't believe there will be a military solution and one option would be an arms embargo. One option would be for both sides to withdraw military support from the regime, from the opposition groups and force them to the negotiating table.Now, in the meantime, in Afghanistan, things are not getting any better, in fact they're getting marginally worse. There are reports suggesting now the Taliban are in control of more territory there than any time since 2001, that's got to be of concern? It's deeply concerning the Taliban is operating an insurgency to undermine the Afghan Government. President Ghani has a vision for the future of Afghanistan. He's cracking down on corruption, he's focusing on trying to deliver services to the Afghan people and his Government needs support. That's what Australia and other coalition partners are doing, backing the Government, so that they can secure their own nation, they can crack down on the Taliban and the insurgency that is reviving and Australia will stay the course to ensure that we can help President Ghani build this nation. There have been some obvious gains. I mean education is one example. There is something like 8 million students at school now but 40% of them are girls. Back when the Taliban was in control there were very few students at school and no girls at all. So the nation building is there but we have to continue to crackdown on this insurgency from the Taliban.And control is slipping away in Oruzgan province which is, of course, where Australians fought and died for more than 12 years. Did they die in vain?Absolutely not. They were committed to a cause. They were part of what was an absolutely essential effort on the part of Australia and other countries to ensure that Afghanistan was not a haven for al-Qaeda. Remember, this came about because of the bringing down of the twin towers and al-Qaeda was using Afghanistan as its headquarters. So we have to ensure that al-Qaeda and the terrorist groups cannot make Afghanistan their headquarters again as a haven for terrorists. And so that work was successful but the Taliban, who, of course, were in control at the time, are now operating an insurgency, that's what we have to deal with. Just on a couple of domestic issues, but the first one, the opinion poll has showed that your government falling behind, seem to have come at a time when Malcolm Turnbull was making breakthroughs in the Parliament, he had a good overseas trip, how do you explain it?People have very high expectations of Malcolm Turnbull and they're well placed because Malcolm is highly intelligent, highly capable person and he will be a great leader of this country and I believe that public support will return as we continue to provide good government. We've made some gains in recent times in working with the Senate, in passing some important legislation, including the budget repair. But I believe that as the Government continues to deliver, we continue to repair the budget, fix up our superannuation system, all the work that we have on our agenda, as we complete that work agenda, then I believe public confidence will return.Could it be a single issue here? Could it be frustration with the fact that the plebiscite issue simply don't go away, that nobody is in control of it?I think the plebiscite issue is frustrating for the Australian people because we took to the election a promise that there would be a plebiscite on the question of same-sex marriage and every voting person in Australia could have their say. Labor seems determined to frustrate it and we shouldn't fall for the idea that it's about the money. I mean this is a party that fritters away money on pink batts and cheque giveaways and the like.The public wouldn't be impressed with either side on this, would they?We made a firm commitment that there would be a plebiscite. It's going to be in February, everybody can have their say and we can get on with it and the issue will be determined once and for all. Labor seems determined to frustrate it and the only people losing out of that are the Australian public who want to have their say.In your own State, can your party recover from the recent leadership skirmish?I believe Colin Barnett will lead the party to the next election. I believe the Liberals will win the next election. I'm very confident that WA is being well governed and Colin Barnett is an outstanding Premier.Thanks for your time this morning, I apreesh devrait - appreciate it.My pleasure.The Turnbull Government has passed an ominous milestone.The Coalition is now less popular than when Tony Abbott was dumped.Then the Coalition's primary vote was 39%. Today, under Malcolm Turnbull, it hit 38.After preferences, the Government's down 2, Labor up 2.I never commented on polls as party leader myself, and I probably shouldn't start now.They're not good.Look, polls are things that come and go.This is one Newspoll. It's one poll.The most important poll was the one determined a couple of months ago which was a clear election win for the Coalition. Whatever the Government's doing since the election isn't impressing voters.How long can this go on?In the end, people should be judged by their performance, not by the polls. Frankly, I don't need an opinion poll to know that Malcolm Turnbull is now Australia's great national disappointment.Government is tough.

The political deadlock over how to legalise same-sex marriage is becoming more entrenched.The February poll of 15 million voters is in deep freeze. Placed there by farcically failed talks in Brisbane. Regrettably, I have to say that they didn't have much to say at all.When I look Mr Day fus - Dreyfus and I said to him "What is your position? "It's really for the Government to indicate that it's prepared to make some changes.On some 9 occasions I said to them, "What do you want? " The Government actually put nothing on the table.I'm sorry to say, Mr Dreyfus refused to tell us what the Labor Party's position was.We got nothing.The only thing Mr Turnbull won't drop or won't compromise on is this plebiscite into marriage equality.The ball is in Labor's court on this issue.Let them either put up or shut up and I think then we can talk about more important things.Labor have done a pretty good job over the last month or so, in rubbishing, you know, the plebiscite and I think that's probably reflected in what we're seeing in the polls.This is consumed far too many column inches, too many broadcast minutes for something that doesn't matter to a great many people.Australians are marking Mr Turnbull down because the right-wing tail of the Liberal Government is wagging the Liberal Government dog.Thank you, that's my report card.

Alright, I raised with Julie Bishop why this has happened, why Malcolm Turnbull seemingly has 2 or 3 good weeks and yet falls behind in the polls. Laura, you wrote there can only be one explanation.Yes, I talked to a few pollsters about this and they confirmed what I sort of would take out of it which is that as you mentioned to the Minister, you've got this plebiscite issue that's just goned on and on and on. Now, there are some people who have got very strong views about it in either direction but for a lot of voters it's not a first order issue and it's something that just represents to them this sense that they've got about Malcolm Turnbull which is that he's a ditherer, he doesn't get things done, and it's a story which has lots of colourful people right across the spectrum talking about it every night so it's great media fodder. That's dominated what people see out of politics whereas things like the omnibus bill tends to make people's eyes glaze and so you just think about what people have been digesting and getting frustrated about.Because on the one hand, those who regard it as a first order issue are frustrated by it. Those who don't just see it as a government distracted.Why is why Malcolm Turnbull came out and said this is not a first order for me. That's his headline message because it's showing up in the polling. People don't want the Government to be bogged down in an ish - issue like this but there's been something else happening in the last few weeks. Yes, he's getting wins but how many headlines have people red about him having to give into the right wing of his party. And that Malcolm Turnbull isn't quite in control of his own party let alone the agenda.I think good will is the other major thing here. Malcolm Turnbull came to government with enormous good will, as much good will as Kevin Rudd did. The plebiscite issue has been treated at first with good will. But it's, you know, it's a very shy beast and they've got it scurrying. It's very hard to get back. The plebiscite support has fallen because there are Liberals who reckon there's 40% or 40 to 50% of people who just say it is a second order issue, as you say, just get it done and don't talk about it. I'm sick of talking about it.I actually disagree with Julie Bishop. I don't think it is that people are ferociously attached. I mean of course some are but to the idea of having their say, I actually think if the plebiscite had never been mentioned, the Parliament had dealt with it, it would have been fine.That's changing, the latest figures, 48% now, 48% are in support of the politicians dealing with this issue and the plebiscite support has slipped back to 39.I think by and large people would like it to be dealt with and done and off the agenda and whether they get to have their say or not, that was a nice offer but if it's not going to work just do it.George Christensen, the Government MP from Queensland, says that in the event of same-sex marriage becoming legalised he wanted exemptions and exemptions not just for the priests.What about the person of faith who is a wedding photographer or a wedding cake maker or owns a particular venue that just doesn't agree with same-sex marriage and that venue's called upon for a reception? Really you are then pitting people's right to freedom of belief, freedom of conscience and freedom of religion against another right, a right that's only just popped up in recent times and that is this so-called right to same-sex marriage.Outrageous.Member for Michele's there.We have antidiscrimination laws in this country.If they have a problem, don't do it.Say I can't do it, I'm booked.The logic went to a new level there. In SA, and of course the fact that there were 80,000 lightning strikes and about 22 transmitters blew over, there were all sorts of theorys running around about what happened and what caused it and we still don't know for sure. Where's your betting, Laura, and hen - when they finally discover when the power went off it might have something to do with the storm knocking over the transmitters?I think the storms knocking over 22 towers, and there's a conspiracy theory relating to that about Chinese steel. I think at the end of the day, despite some colourful interventions, the PM was saying look, this was a storm event and, you know, all the advice is that it was a storm event. By Friday people were able to describe in great detail, you know, who sort of inside the system, you know, the knock-on effects of the tower going down, things cutting themselves off, but I think this goes to the question of the transmission system, it's not about generation. It's about the transmission system, whether it's the towers falling over or how the whole transmission network works within the State or at a national level.Alright, so let's accept that, why then did the PM use these form of words, here he is.Let's focus now, let's take this storm in SA, this incident in SA, as a real wake up call. Let's end the ideology, focus on clear, renewable tarkt - targets.The Liberals and the Nationals, I think quite cynically, are trying to take a disaster which has hit the State and use it for their own politic political purposes. Shame on Malcolm Turnbull for doing that.There's the point, he didn't make the connection but he said let's use this as a wake up call. What's the relevance here if new renewable energy wasn't a factor?It's OK to use it as a wake up call. This country has a problem, we have all these different renewable energy targets, it's ridiculous, we need to harmonise it. Energy security needs to be top of the agenda but in my view the PM was very ill-judged to use the form of words he did. He didn't say that, what I just said, let's harmonise, let's get together. He said it eventually but first he gave the States a whack around the chops saying their renewable energy targets in SA, Victoria and Queensland, all Labor States, he could have mentioned the ACT, all unreal istic. To talk about the ideology, yes, let's end the ideology but put it in a context. This is when Tony Abbott and Joe Hockey were out there trying to have no renewable target, saying "We hate wind energy." The States have moved because the Government dropped the ball on renewable energy. The States can see there's a lot of jobs and opportunity and a carbon budget that needs to be met. We have targets, we need action.Before we just get into the ins and outs of that particular debate about renewable energy and so on, what about the timing, though, Malcolm Turnbull raising this in the way that he did?I thought it was terrible.This timing was brought upon him by his other ministers and we had Barnaby Joyce going out really hard early.The Premier of SA did have his hands full and suddenly he had to deal with a political crisis as well as an emergency.You had Barnaby Joyce caming out and making incredibly dopey statements saying it was all due to renewable energy, blah, blah, blah. That set the way everybody saw what was subsequently said here. Now, you know, I think Malcolm Turnbull's use of the word "ideology" just set everybody running on this. But I think what is being discussed here. I mean the reality of renewable energy and how it affects SA is that the real driver of renewable energy in Australia remains the Federal Government's Renewable Energy Target because there's an actual money amount involved in that.Does it rely on what the States are doing? The States -The Paris agreement, for example, doesn't that rely on the States setting targets in the way that they have?I don't think it does. When he says they're ideological targets, often all they are is this is where we'd like to go. That goes to the point about what is Daniel Andrews going to do to actually get to this target.Or Queensland which is going to 50%. I'd like to have an 80% target at my house. It's a nice goal but the really big fundamental financial driver of renewable energy remains the Federal Government target. Now the question becomes not, you know, we do have to have more renewable energy, without a doubt, and the Government does not have a plan for getting to its Paris target after 2020 effectively, when the current Renewable Energy Target runs out. The question becomes what you do in the transmission network and in the system to deal with the fact that renewable energy is variable, it means that you have to have more capacity for the electricity to run up and down the country.On that point with renewable. The next 10 years we are going to have a vastly different electrical - electricity system. We're going to have every single household is going to be a generator because we're going to have batteries. Batteries are coming in and the next 10 years we're all - things are going to be different. You will have your base load power, whether it's coal or gas or whatever. But everyone is going to be effectively powering the State, the territory or whatever.And so our national energy market needs to take that into account. The Federal Government needs to be leading that, needs to have a Renewable Energy Target that will be adquet to get us to the post 2030 agreement we've signed onto for Paris. But the States are key in that. If there is no building of wind farms or solar plants going on then -I think that's what Turnbull was correcting. When he suggested that Josh Frydenberg, as the Energy Minister should get all the State ministers together.The State-based targets, some which are unrealistic. Queensland has a 50% renewable target, currently renewables are about 4.5% of their mix. So what's the pathway to achieve that? It's very hard to see it. It's a political or ideological statement. Fran, not only is he looking there for cooperation, coordination, but isn't he pushing back?He's certainly pushing back, which my point, I suppose is, if you're looking for harmonising and cooperation, that is not the language of harmony. That's not the best way to bring people to the table in a united purpose, I don't think. There's the timing and tone of it. Yes, his point is right, we have a hotchpotch of targets and that's useless. We need to get together around the table. Josh Frydenberg has been saying this since he was given the portfolio. This has just hastened this debate and this coming together. But, you know, look at the ACT, it's got a target of 100%. Now you could argue that's not realistic but they are - what they are doing with that is they are also ensuring that when a wind plant comes to the ACT, they're bringing with it their HQ, they're bringing with it jobs. This is what the States are interested in and why wouldn't they be?It'sIt's not just about having a 100% target. I think the debate here is how you make that 100% renewable energy or whatever the number you choose -It's a transition.One, it's a transition and 2, it's the system. Andrew's right. We've got batteries coming on but not quite yet. It's about sort of actually making sure that the system can work so that renewable energy is reliable.The ACT can do whatever it wants because if they have a problem they go whoosh because they've got a great big snake.And SA is at the end of the line, here we are basically spending billions of dollars making it the new renewed manufacturing hub of the country. It's got to have reliable energy.It does, of course it has. Security of energy is key. There is no doubt about that.Is it number 1? It suddenly took over from national security and budget repair?Onish. It is important.I took that as being the number one issue in energy policy.It is key, there's no doubt about it.And you're right, Josh Frydenberg and others have talked about this for some time. It's just let's face it, it sounds pretty boring so nobody's been paying any attention.Do you think it's a good idea that Josh Frydenberg is Minister for Energy and environment? I think it's good. They have to be talking to each other because ate - it's all very well to have energy the issue, but climate change means, according to nearly all the experts, means we're going oto to have more major weather events so the two need to be working together in a hurry. The backpacker's tax has been modified from 32 to 19%, but that didn't stop Bill Shorten from continuing to criticise the Government on the issue.In many ways, the backpacker tax tells you everything that's wrong with the Turnbull Government. They make a poor decision, which is poorly executed, they then refuse to back down until they're dragged kicking and screaming and then they come up with a new policy which is made on the run.What it means is we've worked a problem and solved.It's something we've said we'd fix, we've fixed it and now we can move on. We're moving on.They are moving on. Barnaby Joyce tweeted during the week that we had a win on backpacker tax, who did he beat?I think a lot of the hard work on this was actually done by Richard Colbeck because remember, he was pushing before, and before the election, of course, he was pushing for exactly 19%. He was pushing for a few other things and there was resistance all the way. He did all the hard work and, you know, sure, the Nats would have supported it but the hard work was Richard Colbeck's.The fascinating thing is we finally saw the Deloitte report on which Scott Morrison kept referring to as the basis for them deciding their policy. And the really fascinating thing to me about that was that the 19.5%, and more or less every other feature of the compromised package, was something worked up by the stakeholders. It's a bit like the mining tax, design your own tax system.But in answer to who they beat, it was their own side.They beat themselves. When you've got - they've got parity, New Zealand parity with Canada, and they're using this as a virtue of the policy, why didn't that occur to them at the time?Beats me.Because it looked pretty easy to go after foreign backpackers but they were just hurriedly trying to find money. There was a hole left in - when Labor changed the tax scales to create that huge tax-free threshold, it essentially meant that those workers were never going to pay tax. So there was a legitimate argument to say well, that seems crazy, you've got to pay something. But goodness knows why they -They spent every cent of what they earn and they spend it here. The Tourism and Transport Forum are not happy with as part of this deal they want it to be revenue neutral so they slapped $5 on the departure tax.The real problem here is that the Government has fallen for that old one again of treating our industry as a cash cow. So they're now expecting us to pay for them making a decision that was bad in the first place.The backpacker industry is $5 billion a year or thereabouts for the tourism industry. These backpackers are spending this money on the tourism industry in regions all across the country. So they are the principal beneficiary of these measures.That departure tax is almost a hidden tax now.It's a wealth tax too.You never see it. It's in your ticket price. It's a point well made by the Treasurer. There was money in that package for tourism as wellIt's a wealth tax that if you can afford to travel you can afford to pay for this too.You said it's a point well made by the Treasurer. What about this point back in 2008? He's got a history in the tourism industry and when there was talk of an increase in the departure tax, he had this to say.This tax is a pernicious impost on our aviation and tourism sectors which are already under pressure. Tax increases are designed to discourage consumption and so placing a tax on travel is designed to discourage, I assume, therefore, business activity in the travel sector.Don't you love the archives. You're cruel, Barry, you're cruel. That's then, this is now. We'll move on. Education funding. Now that took a bit of a twist in that tale as well and Q&A on Monday night when Tony Jones asked these questions of the Education Minister, Simon Birmingham.But do you know that some schools are overfunded?We do, Tony.Are wealthy private schools overfunded, to go back to the question?There are some that fit that bill, yes, there are.Some, the Fairfax are now saying maybe 150 of them.It was 170 a few years ago when this similar thing was raised. But look, I thought Sean Kelly wrote a good piece in the Monthly this week when he was talking about this is the Nixon goes to China moment where if anyone's going to do this, then it has to be the Coalition. I just think, you know, this is, you know, when Labor talks about going the full Gonski, it's actually rubbish because the full Gonski would have ripped money from schools. What they were talking about was the political compromise which is problematic, which will take a long time, decades to have sorted out.Julia Gillard sort of started - set the base where nobody was going to be worse off and by definition, with all the various methodologies and things, that meant some schools were going to end up getting a lot more money than -To be fair to Gillard at that point, if she hadn't done that we would have got nowhere again because we've had this argument going back to, well, I remember David Kemp, I'm sure it went back before them.Whitlam also had needs based.A whole State Aid thing but this has been built in for decades and so the inequity is there, Gillard locked it in because she wanted to get some movement on that school resources standard, which was a good thing, I think, to have embedded and Simon Birmingham is not walking away from that. This is a hard thing to do but I think the Minister, by sort of letting it out like that, has lost control of it which is a shame.Has he lost control of it or has he actually set it up as an issue that they're going to have to deal with?It's a bit like the Turnbull thing with renewable energy. Has he put it on the table and said let's go. Perhaps, but I don't know, I think it's invited the hysteria in in the first place which is not the best way to manage it. Having said that, there does need to be something, either these payments to the independent schools, some of them need to be frozen for a few years or they need to be whittled back, bit by bit, something needs to occur here.Some people within the Coalition were not happy that Simon Birmingham's remarks opened up the private versus public debate again. Of course not.And that becomes an issue but on the other hand, you had the Labor Party this time talking about this hit list of wealthy schools and turning everything on its head.This is so similar to the SES debate that we had in 2001, 2002 and it's just, you know, it's going to be a bit tiresome really for people who have done it once or twice before. But, you know, it has to be discussed, it has to be discussed.They should be welcoming this, not talking about a secret hit list.And talk about inEck 'tis, you're probably best off starting talking on your own turf and talking about private schools rather than making it a debate about, you know, about State schools, which is going to really sort of open up the ideological can.Tanya Plibersek was put into this portfolio for a good reason. Both education and health were important to the last complain. It was a lesson learned. Will she exploit it for all it's worth?Of course she will. The hit list is golden, golden tabloid stuff.Worked against Mark Latham.Yeah, I think it's going to be hard to wrestle this one back to the ground. It's out there now. Out there, Barrie. Before we look at the first of the 3 debates in the US, the Wyatt Roy issue, you heard what Julie Bishop said about that. She didn't miss him this morning.Thrill seeker. Another word is war tourist.You can understand why she's saying that. It's not something that you'd want to encourage.No, but look, I actually struggle to be sensorous about this one. We often do criticise politicians or would be politicians or future politicians, which I think Wyatt Roy will be again for not having any experience. He's a bit of a twit for doing what he did. But at the same time, I mean he made a big mistake going that, you know, few extra hundred metres, but he, you know, the Kurds, they're kind of our allies because they're the allies of the US. So look, I actually struggle to be really, really cross with him about this. Look, it's great to get on the ground experience and see what people - what's really happening to people but that's a bit different than any old person, which is what Wyatt is at the moment, getting embedded in a war zone. It's irresponsible.Given there's been so much Government investment put into this idea that you've got to stay well and truly away and of course the first thing that everybody wanted to know when Jana Wendt broke this story was he within the zone where you get chucked in the clink when you come home. It was that close. So you can see why they're irritated in that way. As you say, it's good that somebody's actually trying to unravel it themselves. We've all covered stories involving people who have gone to fight for the Kurds and, you know, they're technically breaking the rules but when they come back they don't get charged and this is - we're in that grey area. Look, I don't want people to do it, I'm not condoning it, but look, I think it is interesting and I think his piece that he wrote for the Oz was quite an interesting piece.We'll move onto the debate in the US and whatever you might think of it, I found it the most entertaining debate I've seen at every level. Entertaining, not particularly illuminating. The moment for me, and the moment I think presented advertisements for the Democrats and for Hillary Clinton was when the issue turned to taxation.Maybe he doesn't want the American people, all of you watching tonight, to know that he's paid nothing in federal taxes because the only years that anybody has ever seen were a couple of years when he had to turn them over to State authorities when he was trying to get a casino licence and they showed he didn't pay any federal income tax. So -That makes me smart.It sounds like you admitted that you hadn't paid federal taxes and that that was smart. Is that what you meant to say?No, I didn't say that at all.He did say it.The video you just saw is a lie, everything about it is a lie. People just saw it and this seems to be a trend. It's a recurring theme.That was the moment for me and I'm saying - I'm thinking why doesn't she sort of say "What did you just say? " Because here in Australia that would have just been it, the end. But I don't know that it's necessarily going to be the end.There was that other point where she talked about him exploiting the GFC and the housing. That's called good business.And that was the moment which he said earlier, I think, about how he went hello. Because people talk all about the Trump phenomenon and the global sort of disaffection and all that sort of stuff. But Trump's appeal as being an outsider still requires people to be able to identify with him, you know, the jaded, shall we say, voter. And lines like that, I think really do cut through all of the other noise and just made people say wait a minute, does that mean I'm dumb because I do pay tax?Do they, or is this thing, you know this better than me, Barrie, in America where the - like the guy who St Good at making money and aspire to that. That's been part of the story why people aren't turned off by Trump.I think Bernie Sanders might have broken that down a bit during his campaign. It goes to the standard. If Hillary Clinton was to have said that, that if you get away without paying taxes then that's just smart and - that would be the end of her campaign, I would have thought. But it's not for him. Why is that?I think that what the debate showed was that the essence of his campaign is to answer any argument that has any element of sophistication by he simply condemns it as an obsession of the elites and we saw it at every moment. He's actually brilliant at just saying oh, you know, done this and this, smarty-pants. This is why you should be resentful and angry and disgruntled about your place in the world and that's why he's going to be bloody close to winning. Like being the States with the PM a week and a bit ago, it was just fascinating because it is the whole place is convulsing at the idea of him becoming President. But a lot of people also acknowledge that what he says is so true. You know, the key elements -The supporters are so rusted on they don't care what he says. TThe arguments about the jobs, and I don't think Clinton's response or answer to that was very compelling. I was listening thinking I still don't know what you're saying now. It's hard to know what to say about ending free trade and putting tariffs back on and what that will mean and why these jobs have moved. She's going to have to have a better cut through line than she has.I was in the States in '93 with Keating and they signed the NAFTA deal.The worst trade deal ever put together.Very bad.One of the most sensational political speeches I ever heard where Clinton talked about how free trade had been the basis of middle class prosperity. Now, you know, maybe that's a bit of a jaded message now but it was just such - and George H Bush was in the room when he said it and at the end of the speech he got up and said, "Now I know why I'm on the outside looking in." It was just this absolutely compelling bit of rhetoric about free trade. I kept on listening to Hillary Clinton and thinking "Remember what Bill said." And I was in the US back in '99, or whenever it was with John Howard before George W was elected and John Howard took time out to go and meet this young bloke, is how he described him at the time, I don't think he'll have any Liberal politicians going out to meet Donald Trump at the moment.The website I go to every day to check on who's winning is real clear politics and what they do is average out all of the major polls daily. They went into that debate with Hillary Clinton leading by 2.3% and as of this morning she's leading by 3.1%. So she got a bit of a bounce out of the debate.Not much, though. It's still pretty tight.Very, very tight.Even though it's 3.1. When you look at a couple of States that could deliver the numbers across the board, Florida for one is less than 1%, the lead in Florida. When Florida is that tight, given all the issues, why is Florida tight? You would think Trump by now has insulted or offended just about everybody in that State.Florida was one of the areas that did lose big time in the GFC because of the property market there. Massive losses there. And this is the other - the resentiments and the disgruntlement is going to the fact that people don't see their future being any better for their children than the lives that they've had and that's a massive thing. The social wage in Australia is so critical here. We won't have that.But Clinton must be desperately worried about the turnout of her supporters. Well there might be a bigger turnout than the previous election. That's my tip. I think the turnout will be bigger because people care more about the result this time around. More with our panel shortly but it's time now for Mike Bowers and Talking Pictures.

I'm Mike Bowers and I'm photographer at large for the Guardian Australia. I'm talking pictures this week with Reg Lynch who cartoons, I take it you still cartoon for the sun herald.Yep.A very warm welcome. Thanks for having me back.SA had no power, we always knew that.That's not very nice.Victoria had to keep its power so they just turned it off. Congratulations, SA, the first State to reach zero emissions.I thought that was very funny.Lovely David Pope as usual.

Fact free zone.This might be cartoon of the week for all sorts of disturbing reasons. I think it's a Nick Xenophon is lighting Barnaby's bottom here:He is too.It's illumination. Tony Abbott is the potbelly stove which is blowing smoke up the chimney.Barnaby's enlightning everyone with his wisdom coming out his arse.There were backdowns and backflips as the back-benchers caused a backlash for the backpacker tax.And we're back where we started again.Backpacking on Barnaby's farm.

The company store is George.And I'm sure that Malcolm probably thought he was doing a good thing taxing all these foreigners and then what? You don't like that? I thought that was the right thing for a change.Mr Broelman, "No, he ain't a backpacker, he's more of a backflipper." As George Christensen seems to be wearing Malcolm as a backpack.I thought it was the other way around for a while.With negotiations at a stalemate there's never been a more plebisciting time to be alive.Oh, dear.Wedding crashers, George Brandis here is the bride. "What's the hold up, George? "That's beautiful Rowe again. This lump that's sort of stuck in the throat of forward movement.The ball's in your court. It just doesn't seem to be going anywrsmt That's perfect Kudelka again. Just one thing after another, nothing gets done.Australian politics might be stuck in a rut u be - but in the US it's highly debatable whether things are going to turn out alright or night. The big debate strategies Mark Knight. Duck the personal attacks:

That was weird, right?That sniffing was weird.You were listening to it on the radio.I thought I've got to rush down to watch this. What's he doing?Moya summed it up beautifully as they're playing poker with each other and the world is sitting there sweating.Apparently if you - I heard this rumour, that if you watch all 3 debates really closely don't take your eyes off it, you will go blind and the Triffords will come out. Don't watch all 3 debates.The more popular you are the more backs you get turned on.What's happened to the world? Can't people just say look, I took this photograph of the band, or of Hillary, why do I have to be in that.Reg, it's been a great pleasure, thank you for making the arduous journey from the apple isle.Thanks, and back to you, Barrie.Final observation, Fran. Well, the Simon Birmingham's letting the cat out of the bag on schools is probably means it's going to have to go back into the bag in this party room. But also, the Swans will be back.Andrew.I think that it's about time that ScoMo reintroduced more phrases to his white board because wash its face, a lot of people have gone onto Google going what on Earth is he talking about? He's used it this week about the backpacker's tax and it means pay its own way but we've had fit for purpose, wash its face and work the problem which he's also used this week.So it means it pays its own way.Apparently.Laura.Well, in amongst all the sort of storms, the other issue which won't go away, which is border protection, Manus Island, Nauru, I think we've got to keep an eye out, I feel that there is something Abreuing here in terms of some sort of solution that we're likely to see in the next couple of weeks, whether it's a good one or a bad one to just nail this issue once and for all.The word solution will be part of it.Yes.Alright, well I'm looking for a segue to a big Offsiders program coming up, the traditional North Melbourne breakfast before the grand final, Bill Shorten identified a small association with the premiers, the Bulldogs. Thanks for watching.I'm a Pies supporter but I'm also the proud owner of 2 premium establish bull bulldogs, Theodore and Tilly. My main job at home is to clean up after them. If you've seen what two 20 kilos bulldogs the eat it's a big job. It's good training This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Good morning and welcome back to Weekend Breakfast, I'm Miriam Corowa.And I'm Ben Worsley. Towns under threat as SA's flood emergency continues with fears of more rain on the way.

Also ahead - NSW boosts drum lines in response to the latest shark attack.Air strikes on the Syrian city of Aleppo hit the area's largest hospital for the second time in days.And celebrations continue for the Western Bulldogs after their historic grand final victory over the Sydney Swans.

Hello, thank you for joining us, it is Sunday, 2 October.Also coming up on Weekend Breakfast, what's the cost of a download on the environment?Well, it may just be a click of a button on your smart phone or home computer but researchers in London estimate downloading a gigabyte of data could use anywhere up to 200 litres of water. The researchers say the water is used in energy production and to cool datacenters. We'll be hearing from one of the researchers behind the findings a little later this hour. Extraordinary findings.I had no idea.Particularly when you consider just how ubiquitous this sort of technology is now. It makes you think twice. Particularly in our industry too.Yeah, true. Let's check the weather in the capitals.

To our top stories this morning - SA is bracing for more wet weather as floodwaters north of Adelaide finally begin to recede. Flooding on the Gawler River, around Virginia and Two Wells remains the most pressing concern with damage to a number of market gardens and semirural properties. More than 60mm of rain is expected today and tomorrow in a saturated river catchments of the Mount Lofty Ranges. SA Premier Jay Weatherill says only with one power line supporting the entire north and west region, there's the possibility of further outages as well.In WA's south-west, more than 28,000 people are still without electricity after a severe storm cut power supplies in the area on Saturday. The most affected towns in the region are Bunbury, war pole and Denmark. It came as strong winds peaked over 110km/h and bought down some power lines.And thousands of State Emergency Service volunteers in Victoria are on stand-by ahead of severe weather, expected to hit the State later today. They've urged people to prepare their properties by securing loose outdoor items with strong winds forecast. The wild weather has passed over Tasmania, but is weather bureau says there are still many flood warnings in place. Police are trying to determine whether a fire that destroyed a home in Sydney's west overnight was deliberately lit. Emergency crews arrived at the vacant 2-storey townhouse in Bidwell at 3:00 this morning. The flames were so intense that crews were forced to wear oxygen masks. It took 4 fire trucks and 18 fire fighters to put out the blaze.NSW is boosting the number of drum lines being deployed off the State's beaches in response to the latest shark attack last week on the north coast. Primary Industries Minister Niall Blair says a further 85 smart drum lines will be deployed taking the total number to 100. So far 31 great white and 5 bull sharks have been caught by 15 smart drum lines being trialed with the animals being tagged and relocated. Mr Blair says the latest roll out will lead to the creation of new jobs.Police have praised party-goers at the Listen Out Festival in Sydney's Centennial Park even though 116 people were charged with drug possession and a number of others arrested for gate crashing the party. Another 3 were taken to hospital with suspected drug-related issues. The arrests were part of a high visibility police separation for - operation for the event which was attended by about 25,000 people. Adelaide police are still trying to piece together the motivation for the murder of a woman during a violent attack yesterday. The 57-year-old was killed and her daughter-in-law bound and gagged in the attack at a home in Valley View in the city's north-east. Police believe the murdered woman was followed home and say the attack doesn't peer to have been motivated by any kind of criminal activity on the part of the victims.More than 70 people have been injured, 5 seriously in an explosion on the southern coast of Spain. The blast happened in a cafe during a town festival close to the popular tourist destination of Malaga. Local reports say the chef had raised the alarm moments before the incident. It's not yet clear why the gas cylinder exploded.In Syria, fighting is intensifying around the rebel-held areas of Aleppo. There are reports the largest hospital in the east of Aleppo has been hit by at least 2 barrel bombs. It's the second time in 4 days the facility has been targeted. In the past week it's thought around 400 people have been killed in Aleppo including more than 100 children. There have also been reports of Russian-backed Syrian Government forces pounding Aleppo's old city.Hungarians will vote in a referendum on European Union refugee quotas later today. Polls are showing broad support for PM Viktor Orban's call to reject any settlement. He's been at the forefront in the opposition of EU taken by Germany a chancellor who says Europe has an obligation to take in refugee. He's sealed the southern border with Serbia and Croatia to asylum seekers with a razor wire fence and around 8,000 members of the security force.We do not agree with this quarter, of course, because it would let meme coming into the country without any control and although we would like to try to help the refugees, but still, you know, not like this. So I mean it has to be some kind of a control to let the people in. So the referendum is really important otherwise it's going to change the culture of the nation.One of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes in recent history has weakened a little as it drenched coastal Columbia and rored across the Caribbean. Matthew reached its top Category 5 speed yesterday and is now back to a Category 4 storm. It says the hurricane is still packing winds of up to 250km/h. The storm is expected to make landfall tomorrow night.Now to sport with Georgie Tunney and Georgie, the Bulldogs just won their first premiership in 62 years. They're already looking ahead.They certainly are and it's easy to see why as well. A very young team, none of them had played in a grand final before yesterday afternoon's match and they already have a 100% success rate. So this could just be the beginning of things for the Dogs. Western Bulldogs coach Luke Beveridge believes their first AFL premiership in a very, very long time is just the starting point for his young side. He sent an ominous warning to the rest of the competition to expect more success for the sons of the west. Down at the main break, the Doggies outbooted Sydney 6 goals to 3 in the second half to break one of the AFL's longest premiership droughts and complete the most unlikely finals run of all time. Jason Johannisen won the Norm Smith medal with 33 possessions as the Western Bulldogs, the AFL champs, achieved what no other team in history has been able to do from 7th spot to 2016 premiers.To the hundreds of thousands of other Bulldog faithful who have stuck with us through years and years of never seeing that day come, this is a dream come true. This is one of those big days in life and one of the days in life that most of us will never forget. One of the happiest days of our lives for all Bulldog fans. So what does it feel like? It feels bloody fantastic.One team hoping it's a fairytale round of football in general is Cronulla who this evening take on the favourites Melbourne Storm for their maiden NRL premiership. If history was again made, it would make a remarkable comeback for Cronulla. Just 2 years ago the team finished last and the captain Paul Gallen and 9 other players accepted back dated doping bans. Since then the club has undergone a huge transformation which could meet its climax at the Olympic Stadium tonight. And the Wallabies' drought in Pretoria continues. Morne Steyn booted all 18 of South Africa's points and despite scoring the only try of the match, Australia remain winless against the Springboks in their 7 attempts. The 8-point loss snapping their 3-match winning streak in the rugby championship. But Ben and Miriam, as we heard there from club president, Peter Gordon, it was certainly a day lots of Bulldogs' fans and AFL fans in general won't forget but I think they could be having a bit of a week-long celebration. We'll check in with Ben lissen later gone this hour to see how many fans have turned up at Whitton Oval, their spiritual home, to welcome the team and the premiership cup.It was a long time coming so I think they will enjoy it while they can.I think so. We've got many months. When is the next - as soon as next season starts they will be still celebrating.Why not? Thank you, Georgie. And thank you for your company here on Weekend Breakfast. Still to come - more from Aleppo. Syria, where a hospital in the city's rebel-held east has been bombeded for a second time in a week.Also ahead - Hungary votes on a controversial ref Rehn dunl - referendum to whether to accept future migrants.And a tale with themes that still ring true. Actor Andrew demeetiadies and director Damian Ryan will be joining us in the studio to talk about their production of Antigony.In Syria, the largest hospital in the rebel-held east of Aleppo has been hit by at least 2 barrel bombs.It's the second time in 4 days the facility has been targeted. In the past week it's thought around 400 people have been killed in Aleppo including more than 100 children. Once again Russia and the Syrian regime are targeting the field hospitals in the city of Aleppo. This is in the east of the city. It was targeted earlier this morning by several aerial raids. These are the spots where the rockets and barrels landed. Severe damage as you can see. One of the rockets just landed in front of the main entrance of the hospital near the emergency entrance. The hospital has suffered severe damage.

TRANSLATION: This area has been the target of 7 Russian aerial raids. The hospital is no longer operating. We have people killed because of the raids including 2 people who were admitted earlier to the hospital. The ambulance services have stopped, despite the siege, the world has given the regime a green light to kill the Syrianens and the regime is now concentrating on Aleppo.As you can see, the bodies of the dead people are still here. They were killed as a result of these raids. There were patients here just before the strike. The hospital is no longer operational and most of the wounded people have been evacuated to other hospitals. But the question on people's mind here are are the hospitals a safe place for those people? Hungary is voting in a controversial referendum on whether to accept future European Union migrant quotas.Figures show that at least 1,000 refugees and migrants each week are still attempting to reach the EU through Serbia and the Balkans. Many of the refugees reaching Serbia now are coming with the help of people smugglers.This is how they're getting into Europe now. Afghan refugees clinging to the bottom of a train. Heading towards Austria.We were 5 people. We were under a train.20 hours they spent there, among them Hamid. How much did you pay in Greece?Each person 1,500 euro for one person.To go from Greece to Austria.Austria. Caught by police, Hamid is now in Serbia. He'd spent months trapped in Greece, passing the time teaching English to other refugees, determined not to go back to Afghanistan. Too afraid after the Taliban murdered his friend.He was beheaded in front of my eyes. The Taliban took one of my friends, they searched his pocket and he found... Europe's refugee crisis hasn't gone away. Instead smugglers have taken over. So Serbia, along with Greece, is now becoming the new staging post for refugees. The army has been sent to try to secure Serbia's borders but up to 200 refugees a day are being discovered. Smuggling is now so lucrative, we were told, other forms of crime are falling in Serbia.TRANSLATION: Our information is refugees pay from 800 to 1,300 euros per person. It's very good business, good money for the smugglers.And this is the reason why. In Greece, thousands are stuck in grim conditions. Their claims to asylum stalled. So they're finding new routes. Several hundred refugees have disappeared from this camp in recent months. The children and their mother Maram are in Damascus. Anyone who can afford it, uses a smuggler, she says.If you have money you go with the mafia.So some people are going?Yes. But we don't have money. We stay here.This is the route the refugees have been taking from Greece through Macedonia over the mountains, eventually to Austria and Germany. Governments say closing the borders has stopped the flows. But it seems refugees are still making it through, evading police, escaping detection. And further north in Serbia, they're starting to back up. Borders may be tightening, but the dream of Europe isn't fading, just turning into an organised underground racquet. Back home, and Senator Nick Xenophon is maintaining his call for an inquiry into the State wide blackout during last week's severe storm in SA.The NXT leader says questions remain as to whether energy security is being maintained as Australian States shift to sustainable sources.I support the Renewable Energy Target rkts - I support what Australia wants to do at the Paris agreement. We need to be at zero carbon emissions by 2050, if not earlier. We also need to look at the issue of energy security and if we don't plan properly, if we don't get the science and the physics right, that's going to cause problems. There are some legitimate questions to ask as to whether we've planned this properly in terms of the network security to ensure reliability of supply and I don't think these are unreasonable questions to ask. The question that needs to be asked, and I can't answer this, I think there are experts out there, not politicians, is would the blackout have been as widespread, would it have been a cascading State wide blackout if there was, in terms of that, if we had more thermal generators in the mix at that time?Speaking of experts and you get the feeling in Australian debates, political debates about the environment that experts are often ignored. The Deputy Director of the Research School of Physics, epg nearing at ANU, there are views among experts in the electricity sector that this blackout had nothing to do with the high level of renewable energy. Professor of science an technology at Griffith University, the problem would have been exactly the same if SA used coal or nuclear power to provide all its electricity. The list goes on. They're being ignored. No, I'm not ignoring them at all. I've had other experts who have worked in the u power systems who have worked with transition, who have had senior roles, executive roles around the country who haven't gone public and they've felt constrained because of confidentiality agreements they've signed in the past to say there are real issues here. I think we need to learn from this because we need to have strong renewable targets. But how do you avoid the physics of that? If there is an issue there between the two, then we need to address that and the other issue is I don't think as a nation, we've looked at security of supply sufficiently and whether the technical rules maximise that security of supply.Senator Nick Xenophon. Foreign Minister Julie Bishop says she's not ruled out going back to the UN for help to prosecute the people responsible for the downing of flight MH-17.The Malaysian passenger jet was shot down by a Russian missile over the Ukraine in 2014 killing nearly 300 people including 38 Australians. Ms Bishop told the ABC's insiderprogram the names of those believed responsible could be known this year.The joint investigation team is made up of investigators from Australia, Malaysia, Ukraine, Belgium and the Netherlands and this is a very me tick - meticulous and thorough investigation. The Dutch Safety Board did the first part of inspecting the plane to make sure it wasn't an internal combustion, that it was an external impact. Now the joint investigation team has confirmed that it was shot down by a Russian missile that came in from Russia to eastern Ukraine, to the Russian-backed separatist area and that's where the plane was brought down. The next step is to identify those responsible, the chain of command within the Russian military and all those who were involved in making the decision and actually operating that missile. That is under way and I expect that by the end of the year, maybe early next year, the list of those that we believe should be held accountable will be confirmed and then there must be a prosecution.They say, don't they? That there are 100 people that might have been in some way involved and they know their names and they know their nationality but they can't do anything about that just yet.At this point we're calling on Russia to cooperate, to ensure that it provides all assistance possible to the joint investigation team so those responsible are held to account. The next step is to determine the prosecution method and I had a meeting in New York with the foreign ministers of the countries involved in the joint investigation team. There are a number of options available to us. I wouldn't rule out going back to the UN Security Council for backing but Russia has indicated that it will veto attempts to do that.They will, won't they? They will just veto it again.I believe that we can assume they will but I don't rule it out. There are other options. There can be a lock - Lockerbie style prosecution, or there can be domestic prosecutions in say the Netherlands. As lock - long as they had the power of extradition and the like, a prosecution could be mounted successfully. In a domestic jurisdiction but that would cover the interests of the 298 victims aboard that flight.So if the veto happens in the UN, what would you favour, the Lockerbie style or a Dutch-based investigation?At this stage both have positive and negative attributes. I think a domestic style tribunal would possibly be easier to establish but you'd have to make sure that it had all the necessary powers, for example, extradition, to be able to absolutely hold those responsible for this atrocity to account. Foreign Minister Julie Bishop. Well, to an ancient tale which has themes still relevant to contemporary times. A brand new adaptation of the classic Antigone tackles war terror and hatred in a production set to tour NSW and the ACT. Let's take a look.My name is Antigone. I wish I could surprise you and not die.

Who are you? Are you the future?For more, we're joined by Antigone lead actor Andrea Demetriades and writer and director Damien Ryan. This was written in 441 BC and I understand it's modernised effectively into the world of modern Islam and I read that you draw parallels with the story of the Boston bomber after his death. Paint the picture, draw the connection Sophoclese and the Boston bomber?It's about how we with justice and 2 years ago when the Boston bombing took place, that night the 26-year-old terrorist, who conducted that atrocity, was killed by police and for several months America wouldn't put his body in the earth. The State of Massachusetts and the neighbours States wouldn't put him in the ground. And when they did the community dug him up and left him on the earth again. That's what they were saying what do we do with the hated dead? What do we do with the bodies that we despise? The symbol that represents, I suppose. It's a story about a family, Antigone wants to bury her brother but her brother is an enemy of the State and what do we do in that circumstance. So it's about the notion of there are written laws, judicial laws, governmental legal systems that we prais by but there's also family and ideas of conscience and that idea of conscience, I guess, is the stuff that we're debating every day in our lives, whether it's gay marriage or euthanasia or any of those issues. There's a legal system and then there's a system of morality to the person, individual, and Sofhocles was trying to walk us down that rope.Themes rel today, incredible themes you're exploring in the film as well. Explain for us how you have felt about taking on this part which, of course, has stood the test of time and the adaptation, I mean that's quite fascinating to see that it's so relevant still?Yeah, well I've always been obsuccessed with Antigone and Sophocles version and then I read Damien's version and in awe of how much he understood intrinsically what that play was about and what Sophocles was trying to say. This version is so relevant and contemporary and playing a role like Antigone, she's a young girl who is a revolutionary and having a play revolving around a young female is quite extraordinary within itself. Her being the protagonist and Damien's adapted - adaptation is so wonderful that we get to see both sides of the fight. But yeah, she's angry and she's stubborn and she's, yet she's fighting for something she believes in.Damien, what are the risks in modernising a play like this? I guess in two ways, maybe, the risk of a contentious subject but also the risk of maybe alienating an audience that prefers the more conventional version?Yeah, I think that debate between what we might say the purists want and a contemporary more contemporary minded audience will never go away, I think. I guess the duty you feel as a theatre company, though, is purely to the audience, you know, to the notion of entertaining, an audience of gripping us and if we are going to look at shake spear plays or Elizabethan or Ainent Greek plays, why would we if we're not looking through them at the prism of our own experience. I imagine if Sophecles was still alive today he'd be stunned we're still performing his play but he'd be deeply affected by the fact that it's still so important to us and to simply see it as a museum piece feels to me like art for its own sake, I guess, rather than something a little more ambitious and personal, I guess.I mean Andrea, as well, you mentioned there that this is a play that is close to your heart. I imagine, though, that many of us will be familiar with maybe some of the concepts but not the story necessarily in Australia of Antigone, how are you feeling about sharing that story more broadly with an understand that may not understand it to the level that you do?I'm really excited to share it with an audience. I feel as if everyone's going to - the themes within it are so human and the characters are so flawed and passionate and I feel as if everyone is going to be able to relate to - Pretty accessible story.Yes, definitely.We know you mostly through Crownies, Alex and Eve. You were Eliza Doolittle. I would imagine that the challenges of different roles bring different emotional challenges and I suspect this one would be quite at the draining end of this scale, is that the case?You understand that, yeah, yeah, it's a tragedy. I weep wandering why I'm crying so much, I'm like that's right, it's a tragedy. Doing Janet King is wonderful. I've been lucky I've been able to play such tough women and it's always an honour to be able to play tough women and have young women look up to that and playing Janet King, she's also a tough woman but yeah, I guess it is quite draining but you have to understand that the stakes are so high within this context. So you've got to come on at 100% and finish at 100%. It's libIt's liberating watching them perform. That's what tragedies are about. They're about hope. They're giving us an opportunity to reason something about our morality. You shouldn't depress, you should leave uplifted.Do you all stay friends at the end?At the moment. Yeah, yeah. Because I mean that must be quite an intense process as well, working together, particularly for a new production.Yeah, yeah.Finding a way with it and, you know, developing all the intensity and the right cues with everybody.Yeah are, and we've got a new piece of writing too, it's always risky and you're working with a fantastic group of actors and we've really been pulling it apart and working out as a group what we think it means but it's that collaboration that is exciting. You've come in today losing your voice which we appreciate but maybe do actors like it when a director loses their voice after all the hard work?They were never listening anyway.We want his voice to come back. No, yeah, we do want it to come back. He's written such a beautiful adaptation. People shouldn't believe that it's different to the original text, it's not, his adaptation honours it entirely. That's the most exciting thing. I feel as if stiemsz when these tragedies maybe they're made to the epic is taken out and it's too domesticated and stuff because we feel as if an audiencience isn't - audience audience isn't going to understand these themes.They will, they're human. I feel like news used to be a very symmetrical thing where journalists loaded us with what we needed to know. Since social media and this new Assim met Cal form of communication we have in society we are a Greek chorus. Everyone has an opinion, everyone is laundering their conscience out there somewhere and so that conversation, I think, is so true to this play.I mean, for instance, this morning we're reporting about the ongoing air strikes in Aleppo and the situation there. How do you feel in terms of, you know, seeing that ongoing struggle being played out, not just in Syria but more broadly, you mentioned obviously the influence of the Boston marathon bombing story, how does it feel to continue to reflect upon these ongoing situations and tragedies when we're looking at something like this which is so historic and we're talking ancient times?That is the only part of it that's been depressing, in a sense, is each day we've all sort of had our, I guess, our minds on that pulse and each day we're coming in and sharing stories we're finding with each other and the Aleppo situation, the Mosul situation, the South Sudan situation, all of those things are so horrific and are very much the world of our story, you know, the episode on the Iraqi Kurdistan border with the 13 bodies in a truck that couldn't be buried due to a political borderline and all those things. It's just an ongoing story. That part's been very difficult in a way, hasn't it?Yeah. We've got a couple of refugee actors in our production, you know, who have had some personal experience of extreme trauma and so it's been, you know, a pretty human experience working on this play.Best of luck with the production. Thank you very much for sharing all of that with us this morning.Thanks very having us. With not much of a voice left.I can do voice-overs.Quite sexy I've been told.

Let's take a look at the satellite. A low pressure trough is producing areas of rain over northern WA and western Queensland with thundery showers over the Northern Territory. A trough is producing thunderstorms over SA, an unstable air flow following a front is generating gusty cold showers and storms over southern WA. Looking around the country:

The top stories from ABC News - the threat of flooding has temporarily eased in SA with emergency services focused on preparing for the next band of rain forecast for the State. Properties were flooded yesterday and overnight at Virginia, Two Wells and Lewiston north of Adelaide. Extensive sandbagging in Port Wakefield prevented any major damage. NSW is boosting the number of drum lines being deployed off the State's beaches in response to the latest shark attack last week on the north coast. So far 31 great white and 5 bull sharks have been caught by 15 smart drum lines being trialled. An air raid on the rebel-held eastern half of the Syrian city of Aleppo has hit the area's largest hospital for the second time in days. The Syrian-American Medical Society which supports the hospital says it's been struck by 2 barrel bombs. AFL premiership winners, the Western Bulldogs, have spent the night celebrating with family, friends, ex players and staff in Melbourne. The Bulldogs broke a 62-year premiership drought with the 22-point win over the Swans and coach Luke Beveridge says the club's next goal is prolonged success. Time to take a look at the front pages of today's major newspapers.Let's start with Queensland's Sunday Mail which has a story claiming the State's economic growth is being jeopardised by a well organised environmental movement using legal challenges, protests and social media.SA's Sunday Mail is focusing on the Western Bulldogs' grand final win as well as the continuing flooding in the south of the State.Field of dreams, the Sunday Telegraph is throwing its support behind Cronulla for tonight's NRL grand final clash between the Sharks and the Storm. The Sun Herald is also quickly forgetting the Swans' loss and is moving its focus to tonight's NRL final between Cronulla and Melbourne.Not surprisingly, the Herald Sun all about the Bulldogs' historic win, calling it a grand final Melbourne will never forget. Dream Dogs, the Sunday Tasmanian says yesterday's win is the greatest fairytale the AFL has ever known. The Sunday Territorian is also covering the Bulldogs' victory, 62 years after their last premiership. And top Dog, the Sunday Times is focusing on Perth's local boy, Norm Smith medal winner Jason Johannisen who helped the Bulldogs to their premiership win.Pakistani army commanders say there has been another exchange of fire with Indian troops across the unofficial border in Kashmir.The UN is calling for calm in the region disputed by both India and Pakistan where renewed fighting is forcing thousands of villagers from their homes. Villagers near the line of control in Indian administered Kashmir feel frighten pd a vulnerable. TRANSLATION: They were destroyed by earthquakes and floods. We have no trenches to protect our women and children. All around us is devastation. If there is a war it will be the ordinary people who suffer the most.Kashmir has been divided between India and Pakistan since 1947. These latest troubles threaten the ceasefire agreed 13 years ago.TRANSLATION: We don't want war because nothing good will come of it. People from that side of Kashmir and this side of Kashmir will die. That's why they should sit and talk. Only dialogue will resolve this issue.Tensions flared after Indian military commanders launched what they called surgical strikes on suspected fighters in Pakistan-administered Qarase Mir. Pakistan denies the operation happened and accuses India of deliberately stoking tensions between the two countries.Having verified everything on ground, checked everything on ground, I am one against rebutting this claim very vehemently. There is no such thing like a surgical strike or physical violation that happened. 400 kilometres away from Kashmir is the city of Faisalbad in Pakistan. One of two soldiers killed in cross-border fire on Thursday has been buried. The crowd of mourners chant "Long live the Pakistani army." Feelings are running high on both sides. The UN says it's working on ways to stop the fighting.The Secretary-General urges the Government of India and Pakistan to exercise maximum restraint and address the outstanding issues peacefully and through dialogue. Political tensions between India and Pakistan are spilling over into popular culture. In a show of solidarity with their armed forces, some Indian film producers have banned Pakistani actors and singers from working in India. Others, though, disagree with that. TRANSLATION: These are artists, these are 2 different subjects. They were terrorists. These artists, what do you think? Is an artist a terrorist? It's our Government who gives them work permits and visas. In Pakistan, Bollywood films are being boycotted by most major cinemas. Usually when we talk about smart phones and water the question is whether the device is waterproof but there's a bigger issue, researchers say, needs consideration. When we check our emails or surf the net, just how much water does the worldwide web use?Experts have estimated the download of a single gigabyte could use up to 200 litres of water. Dr Medani from the Imperial College London has investigated this topic. He joined me earlier from London.So at this point we're not quite sure about the exact number but we're estimating between 1 litre the 200 litres of water being involved in downloading 1 gigabyte of data. To give you a rough idea, at the higher end this is equivalent to the water needed for producing 1kg of tomatoes which is quite huge.And when we're talking about amounts as much as 200 litres of water, why is that? Why is so much water required in some instances?There are 2 major reasons, 1 is the requirement for cooling of the datacenters, the datacenters are constantly working whenever we download something, message each other, check emails, do a simple search. All of these are yoounl use - using a lot of energy. One is the need for getting rid of the heat produced in datacenters and the other is the energy that is burnt over there. So two reasons. One is cooling the datacenters and the other is the energy they're using. So indirect use of water in the production of energy and whatever, you know, no matter what the source. No matter what source they're using, there is a lot of water being used that way.And when we consider the exponential growth in the use of technology of this nature, that's going to mean a lot of water involved, isn't it? And we're seeing more and more of that? Yes, it is scary because modern people need more from the internet and we're increasing our reliance on the internet. That means increased user water or increased demand for water but also we are hearing the increased - no need for water in other sectors. We need more food, we need more water for drinking, we need more water for the environment. You in Australia appreciate the value of water, you have seen droughts in the past and a lot of climatic variability so you definitely know how valuable water is.Indeed we do. We're actually currently experiencing some floods so a little too much water at this point. But in terms of this as an issue, are we already seeing strategies being employed to try and minimise the amount of water involved either in the cooling side of the equation or also in terms of more sustainable energy use?We definitely - the whole industry has overlooked the impacts they're having on water. So I think the industry was not prepared for this. So the shift that we are seeing in behaviour is mostly because of the lack of water. I mean lots of these industries are located in California which is experiencing serious drought at the moment. So lack of water is forcing the industry to behave differently but also the good thing is that the users of internet are more careful about the environment. So there is some reputational risk there. If these companies that the ICT giants don't respond to what's happening at the moment, they can damage their reputation. So people can switch from one server to another, one internet provider to another because they're not happy with the environmental impacts of these giants. Lots of good, you know, lots of companies are now reacting Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Apple are doing really good, better than before. This is not enough. They are changing the location of their date centres, they're taking them to some colder places on the Earth. They're changing the energy types that they're using, a lot of solar plant and renewable energies. This is not enough but it's definitely helpful. We're doing better than before but a lot needs to be done.I understand, for instance, that Microsoft is looking at developing underwater datacenters. Is that something that is likely to be a possibility?You know, tech improvements are are fascinating. So it is hard to say what is not possible these days. They're trying it and the good thing about that is that they can place these datacenters closer to areas with more population because one of the problems we're having is moving these datacenters far away from places where we have huge populations. So there is some value in putting them closer to major population centres. That's something good about this type of technology. The other thing is if it's under water in terms of cooling, they need less energy and that is good. That is one of the fascinating ideas that is currently being tested. There are other methods like using the heat produced by datacenters for warming and heating some of the residential or commercial places. So lots of things are happening. It's really hard to tell what technology or technique is promising and which one will be used in the near future. But everyone is moving. They're all testing different things.Now you did mention there that consumers tend to be quite smart about making their choices. Just how can someone establish what are the environmental sustainability credentials, if you like, of a service that they're using or a particular type of technology that they're using? Unfortunately this industry has not been responsible enough in reporting what they have been doing and their environmental impacts but we can see another shift in the industry. Some of these companies are now like Facebook, for example, are now reporting what they're doing for some locations, some of the datacenters as they're becoming more environmental friendly, they're becoming more open about what they're doing. I think consumers can put pressure on these companies and ask for open access information and reporting and auditing and these kind of things. Unfortunately I think this industry has not been clear about what they have been doing but this is also changing.Dr Madani with the Imperial College in London. Nearly 40 years on from the moment that captured a nation's imagination, Ken Warby is at it again. He broke the world water speed report on a dam in the Snowy Mountains all those years ago, a mark yet to be surpassed.Now he's helping his son attempt to supersede him in the record books in a new speedboat the two are working on in the NSW city of Newcastle.It's a world record that's stood for almost 40 years.

Ken Warby reached a speed of over 500km/h in the NSW Snowy Mountains. It's a feat which saw him crowned the world water speed record holder. It was quite amazing. In my wildest dreams I'd never thought that I would hold the record this long. And in fact it was an easy run. For the power that we had in the engine at that stage it was pretty much a walk in the park and the boat behaved perfectly. It was a dream that I'd had since I was a teenager of breaking the world water speed record and to achieve it, that was the pinnacle of my life. It really, really was.Ken and his son David are putting the finishing touches on a powerboat they've spent the last 3 years building at a property in Newcastle.In the not too far distant future we'll break the world water speed record with it. As I get older I really appreciate what lease done and it's amazing to have him next to me while we're building the boat to break the record.It's a highly dangerous pursuit but the father and son team is committed to making history.The water speed record has got an 85% death rate and I, for a long time I tried to talk him out of it. I said go play with jet cars or do something else but don't get into the water speed record. But David's been building boats for quite a while and he's had circuit boats and, you know, I can understand what he wanted to do. I've been there, done that. So we had a long talk about it and then decided OK, maybe it's time.If he just jump in the jet boat and going "I'm going to break a water speed record" and af you go, that's how people have killed themselveses in the past. We've had some people in the original team where Dad broke the water speed record that will have a good test program and schedule put in place. I'm not that fazed by the issues. I know what I've built and I'm confident I will be able to drive it and get the job done.In the coming months, the pair will test their powerboat with the hope of attempting the record later this year.There's no doubt I want David to break the record, you know, the record should never live forever. I hoped early on that people would have broke my record but nobody did. But no, look, I'll be there to support him in every way that I possibly can and if he gets it and when he gets it or whatever it turns out, I will be a proud father.Time now to talk sport with Georgie Tunney. And Georgie, the Bulldogs talking about the next premiership and the premierships after that.Yes, exactly, guys. This might be just a bit of a snow ball affect, at least according to their coach, Luke Beveridge. He does have a very, very young side and he obviously believes in them as he has done all season and why not when they do actually eventually win the NRL - the AFL premiership, their first one in 62 years, you have a right to be happy. And I think a lot of fans would be happy as well. Let's go back to Whitton Oval with reporter Ben Lisson. You've made your way onto the oval. How many fans have started joining you already?Good morning, yes, the gates have just opened here at Whitton Oval and the lengthy line is starting to make its way in, as you can see. Thousands of people have already come into Whitten Oval to celebrate this amazing day. They haven't seen anything like it, as you mentioned n 62 years. This is a fantastic occasion for them and as I've mentioned a few times, this club knows that these things don't come around very often. So they're going to make the absolute most of it today. They had 10,000 at their final training session before the grand final, I reckon that number is going to be easily surpassed today. Yes, you said they're going to make the most of it today, did they make the most of it last night as well with the players celebrating a pretty historic grand final? Absolutely. There's a couple of people wondering whether we may ever see some of those players again. They've definitely enjoyed their activities over the evening and probably into the early hours of the morning and when I came to Whitton Oval this morning there was debris everywhere, empty beer bottles rolling in the wind and empty cases as well. So people have searchly enjoyed themselves, hopefully in the right spirit, of course. It's been a fantastic sense of atmosphere about this place for a good week or two and this is the culmination of all of that. Everything they've dreamed of has finally come true and spoke to plenty of Dogs fans and they were absolutely ecstatic. A few of them have lost their voice. That doesn't seem to matter. They're well and truly going to get into the spirit today.Ben, on the game itself, the day after the AFL grand final is always a debate about the Norm Smith medal, is there any controversy about that or is Johannisen and his 33 touches a worthy winner?I think when it comes to controversy, it's usually if it's been given to someone that really didn't deserve it. Johannisen certainly had a good game so I don't think anyone, particularly in the Bulldogs camp really cares that much, the premiership cup is what they came to get and they got it. As far as who was probably best on ground, there were a few others worthy of being up there. Josh Kennedy for Sydney was a stand out in the second term but Liam Picken had a big impact late in the game. A number of names floating about. Johannisen was certainly in my top 5 but as far as best on ground, look, it's 6 or 1, you can pick a number of players there that had a good game. It's a testament to the Bulldogs that they do have an even contribution across their team, that it's too hard to pick the best player because they all have good contributions throughout the match. I think a lot of the players, if not all of them, will definitely be the fans' favourites a little bit later this morning as well once the players e - eventually arrive with that premiership cup. I wanted to talk to you about Luke Beveridge. He only came to the club a couple of seasons ago. How has he been able to do, some would think the impossible, and take them from where they were to premiership winners?Well, it has been a rapid rise for this club and as I mentioned, they get an even contribution from their 22. They haven't really had a great deal of star power for the last few years. So this guy seems to think he's a bit of a star. But the whole side itself has obviously been a massive contribution from everybody and Luke Beveridge has always been able to get that contribution. You seem to agree, is that right? Yeah, he agrees. But Luke Beveridge has always been very good at getting the most out of the young guys and we've seen that and he's also clearly one that the players love to play for and we saw that with him giving the medal to Bob Murphy after the game. It's those actions that give the player assense of purpose they're playing for something.I have to agree with you. Ben making friends there at Whitton Oval, we'll check in with you in another couple of hours, enjoy.Thank you.Great to see and hopefully the real live Sid the Bulldog will be making the appearance. The Bulldogs mascot who goes to every single game.Everyone is getting on in action.So that was just some bloke?Yeah, that was a bloke, not the real living, breathing Bulldog.My goodness, someone has got their own mascot outfit.Yes, yes, yes. That was, of course, one fairytale that we saw yesterday afternoon, there might be another one later on tonight in the NRL. Cronulla up against the Melbourne Storm. Now the Melbourne Storm will start favourites for this match. They are the minor premiers, of course, from this season. It has been a remarkable rise for Cronulla. We saw only 2 years ago they were the wooden spooners. So a very similar rise, really. There were a lot of similarities between the Sharks this season and the Western Bulldogs. The name difference being that they are up against a team that have a lot of experience. Their professionalism personified and you have some of the best players that we've ever seen play the game in Cooper Cronk and Cameron Smith, his captain. Now, those 2, they have, of course, played at the highest possible levels. They're obviously always in the Australian team as well as the Queensland team. They have enjoyed great success with both sides there. The challenge for the Sharks will be actually taking on that defensive unit of the Storm. They really have revolution ised defence. For better or worse with this wrestle, which is always a controversy when Melbourne play in the NRL. They've changed the game in terms of how you should defend. But if Cronulla can employ the kind of attack they displayed way back in round 4 this year, against Melbourne, to actually upset them, they only won that game 14-6 but it started their 15-straight winning streak in the NRL this season which definitely got them to one of the top 3 spots on the ladder. If they can employ that again, that can test out Melbourne because Melbourne don't like to be run around. We saw that again with the Broncos towards the end of the regular season as well. And we also saw the Raiders last week in the prelim final, if they got on the outside edges, especially on the right edge for the Storm, a lot of trouble could be caused. So we could be seeing another fairytale, guys. But I think Melbourne Storm.You just had to get a State of Origin mention in there, couldn't you? You Queenslanders can't help yourself.Have to.The Wallabies last night, the drought continues in pretorior - Pretoria? It continues in the rugby for if Wallabies. This is their 7th straight loss in Pretoria which is compounded because they've only ever played 7 times against the Springboks in Pretoria. They've lost all of them. This one they went down by 8 points, 18-10. And one in man in particular appeared to be the difference. Morne Steyn, he kicked all 18 of South Africa's points with 4 penalties and 2 drop goals as well. Unfortunate sin binning there for Israel Folau. They're heading to London next week to take on Argentina.We'll think about that, shall we? A bit of work there.They definitely have a lot to do.Thank you, Georgie. Well that is all from us here at New Weekend Breakfast. I'm Miriam Corowa.And I'm Ben Worsley. Have a great weekend.

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Hello. Welcome to The World This Week, I'm Beverley O'Connor. Coming up: Lies sexism and the right stuff. The US presidential debate.I will release my tax returns against my lawyers' wishes when she releases her 33,000 emails that have been deleted.Religion and politics in Indonesia. Be careful on judgement day. God will ask you why did you choose the infidels as the leader while I have warned you not to? And the death of one of Israel's founding fathers.I'm sure I shall

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