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(generated from captions) This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Good morning and welcome to News Breakfast, it's Wednesday. It's great to have your company many morning, I'm Michael Rowland.And I'm Mary Gearin. Making the news today - foreign ownership debunked. New figures show nearly 90% of farms are in Australian hands.

An Australian man dies in a shark attack while kite surfing in New Caledonia.The PM talks tough on terror as extremist propaganda takes aim at Australian targets.We have a threat level of probable so it is a real, it is a real threat.Leading sport this morning, the Socceroos take a big stride towards World Cup qualification with a win in Abu Dhabi.Severe weather warnings in the south-west, south coast and great southern in WA.A long-awaited audit of Australian farmland has exploded the myth that our farms are being sold off to foreign interests, revealing Australians control close to 90% of our farmland. The agricultural land register, compiled by the Australian tax office, shows 13.6% of Australia's farmland is foreign owned. The equivalent of 52 million hectares.More than half of that, or 7.1%, is owned by British interests. The US is second on the list with a 2% stake followed by the Netherlands and Singapore which each have less than 1%. Now, interestingly, China is 5th on the list with a relatively small 0.38% stake in Australian farmland. But it would have been pushed firmly into second place had the Federal Government not vetoed the proposed sale of that massive Kidman cattle station to a Chinese consortium. So a very interesting survey result there and aimed to exploding those myths about who owns what or how much Australian farmland is owned by foreign interests. You wonder how much the maths of that, the stats will affect people's attitude towards foreign ownership because it's so emotive, it may just very well go beyond these stats.And And some of the arguments are so deeply entrenched. Can I welcome back to the News Breakfast desk Mary Gearin. Great fo have you onboard.It's been some time.It's like riding a bike. Mary straight from her fantastic coverage of the Rio Games in Brazil. You're also there keeping PK in check as well. I hear quietly.No, no, what happens in Rio stays in Rio. So we'll go no further.It's good to have you onboard. Virginia is still unwell and we'll discuss what happened in the so-called ABC swamp with PK maybe a bit later on, just a few tidbits. Now let's move onto other news this morning and an Australian man has died after being attacked by a shark while kite surfing in New Caledonia. The 50-year-old WA man fell into the water near Koumac and was bitten on the thigh by a large shark. It's the second fatal shark attack in New Caledonia in the past 6 months. There were 96 shark attacks globally last year, that is the highest number ever recorded.The PM will focus on security and the threat of terrorism during talks at the ASEAN summit in Laos. Malcolm Turnbull's meeting with his Singaporean and Japanese counterparts over the next few days. Leaders from Russia, India and the US are also attending the event. The security talks come after propaganda released by Islamic militants released yesterday reportedly encouraging extremists to attack targets in Sydney and Melbourne.Counter-terrorism has also dominated talks in Berlin as Foreign Minister Julie Bishop and the Defence Minister Marise Payne met their German counterparts. Julie Bishop says they've had constructive discussions with the German ministers at counter-terrorism and cyber attacks as part of ongoing efforts to combat the rise of extremist fighters.Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte has delivered a bloodthirsty anti-terror speech vowing to personally tear apart and eat Islamic militants. While telling a Filipino audience at the ASEAN summit in Laos, he planned to target terrorist group Abu Sayyaf, President Duterte said give me vinegar and salt and I will eat you. The crackdown on drug dealers is gaining momentum with new police data showing an average of 44 people being killed each day. Nearly 3,000 people have been killed in antidrug operations since June.In Mexico, hurricane Newton has battered the up-market resort area of Los Carbos, forcing 1,500 people to spend the night in shelters. Wind speeds of 145km/h when it made landfall at the southern tip of the Baja Californian peninsula. There are about 14,000 tourists staying in the region but so far there are no reports of injuries.Former bank manager in NSW has been accused of stealing more than $90,000 from customer accounts. It's alleged the 35-year-old man used bank log-ins to access accounts from a bank in Cootamundra.Let's take a quick look at finance. Del is still unwell this morning as well.

And now for a weather update, here's Vanessa.Good morning.

Thank you very much, Vanessa. Let's get more now on that long-awaited audit of Australian farmland. Political reporter Matt Doran joins us from Parliament House. Good morning. It's very interesting findings by the survey put together by the Australian Tax Office.That's right, good morning to you. It's likely to be food for thought for many this morning because the issue of foreign investment is a very hot topic here in Canberra and right around the country. Looking at some of those figures, it does show that the UK is still number 1 when it comes to foreign-owned agricultural land, probably a hang up from our colonial roots and then the US coming in after that. Interestingly, though, as you mentioned earlier, China a bit further down the list with just a very small proportion of foreign-owned farmland but they would have been tipped very higher than that had the Kidman and Co empire sale to Chinese investors not been blocked on national security reasons. Of course one parcel of that land does fall within the Woomera prohibited zone in SA, the weapons testing range there. So had that changed we would have seen a significant spike in China's interest there but still the UK still very much in front and as we continue to have this foreign investment debate no doubt there will be a further discussion about where to from here and what sort of influences will grow over the coming years.Indeed. Let's move now from foreign-owned farmland to foreign-sourced political donations. Lots of debate about that again this morning as pressure continues on Labor Senator Sam Dastyari over his move to get a Chinese government-linked businessman or corporation to pay some of his travel expenses.Senator Dastyari broke his silence yesterday holding a press conference. It was something of an apology but not able to fully explain what he was apologising for because there are still outstanding questions as to why the top education institute, this Chinese company, intervened and paid this $1,670 personal debt to the Commonwealth on Senator Dastyari's behalf. He has apologised. He said it was wrong but he still wasn't able to explain to the waiting media there why this company intervened, why they saw fit to pay that debt but he did emphasise that they didn't get anything in response. It came after something of a slap down from the Opposition Leader Bill Shorten who continually regarded or referred to Senator Dastyari as a junior minister, that's raise - sorry, a junior senator, that raised some eyebrows because he's the manager of Opposition manager of business and on the front bench. It fires up the debate about foreign political donations. Labor says there should be an all-out ban, they've joined the Greens in that regard and on Lateline Coalition back-bencher Eric Abetz says he's been of the view for some time that foreign political donations do tend to undermine the sovereignty of Australia's political system.As a matter of principle I think it is important that those that involve themselves within the body politic of Australia should be within Australia.Eric Abetz there. Matt Doran in Canberra, thank you.Now staying with politics, Malcolm Turnbull says our region needs to focus its energy on a full-court press to counter violent extremism. He was speaking shortly after arriving in Vientiane. With one summit scaled, the PM flew from China to Laos and another formal welcome on another red carpet. He's joining leaders across Asia. Its bringing together regional power and 8 of Australia's top 10 trading partners but here the focus is more on security.This is the premier forum for discussing and resolving issues of national security, economic security in our region.And the PM focused on a call from Islamic State for lone wolf attacks on significant sites in Australia. Australians can be put at risk, and indeed have lost their lives. So we're all in it together. It's got to be a very strong, full-court press against terrorism. We're committed to that and I'm looking forward to some very candid and constructive discussions over the next few days.But the security backdrop to this meeting is growing nervousness about China's fortification of islands in the South China Sea. No doubt it was among the talking pount - points when the PM met his Singaporean counterpart who has said if ASEAN can't deal with a major problem on its doorstep, then in the long run no-one would take it seriously. But for the cameras, all the talk was about the strengthening ties between the two nations. Chris Uhlmann there in Laos. Now the Federal Trade Minister, Steve Ciobo, has been meeting with his British counterpart hoping to broker a new trade agreement with the UK.Mr Ciobo's also travelling to Brussels looking to build support for a separate post Brexit free trade deal with the EU and the Minister joins us now from London. Steve Ciobo, good morning to you.Good morning, Michael.Let's start in London. What are the prospects of Australia forging a free-trade agreement with Britain after the Brexit vote?Well, the prospects are very positive. I was pleased today to join with Secretary of State Liam Fox, the UK - my UK counterpart and the two of us issued a joint announcement that we would be forming a joint working group to scope out what a free trade agreement between Australia and the UK will look like post Brexit. That post Brexit is important because the UK, until they formally do exit the European Union are not in a position to commence formal negotiations. So it's important that we have a lot of preliminary discussions and a scoping study for that point at time in which the UK finally exits the EU.How important would a trading partnership be with the UK without the heft of it being attached to the EU?I think it's very important. If you look at two-way terms of trade, the UK is our 7th largest trading partner. If you look at the total pool of investment from the UK into Australia, and in addition to that from Australia into the UK, it's worth around $850 billion. So there are a lot of strong ties between Australia and the UK and of course, Michael, there's strong historical bonds as well. We can build off that, we can make sure Australia and the UK have a brighter future together and that's what I'm wanting to capitalise on in Australia's national interest.What's your impression from meeting British politicians and policymakers there during your visit and grasping for leads as to what to do, where to go after the Brexit vote?No, I wouldn't describe it that way. I think what the UK is really feeling is a new-found sense of energy, about being masters of their own destiny and certainly very keen to focus on what they can do to drive a pro free trade agenda. Australia and the UK both want to be international beacons when it comes to the benefits of free trade. So what I've discovered in the conversations that I've had, is a strong political commitment, to making sure that we're able to boost national prosperity, both in Australia and in the UK. We know that a free-trade agreement, one that has next to no or ideally no barriers to trade is a kind of situation that means that we've got more efficiency, less red tape and Aussie businesses that are better able to trade with a very substantial market like the UK. Let's zip across the English Channel now. How confident are you of building support of an Australian trade agreement with the European Union?Again, another important market for Australia. Discussions with the European Union are more mature than discussions that we've been having with the UK, by that I mean more advanced. We're still in a scoping stage with respect to the European Union but I expect that that scoping stage will conclude by the end of this year. I hope then that we clear the first hurdle which is that having done the scoping study, we can look at what opportunities present themselves to formally commence free-trade agreement negotiations between the European Union and Australia. That's really important. It's abig market for Australia. Some terrific potential gains in a range of different areas. I want to focus on agriculture but also broader than that. I want it to be comprehensive, high quality, digital economy, services, all these types of things. Speaking of foreign investment, one big form of foreign investment is ownership of Australia's agricultural land. You will be aware of the new survey by the Australian Taxation Office. Only 14% of Australian farmland is owned by foreign interest and the biggest stake in that group was UK interest. Do you think that would surprise a lot of people?Yes. I beg your bard - pardon, do I think what?That there's only 14% of Australian farmland owned and the biggest foreign stake is owned by a UK interest, not Chinese, would that surprise a lot of people?It doesn't surprise me but I guess I've had the privilege of seeing a lot of these numbers and seeing investment flows into Australia as investment minister. But I do think it reinforces the need to put a factual information before the Australian people. That's been a core focus for the Coalition. We want to have transparency around us. We don't want people to go off with only part of the information. Frankly, and I think it's unfortunate, there's been a lot of media discussion, I'm not pointing the finger of blame at any particular organisation, but a lot of media discussion which unduly places a lot of attention and focus on China and the fact is that China is just not at the level where a lot of Australians would think it is, based upon what they're seeing portrayed in the media on a regular basis. Now I really reinforce that we must have foreign investment into a country and the reason we've got to have it is because that is what drives economic growth in Australia and that is important because that's what drives jobs for Australians. So we need to embrace investment into our country, we have, for more than 100 years, and it is a vital ingredient to the continued economic growth of our country.Steve Ciobo, the Trade Minister joining us from London. Thank you for your time, Minister.It's a pleasure, thank you.Now alarming figures show up to 60% of child sexual assaults are committed by other children. Child protection group Bravehearts has launched an intervention program in Queensland. Children experiment through curiousity. It's all part of growing up. But child protection advocates are concerned about an upsurge in harmful sexual behaviour. The incidents that we're talking about with children go from the very low grade ones to the less concerning to the very concerning and including, you know, including the actual rape of children. Bravehearts research shows the sex attacks often happen among siblings but also in schools and day care centres.This is an increasing phenomena, we've been saying it for a long time and it needs to be addressed.Through right to information, the ABC has uncovered at least 12 child-on-child attacks in primary schools in just over a year, from sex play in toilets to students being indecently assaulted in the classroom. The blame has been pointed to sexualised images available online.They will mimic that behaviour, they are curious, they will try and find out what's going on.It's alarming that the statistics show us that 30 to 60% of child sexual abuse is occurring from other children.We do need to talk about this issue more. The ways which we can educate, empower and protect our children.Turning corners will provide individual and family counselling as well as home visits.There's a cry for this service out there and we couldn't ignore it anymore.The program is the first of its kind in Queensland and is funded for a year. Let's check out the front pages now of the major newspapers around the country this Wednesday morning kicking off with the Daily Telegraph and that paper reports, Australians control almost 90% of the country's agricultural land, exploding the myth that properties are being sold off to foreigners.Labor Senator Sam Dastyari is pictured giving a thumbs up on the front page of the Sydney Morning Herald which writes he's been given a second chance by Bill Shorten over the Chinese payments issue.That thumbs up was before his, many would argue, unsuccessful media conference later in the day. The Australian reports the front bencher has apologised of new revelations a Chinese company that paid a $40,000 legal bill for the senator has formal ties with Beijing.To the Financial Review, and Malcolm Turnbull is promising frank discussions with regional leaders over the South China Sea dispute, with the PM saying Australia's prosperity and stability are at stake if tensions are allowed to escalate.Lone wolf threat, The Age reports Islamic State's propaganda call for attacks on Australians but authorities are playing down any threat to AFL fans this weekend.What about the NRL fans? The Northern Territory News reports a second teenager has been indecently assaulted at the Centre nats car festival.The West Australian writes drug kingpin pool a Paul Musarri will spend the rest of his life in jail after being caught in a police string.The West Australian reports Tim Meehan and a law clerk have been fired after allegations they took more than $160,000 from their law firm.The Guardian Australia, Catalyst host Maryanne Demasi loses a compensation claim after breaking her hip in a jogging accident.And the hurld Tsun says Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews is facing another fire fighting crisis with the top brass saying it won't fold to union demands for more control in a pay deal.The Mercury, Hobart's parking inspectors will start wearing cameras to protect themselveses from angry motorists.The Advertiser reports good winter rains and average temperatures have led to a bumper grain and plant crop meaning thousands of job opportunities for casual harvest workers across the State.And the Canberra Times says it will be standing room only at Canberra Stadium on Saturday when the mighty Canberra Raiders take on the Sharks in the NRL qualifying final. That will be a fantastic match to watch and Canberra's looking pretty good.With Jack Whiten now let off.He got off.He got off the #let Jack play clearly, you know, influenced - no, obviously it didn't, but there was a huge social media response. It was just joy across the Twitter verse.So we'll talk about that more with PK shortly. Let's talk about now dairy farmers. We can't talk enough about the massive problems being faced by dairy farmers as a result of the big dairy processors crunching that farm gate price, the price they pay dairy farmers for the milk produced on their farms. Lots of blow back as well on the major supermarkets for also driving the prices down, but we see an attempt this morning, Mary, by one of those supermarket chains, which starts with C, teaming up with the Victorian Farmers Federation to try to put some money back to those struggling dairy farmers.They're going to have a $2. 50, we're told, carten of milk. Now what that will mean is 40 cents of that will go towards a farmer's fund which will help with the unions with all of the farmers affected by those milk wars but you'd have to think, and we see pictures of that supermarket we see just there, you have to think that will rest largely on whether people consider this a cynical move. 40 cents of this $2. 50 will go towards it, there's an extra 10 cents in there for Coles as well. Will this work? Will you go out to buy this milk in order to help the farmers or do you think that it's a cynical stunt?Nicely put and I think that's the dilemma faced by lots of people who buy milk regularly from Coles and may have to have that dilemma when they go to their milk shelf today. I'd like to get your views on that and perhaps you're a dairy farmer as well, in particular very interested to hear what you think about this.

Let's go to sport, PK. You and I thought you filling in yesterday was pretty good.Not everyone thought that.We got away with one day of it.It's great to see Mary here. We worked together in Rio. It's like the Olympics all over again.Worked and party.It was all work, except for the feathers. Tim Cahill came off the bench to score the winning goal. This is a great result for the Australian team. He replaced Tommi Uric. It means Australia is on top of Group B with 2 wins from 2 matches. Let's see the goal from Cahill.

Decent ball in. Cahill, he's there again. One touch from Timmy Cahill. One small step towards Russia for Australia, perhaps. 25 minutes into the most energy-sapping conditions you can imagine. Somehow he pulls out an effort to support Mass Luongo. He hits the cross of the night and Socceroos fans say finally a delivery of substance.I get the rewards for believing in the system and, you know, rewarded by a beautiful cross by Brad. But all the work goes to the boys. Everyone that has put in an effort and that's what we've created in the team, a real togetherness.It's a great start. A win at home against Iraq and an away win against the United Arab Emirates which beat Japan last week. The T20 ton from Glenn Maxwell has helped Australia to a world record score and a big win over Sri Lanka. Maxwell smacked 145 from 60 balls and his side made 3/263. That is the best of all time over 20 overs. The hosts were restricted to 9/178. They were never going to get near 263. There's a few shots from Maxwell. He was in rare form. He had been dumped from the 50 overs team but looked very comfortable opening the batting. Let's hear from Maxwell.It was nice to get a chance and bat up the top. It's probably a slightly easier place to bat for a stroke player like myself and to get through that first 6 and carry on was pleasing.The Western Bulldogs say 4 important senior players could return to the team for tomorrow night's elimination final against West Coast. The captain Easton Wood is a confirmed starter after missing the final round with an ankle injury. The coach says Jack McCrae and Tom Liberatore have recovered and will be fit to play. They're all but 100% ready to play. And Jake Stringer is a chance to return. The Bulldogs, that's an elimination final so if they don't win it they won't be playing next week and they're going to make all those players available. Canberra full-back Jack Wighton, speaking of being available, is free to play in the finals after having his ban overturned. Wighton had faced a 4-game suspension but his lawyer successfully argued his arm wasn't tucked in at the first point-of-contact. Jennifer Browning was there. It's good news for Raiders fans here at the NRL judiciary with the news that star full-back Jack Wighton has been cleared to play in this year's finals series. Now he risked a 4-match ban by challenging the shoulder charge here at the NRL judiciary but his lawyer has successfully argued him off that charge. The charge being overturned meaning he can play in this weekend's match against the Sharks. Here's a little of what Jack Wighton had to say after the verdict was handed down.Very excited. It's been a bit of a rough start to the week but can't wait to get out there. Were you sweating bullets waiting for this to start?I guess so, it's been a long day.With so much riding on the Raiders' finals campaign, a number of fans even drove up from Canberra to the judiciary to see how it unfolded and I can tell you they are very, very excited. Here's a little of what they had to say.I'm very excited. I was a bit worried, to be honest. We lose a lot in his defence but we now know he will be there and a full squad pretty much and there should be no excuses why we shouldn't get the win right now. Jack Wighton clear to play. He will return to training with the Raiders ahead of Saturday's qualifying finals against the Sharks at Canberra Stadium. Jennifer Browning reporting there and if Jack Wighton is a good footballer, his lawyer must be one hell of a mouthpiece.I think that lawyer would be very popular not just amongst sports people but everyone wanting a lawyer in Australia. He did good work when the pictures suggested otherwise.I thought he was in trouble, but these things happen on the edge of finals. Maybe it was the social media campaign.It was a pretty ferocious social media campaign.#let Jack play.They were green with anger. Anyway, he's going to play in the finals. It's good to have all the best players play in the finals. That's one way of looking at it.But your Bulldogs, mate, I'm a bit worried about them, they're bringing all the injured players back.A bit worried as well but you never know, the finals dynamics can be very interesting and who knows what might happen in the west tomorrow night. Thanks, PK. Let's check your weather now. Vanessa, good morning.Let's start with your photos. Michael got a little more than he bargained for on the Whitsundays when he was treated to a display in those vast waters. Nevertheless he had a whale of a time. Let's take a look at the satellite image. Not one but two fronts for the south-west. Overnight winds of. Coastal areas may see those peak gusts of 125km/h and there is a severe weather warning. The first front is weakening. The second will come in this afternoon with the odd light shower around the inland trough and it's a very warm Wednesday. Tomorrow, rain oemp eastern SA into western Victoria, northeastern Tasmania. The rain could cause flash flooding on Friday over northern Tasmania all the way up into NSW. For Queensland today:

Plenty coming up on Breakfast this morning including flaming men on horseback and a guest appearance from actor Stephen Segal. What's not to love? The sport's worlds antidote to the Olympics the world Nomad Games gets under way in Kyrgyzstan. First Mary with all the latest news. New Federal Government data has revealed the majority of foreign-owned farmland in Australia is held by interests in the UK. The agricultural land register shows just 13.6% of Australia's farmland is foreign owned. The majority in Queensland, the Northern Territory and WA. The UK and US are the sector's largest investors with 7 and 2% respectively. Interestingly, China is 5th on the list with a relatively small 0.38% stake. And an Australian man has died after being attacked by a shark while kite surfing off New Caledonia. The 50-year-old WA man fell into the water near Koumac and was bitten on the thigh by a large shark. It's the second fatal shark attack in New Caledonia in the past 6 months. There were 98 shark attacks globally last year, the highest number ever recorded. The PM will focus on security and the threat of terrorism during talks at the ASEAN summit in Laos. Malcolm Turnbull is meeting with his Singaporean and Japanese counterparts over the next few days. Leaders from Russia, India and the US have also attending the event. The security talks come after propaganda released by Islamic militants yesterday reportedly encouraged extremists to attack targets in Sydney and Melbourne. And counter-terrorism has also dominated talks in Berlin as Foreign Minister Julie Bishop and Defence Minister Marise Payne meant their German counterparts. Julie Bishop says they've had constructive discussions with the German ministers at counter-terrorism and cyber attacks as part of ongoing efforts to combat the rise of extremist fighters.And further to that story, Julie Bishop and Marise Payne have held talks with their German counterparts in Berlin, as Mary said, discussing international and regional security. Ms Bishop says she hopes they can collaborate on a solution as both nations struggle to cope with increasing numbers of citizens going to fight for terror groups abroad. Germany is a natural partner for us in so many ways and in the area of counter-terrorism I was struck by the fact that, like Australia, Germany also has a number of citizens who have become radicalised, who have been attracted to the horrific ideology of ISIL or Daish and are taking part in the conflicts in Syria and Iraq. Australia like wise has a similar challenge. We have about 100, 120 citizens, Germany on a per capita basis something similar, 6, 700. And so we can share information, share ideas, share experiences, share intelligence to ensure that together with other members of the like-minded coalition, we can defeat this scourge of terrorism that is not only a regional threat in the Middle East, but is a global threat. Julie Bishop there. Now, the media arm of Islamic State has, of course, released that propaganda material issuing a call to arms for terror attacks on Australian soil.The magazine that's been published in English for the first time identifies specific locations in Melbourne and Sydney, prompting police and security agencies to address public concerns. Global terror expert and chair in global Islamic politics at Deakin University Professor Greg Barton joins us in the studio. Thanks for coming in.Good to be here.People will be really distraught listening to these sort of threats, how concerned do you think we will be?I think Commissioner Graham Ashton was right when he said it's propaganda. It was just last week the second in charge of Islamic State, the guy in charge of media and messaging was killed, apparently, in a strike just near Al-Bab in northern Syria. It's a reminder that they're under pressure and of course they're putting up propaganda. They've got this new magazine in 7 languages, in each of those 7 language groups they're naming local places. So I think that's why we're not feeling too worried about the naming of Broadmed orks and Brunswick and Bondi and Bank stown but all the same police behind the scenes are working hard.It's propaganda but as you well know, Greg, there are no shortage of young people, mainly young men out there who would be receptive to such a message. Should we be worried about that aspect of it?It's not something the general public should spend a lot of time worrying about. It's something the authorities and police should worry about. There's some frustrated young people out there that might do something rash and that's what IS is gambling on. This is as much as anything a crowd sourcing bid, who wants to try to be famous. And you've got families, hundreds of Australian families who have seen recruiters come into their lives and touch the lives of their kids. For them it's a chilling reminder.It's chilling because the specified nature of these threats as well, isn't it?Yes.It's one thing to tell the public well look, this nature of terrorism is to attack soft targets and everyone is generally speaking acknowledging and accepting of that now. , which is a terrible state of affairs, but to actually talk about the suburbs, that's a new step, is it?It is a new step and the worry is that when somebody living near one of those locations sees that name they might say now is my time, that's my area, I can do that. Most of the lone wolf attacks have been in areas where the attacker or attackers is familiar and even the November 13 attacks in Paris, it was local guys who knew the area, the same thing with Brussels. One of the 7 languages of this new publication is Indonesian so they've got local places mentioned, they're worried. But in German and French they're mentioning local places as well and they're not going to get a blanket response around the world but they may get some response somewhere and that's the worry.Is this, I guess, perverse out reach to the rest of the world yet another reflection of the military setbacks IS is continuing to suffer in both Iraq and Syria?I think it certainly is but I think we sort of perhaps take a little bit too much comfort in that. This group is a hybrid organisation so it is important to really reduce them down to the bare minimum on the ground in the Middle East. But even when we've done that, they've got a global insurgency and this global insurgency, particularly the last 12 months they've pushed hard on that and they've been saying in their propaganda, look, you can destroy us on the cities of Iraq and Syria but we'll still be around, we'll be in your cities.And if these lone wolf attacks between the next wave of attacks then effectively what happens here, it will only inspire another form of attack potentially.That is the worry and of course Australia is in a relatively lucky position but for Europe the thought of is you destroy these guys in Syria and Iraq, how many flood back through Turkey into Europe. How many are already there? We know they've planned, as it were, sleeper cells, literally, preparing for attacks. We're in a better position but we can still have some kid frustrated from travelling who says I will do something.Are you expecting to see more of this sort of material now this has been published?On their glossy front page it says issue one, the suggestion is they will have regular issues. We've seen 15 ish - issues of their English mag - magazine. While everyone has been told to go about their business, do you think that the general public, you know, needs to be put on a different level now of watch the alert and not alarmed slogan to come back, is that where we're at?I think there's two things there. One is that we're at a high enough level now. We've got the message and we don't want to overcook it otherwise people stop paying aenction the. If you're queuing up at the MCG or SCG, places that are mentions and you see something anywhere else that disturbs you, better to speak up and keep quiet. Hundreds of families have been touched by somebody trying to reach their kids and for those families or anyone in that situation, if they see somebody slipping away and sort of slipping into darkness, somebody's drawing them away from their old friends, their ideas have shifted, they're spending a lot of time online alone better to speak up and get help rather than something bad happening. As always, we appreciate your insights.Thanks.Now greyhound trainer Tom Noble has avoided jail time for animal cruelty.The RSPCA says it's disappointed the man at the centre of the baiting scandal has been handed a holily suspended sentence.Tom Noble left the Ipswich court house counting his blessings. I'm lucky so far, I'd say.The 69-year-old last week pleaded guilty to 15 counts of serious animal cruelty for using live possums, piglets and rabbits to blood greyhounds at his property in 2014. District Court judge Alexander Hornerman-Rehn described the practice as barbaric.

Noble, who has been banned from the industry for life was spared time behind bars with the judge noting his age, poor health and that he's the primary carer for his wife.

The court heard Noble grew up in an age when live baiting was acceptable and he'd already suffered punishment by being vilified and ostracised from the greyhound racing second - sector.There's no excuse for it and it doesn't matter how you're brought up, it's just not right.The maximum penalty for serious animal cruelty is 7 years' jail. The judge said Noble's 3-year wholly suspended sentence will act as a deterrent to other trainers. The RSPCA disagrees. Somebody who has done something so serious over such a long period of time x for them to receive 3 years and not go to prison, I would absolutely consider that to be a setback.Noble didn't challenge the secret video footage which was obtained illegally by animal activists like other trainers have. His lawyer says he wanted to demonstrate remorse and accept his punish ment.His Honour did take into account he'd been vilified in the media and experienced some backlash from the charges before the court and that was obviously consideration of the court in handing down sentence.Noble's defence team insists he's learnt his lesson. Now a world away from the multibillion-dollar global spectacle that is the Olympics, athletes from 40 countries have gathered in Kyrgyzstan for the world Nomad Games.Watch out for this. As Bill Bainbridge reports, the event is designed to celebrate the nomadic heritage of the central Asian nations.

It started with flaming men on horseback.

Before hundreds of musicians and dancers filled the stage for a spectacular opening ceremony. The President personally invited the guest of honour, American actor, musician and environmentalist Stephen Segal, who dressed in traditional Kyrga's traditional warrior armour. Its message is an antidote to the hyper commercial and competitive Olympics.TRANSLATION: In a modern world, people forget their roots. The danger emerges of the disappearance of unique culture and nations. The borders of the countries change. The destruction of the environment leads to catastrophic consequences on a regional and world scale.No mads on the other hand, hold lessons for the rest of the world.TRANSLATION: The careful attitude of nomads towards the environment, the preservation of the ancestors' heritage by nomads has become the subject of careful attention and study. This is evidenced by the big number of participants here today.Held in eastern Kyrgyzstan, the competition is made up of 23 events. That includes archery, eagle hunting and cock bury, a type of polo played with a freshly slaughtered goat. There's also this wrestling competition known as muss wrestling where competitors battle for control of a stick. It's attracted thousands of visitors but unlike the other global Games, accommodation for athletes and fans is not a problem. TRANSLATION: We're retired grandmothers but despite this, we've arrived here after travelling 600 clom terse and brought a nomad tent to participate.And it's not just about the sport, there's also the chance to show off traditional arts and culture. The Games, and the songs, continue until September 8.

If I was you, Mary Gearin, having starred as the face of the ABC's coverage of the Olympics in Rio I would feel short-changed having seen what was on offer there in Kyrgyzstan.Absolutely. I wish we'd seen more of that. That is the spirit that you want in an Olympics. I wish that could be expanded.None of this boring Michael Phelps churning up the pool and this and that on the athletics track. Flaming men on horseback.Absolutely. Freshly slaughtered goats as part of the entertainment.Wrestling dog like over a stick.But you know sponsorship will get involved and then they will all get cynical and they will be wearing lycra.Exactly. Enjoy it while it lasts, folks.Now we're looking at today's papers and we're joined by management consultant Kate Roffey. Thanks for joining us. Talking of cynicism, and we all want to get away from it but we can't get away from it at the moment when it comes to politics.We never do when it comes to politics. Looking at the Sydney Morning Herald and this is all over the papers this morning, we started out with some conversations about foreign political donations should be banned and all of a sudden, and I'm not sure why Malcolm Turnbull came out with this last week, but he came out and said well perhaps only people that are enrolled on the electoral voting roll should be allowed to give political donations in which case virtually everybody is out, so that rules out your companies and unions as well as foreign investors. This article today is talking the Australian Electoral Commission have come out and said if thatwise the case then parties would lose about 90% of of their cash gifts in terms of donations if it was only people enrolled to vote formally who are allowed to give party donations. That doesn't necessarily sound like a bad thing, if it meant we could cut down on some of that advertising guff we get throughout the political campaigning it might be a positive thing. But really, this has gone a bit crazy here to start to talk about that sort of donation limitation to really individuals. I mean they're just not going to pick up significant portions of money because as an individual, as an owner of a company or something, I might want to give but it's always going to go through my company for the various benefits you might get. It's hard to see people getting riled enough, even though the pub talk would be that they're all crook, essentially. It's hard to see that thing are going to change. That's probably the thing, they're all crook essentially so does it matter where the donations come from? It's all about this foreign ownership of companies and things. It's almost turning into a bit of a muddy sort of almost anti-anything foreign at the moment and that's a bit of a concern. But I don't want think we'll probably get to the point of saying it's only people enrolled on the voting list who can give donations because it's going to make such a big hole in their income stream in terms of donations.I don't think the parties would allow it. Now we've been speaking for many weeks, many months, many years about the wild and whacky things that Donald Trump says every day in the US but this guy's got nothing on the Philippine's President.This is crazy and I just said can we actually show this on television? But our Filipino President, Rodrigo Duterte, I won't say what he said there but he has come out in a most extraordinary outburst against President Obama's quite strong stand on some of the human rights abuses in the Philippines at the moment and President Duterte has come out and said he would not meet with this son of a whore, we'll say it there because it is in the papers and white rightly, I think, President Obama cancelled his meeting there, feeling that - saying that I don't think we're going to get too far with this conversation. This is just going crazy if the Philippines. He was elected on the basis of this very strong stance on drugs, which is fine, but he virtually came out, his term in office started 1 July so not that long ago. But he virtually came out and said it's OK, folks, go around and shoot people that you think are involved in the drug trafficking and to date they say since he took office 2,400 people who have been killed in this drug tirade since this time. That's not very long. I mean this is out of control and there's some real human rights calls for something to be done here.And real heartache. We've heard as well this morning that he's delivered a bloodthirsty antiterrorist speech which he says "Give me vinegar and salt and I will eat you" to the terrorists. So it's not as if he's holding back language when it comes to anyone.We do expect a bit of decorum amongst our political world leaders and you can't imagine someone like Angela Merkel ever coming out with something like this. So this is getting a bit out of control and well done to President Obama for standing up and saying this is inappropriate and I refuse to meet with someone who acts like that. Back home, real estate's always the thing that gets our attention as well and apparently there's a new suburb being planned?This is not an uncommon, particularly in the Herald Sunhas run a piece about bold not bland and this is some of the developers and designers coming out and actually again raising this issue that some of the planning controls are too strict and they don't allow for any vision and individuality and we continue to get these cookie cutter style suburbs that are rolling out, that are relatively, you know, unimpressive in terms of places where you think that's a really great place to go and live. And particularly municipalities and designers are saying we want to create something a bit different so it competes in this very competitive space now. We've got something a little bit different to hand down here and I think at this point in time we probably need to look at some of those controls and actually loosening them up a bit so it allows for a bit of variability and creativity in design.I think everyone would love that but when you get bold statements and everyone can point to one in their home city, it's always going to be controversy about that as well. There's always someone who hates a Federation Square or hates a new development somewhere.At least they're a bit different, we've got a choice. When they're all the same you've got no choice. And when you go further out it's cookie cutter style development.An interesting story in the Age about where people who dodge fares on trains, trams and buses actually live.We do, we continue on with our insight into the public transport system here in Victoria. We've had a few things like this. But public transport Victoria have just come out and done their little review of where most fare evaders come from and unfortunately here in Melbourne it's showing that they come from these most wealthy suburbs. So particularly here 3% of commuters on the Sandringham line are dodging their fares there. And Sunbury out in the west, which is a lower socioeconomic has the lowest rate of fare dodges. Come on, folks out there in the wetier suburbs, pay your public transport way so we can all afford to travel more cheaply and those out in the west who are doing it a bit tougher, good on you for holding up the banner and doing the right thing and paying your fares as you should. Not sure that's got something to do with the ticketing sms and the swipe on, swipe off.It's combined with a psychological study, like why is it that these people do this?I've got so much money I shouldn't have to pay for public transport, because I should drive my Mercedes up the road.Getting caught.It might be the excitement of doing something wrong for a change.Thanks for joining us today. Now with footy finals about to get under way, a battle is playing out behind the scenes over who invented that final 8 system used by both the AFL and the NRL.A retired Tasmanian teacher says he came up with the idea but his quest for recognition continues to be ignored. Scott Rollinson explains.Kim Crawford loves footy finals because he claims he invented them.I first came out with the idea back in 1994, just when the AFL first announced it was going to use a final 8 system.That idea has seen the former PE teacher in a 20-year tussle with Australia's biggest sporting codes.It's a bit of a David v Goliath battle, I suppose. Kim Crawford said he sent both codes his unique top 8 system and has the correspondence to prove it.I had letters from every AFL club come back to me and the majority of AFL clubs, when the Macintosh system was being used called for the use of my system.There are plenty that could claim ownership. There were at least 4 or 5 different peopleWith exactly the same system suggested. As far as the time frame is concerned, it's rather difficult to recall just in what order they were received. Neither the AFL or NRL could confirm if the idea was in fact Kim Crawford's. He says it's not about financial reward, but recognition and wants the concept called the Crawford 8:The general public is never short of giving us their opinion or making suggestions, many of which are really constructive. Kim Crawford says he can't afford an expensive legal battle. Instead, he's calling on the codes to play fair.Look, it would mean the end of a lot of frustration, just trying to, I guess, get the AFL and the NRL to tell the truth.A score that's a long way from being settled.. Interesting story, thanks very much, Scott. Now to the rest of the morning's sports news, here is PK. Thank you. The sporting headlines, Tim Cahill has come off the bench to score the winning goal in the Socceroos' winning victory over the UAE in Abu Dhabi. The 36-year-old replaced Tommy Uric in the 71st minute and scored 4 minutes later with just his second touch. The result means Australia is on top of Group B with 2 wins from 2 matches. A T20 ton from Glenn Maxwell has helped Australia to a world record score and a big win over Sri Lanka. Maxwell smacked 145 from 65 balls and his side made 3/263 from 20 overs before the hosts were restricted to 9/178. Maxwell, who had been dumped from the 50 overs team, looked very comfortable opening the bating. Canberra full-back Jack Wighton's free to play in the finals. Wighton had faced a 4-game suspension after being charged with a grade 2 shoulder charge. The player's lawyer successfully argued that his arm wasn't tucked in at the first point-of-contact. In the AFL news, the Western Bulldogs say 4 important senior players could return to the team for tomorrow night's elimination final against West Coast. Captain Easton Wood is a confirmed starter after missing the final round with an ankle injury but the coach said Jack Wighton McRae and Tom Liberatore also a chance to play and Jake Stringer may come back into their team also. That's it from me.Which would be fantastic news indeed. Thanks very much, PK, comments coming oin on that move from Coles and Murray Goulburn to open up a new brand of milk and donate 40 cents back to farmers. Greg says "Milk is a staple, the free market has become anything but. The Government needs to step in and prevent a floor to prevent such price-fixing." Let's go to the weather now, here's Vanessa.For all but the south-west, it's pretty calm, it's very warm, it gets a little showery at times along Queensland's east coast. The south-west a pair of fronts windy and wet. Queensland:

Thank you very much, Vanessa. Let's dive back into those comments on milk prices and the plight faced by dairy farmers in the wake of this news that new branded milk will go on shelves from today. 40 cents from each 2 litre bottle goes back to struggling farmers. Janet says "10 cents will still be unaccounted for at the checkout because the Coles branded milk sells for $2 a litre. Just pay the extra directly to the farmers. Do we want to end up importing milk."A general level of cynicism that we're detecting out there. Brett says "The supermarkets, milk companies and executives all involved have made a fortune and they still want someone else to pay." So will you actually go in to Coles or any other supermarket that might have this sort of initiative to say oh yes, I'll pay that extra 40 cents when you don't know that extra 10 cents is going to go and who's it for?Also Zan Rowe with The Beat is going to tell us about a popular entrant to the Australian music Hall of Fame.Overdue. Absolutely overdue. So Zan has that and the rest of the morning's music news after this short This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services. Welcome back to News Breakfast, thank you very much for watching. This morning - foreign ownership de debunget. Nearly 90% of Australian farms are in Australian hands.An Australian man dies in a shark attack while kite surfing in New Caledonia.Lone wolf alert, the PM issues a terror warning as extremist propaganda takes aim at Australian targets.We have a threat level of probable, so it is a real threat. Also ahead - why are fundamental change in thinking is needed to empower young Indigenous Australians.Leading sport this morning, the Socceroos take a big stride to World Cup qualification with a win in Abu Dhabi.Severe weather warnings in the south-west, south coast and great southern.

A long-awaited audit of Australian farmland has exploded the myth that our farms are being sold off to foreign interests. It reveals Australians control close to 90% of our farmland. The agricultural land register compiled by the Australian Tax Office shows 13.6% of Australian farmland is foreign owned.More than half of that or 7.1% is owned by British interests. The US is second on the list with a 2% stake followed by the Netherlands and Singapore which each have less than 1%. Interestingly, China is 5th on the list with a relatively small 0.38% stake in Australian farmland but it would have been pushed firmly into second place had the Federal Government not vetoed the proposed sale of the Kidman cattle station to a Chinese consortium.Trade Minister Steve Ciobo says the data should alleviate the concerns of many Australians who believe foreign interests are taking over Australian land.The fact is that China is just not at the level where a lot of Australians would think it is, based upon what they're seeing portrayed in the media on a regular basis. I really reinforce that we must have foreign investment into a country and the reason we've got to have it is because that is what drives economic growth in Australia and that is important because that's what drives jobs for Australians. We need to embrace investment into our country. We have for more than 100 years and it's a vital ingredient to the continued economic growth of our country.Steve Ciobo in London chatting to us earlier on the show. It's a very big Wednesday. Welcome back this morning to Mary Gearin to the breakfast desk, live and direct from Rio, straight back to the old home.That's right. And so I'm used to the lack of sleep right now.This is true.Surviving on very little sleep.It's great to have you onboard. Virginia is still unwell. Get well, Virginia. We're playing a bit of presenter bingo on Breakfast this week.I noticed that. I hope there's no lurgy hanging around here.There's a bit going around, Virginia is still unwell, Del is still unwell, I'm struggling but I'm here. I'm OK. Vanessa is not well, but is struggling on as well. I think we're all over winter. Can you fix that up for us?I'll see what I can do. I'm pretty sure another season is coming soon.Great to have you back onboard. Let's check out the other headlines now and an Australian man has died after being attacked by a shark while kite surfing off new kal dorn - New Caledonia. The 50-year-old WA man fell into the water near Koumac and was bitten on the thigh by a large shark. It's the second fatal shark attack in New Caledonia in the past 6 months. There were 98 shark attacks globally last year, that is the highest number ever recorded. The PM will focus on security and the threat of terrorism during talks at the ASEAN summit many Laos. Malcolm Turnbull is meeting with his Singaporean and Japanese counterparts over the next few days. Leaders from Russia, India and the US are also attending the event. The security talks come after propaganda released by Islamic militants yesterday reportedly encouraged extremists to attack targets in Sydney and Melbourne. Counter-terrorism has also dominated talks in Berlin as the Foreign Minister Julie Bishop and Defence Minister Marise Payne met their German counterparts. Julie Bishop says they've had constructive talks with the German ministers about counter-terrorism and cyber attacks as part of ongoing efforts to combat the rise of extreme fighters.Syrian activists say the Government has dropped barrel bombs filled with chlorine on civilians in Aleppo. Rescue workers in a rebel-held neighbourhood say about 80 people have been affected by chlorine bombs. Unverified footage shows victims coughing while receiving treatment at a local hospital. But Russia, Syria's main ally in the war has cast doubt on the evidence.The US judge has ordered Bill Cosby to stand trial next June for allegedly sexually assaulting a woman at his Philadelphia home more than a decade ago. The TV star's lawyers are concerned the case has had too much publicity to be fair and are pushing for the trial to be moved to a different city. Prosecutors want to call another 13 women who all accuse Cosby of sexual assault as witnesses to show a pattern of behaviour.In Mexico, Hurricane Newton has battered the up-market resort area of Los Carbos, forcing 1,500 people to spend the night in shelters. The power storm had wind speeds of 145km/h when it made landfall at the southern tip of the Baja Californian peninsula. There are about 14,000 tourists staying in the region but so far there are no reports of injuries.The French woman who received the world's first partial face transplant 11 years ago has died. Surgeons gave Isabel De Nor a new mouth, nose and chin in 2005 after her pet labrador mauled her face. French media is reporting heavy use of antirejection drugs weakened Mr Nor's health leading to two kansers.To finance:

Let's check your Wednesday weather now, good morning, Vanessa.Thanks, Michael and good morning:

Let's take you to Canberra now. Our political reporter Matt Doran joins us. Matt, good morning. Pressure still firmly on Labor Senator Sam Dastyari this morning after that, in many people's eyes, far from convincing media conference yesterday.That's right, good morning to you, Michael. He did say that he would answer all questions at his press conference in Sydney yesterday but there are still many questions that remain unanswered after he finally spilt the beans and then apologised about accepting this $1,670 debt, or accepting a Chinese company, the Top Education Institute paying that to the Commonwealth on his behalf. While he's apologised and admitted that it was wrong, that he should have paid the amount himself, he still wasn't able to answer why this company got involved in the first place. Why they saw fit to intervene and to pay this debt on his behalf but he does maintain that they didn't ask for anything in return. Now, this was after a sustained criticism from many on the Coalition front bench and the Opposition Leader Bill Shorten himself says that he has counselled Sam Dastyari and had a very strong talk to him about his actions and how he doesn't agree with what Senator Dastyari did. But interestingly, trying to almost distance him from the leadership of the party by continually describing him as a junior senator.Which is the first time in many years that he's been described as such. Exactly. He's definitely seen as a powerbroker within the Labor Party. He was former NSW State Secretary and and he was instrumental in the leadership turmoil that we saw during the Rudd/Gillard/Rudd years in Canberra. So do describe him as a junior senator has raised a few eyebrows here but he's standing behind Senator Dastyari. This is fuelling the debate about the whole idea of foreign political donations. The PM said that the Government would look at this with open eyes but hasn't committed to banning foreign political donations in the same way that the Greens and that the Opposition is calling for. However, the former minister, and now Coalition backbencher, Eric a - Abetz, told Lateline last night he's been of the view for many years, even as far back when he was the minister under the Government of John Howard, that foreign political donations do tend to undermine the system.As a matter of principle I think it is important that those that involve themselves within the body politic of Australia should be within Australia.Matt Doran in Canberra, thank you.Now staying with politics, Malcolm Turnbull says our region needs to focus its energy on what he calls a full-court press to counter violent extremism.He was speaking shortly after arriving in Laos for the ASEAN summit. Political editor Chris Uhlmann is travelling with the PM. With one summit scaled, the PM flew from China to Laos and another formal welcome on another red carpet. He's joining leaders from across Asia for a meeting of ASEAN and the East Asia Summit. It brings together the leading regional and global powers and 8 of Australia's top 10 trading partners. But here the focus is much more on security.This is the premiere forum for discussing and resolving issues of national security, economic security in our region.And the PM focused on a call from Islamic State for lone wolf attacks on significant sites in Australia.Australians can be put at risk and indeed have lost their lives. So we're all in it together. It's got to be a very strong, full-court press against terrorism. We're committed to that and I'm looking forward to some very candid and constructive discussions over the next few days.But the security backdrop to this meeting is growing nervousness about China's fortification of islands in the South China Sea. No doubt it was among the talking points when the PM met his Singaporean counterpart who has said that if ASEAN can't deal with a major problem on its doorstep, then in the long run no-one would take it seriously. But for the cameras all the talk was about the strengthening ties between the two nations. Chris Uhlmann there. Let's go to the front pages now of the major newspapers around the country this Wednesday morning and the Labor senator Sam Dastyari is pictured giving a thumbs up on the front page of the Sydney Morning Herald. The paper writes he has been given a second chance by Bill Shorten over the Chinese payments issue.The Australian reports the front bencher has apologised amid new revelations a Chinese company that paid a $40,000 legal bill for the senator has formal ties with Beijing.Slippery Sam, is the headline in the Daily Telegraph. The paper says the senator is defiant he had not profied - provided political favours in return for the payments. In the Financial Review, Malcolm Turnbull is promising frank discussions with regional leaders over the South China Sea dispute, with the PM saying Australia's prosperity and stability are at stake if tensions are allowed to escalate. Lone wolf threat, The Age reports Islamic State's propaganda call for attacks on Australia but authorities are playing down any threat to AFL fans this weekend.The Northern Territory News reports a second teenager has been indecently assaulted a t the Centernats car festival.The West Australian writes that drug kingpin Paolo Paul Musarri will spend the rest of his life in jail after being caught in a major police sting.The Courier Mail reports lawyer Tim Meehan and a law clerk have been fired following allegations they took more than $160,000 from their law firm.In the Guardian Australia, catalyst most Maryanne Demasi loses a worker's compensation claim after breaking her hip in a jogging accident.And here we go again. The Herald Sunsays Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews is facing another fire fighting crisis with the MFB's top brass revealing it won't fold to union demands for more control in a new pay deal.In the Mercury, Hobart's parking inspectors will start wearing cameras to protect themselves from angry motorists.The Advertiser reports good winter rains and average temperatures have led to a bumper grain and plant crop meaning thousands of job opportunities for casual harvest workers across the State.And the Canberra Times has gone very local this morning. It says it will be standing room only at Canberra Stadium on Saturday when the Raiders take on the Sharks in the all-important NRL qualifying final. And having been to a few Raiders games on Canberra soil in the past, they can be a very vocal lot.Absolutely. And passionate. I was in Canberra when they won their first premiership. I remember the waters turning green in the lead up to it. Sports Minister Ros Kelly, I think, was well behind them and was wearing green all the time. Didn't they dye the milk green?I think they did. Very, very temporarily. Which brings us quite subtly - did you like that?You're good, nice segue, you can come back.No, Virginia, come back. The milk, the milk question is one that we're actually posing to you today because you might find if you go into a supermarket, as you say, that starts with a C which we all know is Coles, that they are having an initiative now to give you a choice whether you buy their $2 bottle of 2 litres of milk, which they're keeping on the shelves or whether you're going to buy for $2. 50 for the same amount, 40 cents will go to the struggling farmers in Victoria, 10 cents we're not quite sure where that's going, presumeally Coles and administrative costs for this initiative, which is supposed to bring about $1 million to farmers. Will you buy this milk and when they've actually got the same $2 item on their shelves that started these milk wars.Forcing down the price of milk. What do you think? Is it a good move, is it too light or do you think it's slightly, slightly too cynical by Coles? Lulu says "The price shouldn't have the be raised at all. Just give farmers their fair share and end the corporate greed."Elise says "I think farmers should be paid a fair price by whoever they sell their milk too. Cost plus a profit margin rather than receiving charity." Which it will be seen as.Wendy says "I don't feel sorry for any kind of farmer who comes to hard times because they have had plenty of good times. We buy A2 milk because we like it and don't look at home brands and don't care about dairy fearmsdy farmers."Carl says "Farmers have asked for long-term reforms and they keep hitting walls with bodies who say it's a world glut problem and the problem supermarkets put on processors to drive the price down and Coles are just trying to get people back in their stores."Barry says "Why not make Coles and Woolworths and the processors act ethically and make laws that protect people over corporations."So tell us what you're going to do, tell us when you see this milk and what the reaction of people is around. Whether you even notice that it's on the shelf next to the $2 item or whether you go straight for that saving. If you would like to get involved you can see there how you do it.

I reckon green milk could make a comeback in Canberra if they knock off the Sharkies on the weekend and go all the way to the NRL grand final. You never know.That's right. And you know, they will keep supporting the Raiders though, no matter what happens.Compracktly, they bleed green in Canberra. Mission Australia is this morning calling for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to have a much greater say in the social and welfare support services they use after a new report found that young Indigenous Australians are far more concerned about issues such as depression and suicide than the rest of the population.Professor Tom Calma is the cochair of Reconciliation Australia and the man who wrote the foreword to the report and he joins us from Canberra. Can you outline what this report says quite disturbing details about the level of depression and unhappiness in Indigenous youth?That's right. Well the survey was conducted across Australia, about 19,000 people were surveyed and just over 1,000 were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were predominantly living in urban and in the regional areas. So it's not a picture of those living in remote and very remote areas. What we did find from the report that Mission Australia has been doing for the past 14 or so years, they do this annual report after doing the survey, was that yes, we see very big disparities between Indigenous and non- Indigenous people, particularly around the area of hope and homelessness came out very high. Areas of discrimination, so there was this disparity and it's an issue that we - and I think policymakers need to really consider when we look at the high levels of people taking their own life in remote and very remote communities. Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander people and non- Indigenous peoples. So we have to get into an environment where we can firstly allow the youth to be engaged in the policies that affect them and secondly, to be able to create an environment where there is hope and this goes for all youth but particularly for Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander people that came out in this survey.Yes, the scope of this is really breathtakingly disturbing. One thing, one measure you had was when asked to give level of happiness, the number of people who said zero out of 10, 1 in 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young men as opposed to 1 in 100 not of that background. So, as you say, it's a really rock bottom place for so many of the youth.Yeah, it is for 10% and look, I think one of the things that we have to look at is not always focused on these negative aspects, because whilst 1 in 10 reported zero, 9 in 10 were at least comfortable or very happy with their life. And we have to make sure that we don't just focus on one area but the key messages out of this is that, you know, there are really significant areas of concern amongst youth generally and particularly with Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander youth, an governments and policymakers need to really develop processes where it can be more inclusive. Because we have to remember that the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. They're the parents, they're the people that get into bureaucracy, into jobs and if we don't create the environment now that can be inclusive, that can address the issues that they can identify as major issues, then these issues are just going to compound into the coming years and so it's incumbent on all governments to take a much fresher look at the way they go about their business. But whilst this report highlights that there's been numerous other reports that say the same thing and you know, you might have seen Michael Marmit talking in the Boyer lectures and he talks about these issues of inclusiveness and ways if we look at it from a holistic point of view, an this is what our youth is telling us as well, don't just segment us, look at the whole system and let us be involved and then we will see very substantial differences in the future.As you say, there have been many reports saying the same thing, that that's been the catch cry from the community saying we don't want changes made at us or onto us, we need to be involved with these decisions. So why is it that the policies don't reflect that in your within?Well, I think this is across the board in Indigenous affairs and in many areas of public policy. We have bureaucrats who believe that they have the answers. We have politicians who aren't interested in looking at the research and the evidence that's out there but making decisions that may be based on their view of economics and looking at the whole of Indigenous policy and general policy within the time traim of - time frame of an election cycle and we have to get beyond that and start to look long term and look at the investments we make today need to - will really reap benefits in the years to come and that's across the board and so - and, you know, I think really importantly we have to look at it from what we call a social and cultural determinants perspective and looking at the system as a whole and making sure that in our case with the youth, we found the number of youth who were depressed and who wanted to take their own life was very closely related to those who were homeless or didn't feel that they had a home that they could spend time in for various reasons and that was both Indigenous and non- Indigenous and whilst it's a relatively, you know, small group, but still a significant group, and, you know, they're the type of issues we have to look at. You can't just look at treating depression without looking at what's causing the depression. We look at the justice system and particularly the juvenile justice system at the number of people who are incarcerated and we saw the Don Dale issue in the Territory, and we've got to get back down to looking at why are those kids in jail in the first place or in custody and look at the behaviours that led them there and then what we're calling a justice reinvestment model is investing within the community rather than investing in keeping people locked up because as a very small example, in NSW, it costs around about $230,000 a year to keep one child, one youth in juvenile justice and so you can invest into the community $230,000 and get a youth worker, 2 youth workers programs and we'll see a difference and that's been the evidence in the US, Canada and the US and it's not something that the Government doesn't know about because they've done a Senate inquiry into justice reinvestment and that has given them the leads on where they need to go. But that's still sitting on the shelf and not being addressed.They should have the information, shouldn't they? Thanks for joining us and we hope that report hits the mark. : ThankThank you for your interest.If anyone you know or yourself are experiencing interest contact lifeline or if you need information you can contact Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36. Let's go to sport, here's PK. And stay with us, in a moment we'll be speaking to Don Elgin and looking forward to the Paralympics which is just underone day away now. But I'll quickly update you with what's happened with the Socceroos. Tim Cahill came off the bench to score the winning goal in the match against UAE. It's a World Cup qualifier. The Australian team beat Iraq in Perth. United Arab Emirates beat Japan last week and now the Australians have knocked off the UAE. Timmy Cahill with the second touch of the ball, he's called the super sub these days and 1-0 the score line and Australia 2 wins from 2 matches and sitting on top of the group. And a remarkable performance by the batsmen by Australia in the Twenty/20 match last night in the cricket against Sri Lanka. Glenn Maxwell hit 145 off 65 balls, Australia had a world record total of 263. And, of course, that was enough to win the game. So off to a bright start there and Maxwell, who got dumped from the ODI team is feeling good about his place at the top of the order in the Twenty/20s. The Paralympics are upon us and Reece - Rio is hosting. Joining us this morning is former Paralympian and medal winner Don Elgin who has competed across many, many years and now is in coaching and manager role and he's not in Rio so we're lucky enough to have him here on the couch. G'day, Don. G'day, mate, how are you travelling? Very good, thanks. You are not there this time. You are the track and field manager for the London Paralympics. Tell us what you've made of the build up to Rio?It's exciting. We've had the best curtain raiser you could hope for for the Paralympics. And then we have - we've got to see a bit of Rio so the the best thing about being a Paralympic athlete you get excited by watching the world's best athletes come to town, you're watching the lanes and you go OK, that's the lane. You don't know what lane you're going to be in, but you're looking at the track and the pool.So you went to several Paralympics, there will be some competing for the very first time. What are they going through at the moment as they start to size up the opposition?The first thing that is going to go through their head is they will go to the dining hall, the place of so much energy and excitement. Everybody gets to check everybody out in the dining hall. The biggest concern is when you're sitting there and my case below knee amputee, you're looking at any other below knee amputee and going they could be against me. Whether they're big, small, fast whatever. But we're not probably doing the same sport, to be honest. There will be a lot lof nervous energy. The energies will be excited and the ones that have been around for a while will take a breath, it's nearly game time. The hard thing for these athletes is they are literally in the shape of their life, they are ready to go. The hard thing is being able to get a good night's sleep, being able to keep a lid on it until that time. It's not their time yet, nearly their time but not quite.Who are you looking out for? We've heard from a few of the veterans in the last couple of days, Brad Ness is going to be the flag bearer,. Who are you looking forward to watching? Well, I always love Kurt Fearnley. Kurt Fearnley, no matter, win, lose, draw wherever he finishes you know that bloke is leaving nothing, no stone unturned. He's had a crack, he's arguably Australia's toughest bloke. He's crawled ka code - Kokoda, he's done amazing things. He's just a quality human too. So when he puts his views forward, when he gets beaten he cops it on the chin. He hates it and he reloads and goes again. He will be one to watch. I think definitely Carly Beattie. She is a long jumper, arm amputee long jumper. She will be jumping hopefully in excess of 6m and turning things around for us. Giving the people who go out early and compete, what's exciting is it builds that energy. As soon as you bring one medal back to the camp people get excited by it. It adds a bit of prebure for those yet to compete but it builds the energy. In the pool you've got Eli Cole. Beautiful young lady doing amazing things and her a twin, by the way. That's another story. I love seeing people just that have come back from things. Eli had shoulder surgery and people come back. Maddy Hogan.You manage Maddy.Yeah, so watching her come through and just be devastated with a knee reconstruction and then be able to come back from 2 knee reconstructions ready to roll for, you know, for these Games is just very exciting.We saw Kitty Chiller and others made the big statement, top 5, we are working out how many medals, is that helpful for the Paralympic team and have you cut the form to see whether Australia might be able to do as well as London and others?To be honest I never do. I never do because I couldn't really give a rats about the medals. People that go out there and nail it on the big day are the ones that you want to get excited for. If we're not getting excited for PBs for personal bests then we're missing the whole point of the Games. One person is going to win a gold medal, someone's going to get a silver and bronze. If you can get your PB out there and be amongst the world's best athletes that's an exciting time. We'll see young people that will step up to the plate and absolutely shine with all that energy and excitement. We'll see people that struggle, struggle to cope with it. So whatever way it goes, you know, our medallists will be honoured and we will congradge let them but we absolutely should be looking out for Pbes. You are producing books every year now, this is a follow up to your award winning auto biography last year. Tell us about this book?It's about growing up without my leg, getting to the podium at the Sydney Games and going beyond that is about life as a speaker, as somebody who represents our country in different capacities. Of course, on the cover of the book you have me stopping at Allen's Corner, changed out of my walking shoes in my crocs. I don't think there would be enough people silly enough to have crocs on the front of their book.Looks good to me. Good luck getting sleep while the Paralympics are on.Thanks, mate. Appreciate it.Back to the News Desk. A reminder Zan Rowe is with us later this after hour to talk things all music and the new entrants to the ARIA Hall of Fame, a popular group about to be inducted? A group that has been part of my life. I can't believe they are not there.We go to the weather now, Vanessa?It is windy and wet over the south-west. We have a low pressure system over the interior at the moment. But here is our severe weather warnings for WA and those damaging winds, 107km/h on Garden Island overnight. All of this moves over towards the east. We have got rain entering the eastern parts of SA on Thursday and right over towards the south-east on Friday where we will see a lot of rain falling and the possibility of flash flooding. For Queensland:

Thanks, Vanessa. Looking forward to this. Still ahead on the program this morning. (Sings) # It's only natural # I should want to be there with you... # Can you believe it, it's taken 30 years but Crowded House finally is in inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame. Triple J's Zan Rowe joins us to chat about all things music coming up soon but first here is Michael with the latest news. Thank you, Mary. The PM Malcolm Turnbull says the threat of lone wolf attacks should be taken seriously following the release of propaganda by Islamic State mill tabts. IS is encouraging its followers to attack targets in Sydney and Melbourne. The threats have been played down by the police and the Victorian Premier but Mr Turnbull said recent attacks have shown the danger of individual extremists. Counter terrorism has also dominated talks in Berlin overnight as the Foreign Minister Julie Bishop and Defence Minister Marise Payne met their counterparts. Julie Bishop said they have had constructive discussions with the German ministers, all part of ongoing effort to combat the rise of extremist fighters. New Federal Government figures have revealed the majority of foreign-owned farmland in Australia is held by interests in the United Kingdom. The land register shows just 13.6% of Australia's land is foreign owned. The Trade Minister Steve Ciobo said it should alleviate concerns of Australians who think foreign interests are taking over our farmland.It fact is China is not at the level where a lot of Australians think it is.An Australian man has died after being attacked by a shark while kite surfing off New Caledonia. The 50-year-old West Australian fell in Koumac and was bitten on the thy by a large shark. It's the second fatal attack in New Caledonia in six months. Let's get more on the new terror threatOf course, we are concerned about terrorism. We have a threat level of probable so it is a real threat. Our security services are relentless, tireless in keeping Australians safe. The capacity of Daesh, of course, is much less than they proclaim it to be but we do have to be very alert to the actions of these lone actors, individuals who, as I described in the national security statement last week, individuals who, for a variety of reasons, may be radicalised, often associated with mental illness, frankly, can be radicalised very quickly and engage in very destructive lethal conduct, as we saw in Nice. We need to cooperate closely, to engage intimately with our neighbours in the fight against counter terrorism, sharing of intelligence is more important than ever before. And so counter terrorism too is going to be a key focus of these meetings over the next few days.The PM speaking last night. Staying for the moment on the subject, global terror expert at Deakin University, Professor Greg Barton spoke to us earlier about the Islamic State propaganda material.I think Commissioner Graham Ashton was right when he says it's propaganda. It was just last week that the second in charge in Islamic State, the guy in charge of media and messaging was killed apparently in a strike nearal Bab in northern Syria. It's a reminder to us they are struggling under pressure and they are putting up propaganda. They have got this new magazine in seven languages in each of those seven countries they are naming local places. I think that's why we are not feeling too worried about the naming of Broadmeadows and Brunswick and Bondi and Bankstown but all the same, police behind the scenes are working very hard.It is propaganda but, as you well know Greg, there are no shortage of young people, mainly young men out there, who would be receptive to such a message. Should we be worried about that aspect?It's not something the general public should be worried about, but the police have to be worried about. They have stopped 800 people from travelling, that is what Islamic State is gambling on. This is as much as anything, a crowd sourcing bid, who wants to be famous. You have got hundreds of Australian families who have seen recruiters come into their lives and touch the lives of their kids. For them it's a chilling reminder.It's chilling because the suppose filed nature of these threats. It's one thing to tell the public look, this nature of terrorism is to attack soft targets and everyone is generally speaking acknowledging and accepting of that now, which is a terrible state of affairs, but to actually talk about the suburbs, that's a new step, is it?That is a new step. The worry is when somebody living near those locations sees that name, they might say now is my time, that's my area, I can do that. Most of the lone wolf attacks have been in areas where the attacker or attackers is familiar. Even the November 13 attacks in Paris, it was local guys who knew the area, even Brussels. One of the seven languages is Indonesia. In German and French, they are mentioning local places as well. They are not going to get a blanket response around the world but they may get some response somewhere and that's the worry.Greg Barton talking about the release of the propaganda material. Let's take you back to the streets of Rio, a place warmly familiar to Mary Gearin, great timing that you are onboard this morning, we are seeing the Paralympic torch arriving in that city?It's been touring, as did the Olympic Torch, it's been touring Brazil and has arrived, as you can see in front of that iconic Christ the Redeemer statue. I can tell you from personal experience, it's well they got it in the middle of the night, otherwise there would be a thousand tourists. I'm amazed the cameraman isn't lying on the floor which is the time honoured way of getting a shot of someone standing in front of it. That is incredible, look at that. It's going to be interesting to see how Rio responds to the Paralympics. The feedback is that it's starting to get exciting again and perhaps the Paralympics is going to be even more inspirational, as many people regard that it is. It is better spirit potentially for many than the Olympics which was tainted by many scandals. This is a big moment for Rio and the Paralympics.You can't look at that statue often enough. Did you get that shot of you?Luckily I went with a couple of cameramen so they got a really good shot of me. I managed to get there on the morning of my flying out. It was my first and only visit there. It is incredible. The view is amazing. It's really quite inspirational. Good stuff. Inspirational, those shots coming to you live from Rio ahead of the opening of the Paralympics. Let's bring you back home and talk about tap-and-go technology. It may be a more convenient way to pay for things but it's sadly made it much easier for crim flals to get your money.In SA, police say they have noticed a rise in petty theft offences. Ace sies tant Police Commissioner Paul Dickson joins us from Adelaide. Thank you for joining us. What have you observed about this rise in petty crime and why you think it's related to these pay pass tap-and-go way of paying?Good morning, Mary. We identified that there is an increase in the number of thefts occurring in relation to wallets and handbags. When we look back at our data, we identified between around 2011 and 2014 there had been a significant reduction in the number of handbags and wallets that had been stolen. However, in 2014, that appeared to have changed and between 2014 and now, we've identified there has been about a 10% increase in the number of handbags and wallets that have been stolen and when we analyse that data even further, we identified on about 40% owe of occasions when handbags and wallets had been stolen, the debit and credit cards had been used in the tap-and-go function, where people had stolen those cards and used those cards to receive money and services.We are looking at images now of the banks that have been promoting pay pass as a convenient way of doing business and many people will have been embracing that, but are you saying that people are just becoming forgetful about security of their cards?As an organisation, we acknowledge that the tap-and-go function has been embraced by the community. What we are asking the community to do is to treat their wallets and handbags as if they had $1,000 in them because that's how offenders are treating those handbags and wallets. They believe if they target that commodity, they can receive quite quickly a significant amount of services and or cash. So all we really are doing is saying to the community, treat your handbags and wallets as if I've got $1,000 in them because that's how offenders are treating them. They see them as an opportunity to make quick money. Yet it's ironic because many would have thought it would reduce fraud, you don't have to hand over your card, where there were skimming problems in the past. You are saying effectively people are watching you when you are tapping that card? There is no doubt that people are and, you know, there is crime continually changing and where people may have committed other sorts of crime to receive that cash, now they can see there is an opportunity very quickly to pick up that wallet or handbag left unattended in the licensed premises or at the retail shop and then very quickly use those cards and receive a significant amount of money in a very quick time.A warning for us all. Thank you very much Paul Dickson, Assistant Commissioner of SA.Thank you.It certainly made me think twice about that. It's so easy and it could be some time as the Commissioner noted, before you realise the card is gone and in that time hundreds of thousands of dollars could be racked up because up to a certain amount, you don't have to put a PIN, you don't have to sign.In the case studies they have looked at, they were very quick purchases that these offenders had made. They know you are going to call up the bank. They get out there, make lots of small purchases. My worry with those cards is separate to the theft issue, it makes it too easy to spend. You come in cavalier with swiping the card across that machine, swiping it across that machine, there are no signatures.It might be a more psychological problem rather than a technological one.Keep that purse and wallet safe at hand. In WA it is estimated bushfires last year may have killed as many as 500 quokkas. The Northcliffe blaze destroyed thousands of hectares of crucial habitat and most of the habitat of the threatened species.The fire which threatened Northcliffe in February last year burned through more than 90,000 hectares and one of the animals worst affected was the quokka.We have lost a large number of quokkas. We believe it was over 500 quackas in that area. Now we believe there is only 39 quokkas remaining.The quokkas are elusive and it's taken WWF and the Department of Parks and Wildlife more than six months to come up with an estimate.We have come trekking through the bush all burnt and we have hit this perch system here. There is around nine animals still surviving here.Due to the intensity of the fire and the animals' inability to move quickly over long distances, environmentalists believe it's unlikely many of the quokkas got away. There is a warning they may not survive another big blaze. You could potentially see quokkas wiped out if we don't learn more about what is happening post these wildfires and how can we manage that vierlt and support those animals to survive.It's hoped better forest management between fire seasons will allow more protection of the fragile mainland quokka population which is believed to be as low as 4,000. Let's help save the quokkas. It has taken 30 years but finally one of Australia's most treasured rock bands is being inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame.Crowded House dominated the charts for the best part of a decade. How has it taken this long. They won 13 ARIAs along the way including best video for this song in 1987. (Sings) # Hey now, hey now # Don't dream it's over # When the world comes in # They come # They # To put a wall between us # We know they won't win... # 30 years too late but it's finally happening. We are joined from Sydney by triplej presenter Zan Rowe. Why has it taken so long?Everything takes time. There are a large line of people lining up to be inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame. This band formed in Melbourne in 1985 and through Australian music have had so many hits and so many awards, 13 ARIA Awards in their career. Five No.1 albums and so loved across the Australia and New Zealand. A lot of people say hang on, are they Australian, Neil Finn is from New Zealand and the other two band members are from Australian. A lot of people would remember their farewell concert on the steps of the Opera House in 1996 where 100,000 people crowded dots - sorry, no pun intended.I will take it as a pun. This will happen on Wednesday 23rd November, we will probably see Crowded House perform live again. It's a treat for everyone when they take away this induction.That is fantastic. Neil Finn, we know is continuing to ply his trade as a solo artist. He has never left the game?He is an incredible artist, he has his own studio in New Zealand. He has a band with his wife Sharon called the Pyjama Club, they were staying up late drinking a few red wines after the kids left home and formed a band. They will be the most loved incarnation of what Neil Finn has done and so many incredible songs along the way.Nick Cave has released a new album, a documentary this week. It is a particularly dark work, his first work since his son's tragic death last year.What happened to my face. Look at those bags under my eyes. Where did they come from? They weren't there last year. The director says I look like a battered monument.Yes, it's pretty searing stuff, isn't it? Yeah, and this is a film that was premiered at the Venice Film Festival on Monday following the premier of this documentary. Following the premier, Andrew Dominic, who is the director, sat down and gave a press conference and explained why Nick decided to do the film. He didn't want to talk about this album with journalists. It's obviously a hard album to speak about. They were halfway through recording the Bad Seeds album when his son died. Not wanting to talk about the album with journalists or perform it live, we may not see the Bad Seeds perform it live. Andrew Dominic has been a friend of Nick Cave's for 30 years. They have created this beautiful black and white film, all shot in 3D which has a handful of the songs from the record but also some fairly intimate conversations with Nick Cave, with his wife Susie zap Bick, with his other son Earl and Warren Ellis who the violinist and a long time collaborator of cap cave as well. Worldwide this film is going to be released on Thursday night and then on Friday, Skeleton Tree, the album will be out in the world as well. I will be up late on Thursday night watching it at about 9:00pm with a lot of other people. I will have the tissues ready. It looks like a very intimate and sad film. New music from Nick Cave in very unique circumstances coming our way this week.Always a good thing for fans. Finally, Sia is back with a new single. Let's have a look. (Sings) # I'm free to be the greatest here tonight # The greatest # The # Tonight # The great est... # 13-year-old Maddie Zeigler starring yet again?Sia's mini-me which she is using where Sia is not comfortable being seen in the public space. It also pays tribute to the victims of the Orlando nightclub attack where 49 people died. In the video there are 49 dancers, there is rainbow paintings on Maddie Zeigler's face and sad imagery at the start and end of this beautifullyly film. And a tribute to the LGBT community and also a first taste of a brand new record from Sia which will be coming our way hopefully very soon.Lots of stuff to chat about Zan Rowe, thank you. Thanks, Michael.Straight to sport now, PK is back with us.Tim Cahill has come off the bench to score the winning goal in the Socceroos 1-0 victory over the United Arab Emirates in this morning's World Cup qualifier in Abu Dhabi. The 36-year-old came on for Tommy your itch in the 71st minute. Then he scored with his second touch. The first time the ball touched his boot the ball went into the net. It means Australia is on top of Group B with two wins from two matches. That is significant. The UAE last week beat Japan and so Australia beating Iraq and the UAE in Abu Dhabi is on its way.The T20 tonne, this is just as remarkable but not quite as Ziggy guess in the overall things but a T20 tonne from Glenn Maxwell has helped Australia to a world record score and a big win over Sri Lanka. Maxwell smacked 145 - repeating this is a T20 match off just 65 balls and Australia made 263. The hosts were restricted to 9/178. Presumably Australia wins. Maxwell was dumped by the selectors for the One Day Internationals but put into place as an opener for the Australian T20 team. That looks to have paid off. Canberra fullback Jack Wighton is free to play in the finals after having his likely ban overturned. He was facing a four-game suspension, being charged with the grade two shoulder charge. His lawyer successfully argued that the arm wasn't tucked in at the first point of contact. Have a look at it again and see whether you reckon that's a shoulder charge. Any way, free to play in the finals. He's got a good lawyer. The Western Bulldogs say four important senior players could return for tomorrow night's elimination final against the West Coast team. Easton Wood has come back and a couple of other players are making possible unlikely returns. Jack McRae and Tom Libratore. I thought they would have missed this match but they appear to be right for selection. You worry about teams who are throwing players in before they are ready but the coach Luke Beveridge reckons they are right to go. A big task against the Eagles.A very big challenge. If I'm ever in trouble with the law, hopefully I never will be, I want Jack Wighton's lawyer.Do you think it felt any less of an impact, the arm wasn't tucked in at the first point of contact?It was about technicalities, I guess. His arm looked every bit a shoulder charge. It was a quick decision?The judiciary deliberated for a few minutes before coming back and saying go get them Jack.We will leave it there, thank you. Let's check your Wednesday morning with Vanessa.Despite the warmer winds, plenty of fog under a high pressure system. This photo comes from Woy Woy on the NSW Central Coast and near the South Australian-Victorian border also foggy. Not one but two fronts for the south-west. Overnight the winds got up to 107km/h on Garden Island. It may see them peaking at 125km/h. The second front will come in this afternoon and the odd light shower around an inland trough makes for a warm Wednesday. Tomorrow, rain moves into Western Victoria, north-eastern Tasmania and the rain could cause flash flooding on Friday up into NSW and we have a very cold start to next week for parts of Victoria and Tasmania. Queensland:

Vanessa, thank you. More comments on Coles and Murray Goulburn teeming up to put out a new bottle of milk. 40 cents goes to help struggling farmers. Andy says, "It's a brilliant idea".There is a bit more comment we are getting now. It was cynical when we first started this question. Now everyone is saying why not support the farmers, even if Coles is pocketing 10 cents of that as well.Let's keep more comments

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This program is not captioned. Welcome back to News Breakfast, thanks for watching. This morning - lone wolf alert. The PM issues a terror warning as extremist propaganda takes aim at Australian targets.We have a threat level of probable so it is a real threat.

An Australian man dies in a shark attack while kite surfing in New Caledonia. Foreign ownership debunked. New figures show nearly 90% of farms are in Australian hands. Also ahead, author John Elder Robison joins us to tell how a medical trial treated his autism and dramatically changed his life. Leading sport, the Socceroos take a big stride towards World Cup qualification with a win in Abu Dhabi.In WA, severe weather warnings in the south-west, South Coast and Great

The PM has admitted Australians face the very real threat of terrorism on home soil after an ISIS propaganda website published a chilling call to arms urging extremists to attack specific Australian targets. The website calls for lone wolf attacks in both Sydney and Melbourne. Yesterday Victorian Police and Premier Daniel Andrews played down the threats but overnight the PM has warned attacks around the world showed the danger of so-called lone wolf terrorists. Malcolm Turnbull, who is in Laos for regional talks about security and economic ties, said regional cooperation is needed to keep Australians safe from extremist violence.The Justice Minister Michael Keenan said Australians should be very aware of the issue. He spoke about the matter on commercial TV a little earlier. People need to be assured our authorities have the capability to protect us. We have given them resources and extra powers to deal with this. Woe do take appropriate measures to make sure any footy final or any place where there would be a lot of people does have appropriate protections. We have given our agencies the power to intervene far earlier. That's very important and that's why we have been successful in stopping tender or attacks in Australia in the past two years. So the nature of the terror threat has changed but the nature of the way we police it has changed as well. Australia is better prepared to deal with this. As the PM made clear in his national security statement to the Parliament last week, as we are more successful against ISIL in the field and we are destroying them in Syria and Iraq, in many ways that does mag any file the threat, they will seek further legitimacy with further attacks in the West. Everyone needs to be vigilant. We don't want people to be scared but the terror threat remains at probable which means something could be imminent at any time.The foreign owned farmland is owned by UK. 6% of Australia's farmland is foreign-owned. The UK and the US are the sector's largest investors followed by the Netherlands and Singapore. China, interestingly, is fifth on the list with a relatively 0.38% stake. An Australian man has died after being attacked by a shark while kite surfing off New Caledonia. The 50-year-old Western Australian man fell into the water near Koumac and was bitten on the thy by a large shark. It's the second fatal shark attack in New Caledonia in the last six months. There were 98 shark attacks globally last year, the highest number ever recorded. Syrian activists say the Government has dropped barrel bombs filled with chlorine on civilians in Aleppo. Rescue workers in a rebel-held neighbourhood say 80 people have been affected by chlorine bombs. Unverified footage shows victims coughing while receiving treatment at a local hospital. But Russia, Syria's main ally, has cast doubt on the evidence. A US judge has ordered Bill Cosby to stand trial next June for allegedly sexually assaulting a woman at his Philadelphia home more than a decade ago. The TV star's lawyers is concerned the case has had too much publicity and pushing for the trial to be moved to a different city. Prosecutors want to call another 13 women who accuse Cosby of sexual assault as witnesses to show a pattern of behaviour. In Mexico, Hurricane Newton has battered the up market resort area of Los Cabos, up rooting trees and forcing 1,500 people to spend the night in shelters. The powerful storm had wind speeds of 145km/h when it made landfall at the southern tip of the Bahah California Peninsula. There are about 14,000 tourists staying in the region but so far there are no reports of injuries. The French woman who received the world's first partial face transplant 11 years ago has died. Surgeons gave Isabelle Dinoire a new nose, mouth and chin during a 15-hour procedure in 2005 after her pet Labrador mauled her face. French media is reporting heavy use of anti-rejection drugs weakened Ms Dinoire's health, leading to two cancers. A former bank manager in NSW has been accused of stealing more than $90,000 from customer accounts. It's alleged the 35-year-old man used bank log-ins to access accounts from a bank in cute mun dra. Now a quick look at the weather:

Thank you, Mary. Let's get more on the surprising revelations in the new agricultural land register released this morning. Our regional affairs reporter Lucy Barbour joins us from Canberra. A very good morning to you. Is it a shock that China doesn't own more Australian farmland?To many in the agriculture sector, Michael, this won't come as a huge shock. Historically, of course, the United Kingdom has invested heavily in Australian farmland. You just have to think back to our colonial past. So many in the industry won't be surprised, nor will they be surprised that the figure of 13.6% of land owned totally by foreign countries and interests exists. However, the Australian farm institute, the Managing Director or chief executor of that Mick Keogh had some surprises, he thought China would be higher up on the list.Farmers have been calling for this register for some time. Will it quell some of those myths that are out thereabout who owns what and how much of Australian farmland?The National Farmers Federation has been lobbying for this detail for some time and it's wanted it for that exact reason you mentioned, because there has been a lot of hysteria about foreign investment and ownership of Australian farms, particularly when it comes to China. Now what's important to note in this document is the definition of a foreign person. It says in the document that a foreign person can be an individual person, but it can also be a foreign government or it can be a foreign government investor. It can also be a trust or private corporation. What that suggests is that Tate-owned enterprises, for example, could be the owners of the land specified in these numbers but so could a superannuation fund for example. So while this register tells us how much land is owned by a different interest in different countries, it doesn't specify exactly what corporations or governments, for example, own the land. That issue of state-owned enterprises is where so much of this public angst about foreign investment lies and will continue to lie in future unless potentially we see the Government providing more and more detail down the track.Will the calls for much tighter controls of foreign ownership of farmland, especially within the National Party, will they be quelled or do you see this being a rampant debate, particularly in rural and regional Australia?When I talk to Nationals MPs and senators, have are some saying right now they do desperately want to see foreign investment restrictions go further. They want to see things like a productivity test introduced where foreign buyers would have to show the Foreign Investment Review Board exactly what they plan to do with the land and how. Going as far to say that if those buyers don't do what they promised with the land, the Fi much IRB or Treasurer could force those countries to divest. It is a live issue. It's not an issue shared across the entire National Party and I'm sure there will be some Liberal MPs and senators who would be fiercely against suggestions like that but what it does show is that this issue of foreign investment, the debate about this topic, is well and truly alive and that's despite the fact that the Government has already significantly reduced the thresholds for scrutiny of foreign investment and ownership and also, of course, published this farm register as it promised to do before the 2013 Federal election.Really appreciate your analysis this morning, thank you for joining us. We have been getting comments this morning about some more milk being sold in Coles with a very particular bent on it. $2. 50 they are selling 2 litres for alongside their $2 cheap milk and the extra 50 cents, 40 cents to struggling farmers and 10 cents, we are not sure, it will probably go to Coles in administrative costs. Will you be buying this? We have had some very passionate responses we would have to say.A lot of people are conflicted about this, as they have been about the whole milk price. Serge says "I shop at Coles and Woolies and seek out the genuine producer-owned co-op milk. Will never buy the home brand. Farmers don't need PR stunt charity. All they need is a fair go".Robyn T says "if Coles cared about milk producers, they wouldn't be selling cheap milk. They are putting the onus on the consumer than themselves". That is the danger, is this a publicity stunt?Grant says "it won't pay an economically viable price, powder the lot and send it to China, they will happily pay". Keep those comments coming in on Australia's milk industry problems. Staying with Federal politics and Malcolm Turnbull says our region needs to focus its energy on what he is calling a Full Court press to counter violent extremism.He was speaking shortly after arriving in Laos for the Asian summit. Political Editor Chris Uhlmann is travelling with the PM. With one summit scaled, the PM flew from China to Laos and another formal welcome on another red carpet. He is joining leaders from across Asia for meeting of Asian. It brings together the leading regional and global powers and 8 of Australia's top 10 trading partners. But here the focus is much more on security.This is the premier forum for discussing and resolving issues of national security, economic security in our region.And the PM focused on a call for Islamic State for lone wolf attacks on significant sites in Australia.Australians can be put at risk if and indeed have lost their lives. So we are all in it together. It's got to be a very strong Full Court press against terrorism. We are committed to that and I'm looking forward to candid and constructive discussions.But the security backdrop to this meeting is growing nervousness about Chinese fortification of islands in the South China Sea. No doubt it was among the talking pings when the PM met his Singaporean counterpart who said if they can't deal with it on its doorstep, no-one would take it seriously. But for the cameras was about the strengthening ties between the two nations. Imagine all of the senses ramping up to full volume in aing is will moment. That is exactly what happened to John Elder Robison when he decided to take part in a medical trial to treat Asperger syndrome. That transformed his ability to connect with people but it also cost him several close relationships. The New York Times best selling author shares his story in his latest book Switched On and joins us now in the studio. Thanks for coming in.Thanks for having me.It's an extraordinary tale you tell. Guide us through what it was that gave you this high and also the lows?The idea was that no scientist could use high-powered magnetic fields like what's in an MRI machine, to fire pulses of energy into the brain and it would be targeted to very specific regions, the size of a marble in our heads. That energy could turn up or down specific portions of the brain without affecting other parts. So, for me, it was an experimental treatment that helped me to see emotional cues in other people, which I, as an autistic person, had been largely blind to.What was that like?It was - frankly, it was overwhelming. Because so much of the emotion that I received was fear, worry and angst but I could also see love and compassion. I always felt strong emotions but I couldn't read your emotions looking into your eyes and suddenly I could do that. It was - frankly, it was like magic that scientists could switch on something like that in an instant and it shows how much is inside our minds maybe locked away from us.Was it lasting or were those effects fairly short-term? Have you had to have repeated doses of the transcranial medication?The effects faded away. But my life changed forever. Marriage a person is colour blind and you think it's a joke. A doctor does something to you and you see colour. You say my God, it's real and it fades away. Even if it fades away, you will live the rest of your life of the full knowledge of beauty and reality of colour. That is how it is for me.Even if you did see those negative emotions, can you tell us why there were some bad effects in terms of your relationships?Well, I saw that some people that I thought were my friends were really mocking me. That was very sad.That must have been really tough on you?That was a sad thing to see. And I was overwhelmed by depression from other people and that was really sad too, that I had been oblivious to all these years and suddenly it was like a mat suffocating me.You were on quite a journey. You weren't diagnosed with autism until the age of 40. What prompted that diagnosis in the first place?I was told about my autism by a therapist back in America but when he did, he presented me with a book by Australian doctor Tony at wood. That was really the first transformative step of my journey. Are many other people following you now in using this technique?Well, right now Dr Peter end cot is one of the foremost TMS researchers here in the world right here at Deakin and Monash here in Australia. The folks I studied with at Harvard back in America and at Brown, they are doing it. There are a number of researchers studying TMS for autism and right now it's a clinical treatment for depression here in Australia and in much of the world. Would you encourage for instance younger people to do it whose brains are perhaps still developing?I would not encourage anyone to do something like this unless they had the maturity to understand what they were going into. That might mean some 16-year-olds and it might mean some 20-year-olds. To me it doesn't mean 6-year-olds.Is there some degree of controversy about it? I read there were some people who thought that it implies, this treatment, implies there is something lacking in people with Asperger's that can be fixed?I think you're right about that. And clearly when emotions - when emotional insight could be switched on in me, that shows it was latent inside me. It's important to realise that autistic people are not broken versions of normal. We are different people and we are complete and correct in our own right. Having said that, though, we may want to do certain things better like seeing emotional cues.Do you feel there is too much of a stigma against people with autism and Aspergers?There is absolutely a strong stigma against us. One thing that keeps that going is when we respond in unexpected ways and we are rejected by society and frankly, it's really a civil rights issue for the 21 century we need to stand up for.As you have been in Australia, have you gotten a lot of feedback along those lines? The idea of building autistic community is very, very well received among autistic people. It's a really important mission. That's one of the things I talk about all over the world.Fantastic meeting you. Enjoy the rest of your stay in Australia.Thank you. The man who designed one of the world's most coveted Supercars, the McLaren F1, has now helped transform life in the developing world.Gordon Murray has designed a small cheap, flatpack truck that is tough enough to cope with the rough conditions across many parts of Africa and Asia. The BBC's Richard Westcott has more. It doesn't look like it could tackle some of the worst roads on earth. On the surface the Ox could be any other truck until you put it through its paces.ItIt's just an ordinary looking van, it's got tiny wheels, it's two-wheel drive and I'm driving over what could easily be a dry river bed in Africa, really rocky and frankly, it's doing it as well as a 4x4 would do it. Believe it or not, the man who designed it, also made this. The McLaren F1 is a super car for the super rich. Xx drivers have very different needs.When we studied the requirements of where this vehicle will end up, there is a requirement for loading livestock, you hold it there, loading livestock and barrels of fuel and water. I know it's probably difficult to believe but for me this ranks above anything else I've done. Designing expensive sports cars, that reaches a few people. This thing will help, this goes into mass production, this will help thousands of people with mobility.Crucially it flatpacks like furniture so it's cheaper to transport. Three semi-skilled people can build it under 12 hours. Every part is designed to be easy to fix. It could make a huge difference for rural farmers. According to one expert in Kenya.This is the main driver of development. The poor farmers are located in the very remote areas where it's difficult for them to kind of transport their commodities to the market and also imports into the market.They are now hoping to make a thousand or so without making a profit. That report from the BBC. Now a world away from the multibillion-dollar global spectacle that is the Olympics, athletes have gathered in Kyrgyzstan for the world nomad games. It's designed to celebrate the heritage of the central Asian nations.

It started with flaming men on horseback. Before hundreds of musicians and dancers filled the stage for a spectacular Opening Ceremony. The President personally invited the guest of honour, American actor, musician and environmentalist, Steven Seagal, who dressed in traditional warrior armor for the occasion. The World Nomad Games features teams from 40 countries, including Russia, the United States, Argentina, Germany and Brazil. It's message is an anti-dote to the hyper commercial and competitive Olympics. TRANSLATION: In a modern world, people forget their roots. The danger emerges of the disappearance of unique culture in nations. The borders of the countries change. The destruction of the environment leads to catastrophic consequences on a regional and world scale.Nomads on the other hand hold lessons for the rest of the world.TRANSLATION: The careful attitude of nomads towards the environment, the press racial of the ancestor's heritage by nomads has become the subject of careful attention and study. This is evidenced by the big number of participants here today.Held in eastern Kyrgyzstan around Lake Issyk Kul, the competition is made up of archery, eagle hunting and kok-boru, a type of polo with freshly slaughtered goat. There is wrestling where compete force battle for control of a stick. It's attracted thousands of visitors but unlike the other global Games, accommodation is not a problem.TRANSLATION: We are retired grandmothers. Despite this we have arrived here after travelling 600km and brought a nomad tent to participate.And it's not just about the sport, there is also the chance to show off traditional arts and culture. The Games and the songs continue until September 8.

If only wrestling with a stick or having eagle hunting was in Rio. Missed opportunities. Now we will look at the finance news. Fox News has paid $26 million in damages to one of its former top news hosts over allegations of sexual harassment. Grech in Carl son alleged she was demoted and victimised by news chief Roger Ailes after rejecting his sexual advances. Other women have since come forward to back her claims. 21st Century Fox has issued a statement saying "we regret and apologise for the fact that Grechen was not treated with the respect that she and all of our colleagues deserve". Roger Ailes said he did not pay any of the settlement. He was sacked by Fox last month and has received a reported $52 million payout. Wall Street had a modest rise:

For more on finance, we are joined by Noel Yeates from Macquarie Private Wealth.Hi Mary.Hi, Noel. The RBA has kept its rates on hold. Does that mean the rate cutting cycle is over?A hard one to call, Mary. We think there is still one to go. If you look at how reporting season finished up, the general health of the Australian economy looks pretty good and business looks good and industrials looks good. If this level is not where the RBA wants to be, then it's going to be new data for us to go further.The US Fed announcement is next and the data is pointing to a continuation of art fishily low rates. Why hasn't the US data picked up?Very good question. The employment numbers last Friday were a bit disappointing as were new housing starts. I think it's a bit confusing for many people, particularly our viewers, one day it's all good news, one day it seems to be bad news. There is a major transformation in the US economy and maybe the data we are looking at is maybe old-fashioned or old hat and really what we are not seeing is the benefits of a lot of productivity coming through with new companies. The US companies that are the biggest these days all relate to technology and what they relate to is productivity in the US. So while on one hand we are seeing US recovery but we are not seeing it flow through to everybody, particularly employment.But these low rates must mean housing prices keep rising and affordability falling?Yes, we've seen a big lift in house prices in Australia in the last year, particularly in the capital cities, Melbourne and Sydney in particular. It would appear they have flattened off a little bit. We are about to go into the spring sale season as the real estate agents call it. This will be a key indicator of how high possible house prices can go. There is a lot of people who think it can't go higher. But there are a lot of people who think housing, particularly through affordability will be very cheap. It will be interesting to see over the next four weeks what happens. You should expect fairly high clearance rates, and a lot more listings. How high prices go will be a key indicate or will indicate how people retire and affect newly marrieds and if they can afford to buy a house. That will be something to watch and something the RBA may be keen to look at. It may lift interest rates next year to choke off the lift in house prices. We might see a coat on one hand but if house prices get out of hand, we may see them lifted. Interesting times. Thanks for your time.My pleasure.Now straight to sport, PK is back on the couch.Tim Cahill has come off the bench to score the win by the Socceroos over the United Arab Emirates in Abu Dhabi. The 36-year-old replaced Tommy your itch in the 71st minute and with his second touch of the ball, 4 minutes later, he put Australia in front. The result means Australia is top of Group B with two wins from two matches. We will see the goal and hear from Tim Cahill. COMMENTATOR: Lou ong go. Cahill! He's there again! One touch from Timmy Cahill. One small step towards Russia for Australia, perhaps.Five minutes into the most energy-sapping conditions you can imagine, somehow he pulse out an effort to support Lou on go. And Socceroos fans say finally a delivery of substance.In the end I get the rewards for believing in the system and rewarded by a beautiful Crosby Brad. All the work goes to the boys. Everyone has put in an effort. We have created a real togetherness.3 points against Iraq and the UAE. Australia is well placed considering the UAE and Japan have both lost matches in the qualification already. A T20 tonne from Glenn plaques well has helped Australia to a world record score. Maxwell smacked 145 from 65 balls and his side made 3/263. That's right, it's a 20-over match and the hosts were restricted to 9/178. Maxwell who had been dumped from the one day team was opening the batting.It's probably a slightly easier place to bat from a stroke player like myself. To get that and carry on was pleasing.The Western Bulldogs say four important players could return for the team's match tomorrow night. The elimination final against West Coast. Easton Wood is a confirmed starter but the coach reckons that Jack McRae and John Libratore might bob up. Jake Stringer is also a chance to return there as well. Speaking of players playing finals and the fullback from Canberra Jack Wighton is free to play after he dodged a ban at the judiciary ban last night. Whiton faced a four-game suspension after being charged with a grade 2 shoulder charge. His lawyer argued his arm wasn't tucked in at the first point of contact. Jennifer Browning was there.It's good news that star fullback Jack Wighton has been cleared to play in this year's final series. He risked a 4-match ban by challenging the shoulder charge but his lawyer has successfully argued him off that charge. The charge being overturned, meaning he can play in this weekend's match against the Sharks. He here is a little of what Jack Wighton had to say after the verdict was handed down.Very excited. It's been a rough start to the week. I can't wait to get out there and make the Raiders proud.REPORTER: (SPEAKS INDISTINCTLY).It's been a long day. With so much riding on the Raiders' finals campaign, a number of fans even drove up from Canberra to the judiciary to see how it unfolded. I can tell you they are very, very excited. Here's a little of what they had to say.I'm excited. I was worried, we lose a lot in his defence. We Noel be there and a full squad pretty much and there should be no excuses why we can't get through now.Jack Wighton cleared to play. He will return to training with the Raiders ahead of Saturday's qualifying final against the Sharks at Canberra Stadium. If you are happier than a Canberra Raiders fan today, you are having a good day.It's hard to be happier than one of those guys.It's finals time. Should be happy any way.He always had faith he would get that. I can't imagine there would be many people who joined him in that faith? His alleged victim was flying through the air, he might not have been thinking the same thing. He did look sheepish after the incident. Any way...Luckiest man in Australia.He will be running around on the weekend. Shoulder charge, yes. No, apparently not.Thank you very much PK. We will check the weather now. Over to you, Vanessa. Good morning.Good morning. A weakening front over WA. Winds overnight, 107km/h on cape island. They are back down to 70km/h around Cape Leeuwin and the rain falls around that region have been 15-16mm. A second front will come through later on this afternoon. We will see the winds rising to 125km/h near the coast. We will see rain, thunderstorms and the risk of hail. Here is our severe weather warning for the moment. If we look ahead and we will see this system continue to journey towards the south-east. For Thursday we will see rain over the eastern parts of SA, pushing into Western Victoria and Tasmania and another area of rain combining behind in the Bight. On Friday, rain will become heavy from Tasmania through to NSW and we could see flash flooding. For Queensland today:

Bring it on. Thank you very much, Vanessa. Let's get more on the PM's warning about the terror threat. Malcolm Turnbull says close cooperation is needed to fight extremism.Of course, we are concerned about terrorism. We have a threat level of probable so it is a real threat. Our security services are relentless, tireless in keeping Australians safe. The capacity of Daesh, of course, is much less than they proclaim it to be but we do have to be very alert to the actions of these lone actors, individuals who, as I described in the national security statement last week, individuals who, for a variety of reasons, may be radicalised, often associated with mental illness frankly, can be radicalised very quickly and engage in very destructive legal conduct, as we saw in Nice, for example. We need more than ever to cooperate closely to engage intimately with our neighbours in the fight against counter terrorism. Sharing of intelligence is more important than ever before. And so counter terrorism too is going to be a key focus of these meetings over the next few days. The PM there. Meanwhile our terror expert, Deakin University Professor Greg Barton spoke to us earlier about the Islamic State propaganda material.I think Commissioner Graham Ashton was right when he said it's propaganda. It was just last week the second in charge of Islamic State, the guy in charge of media and messaging was killed apparently in a strike nearal Bab in northern Syria. It's a reminder to us they are struggling under pressure and of course they are putting up prop dwan today. They have this new magazine in seven languages and each of the seven language groups, they are naming local places. I think that's why we're not feeling too worried about the naming of broad mode meadows and Brunswick and Bankstown. It is propaganda but, as you well know, Greg, there are no shortage of young people, mainly young men out there, who would be receptive to such a message, should we be worried about that aspect of it?It's not something the general public should spend time worrying about. The police and security should worry about it. They have stopped 700 people from travelling. This is a crowd sourcing bid, who wants to try it and be famous. You have got hundreds of Australian families who have seen recruiters come into their lives and touch the lives of their kids. For them it's a chilling reminder.It's chilling because the specified nature of these threats as well. I mean it's one thing to tell the public well look, this nature of terrorism is to attack soft targets and everyone is generally speaking acknowledging and accepting of that now? Which is a terrible state of affairs. But to actually talk about the suburbs, that's a new step, is it?That is a new step. The worry is when somebody living near one of those locations sees that name, they might say now is my time, that is my area, I can do that. Most of the lone wolf attacks have been where the attacker or attackers is familiar. Even the November 13 attacks in Paris, it was local guys who knew the area, the same thing with Brussels. One of the seven languages of this new publication is Indonesian. They have got local places mentioned. They are worried. But in German and French they are mentioning local places as well. They are not going to get a blanket response around the world but they may get response somewhere and that's the worry.Indeed. Greg Barton earlier. The issue of national security has dominated historic talks between Australian and German ministers overnight. From Berlin, here is our Europe correspondent James Glenday. Germany has long been the economic powerhouse of the European Union and with Britain leaving, it's influence is only likely to grow in the years to come. Australia has for some time been trying to boost relations with Berlin but today marked a high watermark. The Foreign Minister Julie Bishop and Defence Minister Marise Payne are here for the first ever talks of their kind to discuss national security issues with their counterparts.Our relationship with Germany is strong but this two plus two does represent an historic milestone in this already strong friendship.The ministers visited Germany's defence headquarters and then laid a wreath in honour of German peacekeepers who have been killed. Australia is hoping that Germany will help it in its bid to get an EU free trade deal while Germany is hoping Australia will have its back in Asia. Both countries have agreed to work more closely on a wheel range of issues for many, many years to come. James Glenday there. Back home and Labor Senator Sam Dastyari may have apologised for accepting money from a company with Chinese government links but is continuing to come under fire this morning. Matt Doran joins us from Parliament House. The pressure hasn't relented on Sam Dastyari?No, it hasn't. Despite saying yesterday's press conference would be open to all questionsnd he would give a full and frank explanation of exactly what led to this $1,670 personal debt being paid on his behalf by a Chinese company, he still hasn't explained the exact nature of that interaction with the Top Education Institute and why they didn't expect anything in return. There are still a number of questions outstanding there and no doubt there will be further pressure from the Coalition over the coming days for sen for Dastyari to come clean on this and further pressure for Bill Shorten to sack him from his frontbench. Senator Dastyari holds the position of the manager of Opposition business in the Senate, effectively in control of how the Opposition managers its affairs in the Senate. Which will be quite important given the nature of the crossbench, it's more of a numbers game than ever before. He is also on Bill Shorten's shadow frontbench as well, holding some small portfolios there. The pressure ramping up on Sam Dastyari. But again this is all going forward to fuel the debate even further about the nature of foreign political donations in Australia, whether or not they should be banned. Bill Shorten says that amid this furore, now is the time to address that matter. The Greens are also in favour of this. Last night on the ABC's Lateline program, the Coalition backbencher, Senator Eric Abetz says he has been of the opinion that foreign political donations should have been banned for many years, including when he was a Minister under the former prime minister John Howard. As a matter of principle, I think it is important that those that involve themselves within the body politic of Australia should be within Australia.On another issue, Matt, the Treasurer Scott Morrison will today release some dough tails of those controversial super reforms the Government is proposing?Some detail but probably not the bit that everyone is talking about, which is that concern, particularly from backbencher members of the Coalition, about the cap on tax-free contributions, the tax-free concessions on superannuation tax contributions. Now we understand that the first tranche of this legislation will be outlined today. It's likely to deal with some of the more minor matters in this package, this suit of changes to the superannuation system. That's led Labor to criticise the Treasurer Scott Morrison, saying that it's not right to be presenting this sort of legislation when it has huge chunks of it missing, just because the Coalition is still trying to sort out its own affairs in the Coalition party room, still trying to ease those concerns from backbenchers who say the plan as it currently stands will alienate significant proportions of the Liberal Party's voter base. Matt Doran in Canberra, thank you. Let's take you to WA now where it's estimated bushfires last year may have killed as many as 500 quokkas. The Northcliffe blaze destroyed thousands of hectares of crucial habitat and most of the population of that threatened species. David Webber reports. The fire which threatened Northcliffe in February last year burned through more than 90,000 hectares and one of the animals worst affected was the quokka.We have lost a large number of quokkas. We believe it was over 500 and now we believe there is only 39 quokkas remaining.Quantifying the loss is not easy. It's taken WWF and the Department of Parks and Wildlife more than six months to come up with an estimate.We have come trekking through the bush, all burnt, and we have hit this beautiful perch system here. There is around nine animals still surviving here.Due to the intensity of the fire and the animals' an built to move quickly, environmentalists believe it's unlikely many of the quokkas got away. There is a warning they may not survive another big blaze.You could potentially see quokkas wiped out if we don't learn more about what's happening post these wildfires and how can we manage that environment and support those animals to survive and resolved noise.It's hoped better forest management between fire seasons will allow more protection of the fragile mainland quokka population which is believed to be as low as 4,000. Let's take you overseas now. The long weekend of the United States just gone, saw 65 shootings, leaving 13 people dead. This took Chicago's death toll from gun violence to more than 500 so far this year. That is more deaths than all of 2015. The BBC has more. In a city where some live in peace and prosperity, others live in poverty and peril. Strict gun laws have made no difference here much the last day without a shooting or murder was February 2015. The sad fact is that for some, a life of drugs and violence has now become a way to get ahead. The violence swirls around west and south side Chicago. A few weeks ago 6-year-old Takara Morgan was wounded in a drive-by shooting. Some say they are forced into a life of violence. Even those who don't walk that path are still affected. How common is it that the shooting around here?Every day.Every day?Yeah, every day. I am so scared for my kids, I tell you I'm really scared for my kids.More people have been killed here since 2001 than US deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan combined. And yet there is almost no outcry. Do you worry about your kids?I do. Like, to be honest, I got a son who is 7 and a daughter that's 4 and I haven't taught neither one how to ride a bike yet because the environment they live in is not safe. You know what I'm saying. I love you.I love you dadda.I'm just trying to change the cycle and it's hard when you don't really have help, you know what I'm saying? It's like we've put in a weird position, you know what I'm saying, because... Cut it. Cut it.(Bleep) it's a never-ending cycle. There is no way (bleep) out of this.With so little control, murders will rise barely noticed and barely solved. A wildfire in southern France has been brought under control after threatening towns on the outskirts of Marseille. The blaze began on Monday in a national park burning through nearly 400 hectares. No-one was injured. The region is still recovering from a bushfire near the Marseille airport last month that scorched 2,000 hectares and forced thousands of residents to flee. Mission Australia is this morning calling for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to have a much greater say in the social and welfare support services they use after a new report found that young Indigenous Australians are far more concerned about issues such as depression and suicide than the rest of the Australian population. The co-chair of Reconciliation Australia, Professor Tom Calma spoke to us a short time ago about the report.The survey was conducted across Australia, about 19,000 people were surveyed and just over a thousand were entrusted on the people who were predominantly living in urban and inner regional areas. So it's not a picture of those living remote and very remote areas. What we did find from the report that Mission Australia has been doing for the past 14 or so years, they do this annual report after doing the survey, yes, we see big advertise parties between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, particularly around the area of hope and homelessness came out very high, areas of discrimination. So there was this disparity and it's an issue that we, and I think policy makers need to really consider when we look at the high levels of people taking their own life remote and very remote community, Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous peoples. We have to get into an environment where we can firstly allow the youth to be engaged in the policies that affect them and secondly, to be able to create an environment where there is hope. This goes for all youth, but particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people that came out in the survey. Governments and policy makers need to develop processes where it can be more inclusive because we have to remember that the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. They are the parents, they're the people that are getting into bureaucracy, into jobs. If we don't create the environment now that can be inclusive, address the issues, that they can identify as major issues, then these issues are going to compound into the coming years.Tom Calma there. Tap-and-go technology may be a much more convenient way to pay for things but it's also made it easier for criminals to get your money. In SA, police say they have noticed a big rise in petty theft offences which had previously been in decline. SA Assistant Police Commissioner Paul Dickson spoke to us about this earlier.We identified there is an increase in relation to the number of thefts of wallets and handbags. We identified between 2011 and 2014, there ha been a significant reduction in the number of handbags and wallets that had been stolen. However, in 2014 that appeared to have changed and between 2014 and now, we've identified there has been about a 10% increase in the number of handbags and wallets that have been stolen. When we analyse that data even further, we identified on about 40% of occasions when wallets and handbags had been stolen, the credit and debit cards in those wallets and handbags this been us in the in the tap-and-go function, where people had stolen those cards and used those cards to receive money and services. That's the South Australian forces attempt to crackdown on tap-and-go theft. The Paralympians have had their first training session. Guy Stayner caught up with Kurt Fearnley. I'm out the front of the athletes village and I'm with the captain of the athletics team Kurt Fearnley. Kurt, do you ever get used to being at a Paralympics?You take every single one in a different lot of emotion and a different vibe and this one, this is the closest unit that I've ever been associated with, to share the role of captain with Danny Di Toro, one of the most beautiful people I've met, she has been able to set a tone in our team and it's a lovely one, it's a great one.There is talk your training form is as good as ever. How do you rate your training form?You got my text messages?The word was from you, actually?Mate, I'm pushing good. My old man said don't count your chickens before they hatch, you have no idea what's going to happen on race day. I've entered the village as fresh, as well motivated, as healthy, as fit, as fast as I ever have been. Now you have to let the race unfold.Of your different races, where do you see your best chance?I love that marathon, love it. An hour-and-a-half out there, you get to hurt, you get to hurt other people. You get to work your way into that race, the 5k is a lot of fun. I've had some of the most interesting races, some of the most action-filled races over the last four Games has been that 5k race. Nowadays it's a pretty intense battle to make it through to the final. Friday night's a big one. I have to turn up to make sure I have a crack at the medals on Sunday. I can't wait for the night before where I'm terrified and nervous and barely sleeping. That's one of the things I will miss the most, that marathon is a hell of a race.We wish you well in the marathon. Kurt Fearnley there talking to us, just like the Chef de Mission Kate McLoughlin said, all of Australia is looking forward to watching Kurt Fearnley's last race in the marathon at the end of the Olympics.Thanks, mate.Guy Stayner's new best friend in Rio. We bring you pictures of the torch in Brazil and PK is here. That place is warmly familiar to you? Yes, at the feet of the Christ the Redeemer there and not the turmoil that the torch had as it approached Rio for the Olympics, which is thankfully the case. But yes, that place overlooking the city. It looks like everyone has had a go at it too. A great opportunity for people to belt up to the Paralympics. Had its dramas as did the Olympics with access being a problem. When I did visit the de a dorro site about an hour inland from the beach to watch the Rugby Sevens, I did wonder how it would be used as a Paralympic venue. Of course they restricted the use any way because of funding. But I thought access might be a problem there as well. Hopefully as with the Olympics, a lot of those kinks have been ironed out.We wish all the Australian Paralympians but also all the Paralympians all the best. Interesting Kurt Fearnley said it's the tightest unit he's come across. That's a big statement. The Paralympic team has been tight and well functioning for quite a while. Maybe we can look forward to expecting PBs. As Don Elgin said earlier, it's not about the medals but personal best. Before we go, let's look at the goal from Tim Cahill. Australia has beaten Iraq and the UAE in the final stage on the way to Russia and I can tell you that there will be some relieved people in the Socceroos' camp. Two wins from two matches eases the tension. They can perform at their best in a relaxed fashion from now on.Good stuff, PK.A nice pass, wasn't it?A beautiful pass.He wheeled around.Poetry in motion. Thank you, mate. Let's check your Wednesday weather now. Good morning Vanessa.We have had wild weather in WA this morning. Still 600 homes in Perth without power and gusty winds got up to 107km/h. Not over yet. There is another cold front this afternoon. More wild weather ahead. Let's take a look at Queensland:

It gets cold again next week, Michael.You keep saying that.In Antarctica?In Melbourne and Tasmania. I won't be here for it, so I wish you the best.You are fleeing to go whereinTo somewhere very cold, Iceland.It's like Brisbane in Iceland at the moment.Thank you Vanessa. I'm not believing you about the cold weather about to come back. Thanks PK. My thanks to Mary Gearin, she left This program is not captioned. This program is live captioned by Ericsson Access Services.

The foreign investment push. Calls for increased overseas ownership of Australian farms.That is what drives economic growth in Australia. That is important because that is what drives jobs for Australians.

Prepared but not scared. The Government reassures the public over the latest terror threats. The Syrian Government accused of dropping chlorine bombs on civilians. And the Socceroos earn a 1-0 World Cup qualifying win over the United Arab Emirates.

Hello, welcome to mornings, I'm Andrew Geoghegan. Let's see how the weather is looking for Wednesday...

The Government is calling for more foreign investment in Australian agricultural land. The newly released register of foreign owned farmland has revealed just under 14% of Australia's total agricultural land is foreign owned. Companies from the UK own about the largest amount followed by the US, the Netherlands and Singapore. China owns just half a per cent of agricultural land in Australia or 1.5 million hectares. Federal Trade Minister Steve Ciobo says the register shows fears over Chinese investment have been exaggerated and more foreign capital is needed. China is just not at the level where a lot of Australians would think it is, based upon what they are seeing portrayed in the media on a regular