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This Program is Captioned Live.This morning - silences the boats. The new Government under fire for its decision not to announce asylum seeker boat arrivals. The policy I thought from the then Opposition, now the Government, was that they would stop the boats, not that they would hide the information. Also on Weekend Breakfast, a Greenpeace process ship under tow in the Arctic Sea after it tow in was stormed by Russian coast guards.Syria submits details of its chemical weapons assets, the first step in a plan for their destruction.And Hawthorn books itself a place in the AFL grand final overcoming Geelong in an end-to-end thriller at the MCG. Good morning, it's Saturday, 21 September, I'm Miriam Corowa.I'm Nick Grimm.Lovely to have you here.Thank you, it's lovely to be here. Also on the program - they say a week is a long time in politics but how does it feel to be pushed out of the game all together? Former PM Julia Gillard recently described losing power as hitting you like a fist. Many of her colleagues likely share that view now in the wake of their recent defeat at the polls. We'll chat to psychologist Peter doil about how it feels to disappear from the limelight. And we haven't seen as much from Kevin Rudd.Not at all. They call it relevance deprivation syndrome. And I notice Peter Garrett is writing a biography. For me money it should have been an album, with some protest songs. Let's check the weather around the country now:

Let's get the latest news headlines now with Miriam.Thanks, Nick. Labor's Immigration spokesman Tony Burke is warning the Government is creating a culture of secrecy by not announcing when asylum seeker boats arrive in Australian waters. The previous Government issued media alerts every time a boat arrived but no new alerts have been issued since the new Government was sworn in.The Government's border protection policyOperation sovereign boarders with Tony Abbott promising to make a difference from day one. The ABC's asked both Customs and the Immigration Department whether any boats have arriveded in recent days but were referred back to the Minister's office. Tony Burke says of information should be
automatic.I've Tony Burke says the disclosure
of information should automatic.I've had journalists
of information should be
from all automatic.I've had journalists from all publications ringing
me from all me today saying "How do we find out?" Because they've me today saying "How do ringing the Department saying "Have any boats arrived?" The Department said, "We don't answer that anymore, you've got to go to Scott Morrison's office." Scott Morrison's office is refusing to answer the ques. The policy I thought from the ques. The policy I from the then Opposition, now the Government, was that they would stop the boats, not that they would hide the information.The previous Government used to issue a media alert every time a asylum seeker boat arrived. A spokeman for the Immigration Minister Scott Morrison says such decisions will now be made by a details
military commander and further details on Operation Sovereign Borders will be provided next week.Businessman Clive Palmer has a slender lead heading into the final day of counting in the Queensland seat of Fairfax.He's in front of Liberal National Party candidate Ted O'Brien by just 111 votes. The Australian Electoral Commission says about 450 votes will be counted this morning as well as any late postal votes that arrive before last night's deadline. There will be an automatic recount if the margin is less than 100 votes but candidates can request one if it's a bigger gap.Two Australians are among Greenpeace protestors taken into custody by the Russian coastguard in the Arctic Sea. The activists were targeting an oil drilling platform but there's now confusion over what happens next.The protestors' attempt to Arctic oil platform on
Wednesday was always going to provoke a Wednesday provoke a robust response from the authorities. Footage of the initial Greenpeace the authorities. initial Greenpeace action shows activists using ropes to climb the sides of the platform but within minutes they were intercepted by armed coastguard officers in boats.Then on Thursday night more armed coast guards used a helicopter to storm the nearby Greenpeace vessel, the Dutch registered 'Arctic Sunrise'. A total of 30 activists onboard have been arrested.All the crew, the captain, the ship should be released immediately. That's why these days Greenpeace officers all over the world are doing solidarity activity s, appealing to Russian embassies and Gazprom officers to release our colleagues.The same platform was bordered by protestors back in August as part of an ongoing campaign to highlight what they say are environmental risks posed by increased energy exploitation in the Arctic. The protest was organised from Greenpeace International's London office but staff here in the group's Moscow office are providing legal and translation assistance and vital GPS monitoring.And after being told the vessel was being steered by the Russians west to Murmansk, latest GPS shows the ship being taken east into Russian territorial waters.The demonstration arrests have garnered international publicity. In Australia Greenpeace's regional chief tried to deliver a letter to the Russian consulate in Sydney.It's very clear and very disappointing that the Russian consulate has declined to even accept a simple letter requesting that the Russian authorities release our activists, let an Australian lad come home, let an Australian permanent resident come back to Australia, give back our ship and they won't even accept a simple letter requesting that they do that. It's disappointing.So far there has been no comment from the Russian Foreign Ministry about the ongoing situation. In the meantime supporters of the Arctic Sunrise crew can only watch the GPS screens and wait.The Syrian Government has started handing over details of its chemical weapons to the international community's watchdog in the Hague. Syria is believed to have around 1,000 tonnes of chemical toxins but fighting with conventional weapons continues and not just between government forces and the opposition. Two Syrian rebel groups who have been northern
fighting each other in the northern town of Azaz have agreed to a ceasefire proving how complicated the picture on the ground has become.Stuck with no hope of going home. These refugees in Turkey fled the Syrian regime. Now they must also worry about an emerging conflict between Al-Qaeda and other rebel groups.Their men folk are FSA fighters. They don't think the ceasefire agreed today will make any difference in the end.The jihadists are a creation of the regime, this FSA officer. "After we topple the regime we'll deal topple the regime with them too."Slick
propaganda from the main Al-Qaeda group in Syria. The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria as the group is known, has a not very subtle message - we're on the march.The video switches to what seems to be a camp for suicide bombers. The young men are enjoying a last swim before martyrdom, the speaker explains."Fill the car with explosion explosives, embrace death, teach the infidel s a lesson."The jihadist black flag flew only briefly over the town of Azaz but their influence continues to spread.Despite the ceasefire, the nearby border with Turkey remained closed today. Much needed food and aid are not getting through.The US is reeling from two mass shootings in one week. Yesterday 12 people including a 3-year-old boy were injured in a shooting attack in Chicago.It happened on a basketball court in what police say is a gang-related incident. It follows the shooting rampage by a military contractor at a navy base in Washington DC earlier this week in which 13 people died. Our North America correspondent Lisa Millar says police have suspected in mind incident.They're
for the latest incident.They're hunting 3 gang members who they believe were firing. At least one of them had an assault weapon. Not a lot of details. them had an a lot of details. No-one died. In fact in the scheme of a lot of details. No-one In fact in the scheme of things it's not necessarily a serious gun incident when you look at how many we see here in the US. Every day we hear stories of various gun events. This one everyone survived, including the 3-year-old who was there as well. But what we do know gang-related, an assault weapon likely to be an illegal weapon. In fact the police chief was fairly passionate about how many illegal weapons they have to seize every year and 5,000 already in Chicago alone. The trouble is as soon as they seize them more of them go back out onto the streets. So they just feel like they keep losing this battle.Our North America correspondent Lisa Millar. A Hobart zoo is celebrating the birth of two rare white lions. It's believed to be only the third successful Australian breeding of the endangered cats. These two 5-week-old cubs are a rare sight. The white African lion has been hunted almost to extinction.They are only in zoos and breeding institutions around the world and there's less thn 300 of them. The lion is not an albino. A recessive gene is responsible for the white coats. These two have already been removed from their mother to get used to being cared for by humans.He doesn't like bath time very much so he gets a bit grumpy when it's bath time and he will grab hold of the tissues and the towels. The other one is a better feeder on the milk. Likes feed time a lot better. The cubs have been reacquainted with their parents for the first time since being removed.It's look but don't touch as it would be too dangerous to put them in the cage together. For now these lion cubs need a lot of care and attention but in about 9 months time they will have to start looking for a new home. These are part of a very special breeding program which these will go back overseas. I'm not sure which country Thrace be going to but they will certainly be leaving the shores of Australia.For now they're the pride of Tasmania. Now to sport with Sasha Mirzabegian.

Hawthorn are through to the AFL grand final after a thrilling 5-point win over Geelong at the MCG. They were 20 points down at quarter to 20 points down at quarter time
to win. Geelong's Travis Varcoe had a chance to level the had a chance to scores with 30 seconds left but his 30 metre scores with 30 his 30 metre shot faded his 30 off target. his 30 metre shot off target. The victory ends off target. The victory the Hawks' 11-game losing
street the Hawks' street against the Cats and finally breaks the Kennett curse but Brendan Whitecross looks set to miss the decide wer a knee injury. In the NRL Manly will play South Sydney in a preliminary final. They eliminated Cronulla last night. Daly Cherry-Evans scored for Manly. Shark's skipper Paul Gallen appeared to level the scores but replays showed John Morris had impeded Matt Ballin at the play of the ball. Jamie Lyon is in doubt for the grand final qual ferker with a leg injury.And the Wallabies will assemble Daoud without James O'Connor. O-Conner had been stood down indefinitely for repeated off field indiscretions. The ARU is investigating the latest incident. Waratah's Winger Peter Betham will replace O'Connor. Back to you guys.Thanks, Sasha.Well coming up, Pope Francis has again broken with tradition, this week blasting the Catholic Church for putting moral doctrine ahead of helping those in need. We'll take a closer look in a moment.And public/private partnerships under the spotlight with a string of recent failures prompting questions over whether there are better ways to fund infrastructure projects.And later WA's Pilbara region is known mainly for its mining rather than the arts but a group of men there have been broadening their horizons adding contemporary dance to their skill set. Pope Francis shocked many this week after calling on the Catholic Church to shake off an obsession with strict rules on abortion and homosexuality. He made the remarks in a lengthy interview with a fellow Jesuit in which he criticised the Church for putting dogma before love and prioritising moral doctrines over serving the poor and again striking a contrast between himself and the again striking a between himself and the former
Pope between himself and Pope Benedict and will no doubt divide strongly held beliefs within the Church. A man who has met Pope Francis and closely followed his teachings is fellow Jesuits and mission leader Jack De Groot and he joins us now in the studio. Good morning to you, thank you for joining us.Good morning.Lovely to be talking to you again.I better clarify, I'm not still a Jesuit, I was once a Jesuit.Thank you for clarifying that.My wife and children would be a bit worried.Something happened between home and here this morning.Yes.We're going to talk about the wide ranging interview the Pope gave at the outset but he's given an update on those comments with news emerging overnight that he's told a group of Catholic docket thars abortions are a symptom of a modern throw away culture. Is he offering a bit of an olive branch there? I think he's absolutely consistent really. What he's saying is that there's no change in regard to the teaching on abortion. What he's saying is we need to take the person who is before us, that woman who maybe whatever tragic circumstance may have led her to the decision for abortion, that we need to take her and all of her needs into account and pastorally engage with her. Not just straight out judge. That's the consistency is there's not an agreement with the need for abortion, there's an opposition to that. But let's not lose sight of the human, their frailty, their suffering and the need in our community to protect life. So I think it's the emphasis on the pastoral that he is clearly advocating here and criticising the Church when it only speaks doctrinally and forgets the pastoral need of the individual.So essentially he's saying we're not changing the teaching of the Church, we're not going to change our approach, but what we will change is just we'll have a softer, more inclusive approach about doing it? That's the emphasis. It's very much about the person before us. He keeps on talking throughout the interview about his need to be in relationship with people who come before us in need. And that's what he's emphasising. His criticism is about when the Church loses sight of the person and only gets involved in theology, only gets involved in law and doctrine. He's saying that's not the Church. The Church is a pastoral outreach to people in need.So the responses that people have been having to those comments yesterday interpreting this as a sign of perhaps more liberal stance, we need to maybe check stance, we need to some of those ideas and perhaps some of this won't be some of those ideas and this won't be then seen as an this won't be then seen as issue that will create more division between more conservative elements of the Church as well.I think there will be division over this but because the Pope actually says in the interview tension is pretty normtive. What he's concerned about is a Church that is divorced from the needs of people and that will be something that is very much welcomed by the community at large. That's why so many, I suppose, so-called liberals have said isn't this a great sign? Is this a portent of something new in teaching. I'm not too sure whether it's a portent of new teaching but certainly a change in emphasis in the pastoral, to the outreach, to be with those in need and that's where the Pope has put his body in the last 6 months. He's been in the slums in Rio, he's been with the refugees in Lampadusa and in Rome last week to asylum seekers in the city of Rome. To those in need. He's responded by the phone calls to those who have been the victim of rape. He's with people and that's the change in style and approach.But with respect, in the world of politics this is sometimes what's known as spin? Well, it could be but this is a Church, this is not politics for Pope Francis.But there's a lot of similarities.There can be but I think if we look at the reality of what the Catholic Church does throughout the world it is an outreach of service to the world. The Pope keeps on talking in this interview that we need to be a church out in the world not asking people to come to us,way need to be able to service. So I don't think that this is a guy, when you look at him, what he does, his integrity, who is a spinmeister. He's actually there to be with people. I withdraw think though there were withdraw from the spin.Do you comments also made regarding perhaps rethinking the role that women will have in the Church, is there potential for this to open up a new direction in the Catholic Church? I think there is. I mean the Pope says we need to do some rethinking on the role, the participation and obviously the leadership of women in the Church. He's ruled out the issue of the ordination of women, but that is one area that's probably not surprising. But his actual saying that can't be the end of leadership for women in the church and we really need to think about that. He's very clear on that needs to be a reform within the Church's thinking at this time. The Pope did say in his interview that he called for a still
new balance, maybe he's also still walking a bit of a tightrope.He is. These are early days still. Six months, he's got a big couple of weeks ahead where he meets with his kitchen cabinet, his cardinals, 8 of them, to consult. He's got a time where he's goes to Assisi, he's been leading the world's opposition into the bombing of Syria. He's got a full agenda, which is not just about the Church and its internal functions and challenges, but the Church reaching out to the world and being a voice of diplomatic reason at a time when there's great chaos and on the brink of war.Plenty of work to be done there. Jack De Groot, thank you for your time this morning.Thank you very much.Private/public partnerships are commonplace for major infrastructure projects in Australia but with a poor history of financial success their viability is in doubt.Well this week Sydney's cross city tunnel went into receivership again prompting the question whether private/public deal are the way to go.There are 4 major roads in Australia which started out as a good idea but didn't take long to become a massive financial nightmare. In Brisbane the airport link went into administration in February this year. The city's first private tollway, the Clem Jones tunnel, known as the CLEM7, went into receivership last November. In Sydney the Lane Cove tunnel went into receivership at the start of 2010 and the cross-city tunnel which has had a poor financial history since 2006 has just been placed into receivership again.And this is why. Less than half the number of vehicles predicted to travel on these roads are actually using them. And that's prompted people in both the public and private sectors to question the value of private/public partnerships.The Queensland Government opened the $4.8 billion airport link in mid 2012. Original forecasts by 2012. Original forecasts operating Bris Connections predicted 90,000 vehicles would use the tunnel each day but when the tunnel went into administration less than a year after it opened, less than 48,000 vehicles were using the tunnel daily.The Clem 7 was built at a cost of $3.2 billion and opened to the public in March 2010. Operator River City Motorway Group predicted 60,000 vehicles would use it daily but when a reduced toll was increased patronage was closer to 20,000 vehicle asday. The tunnel went into receivership in November 2012 and shares in the company are now worthless.Sydney's $1.1 billion Lane Cove tunnel was opened in early 2007. Connector Motorways owned the contract but in 2010 the project was put into receivership and Transurban bought the tunnel for $630 million. And the cross city tunnel was built for $680 million. The cross-City Motorways owned the contract to own and build the tunnel in 2002. The road has had a very rocky history. It went into receivership yesterday, the second time in 8 years.Public/private partnership failures such as these raise the question of whether governments should be investing taxpayer funds into these ventures making the viability of any future similar projects uncertain.For more on these public/private partnerships we're joined in the studio by the CEO of Smart Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong Garry Bowditch, thank you for joining us. We've painted a bit of a dire picture there of what can go wrong with various public/private joint partnerships to do with infrastructure and again the cross-city tunnel has been in the headLyons. But is there a way that we can actually bring onboard public and private investment in very vital projects, make it work and make it viable? Well, public/private partnerships are something which are a well tested formula and your report has highlighted there's been a number of challenges with them. But the M7 west link in Sydney is a success. Can you imagine Sydney without an M 1, these are successes. All these projects do experience a degree of problems in their early stages but remember, these are 30, 50-year projects really and that cities do grow into them. So what we're looking at here is something that they all share in common are tunnels. Tunnels seem to be a problem when they're in cities and when they're relying on very high-levels of traffic to justify them. The costs are roughly $600 million a clom tore to build a tunnel. So perhaps we might like to stand back and think about why a tunnel. Are we actually paying the price for some absence of some long-term planning? If we had preserved land access on the surface of our cities maybe we could have provided these roads at far less cost and the private sector is putting up significant capital in order to build these tunnels when perhaps if we had long-term planning we would have had surface corridors there which would have cost a fraction of the price. So these are some of the long-term issues that are at play here in terms of whether PPPs work or not. Of course they work. They've been working since ancient Greece where the model actually started but where the risk and the return and the risk and the return is really quite fundamental when it comes to tunnels. Build tunnels are very risky and expensive, as I've already said. So how do we actually look at getting the right risk for the right return because when you fly over Sydney, when you fly over Melbourne and you look down and say there's not a lot of space there for a new road. So tunnels are becoming an increasingly important part of the infrastructure solution. But in terms of how do you deliver those? Well it's about risk and it's about return and if we want private sector money to be involved and we want superannuation money to be involved in particular, that is your money and my money, we're going to have to revisit that formula.But the question that poses is why does the private sector keep on investing in these tunnel projects if they do have such a bad track good question. There is record? Well, that's a sense of optimism good question. There sense of optimism within the
private sector that sense of optimism private sector that these
projects will sense of optimism within the
private projects will in fact pay their way. Now the cross-city tunnel had already gone into bankruptcy once. This second round is really nothing to do with traffic. The traffic numbers have stabilised. It's really about a technical matter over a tax liability with the courts in NSW. So the private sector has in fact pulled back, that the money that was once available in 2007, 2009, you know, when this was more money available, were far more aggressive towards being willing to invest in these sorts of areas. That's no longer the case. And that's really the issue here is well what is the new formula which would better allow risk and return and that's what we're all searching for at the moment is how we might do that. There are some examples around where availability payments, that is it that it doesn't matter how many people use a road as long as the private sector provide the road and it's available for a very significant amount of time, like 99.something percent of the year, they would be paid for having that facility open. That is certainly an area of attraction for the private sector and where the availability payment model is used money is forthcoming.Could we essentially say that I guess years ago we saw images of those big tunnelling machines that built the tunnel under Sydney Harbour, for example, did the technology stride too far ahead of the financial sides of these? Well, the technology has been improving all the time but we also have to recognise that infrastructure is about the future our infrastructure as well and it's really that period of growing into it as to whether it's private money or public money that should growing into it as to money that should be allowed to carry that cost. So you might note with West Connex, the new motorway the NSW Government is proposing, they're proposing to bear the risk associated with patronage of that road during the ramp up period and once the numbers settle down, the traffic numbers settle down, then the project would be put up for sale. Maybe there's something in that about traffic forecasting which has proved itself to be a spectacular black science.Alright, well Garry Bowditch, thank you so much for coming in and giving us a little bit of an insight into how these things may well work for us in the future.It's my pleasure.Thank you.Let's take a look at the satellite. A trough and cold front are triggering isolated showers in SA's south-east while a large high pressure system is pushing isolated showers and on shore winds onto Queensland.Looking around the country:

Still to come on Weekend Breakfast - it's a big weekend for footy fans with final season well under way. We get the very latest in sports news with Sasha Mirzabegian later this hour.You're watching Weekend Breakfast.

The top stories from ABC News - the new Government is being accused of creating a culture of secrecy over the arrival of asylum seekers. Under Labor media alerts were issued every time a boat arrived but that practice will be abandoned under the Coalition. Opposition Immigration spokesman Tony Burke says disclosure of the information should be automatic. 7 boats carrying 480 passengers arrived between the September 7 election and last Tuesday.Two Australians are among Greenpeace protestors being held by the Russian coastguard in the Arctic Sea. The activists were onboard the 'Arctic Sunrise' which was targeting an oil drilling platform. Greenpeace says the Russians have taken control of the boat but it's unclear where it will be escorted to.The sir January Government has started handing over details chemical weapons. Syria handing over details of its chemical weapons. Syria is
believed to chemical weapons. believed to have around 1,000 tonnes believed tonnes of chemical toxins. The Syrian tonnes of chemical Syrian regime says the has now Syrian regime says has now reached a stalemate with neither side strong enough to has now reached a with neither side strong to win the 2-year civil war.
And to win the 2-year And in sport, minor premiers Hawthorn are through to the Hawthorn are through to the AFL grand final after a 5-point win over Geelong at the MCG. The Hawks fought back from 20 points down at three quarter time to win 102-97.Time to take a look at the front pages of today's major newspapers.The Adelaide 'Advertiser' writes that new mums in SA could be discharged from hospital the day their babies arrive after the Women's and Children's Hospital introduced a same-day delivery service. It's been seen as a cost cutting measure but doctors have warned that mothers could miss out on much needed support.Victoria's Sunday age 'Age' has published details about the latest in governmental panel on climate change report. It claims that humans have already released half the total carbon dioxide emissions per missible before the planet is at risk of dangerous warning. The IPCC says deep global emissions cuts will be needed in the coming decades.How young is too young? This is the question many questions of 4-year-olds must contemplate in deciding when to send their children to school. Sydney's 'Daily Telegraph' writes that the Australian primary principals association is calling for a national uniform age for the first year of school. The different rules mean in some States such as NSW there can be a 17-month gap between the youngest and the eldest in the classroom.And farewell the red posty, the 'Sydney Morning Herald' features a story on Australia Post's new motorbike which began roaming our neighbourhoods back in June. It's not proving as reliable as the old red posty. Honda has been forced to recall the bikes because of a fuel pump problem prompting Australia Post to because of a fuel pump withdraw some of its withdraw some of its old bikes from auction. A bit of a false start from auction. A bit start there.Yes, indeed.We won't be seeing our red posties for a little bit longer then. I'll point out in the picture we were showing you the new bikes are lime green and cream. Very inner city cafe decor.That's right. Alright, we look forward to that. Well whether you are Catholic, an Atheist or a Jedi, the recent comments by Pope Francis will have been welcomed by many. In a broad-ranging interview the pontiff said the Church must shake off its obsession with abortion, contraception and homosexuality and find a new balance between upholding rules and showing mercy.Well today we'd like to know whether you believe this marks a change in direction and focus for the Church. And what other issues would you like to see Pope Francis take on? So to have your say just use the ABC News 24 hash tag or you can share your views on Facebook and via E-mail: And ABC Weekend Breakfast can be watched live on the web.Go to the main website abc.net.au/news and you will find a link to News 24 which is streamed live every day. Two bombs hidden inside air-conditioners have exploded in a mosque in Iraq killing at least 15 people. Officials in the city of Samarra say the explosions occurred during Friday prayers in a Sunni place of worship. At least 21 people were also wounded in the attack. Iraq is weathering its worst bout of violence in half a decade with more than 4,000 people killed across the country since April.A grim task for hundreds of people in the US State of Colorado. They have been allowed to briefly return to their homes for the first time since devastating floods inundated the State. They were confronted by scenes of mud cake buildings and vehicles, tangled power lines and downed utility polls. Crews are clearing debris and trying to restore services. An executive body has been appointed to oversee the recovery efforts.It's a case of going, going, gone. A controlled explosion has brought down the final section of an 84-year-old bridge in the US State of Kentucky. It was taken down in seconds. Those huge pieces of steel will be retrieved from the river and sold off as scrap. Traffic won't be disrupted for long. New roadways will be attached to the historic pylons. It will eventually be double the width of the original structure.

Now time for the business news and when the markets in Europe closed a couple of hours ago:

Smart phone giant Blackberry is expected to cut 40% of its work force, or worldwide after work force, or 4,500 worldwide after projecting a $1 billion second quarter loss. Trading billion second Trading in Blackberry shares
have been billion second quarter loss.
Trading in have been halted on the Toronto have stock exchange and the NASDAQ in New York ahead of the official announcement next week. The troubled smart phone maker has watched its market share tumble in re cent years as traditional phone makers moved into the smart phone market.The construction workers union says fines imposed by the Federal Court over a strike in WA's Pilbara are a sign of things to come under the Abbott Government.The Federal Court has handed down fines of between $1,000 and $10,000 on more than 100 workers who walked off the job in 2008. The court found the industrial action at Woodside's LNG expansion project was unlawful. The CFMEU says they expect more pressure on striking workers under the new Government.It was a significant week for international markets and to get some analysis of the affects Martin Lakos from Macquarie private wealth joins me in the studio. Thank you for coming in.Good morning. One of the biggies this week was the decision by the Federal Reserve in the US not to reduce that $85 billion a week fiscal sim lus program? They have certainly tagged the markets. The reduction of this stimulus was always going to be subject to how well the US economy is growing and the US economy is going OK but it's the pace of the expansion, the pace of growth is not want it to be and clearly
they've indicated also they

want to see unemployment heading towards a 6 want to see heading towards a 6 in front of it instead of heading towards it instead of a 7. So they did surprise markets because it had been a good indication and markets were been a good indication markets were expecting them to
pull back that stimulus a bit by about $10 billion a month and slowly but surely take by about $10 billion and slowly but surely take it to zero. Stagger the reduction rather than cutting it out all together.Exactly. The word in the markets Wass taper light. So they were going to taper back gradge - gradually. Does that boil down to the Federal Reserve sending a message the economy is still fragile? Not so much fragile but not where they want it to be and they don't want to disrupt markets or that recovery. If you look at all the data, manufacturing is doing quite well, certainly the housing recovery in the US is well ahead of say Australia's housing recovery. So that's a good thing. With housing comes a lot of additional consumption going forward.I'll ask you in a moment about the impact it's had on the markets here in Australia but I guess when we're talking about the US we should also mention the debt limit issue is still a factor there playing there and that the Federal
could have been on the minds of the Federal Reserve too? There's a few speed humps for markets generally at the moment. We've got the debt limit ceiling coming up for Congress to vote on. If you remember we saw that and that markets
was quite disruptive for markets back in 2011. This time around we think the Congress will make a meal of it a little bit but at the end of the day they tend to pass it. They will negotiate it through and the next thing coming up is although it's not an absolute deadline, it's been well publicised that Ben Bernanke is stepping down in January next year and there's a new chairman to emerge.A little bit of uncertainty still there. So how was all this greeted by the Australian markets here in Australia this week, pretty pleased that that money is still going to get pumped into the US economy obviously? The initial reaction clearly was that if interest rates were going to remain very, very low and hence the stimulus was well and truly in place, the equity markets rallied very strongly on Thursday. In particular we saw our Aussie dollar rally strongly, nearly 2 cents on Thursday, up to 95 US cents and the reason for that is that the Australian currency is a high-yielding currency. That means that with interest rates at 2.5% here in Australia as compared to virtually zero percent in the US, foreigners can buy the Aussie dollar and get 2.5% on that asset purchase and that's why there's a support level of the Aussie dollar. The Reserve Bank is not happy with that. They want to see the currency down to support our economy. What's the reserve likely to do with interest rates? We've been forecasting for quite some time that the Reserve Bank will continue to cut rates down 2%. So we think cuts in nove and December. In fact there's plenty of precedence of the Reserve Bank cutting in December ahead of Christmas. So we think that's most likely. They want to get the currency down below 90 cents at least. I think the target's been talked about more like 85 to around 85 cents. A couple of other things supporting the currency is China data has been better than expected and that's good for Australian exporters in terms of iron ore but we've also seen that the interest rate at 2.5% is a big support for the currency.OK, Martin Lakos from thanks very much for coming in
and explaining Macquarie Private Wealth,
thanks very and explaining all that for
us.Thanks, Nick.The PM's decision to scrap us.Thanks, Nick.The decision to scrap the Climate
Commission has attracted criticism from overseas. The Grantham Research Institute in the London School of Economics is one body that's long advocated more action on climate change. Its policy and communications director Bob Ward spoke to Europe correspondent Mary Gearin about his views on how Mr Abbott's scrapping of the commission is seen in the rest of the world. Well, I think most people from outside Australia will find this a very strange move. For any government having a source of independent expert advice on an issue that's as complicated as climate change is really invaluable and for Mr Abbott to decide he doesn't want to listen to the experts anymore because he doesn't want to have to deal with climate change is a bit like somebody saying I want to get rid of cancer by not listening to the doctors anymore. It's a completely inexplicable, incomprehensible decision.Why can't the Government rely on experts outside of the Climate Commission, other scientists, other scientific communities within Australia? Well one would expect Mr Abbott to listen to all the experts but all the best climate experts or most of the best experts were on the Commission and that's an incredibly valuable resource for those scientists to be willing to devote their time to giving the Government advice. And Australia now must be wondering whether the Government is going to be able to make good decisions if it's decided that it doesn't want to have a commission that gives them about climate change.Are other repositories of knowledge, the intergovernment al panel on climate change, that couldn't provide Australians with what they need? It's an expert body but it reports every 6 or 7 years. The Commission in Australia was telling the Government about the impacts of climate change in Australia and it was a resource that was directly available at any point for the Government to draw upon .Doesn't Tony Abbott have the right to determine his own Government's agenda? Mr Abbott is free to do anything he wants but I think he serves the people and the people will want to know that Mr Abbott is well-informed about the issues that he's making decisions about, deciding he doesn't want to listen to independent experts about climate change doesn't seem to me like he is being sure about making well-informed decisions.The gran - Grantham Institute and you personally have come under fire for not providing personal viewpoints as you put it and is the case that the Climate Commission and many other bodies haven't won the fight yet, are still struggling to be seen as independent and neutral? There's a fairly weak line of argument that opponents of action on climate change views, which is essentially if you don't agree with their point of view you are somehow compromised. The fact is that universities are a good source of independent expertise, they don't rely on governments telling them what to do. Now if politicians may not like the advice that they're getting and they don't even have to act upon it, but if they decide that they're not even willing to listen to the experts then I think Australians must be asking themselves how is Mr Abbott going to make sure he's making well-informed decisions about climate change.Grantham Research Institute's Bob Ward speaking to Mary Gearin in London. Former US leader John Quinsey Adams once stated there's nothing so pathetic as an ex-president. Transitioning from position of extraordinary powers to essentially holding next to nothing. Two weeks on from electoral defeat that stark realisation is sure to have set in for some of Labor's big personalities. Former PM Kevin Rudd has all but disappeared from public view the 'Guardian' online while Julia Gillard's essay in was the first time we've the 'Guardian' from
was the 'Guardian' online last week
was the first from Australia's first female PM was the first time we've heard PM since she was toppled in June.Psychologist Peter Doyle has worked with many high profile business and profile business and political I'd - identities through some of the tougher phases of their career and he joins us now from Brisbane. Good morning to you, Peter Doyle, thank you for joining us on Weekend Breakfast.Good morning, Miriam, you're welcome.It looks like being a bumper Christmas for book lovers with a lot of political autobiographies and biographies due out. Is this an attempt, including I think Julia Gillard and Peter Garrett, is this an attempt to perhaps reclaim some of that spotlight now that things have moved on? Perhaps not reclaim the spotlight but certainly to process and make sense of the ordeal and verbally or in words putting out what am I thinking, what am I feeling, what do I want to do with all of this stuff is a powerful therapeutic process. It makes sense they want to write a bit of self- reflection, self-analysis and process the enormous change. But no, I don't think it's seeking the limelight, I think it's healing the wounds and making sense of their own journey.Is that the sense that you got from the piece that Julia Gillard had published last week in the 'Guardian' online where she was able to spell out some of her personal feelings about what it was like to out what she thinks might the way forward? Absolutely, Miriam. I thought it was a good piece of work and the thing that caught my attention, bearing in mind, as you know, in our private firm we work with high profile leaders and it's not just politics. I think this change of transition happens to anyone. A business owner loses an empire they build up and they're bankrupt, a sporting identity finds they can't compete at the highest level anymore. A person who has created a career profile and suddenly finds that's politically not available, the workplace politics shift on them. We all go through grief and loss and stages of change we have to make sense of. Gillard said it very strongly, it's the physical impact on the person and she in that article mentioned a weight coming off her shoulders, a deep inner knowing, a sense of relief almost that that constant pressure isn't going to be weighing her down but paraphrasing the other part of what that article said, it talked about the sadness, the loss of opportunity, the potential what could have been if only, and so I think what real leadership is about is personal insight and capacity. Learning to master physical tools, intellectual tools, emotional tools, spiritual tools, we call them the four building blocks and when Julia talks about that physical shift I think she's on the right pathway to integrating the experience. It's not the loss of power that matters, it's the depth of character and where you take it from there because positional power will come and go, personal power, that internal mastery, that self-capacity to reflect, recover and integrate new learning, that's a life-long leadership challenge and I think a better conversation for people Australia wide at the moment is not so much what happens to the ego and the positional changes of politicians, it's how do we get the right leaders in the first place and how do we cultivate leaders of character and potential and my warm suggestion is by nurturing those four capacities - physical, intellectual, emotional and spiritual capacity. Leaders need coaching. And leaders of any persuasion, sporting, business, community, public service leaders invest in that type of self- development, that's what real leadership is. It's not the external status trappings and material position, that's a useful vehicle, it's the character and capacity of who you are leadership journey worthwhile. So Julia you are that makes the
leadership So Julia Gillard, Kevin Rudd,
they're leadership journey worthwhile. So Julia they're on a different level of journey. I hope it's a learning journey. I hope it's growth and developmental journey. I hope it's a process rather than an ego growth and process rather than an process for them.Peter Doyle, process many insights you have process for them.Peter to us this morning. Thank you so much for your time on Weekend Breakfast.Thank you for having me, Miriam. Pleasure.And Miriam, they say that history is written by the victors but sometimes I think victors but sometimes I it's the best-selling authors.That's right. We'll see plenty more I'm sure.We can just bring you some live pictures now coming in from beautiful Sydney Harbour there where the navy is publicising the upcoming international fleet review. It looks like we lost that shot there Unfortunately, but we will be seeing more later. That fleet review is going to be one of the biggest events to take place in Sydney this year.That's right.Well, in a place best known for its mining and resources, men have been learning a new skill.A group of blokes in the Pilbara have been kicking up their work boots and learning the art of contemporary dance.Damien Muller is no stranger to a challenge. The 41-year-old has climbed mountains in Peru and volunteers with the State Emergency Service. But perhaps the father of 2's most unexpected challenge yet has been learning how to dance.It's something a little bit different. I suppose an opportunity to do something a bit outside my comfort zone. The Karratha gas plant worker is part of Men of the Red Earth, a group of 7 tradesmen, mining and other workers who took up the challenge to be turned into a performance-ready actually
dance troupe in 3 months.It's actually quite difficult. I think I realised that before anyway but there's a lot of components that have got to come together to make this thing happen.The project is part of Oz Dance WA's Future Landings program. Developing a cast of entirely locals and creating performances distinctionive to their town.The guys felt in general they're perceived to be high-viz wearing buffoons and they wanted to challenge the idea.So this showcases some of our experiences, both good and bad in the Pilbara which probably outside or very much outside that stereotype.After weeks of rehearsals it all comes down to this. The group's first performance in front of an audience.Twisting, turning, jumping, navigating the stage and dangling from a crane, telling a story about what it's really like to be a man in the Pilbara.And it went down a treat. It was amazing. Fully pumped right now. We had just a fantastic night, great response from the crowd.Good fun with a great bunch of people and yeah, reward for a lot of effort from a lot of people.It's not clear what's next for Men of the Red Earth but a tour of some regional towns isn't out of the question.

And let's hope a national tour isn't too far away.That's right.Time now to talk to the man who sputs the strictly ballroom into sport, Sasha Mirzabegian.I didn't mind joining that.I'll be there with you, Sasha. Guys were dancing last night but with a ball in their hands.And the Hawks were doing mighty fine.5 tough game
points in the end. It was a tough game for them because they were down by 20 points leading into the third quarter and now they will play the winter of Freo and Sydney and the Hawks they fought back. In the end it was 102-97 and it ends their 11-game losing streak against the Cats and finally breaks the Kennett curse but the worrying thing for the Hawks are they have some injury problem s. Guerra he has a corked thigh and Lance Franklin was barely in the game. He hyper extended his elbow early on in the first term and he only kicked one goal down the back end of the match. Sam Mitchell had 38 possessions for the Hawks, 11 clearances and the way things are going now, the Hawks are in line to - here's Travis Varcoe, let me point this out. It's a crucial point in the game there and there's Kennett. Varcoe had the chance to tie the game with 30 seconds to go. He's in front of goal but missed it. Very happy Hawks fan. Irrational loyalty right there, thank you. And Jeff Kennett in the audIn the stadium. A lot of clubs are probably terrified to think where's probably terrified to where's he going to put his
curse probably terrified to think where's curse next? He's got curse next? He's got a lot in his bag, hasn't he? 11 years ago or so, they said they would ago never lose to ago or so, they said again and from that point never lose again and from that point on
the again
never lose to the Cats ever again and from the Cats ended up beating them every single time except for last the Cats ended up beating last night. The Hawks are every single time except through but, you know what? They just won too many games throughout the season for them to actually continue on and go through and dominate this last game. They look tired there and I'm actually tipping Fremantle to beat Sydney tonight and go onto win. I know there will be some purists out there who think I'm crazy. Andrew Geoghegan is right with you though. And Manly got up over Cronulla? 24-18 in the end and this game was punctuated by the skills of Daly Cherry-Evans, the Sea Eagles half-back there. He starred scoring one try and setting up another and he's tremendous with the boot. I don't care what anyone says he looks like Andrew Johns brought back to life in terms of the way he plays with the ball, he's very, very - here's this little kick. He moves into the inside, grub er s it for his partner and Manly looked good for most of the game. It was 14-6 and I won't get any easier against the Rabbitohs. This is the problem for Manly. They've got injury problems. Anthony Watmough in the forwards, he's got a slight posterior crucial ligament injury and Jamie Lyon has a cork behind his knee. But the Sharks worked their way back into the game. Look at this try by Fafita. And Wright long
got them in the game with not long to go and this was the pivotal point of the match with Paul Gallen. He seemed to have scored. He ran over like 5 players but it was ruled a no try because John Morris, look at this here, he actually taigs out Matt Ballin there at dummy half and unfortunately for the Sharks they just couldn't get through. Now let's hear from a few of the key players in that match. We had Anthony Watmough, Jamie Lyon explaining their injuries and here's what John Morris had to say about that no try decision.I was trying to get back to dummy half and I couldn't get there and I pulled up, I don't think I hit him with enough force to knock him over. That's their decision. It's not the - I hope it's not viewed as the thing that cost us in the end. You've got to roll with the punches, I guess.It's just behind the knee. I think it's a little cork and lit be right next week.The PCL got stretched again and another game week getting game ready. She will be right for next week.That's all for sport for now.Plenty more to be talking about. Thanks, sash.You're watching Weekend Breakfast. Coming up in the next hour - 40 years after human voices were sent into space a campaign to spend messages beyond the solar system is under way. We'll have this and all the day's news, sport and weather coming up next.

This program is not captioned. This program is not captioned. This program is not captioned. This program is not captioned.

This Program is Captioned Live.This morning - silencing the boats. The new Government underfire for its decision not to announce asylum seeker boat arrivals. The policy I thought from the Opposition - from the then Opposition, now the Government, was that they would stop the boats, not that they would hide the information.

Also on Weekend Breakfast - a Greenpeace protest ship under tow in the Arctic Sea after it was stormed by Russian coast guards. Syria submits details of its chemical weapons assets, the first step in a plan for their destruction.And Hawthorn books itself a place in the AFL grand final overcoming Geelong in an end-to-end thriller at the MCG. Good morning, it's Saturday, 21 September, I'm Miriam Corowa.And I'm Nick Grimm. Also on the program this morning - almost 40 years after the first messages from Earth were sent into space, there may be another chance for people to be heard beyond the solar system.Astronomical artist John Lomburg worked on recordings sent off with the probes in the 1970s, now he's trying to persuade NASA to upload crowd source messages on the craft to explore Pluto and beyond.Fascinating project. Lit be interesting to see what sort of creative content they manage to gather.What are we telling people whoever they telling whoever they are?And what if they're not telling people out there
whoever they they're not listening anyway?
Let's check whoever they are?And what if they're Let's check the weather around the a sunny the country now. There will a sunny start to the weekend
for Brisbane: for

Let's get the latest news headlines now with Miriam. Thanks, Nick. Labor's Immigration spokesman Tony Burke is warning the Government is creating a culture of secrecy by not announcing when asylum seeker boats arrive in Australian waters. The previous government issued media alerts every time a boat arrived but no new alerts has been issued since the new Government was sworn in. The Government's border protection policy dubbed Operation Sovereign Borders took effect on Wednesday with the PM Tony Abbott promising to make a difference from day one. The ABC's asked both Customs and the Immigration Department whether any boats have arrived in re cent days but were referred back to the Minister's office. Labor's Immigration spokesman Tony Burke says the disclosure of information should be automatic.Ooifr had journalists from all publications ringing me today saying how do we find out because they've been ringing the Department saying "Have any boats arrived?" The Department said, "We don't answer that anymore. You've got to go to Scott Morrison's office." Scott Morrison's office is refusing to answer the questions. The policy I thought from the then Opposition, now the Government, was that they would stop the boats, not that they would hide the information.The previous government used to issue a media alert when a boat arrived. A spokesman said such decisions will be made by a military commander and further detail on Operation Sovereign Borders will be provided next week.Businessman Clive Palmer has a slender lead heading into the final day of counting in the Queensland seat of Fairfax. He's in front of Liberal National Party candidate Ted O'Brien by just 111 votes. The Australian Electoral Commission says about 450 votes will be counted this morning as well as any late postal votes that arrive before last night's deadline. There will be an automatic recount if the margin is less than 100 votes but candidates can request one if it's a bigger gap.Two Australians are among Greenpeace protestors taken into custody by the Russian coastguard in the Arctic Sea. The activists were targeting an oil drilling platform but there's now confusion over what happens next.Protestors' tempt to board the platform on Wednesday was going to provoke a robust response from the authorities. Footage of the nieshl Greenpeace action shows activists using ropes to climb the sides of the platform but within minutes they were intercepted by armed coastguard officers in boats.Then on Thursday night more armed coastguards used the helicopter to storm the nearby Greenpeace vessel, the Dutch registered activists
'Arctic Sunrise'. A total of 30 activists onboard have been arrested.All the crew , the captain, the ship should be released immediately. That's why these days Greenpeace officers all over the world are doing solidarity activities, solidarity days, appealing to Russian embassies and Gazprom officers to release our colleagues.The same platform was bordered by protestors back in August as part of an ongoing campaign to to highlight what they say are environmental risks posed by increased energy exploitation in the Arctic. The proses was organised from Greenpeace International's London office but staff here in the group's Moscow office are providing legal and translation assistance and vital GPS monitoring. And after being told that the vessel was being steered by the Russians west to Murmansk, latest GPS shows the ship actually being taken east into Russian territorial waters.The demonstration and arrests have garnered
international arrests have Australia Greenpeace's regional
chief tried to deliver international publicity. In
Australia chief tried to deliver a let
tore the Australia Greenpeace's regional
chief tried Sydney.It's very clear and very disappointing that the Russian consulate has declined to even accept a simple letter requesting that the requesting that the Russian authorities release our activists, let an Australian lad come home, let an Australian permanent resident come back to Australia, give back our ship and they won't even accept a simple letter requesting that they do that. It's disappointing.So far there has been no comment from the Russian Foreign Ministry about the ongoing situation. In the meantime supporters of the 'Arctic Sunrise' crew can only watch the GPS screens and wait.The Syrian Government has started handing over details of its chemical weapons to the international community's watchdog in The Hague. Syria is believed to have around 1,000 tonnes of chemical toxins but fighting with conventional weapons continues and not just between government forces and the opposition. Two Syrian rebel groups who had been fighting each other in the northern town of Azaz have agreed to a ceasefire proving how complicated the picture on the ground has become.Stuck with no hope of going home. These refugees in Turkey fled the Syrian regime. Now they must also worry about an emerging conflict between Al-Qaeda and other rebel groups. Their men folk are FSA fighters. They don't think the make any difference in the end."The jihadis are a creation of the regime", says this FSA officer. "After this FSA officer. "After we topple the regime we'll deal with them too."Slick propaganda from the main Al-Qaeda group in Syria. The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, as the group is known, has a not very subtle message - we're on the march.The video switches to what seems like a camp for suicide bombers. "The young men are enjoying a last swim before martyrdom", the speaker explains."Fill the car with explosives" he intones, "Embrace death, teach the infidels a lesson."The jihadist black flag flew only briefly over the town of Azaz but their influence continues to spread.Despite the ceasefire the nearby border with Turkey remained closed today. Much needed food and aid are not getting through. There's been a spate of violent attacks ahead of today's provincial elections to be held in northern Sri Lanka. It's the first local poll to be held in that region in more than 3 decades. The area was ravaged during Sri Lanka's civil war as ethnic Tamil separatist s fought the mainly Sinhalese Government.It's the first provincial election to be held in Sri Lanka's north in 37 years. The Government says it's the first step-on the road to democracy for the north of the country which is dominated by the minority Tamil community. The area was ravaged during Sri Lanka's civil war. Tens of thousands of people died during it and the Government is accused of widespread human rights abuses both during the war and after it. Candidates involved in the election have accused the Government of orchestrating a campaign of violence and intimidation against them. The majority of the seats in the provincial council are expected to be won by the Tamil National Alliance. Sceptics of the election say that it's a whitewash. And that it will not actually give the Tamil community any more real power. They say the power will still be largely centralised in the hands of the Government in Columbo.The US is reeling from two mass shootings in one week. Yesterday 12 people, including a 3-year-old boy were injured in a shooting attack in Chicago.It happened on a basketball court in what police say is a It follows a shooting say is a gang-related incident. It follows a by a It follows a shooting rampage
by a military contractor at a navy base in Washington DC
earlier this navy base in Washington people died.Our earlier this week in which 13 people died.Our North America correspondent Lisa Millar say police have suspected in mind correspondent Lisa for the police have suspected for the latest incident.They're hunting 3 gang members who they gang were gang members who they believe them had an assault weapon. were firing. At least one of a lot of them had an assault weapon. a lot of details. No-one died. a lot of details. No-one In fact in the scheme of things it's not In fact in the scheme it's not necessarily a serious
gun incident when In fact in the scheme of things
it's gun incident when you look at how many we gun incident when you look how many we see here in the US. Every day we how many we see here in the Every day we hear stories of various gun events. This one, various gun events. This everyone survived, including
the 3-year-old who was there as well but what well but what we do know gang-related an assault weapon likely to be an illegal weapon. In fact the police chief was fairly passionate about how many illegal weapons they have to seize every year and 5,000 already in Chicago alone. The trouble is as soon as they seize them more of them go back out onto the streets. So they just feel like they keep losing this battle.North America correspondent Lisa Millar. It's proof that good deeds do indeed go rewarded. A homeless man in the US found a backpack filled with more than $42,000 outside a Boston store. And despite his poverty, Mr James turned it straight into police. His honesty and integrity has prompted a nationwide response. Homeless man Glenn James made a simple, honest gesture but it's one that's inspired people across the US and beyond. Earlier this week Mr James found a backpack outside a shopping centre containing close to $45,000 in cash and travellers cheques. Despite being in obvious need of the money, he handed it straight to police so it could be returned to its rightful owner.Tell me once again how it made you feel doing that?Good, very, very good.Boston police recognised Mr James with a citation for his integrity but some people thought that didn't go far enough. Marketing firm employee the story and set up Ethan Whittaker was inspired the story and set up a donation page the story and set page online to raise money for that
Mr James.It's not every day that you come across people with the type of honour and humanity that Glenn displayed.The the site has since raised over $131,000.I want it to go to the right things and to the things that he needs, you know, what does he need, what does he want? And, you know, the other thing is medical assistance. When was the last time he's seen a doctor? What can we do to help him out medically?James has been homeless for 8 years and suffers health problems that make it hard for him to hold down a job. Despite his hardship the thing he wants most in the world... No war.No war? No wars.In a statement James said even if he was desperate for the money he wouldn't have kept a penny from the bag and he's glad it's back with its rightful owner.Now to sport with Sasha Mirzabegian.

Minor premiers Hawthorn are through to the AFL grand final after a thrilling 5-point victory over Geelong at the MCG. The Hawks fought back from 20 points down at three quarter time to win 14-18-102 to 15-7-97. Geelong's Travis Varcoe had a chance to level things with 30 seconds left but his shot faded off target. It ends the Hawks' 11-game losing street against the Cats and breaks the Kennett curse. Brendan White cross looked set to miss the decider. Manly will play South Sydney in a prelim final next weekend. The Sea Eagles defeated Cronulla.Sharks skipper Paul Gallen appeared to tie the scores in the 75th minute after he crashed through 5 defenders but replays showed John Morris had impeded Matt Ballin at the play of the ball. Jamie Lyon is in doubt for the grand final qualifier with a leg injury .And the Wallabies will assemble in Sydney today for the rugby championship tour of South Africa and Argentina without key playmaker James O'Connor. O'Connor has be