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Nationals candidate promises to advocate for special regional taxation rates -

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NICK GRIMM: One of the other New South Wales seats the National party is expected to retain is Calare, in the central west where the state MP is attempting the move into federal politics.

If he gets to Canberra, Andrew Gee, is promising to advocate for some bold ideas, including special tax rates to encourage investment in regional Australia.

But Calare is also one of only a handful of seats outside of South Australia that will feature a candidate from the Nick Xenophon team.

Naomi Woodley reports.

NAOMI WOODLEY: With its mix of regional cities, mining and farmland, Calare is safe Nationals territory, but candidate, Andrew Gee, says he's not complacent as he attempts to move from state to federal parliament.

ANDREW GEE: If voters think that their MP is not representing them, then they will change.

NAOMI WOODLEY: While the services and tourism economy is growing in the central west, manufacturing is in decline.

Unlike some in the Coalition, Andrew Gee sees a role for a certain type of government intervention as part of a national manufacturing strategy.

ANDREW GEE: Let's target what we're good at. Food processing has to be one of them. And let's target our policies and importantly our taxation regime accordingly.

So I'm talking about depreciation rates, I'm also talking about things like zonal taxation here which is something that I think we should be looking at to encourage people to move to regional Australia.

So I'm talking about differential income tax rates, differential company tax rates.

NAOMI WOODLEY: For the second election in a row the Labor candidate in Calare is Jess Jennings.

JESS JENNINGS: The main issues are education, health and jobs, without any doubt.

NAOMI WOODLEY: He says renewables and sustainable agriculture are also an important part of his plan to boost Labor's primary vote.

JESS JENNINGS: It's currently about a 15 per cent margin. If we could get that down to 5 per cent it would then become a target seat, and the people of Calare would no longer be taken for granted as is increasingly the case by the National party.

NAOMI WOODLEY: That's the aim too of Rod Bloomfield, who's standing for the Nick Xenophon team.

ROD BLOOMFIELD: I believe that if we make Calare marginal, we make Calare matter.

NAOMI WOODLEY: He's expected to at least pick up the 5 per cent of those who voted for the Palmer United Party in 2013 - beyond that no one is really sure.

Despite his ties to the South Australian Senator, voters like Karen view Mr Bloomfield as an independent.

KAREN: He's more for the people than the major parties cause I think they're out for themselves whereas independent he speaks more for the person.

ROD BLOOMFIELD: Nick said from the get go, especially for us outside of South Australia, to operate as quasi-independents to some degree, certainly our direction and our philosophy comes from Nick Xenophon head office and Nick himself.

NAOMI WOODLEY: The broadcaster is hoping to follow in the footsteps of Peter Andren, a popular local TV presenter who commanded significant support as Calare's independent MP 20 years ago.

The increase in residents seeking a lifestyle change from Sydney also has the Greens candidate, Delanie Sky, confident of boosting her party's share.

DELANIE SKY: Their issues that they bring to the area are different from what the Nationals have been just hanging on to.

NAOMI WOODLEY: But Andrew Gee is expected to be successful for the Nationals, even with some local anger over the state government's plan to force council amalgamations.

Five local governments in the area have taken legal action against the move.

MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: Naomi Woodley reporting there.

: One of the other New South Wales seats the National party is expected to retain is Calare, in the central west where the state MP is attempting the move into federal politics.

If he gets to Canberra, Andrew Gee, is promising to advocate for some bold ideas, including special tax rates to encourage investment in regional Australia.

But Calare is also one of only a handful of seats outside of South Australia that will feature a candidate from the Nick Xenophon team.

Naomi Woodley reports.

NAOMI WOODLEY: With its mix of regional cities, mining and farmland, Calare is safe Nationals territory, but candidate, Andrew Gee, says he's not complacent as he attempts to move from state to federal parliament.

ANDREW GEE: If voters think that their MP is not representing them, then they will change.

NAOMI WOODLEY: While the services and tourism economy is growing in the central west, manufacturing is in decline.

Unlike some in the Coalition, Andrew Gee sees a role for a certain type of government intervention as part of a national manufacturing strategy.

ANDREW GEE: Let's target what we're good at. Food processing has to be one of them. And let's target our policies and importantly our taxation regime accordingly.

So I'm talking about depreciation rates, I'm also talking about things like zonal taxation here which is something that I think we should be looking at to encourage people to move to regional Australia.

So I'm talking about differential income tax rates, differential company tax rates.

NAOMI WOODLEY: For the second election in a row the Labor candidate in Calare is Jess Jennings.

JESS JENNINGS: The main issues are education, health and jobs, without any doubt.

NAOMI WOODLEY: He says renewables and sustainable agriculture are also an important part of his plan to boost Labor's primary vote.

JESS JENNINGS: It's currently about a 15 per cent margin. If we could get that down to 5 per cent it would then become a target seat, and the people of Calare would no longer be taken for granted as is increasingly the case by the National party.

NAOMI WOODLEY: That's the aim too of Rod Bloomfield, who's standing for the Nick Xenophon team.

ROD BLOOMFIELD: I believe that if we make Calare marginal, we make Calare matter.

NAOMI WOODLEY: He's expected to at least pick up the 5 per cent of those who voted for the Palmer United Party in 2013 - beyond that no one is really sure.

Despite his ties to the South Australian Senator, voters like Karen view Mr Bloomfield as an independent.

KAREN: He's more for the people than the major parties cause I think they're out for themselves whereas independent he speaks more for the person.

ROD BLOOMFIELD: Nick said from the get go, especially for us outside of South Australia, to operate as quasi-independents to some degree, certainly our direction and our philosophy comes from Nick Xenophon head office and Nick himself.

NAOMI WOODLEY: The broadcaster is hoping to follow in the footsteps of Peter Andren, a popular local TV presenter who commanded significant support as Calare's independent MP 20 years ago.

The increase in residents seeking a lifestyle change from Sydney also has the Greens candidate, Delanie Sky, confident of boosting her party's share.

DELANIE SKY: Their issues that they bring to the area are different from what the Nationals have been just hanging on to.

NAOMI WOODLEY: But Andrew Gee is expected to be successful for the Nationals, even with some local anger over the state government's plan to force council amalgamations.

Five local governments in the area have taken legal action against the move.

NICK GRIMM: Naomi Woodley reporting there.