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(generated from captions) room there but he's certainly leaving the issue preferences itself to the
national secretary, preferences national secretary, George
Wright, to flesh preferences itself to the
national Wright, to flesh out. In Wright, Tasmania today, Tony Abbott made some announcements about road funding and airport funding for the Tasmanians. There are four Labor seats in Tasmania. Is the Prime Minister making any infrastructure announcements or making any announcements or are there any particular infrastructure issues that are dear to the hearts of Territorians that they'd like to see a bit of action on? There certainly are lots of infrastructure announcements that would like to be made here but in terms of what he might be announcing in this very brief stopover, we haven't been given any Earl eindication. There is a marginal seat here in Northern Territory, Solomon, held by Natasha Griggs, and no doubt the Prime Minister will talk about his ALP candidate here. He's also been joined by several of his front bench today, Warren Snowdon and also the man who Kevin Rudd wants to be the next Defence Minister, Mike Kelly, who himself is a marginal seat-holder in Eden Monaro.Finally, take us through the timings once again. In about half an hour expecting the media conference from Darwin and in about three hours' time we'll see you in Kununurra? That's correct. We're being told we've got to get on the bus because we're off now for that press conference so that's correct, about three hours 'til that next event.Get on it. Thanks a lot, Andrew Green. Talk to you again soon. As I mentioned, Tony Abbott, the Opposition Leader, has been campaigning in Tasmania, announcing a number of measures to boost the State's economy. For more, let's cross to political reporter Kerrin Binnie at Parliament House. Take us through those announcements because there will be lot of Tasmanians interested in what a Coalition Government would have planned for the apple isle. That's right and the Coalition wants them to be interested. Of course the Coalition is keen to gain some seats in Tasmania and they are held by Labor, the ones they're trying to pick up by quite hefty margins so Tony Abbott was there last week, he's there again today and expanding on his plan from last week about jobs and infrastructure and boosting the Tasmanian economy so this morning he announced that an incoming Coalition Government would put more money into the Hobart runway at the airport there, to essentially allow more passengers and larger planes into Hobart and out of Hobart to get also freight moving out of Tasmania more quickly and easily than it does now. Also there's more money for the Midlands highway in there although he was questioned about whether that would be enough and he said, "At this stage that's all that is going to be in there and it will improve." There's also a $24 million commitment from Tony Abbott in there to set up an Antarctic research centre in Hobart. He says he wants Hobart to be the gateway to Antarctica and that this research centre will go a long way towards those seats with a it.Even though Labor those seats with a healthy
margin, the yening those seats with a margin, the yening the smallest margin, margin is 6.7%, the Opposition is optimistic of picking up at is optimistic least one of those? They are. This is obvious by the amount of time Tony Abbott has already spent in Tasmania. They think they can get these seats, a couple of seats over the line. That is why Tony Abbott is down there concentrating on Tasmania today and last week as well. He toured around the north of the State making some local jobs announcements up there. He promised last week that this week he would make an all of State economic boosting announcement and this is the one he's made today.Kerrin Binnie in Canberra, thank you. Australia has joined the international condemnation of Egypt's bloody crackdown on protesters in Cairo. A state of emergency has been declared in the country's interim vice President, bear bear bear, has resigned in disgust. There have been deaths in other cities too. Security forces carried out a day-long operation to loyal
break up camps of supporters loyal to the ousted President Mohammed Morsi. There are wildly differing accounts about how many people have died. The Muslim Brotherhood says around 2000 people were killed in the bloody clashes as the Egyptian army and police moved in. Egyptian health officials put the death figure at around 235 civilian s and 43 police officers. Egyptian authorities have declared a month-long State of emergency and a curfew. Australia's Foreign Minister, Bob Carr, says Australians should avoid travelling to Egypt and if they're in the country they should leave. After week of threats, the authorities finally decided to act. Security forces moved in just before dawn to clear out protesters at two separate Cairo sit-ins. As helicopters hovered overhead, provided support on the ground, crushing tents and provided support on the crushing tents and re moving crushing sandbags. Riot police cleared out the smaller Nahda Square quickly but it was a different story at the larger protest outside the Raada al-Awiyda mosque. A 'Washington Post' journalist says the situation escalated quickly on the streets around the mosque. The police then opened fire on the protesters, first with tear gas and then with a barrage of mevey gunfire. Having covered several war zones, I heard machine gun fire. It was very, very rapid. The army says it's tried to minimise bloodshed and is providing safe exit routes for protesters but the Muslim Brotherhood is calling it a massacre, saying the only thing getting out has been a stream of ambulances. Reports on the death toll vary wildly but hundreds of people are being treated at nearby field hospitals. Had interim Government says some of its forces have also been killed. It's arrested more than 200 protesters, some of whom were armed. It says this footage shows protesters shooting at security forces. The vision cannot be independently verified. Covering the situation is proving exceedingly difficult for journalists on the ground. The press has not been allowed to get inside the sit-in. Those of us who have tried to approach since the break-up started, I and my team, we were directly threatened by police officers on multiple occasions. One officer told my colleague that if he saw us again he would shoot him in the foot or in the leg.It appears the security forces are following through on those threats. We turned on the generators and the gentleman was shot. He was snipered right in front of us on the stage. The authorities are trying to prevent protesters from starting up another sit-in at a new site. They've blocked off roads and have closed the train lines in to and out of Cairo. Muslim Brotherhood officials are already trying to use the latest violence as a rallying point for further protests and insist they'll stay on the streets until Mohammed Morsi is re instated as President. With the army assert ing its authority so strong ly, that prospect seems further way than ever. I was speaking earlier to the editor of one of the Cairo newspapers, her name is Lena. She was saying she expects over the next couple of days these skirmishes will continue between protesters and the security forces. We'll bring up a picture now from the Egyptian television. This a live shot you can see from one of the areas that security forces. This is one areas that was cleared by these areas these
security forces. This is one of 230-odd people died in the last 24 hours or so but those - as I mentioned before, the estimates of how many people killed vary wildly between what the Muslim Brotherhood is saying and the Government is saying. The Government is saying around 230, the Muslim Brotherhood is saying around 2000 people. That's a live shot from Cairo. Curfew came into force just over six hours go and the violence on the streets of the capital appears to have subsided for now but as I said, there are some people who are expecting those skirmishes and clashes to erupt once again after daybreak in Egypt. The United Nations, the US and Britain have all condemned the use of force against protesters in Egypt. The European Union has described the reports of deaths and injuries as extremely worrying. After more than two years of political and civil unrest in the Arab world's most populous country, the violence overnight is likely to have serious implics for eyiment and the rest of the Middle East. What's happening in Egypt is a violent and bloody illustration of the depth of division and polarisation in the country. On one side, armed forces determined to enforce their vision of democracy, on the other, resolute supporters of a more Islamic Egypt than the military is willing to allow. The main front lines in this battle but not the only areas of confrinth have been protest camps in Cairo around Nahda Square and Raada al-Awiyda mosque where supporters of deposed President Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood have pushed from power last month. After the failure of all international efforts After the failure international efforts at reconciliation, early this morning Egyptian forces moved in, bull-dozing barricades and driving protesters out. Within a couple of hours they cleared the smaller camp but around the mosque there is far greater bloodshed and it's the level of violence which many Governments have been quick to condemn. The United States strongly condemns the use of violence amongst pro protesters in Egypt. We extend our condolence s to the fam pales of those killed and injured. We have repeatedly called on Egyptian military and security forces to show restrint. Who are the protesters and what do they want? They're members of the Muslim Brotherhood who say their democratic election victory was stolen from them in last month's coup but the Brotherhood's vision entrenching Islam in and society made them powerful enemies particularly in the military so the Egyptian army, once seen as friends of all the country's people, are now seen to be taking sides. Last month they brought down President Morsi and today the generals used their overwhelming military superiority to push the supporters in the Brotherhood off the streets so does the scale of today's mounting death toll risk tipping Egypt towards something far worse, civil war? Egypt's Government denies using excessive force. The Government salutes the efforts of the security services for imposing order in clearing the gatherings at Nahda Square and Raada al-Awiyda mosque. These forces are using the utmost self-restraint and highest degree of professionalism in the operation to clear the sit-in.But as violence spreads, this is Alexandria, Egypt's vice president, Mohammed El Baradei, has resigned, a serious blow to the interim Government. What happens in Egypt matters far beyond the country's borders. Months, possibly years, of dangerous instability in Egypt and the wider region could be the outcome. That report from the BBC. Australia's Foreign Affairs Minister Bob Carr says he's deeply concern ed by reports of violence in Egypt. We unreserve lade condemn the violence. What we have urged is a political reconciliation in the countries of the army negotiates with the protesters. We thought that the release of some of the political prisoners from the Muslim Brotherhood in exchange for a retreat of demonstrators from the position they Ouped in the streets woo, thought that would have been a good start on a compromise. This an awful tragedy for the people of Egypt who deserve better and had hoped for more.Bob Carr speaking this morning at Sydney Airport. The US Secretary of State, John Kerry, says the world is watching Egypt and he's urged the interim Government to end the State of emergency. Today's events are deplorable and they run counter to Egyptian aspirations for peace, inclusion and genuine democracy. Egyptians inside and outside of the Government need to take a step back. They need to calm the situation and avoid further loss of life. We also strongly oppose a return to a State of emergency law and we call on the Government to respect basic human rights including freedom of peaceful assembly and due process under the law. US Secretary of State, John Kerry, speaking there. The BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen is in Cairo. He says the situation is not good news for Egyptians.Frankly, this a time for dire warnings and it's the outcome, what's happening is the outcome of the winner takes all mentality a that has seized Egyptian politics in the last year or so since President Morsi was elected. While he was in office, before he was ousted, he said he'd govern for all Egyptians but he legally governed for his supporters. Now that the army has ousted him and moved against his people, they're trying to do the same kind of thing as well. the same kind of thing as They say - General They say - General Sisi, head of the armed forces, says he wants to try to restore democracy but the ferocity of the assault on the brotherhood suggests what they want to do is eliminate them as a political force. Clearly this is not good news for Egyptians. It is such a polarised country now, violence is becoming much more everyday and there's been severe violence today on the streets of the capital and, as ever with Egypt, this is being watched from other parts of the Arab world. About 18 months ago it looked very much as if the big win of the Arab uprisings was the Muslim Brotherhood with election victory not just here in Egypt but now there's a backlash going on and that's something which we may see perhaps elsewhere in the region and don't forget as well the two most prominent countries if you like, Egypt and Syria, in the Middle East, in this part of the Middle East, are now Syria is in the throes of a terrible civil war, Egypt has a growing civil conflict and what has happened today has, I think - it's not doing anything to solve Egypt's crisis. What it's doing is deepening it. The UN secretary-general has released a statement condemning the violence in Egypt. He said just days ago:

News of the clash has sparked a protest in southwest Sydney last night by Australian Egyptians. Doesn'tens - dozens of protesters gathsered at Lakemba railway Mohammed Huloll was among the protesters and joins Mohammed Huloll was among protesters and joins me now on
the Mohammed Huloll was among the the phone. This was just a spontaneous protest? It was, yeah, just a spontaneous protest and people went out last night just to voice their concerns and condemnation for the massacre.Why did you feel so strongly about this? Because that is a process of killing any Opposition to this new interim Government that came about by the military coup. Anyone that voices their opposition is being jailed or killed and even all the media is closed down. This is the unfortunate thing. Do you accept some protesters were firing on police as the Government says? Really the interim Government or temporary Government really is lying all the way and they can fabricate anything to justify their brutal crack-down to a peaceful demonstration.Do you know - did you know any of the people woo were killed or dough know of Australian who know of some of the people who were killed if $? The Muslim Brotherhood are saying 2000 dead.I'm not really sure about the number because this involves the media and everyone is saying what they want to say but last night there were people at the demonstration, they know people that were killed and people that were injured in there.What do you want as a result of your protest s? We've heard Bob Carr this morning saying that he condemned the violence and he urges a return to peaceful negotiation. That a good move from the Australian Government and Bob Carr and it is appreciated but the whole world should do more really to really not cooperate with the military coup because it is actually driving Egypt away from real democracy. It is dividing the country. They said they had millions of people giving them the freedom to kill but this is not the way towards democracy. There are millions of people sitting in wanting the real President to come back and real constitution to come back and real democracy, real constitution to come back to
Egypt. What constitution to come back Egypt. What more can
international countries constitution to come back to
Egypt. What apart from condemning apart from condemning the violence? I always actually oppose any interference from foreign countries in Egypt but at least that consistent condemnation of the military coup and its leaders and actually not cooperating with it and not sending it any military support - because this is what America doing still, sending military support to a military controlling the country against the will of the people. Are you planning more protests in Sydney or Australia? There will be one actually on Sunday at the Opera House. There's just - that is just to actually pray for the people and voice our condemnation to this brutal murder by the military and peaceful protest there at the Opera House? That's right. It is a peaceful - it will be mostly prayers and chanting and so on just to do something to support these people and the people that are injured.Mohammed Helol, thanks for talking to us. New modelling of the Coalition's climate action plan shows emissions are forecast to rise by up to 9% by 2020. It suggests the Coalition needs to spend at least $4 billion more if it is to reach its promised cut of 5%. The Opposition has dismissed the modelling as unprofessional. Irwin Jackson is deputy CEO of the the modelling. He joins me now live from the modelling. He live from Melbourne. Irwin Jackson, live just take
Jackson, welcome. First of all just take us through the elements of the Coalition's direct action plan and the extent to which you saw or the study saw that those different elements were going to cut emoitions over the next - cut emissions over the next six or seven years. The Coalition, along with the Government, have committed to reduce emissions by 5 to 25% by 2020 so woe have agreement on the tharingts. What we have disagreement on is the mechanism to get there. Under the Government's policy you have an emissions kries Price but also a limit on how much companies can put pollution can put into the air. Under in-Coalition's plan, they are effectively offering money to whether they be companies or the landholders or the general community if they can demonstrate they're reducing emissions and the Coalition would pay them. The basic difference between the two policies is the Government has a limit on pollution whereas the Coalition's policy is limited by the amount of money they have available in the Federal Budget.So how much do you - did you predict with this modelling that the Opposition was going to be able to cut emissions over the next six years with this carbon buyback scheme? Giving them some pretty generous assumptions and applying a pretty strong benefit of the doubt to their policy, we estimate they would reduce emissions in the order of 200 million tons which is about the annual emissions of our national electricity sector. That only gets us to about halfway to where we would need to get to if we are going to meet the 5% target and it's not within cooee of the 25% target they've also committed to so if they're going to achieve those kinds of target that's ineed to put in place stronger regulation in various parts of the economy or spend more money out of the Budget. How did you come to the conclusion the carbon buyback scheme would cut emissions by detailed
200 million tons? We completed detailed analysis by SKM and Monash university who have had years of experience at looking at how much it costs to reduce emissions and the kinds of projects that can reduce emissions, whether they be energy efficiency projects, renewable energy projects or tree planting and other emission reduction strategies. They undertook a detailed analysis of what they thought was a reasonable in terms of how much the Coalition could buy back and even being very conservative with those assumptions ewee don't get the meet the targets the Coalition has committed to.The Opposition says the assumptions made are wrong so who does the public believe? One of the joys of being a fact-checker in a federal election is you cop a bit of stick from both sides. Last election when we did this analysis we had the Coalition ahead of the Government and Tony Abbott praised us and the Government gave us a bit of a slap. We're happy to have a discussion based on the evidence and we look forward to the Coalition coming forward with more detail about how they're going to achieve the 5 to. There
to 25% rucks they've committed to. There are other elements to the Opposition's direct action plan including planting trees and the green army. Did you come to any conclusions about the extend to which those initiatives will help cut emissions? There's nothing wrong with those kind of emissions and nothing really wrong in some respects with the Coalition's policy. The problem is you can't rely on it as a central plank. Where we've examined these kinds of policies internationally, and they do exist in other parts of the world, they're generally supporting policies. In mO Norway have they have a Norway have they have a similar found put also a carbon tax and found Emissions Trading Scheme. China found put also a carbon Emissions Trading Scheme. has strict reculations and is also building Emissions Trading Schemes has strict reculations and is Schemes as well. These kinds also building Emissions Trading Schemes as well. These kinds of
policies are fine but you can't rely on them if you want to achieve absolute emission reduction.Are you saying things like planting trees and the green army, while they're good things, their contribution to cutting emissions would be negligible? Just to give you some context, to achieve the targets the Coalition and the Government have committed to, you need to do the equivalent of shutting down every power station, shutting down every major factory, taking every car off the road and plane out of the sky for two to three years. You're not going to do that but that's the kind of scale of emission reduction you need. The money available under the Coalition's plan, based on our assessment, is not enough to achieve those reductions. What do you say to the Coalition saying that the study is unprofessional? Well, we've published over 100 pages of analysis based on many more hundreds of pages of analysis. We're happy to have a debate about whether that's a credible or concrete bit of analysis but that requires the Coalition itself to come forward with more detail about how it's going to deliver what it says it's going to deliver. No doubt we'll hear more on this from Greg Hunt later today. Irwin Jackson, thanks for talking to us. My pleasure.The NSW Treasurer, Mike Baird, says the State has lost $9 million from the issuing of - $90 billion from

Mr Baird revealed the figure at a Budget estimates hearing this morning. For more on this, let's go to Brigid Glanville in Sydney. This program is not captioned. You mentioned in royalties so is that because the mine's not going This program is not captioned. This program is not captioned.

This program is not captioned. Hello once again. Apparently we went off air for a couple of minutes. Apologies. There's been a bit of a technical issue with our transmission but we're good to go once again now. Time to take a look at sport with Amy Hetzel and, Amy, what's been happening in-W the women and the Ashes? Captain Jodie Field says while it was disappointing to start the Ashes series, there are plenty of positives to take out of the Test draw against England. The 4-day match ended in a draw after Australia declared its second innings with captain Jodie Fields unbeaten on 78 but England failed to make a solid effort at the chase and held out to be 2/93 at the end of the fourth day. The hosts seemed con-20 the draw given they'd only narrowly avoided a follow-on two days earlier. Came out today with the goal of winning the match and knew we had to set a tempting target for them and we did that. We knew they would come out hard or shut up shop and that's what draw. I think there's they did and finished in a draw. I think confidence we can take into the matches. To men's confidence we can take into matches. To men's cricket and David Warner says Australia learn a few David Warner says learn a few lessons from learn a England's batsmen heading in to
the fifth and final Ashes Test. The Australians are on their way to Northamptonshire for a tour game against the England Lions starting Friday. After another batting collapse in the fourth Test, Warner says the tourists need to be more patient as they try to avoid a 4-0 series defeat. We need to know how to rein in it and then we know we're going to get those bad balls. Perfect example is looking at Ian Bell. Anything we've bowled to him at stumps he's defended back to the bowler. I think 80% of his 500 runs he scored in the series have been through cover and point because they're through to loose balls.David Warner there. We'll just break out of sport because we're going to a media conference on marriage equality. National election campaign will be the inform supporters of marriage equality, particularly young Australians, about how they can vote for love. Today we'll be launching a website at www.vote for love.com.au which has the position of almost all federal election candidates on the issue of marriage equality and we urge supporters to visit that website to check out who in their local constituencies represents their view. Today we're also announcing a partnership with the global company Ben and Jerry's who will help us ensure that the information on that website reaches everyone it needs to reach with media campaign right across the country. Ben and Jerry's has a history country. Ben and Jerry's history of working to support social justice issues including marriage equality and in a moment you'll hear a bit more about that from Carly. AME, over the next few weeks, next three weeks, beginning on Saturday, will also be distributing leaflets in key inner city electorates currently held by both Liberal and Labor member whose don't support marriage equality but should. We'll effectively be targeting over half a million Australian voters with information about which of their local candidates supports marriage equality. Those leaflets feature the personal stories of couples, both gay and straight, in those electorates. They contain information about why marriage equality is important and they call on the sitting member, even if they don't yet support marriage equality, to change their mind and get on the right side of history. I have no doubt that marriage equality will make a difference in this election. It could well be the issue that decides key inner city marginal seats and may, even through that, decide the election itself. We want to ensure that in the next parliament there are as many members of both major parties who support marriage equality as possible. That is our objective this election. We hope that through our campaigning through social media, the website and our leafletting, we will achieve that. I've got no doubt that in the next parliament there will be more supporters of marriage equality than there are today and that we can move together as a nation to achieve this reform. My final point is that when we do achieve this reform it will be through cross-party cooperation. The Labor Party in Australia has a conscience vote on this issue. We hope the Coalition will too. Because the issue will be decide on conscience t will be up to each and every individual MP. Our efforts are obviously aimed at ensuring there's a maximum number of MPs who support marriage equality in the next parliament and at fostering cross-party cooperation. In New Zealand and in the UK, his reform has been achieved by people reaching across political divides in the name of love, commitment, fairness and family. It will be the same in Australia. On Monday, same-sex couples, including couples from Australia, will begin to marry in New Zealand. That will only make this issue an even more important one in the federal election. This issue is not going away. It is not a fashion. It is not a radical idea. It is about the core values that so many Australians hold dear and it will continue to be an issue which Australians aspire to, millions of Australians, until ask
it is finally achieved. I'll ask Carly now from Ben and Jerry's to speak a bit about the partnership we have and I'll also distribute to you copies of the fliers that we'll be handing out in key electorates as be handing out electorates as well as the statement electorates as well as a
Forecaster that I will read in a moment. Thank you, Rodney. Hi. Ben and Jerry's proudly stands alongside Australian Marriage Equality today to support their launch of their campaign. The issue of equality is a long-standing issue for Ben and Jerry's rooted in historical activation. We have stood for equal rights for all regardless of sexual orientation, in fact Ben and Jerry's was one of the first companies in the US to grant same-sex partners benefits over two decades ago.That was live from Sydney, a converted push from marriage equality groups ahead of the federal election to increase awareness of the Prime
same-sex marriage issue. The Prime Minister has told troops at Darwin's Robertson barracks that a former Afghan soldier who shot and wounded three Australians in 2011 has been killed. Kevin Rudd arrived in Darwin this morning, inspected military hardware and thanked soldiers for their service. He says he's been briefed on Afghanistan this morning and heard the insurgent had been tracked down in a combined operation. I'm advised Afghan forces have killed Mohammed Ruzi, former Afghan national army soldier who shot and wounded three Australian soldiers in 20 11. Ruzi was killed by small arms fire when he attacked the national security elms involved in the operation on Tuesday night Afghan time. One of the Afghan soldiers was slightly wounded during the engagement. This operation followed months of intelligence and professional work by the Australian Defence Force in conswrt the International Security Assistance Force. Once again, I commend the absolute professionalism of the Australian Defence Force in the field.Prime Minister Kevin Rudd speaking there in Darwin in the last hour or so. We're expecting a media conference from him in the next 15 minutes or so. We plan to cross live. Tony Abbott says Tasmania needs special help to boost jobs growth. He says the minority Governments in the State and Federally were running the State. Speaking in Launceston, he says the State has been in a permanent state of economic crisis. We've got unemployment that is 2.5 percentage points above the national average, we've got the lowest GDP per head, the lowest average wages, the lowest life expectancy. Tasmania shouldn't be like this. Tasmania has the potential to be so much better than this and that's why we have a plan, a growth plan that has been tailor-made for Tasmania. Tailor-made for Tasmania. So I just want to briefly go through some of the particular points in our growth plan before asking Joe and Will to add to these remarks. Yes, there will be significant infrastructure spending. You already know about the $400 million Midland Highway commitment. Today there's a $24 million commitment to a serious Antarctic research centre in Hobart. There's also a $38 million commitment to Hobart airport so that Hobart airport is far more capable of handling major aircraft, freight aircraft, passenger aircraft. This is a significant boost to transport in and out of Tasmania but we've got to have a new attitude, a new state of mind here in Tasmania which is less about wealth redistribution and more about wealth creation.Tony Abbott speaking there in Launceston just in the last few hours. Australia has joined the international condemnation of Egypt's bloody crackdown on protesters in Cairo. A State of emergency has been declared and the country's interim vice president, Mohammed El Baradei, has resigned in disgust. There have been death in other cities too. Here's what happened in the last 24 hours. Security forces care adout a day-long operation to break up camps of supporters loyal to the ousted President, Mohammed Morsi. There are wildly differing accounts about how many people died. The Muslim Brotherhood says around 2000 people were killed in the bloody clashes as the Egyptian army and police moved in. Egyptian health officials put the figure at 235 civilians as well as 43 police officers. Egyptian authorities have declared a month-long state of emergency and a curfew. Australia's Foreign Minister, Bob Carr, says Australian should avoid travelling to Egypt and if they're in the country they should leave. Now, there's been more than two years of political and civil unrest in Egypt, the Arab world's most populous country. The violence overnight is likely to have earious implications for Egypt and the rest of the Middle East. - serious. What's happening in Egypt is a violent and bloody illustration of the depth of division and polarisation in the country. On one side, armed forces determined to enforce their vision of democracy, on the other, resolute supporters of a more Islamic Egypt than the military is willing to allow. The main front lines in this battle but not othenl areas of conflict have been the protest catches in Cairo around Nahda Square and Raada al-Awiyda mosque where supporters of deposed President Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood have camped behind barricades since he was pushed for power last month. After the failure of all international efforts at reconciliation, early this morning Egyptian forces moved in, bull dozing barricades and driving protesters out. Within a couple of hours they cleared the smaller camp but around the mosque there can far greater bloodshed disphirt level of vile chns many Governments have been quick to condemn. The United States strongly condemns the use of violence against protesters in Egypt. We extend our condolences to the families of those who have been killed and to the injured. We have repeatedly called on the Egyptian military and security forces to show restraint.So who are the protesters and what do they want? They're members of the Muslim Brotherhood who say their democratic election victory was stolen from them in last month's coup but the brotherhood's vision entrenching Islam in Government and society made them powerful enemies particularly in the military so the Egyptian army, once seen as friends of all the conryfs people, are now seen to they brought down be taking sides. Morsi and today the general be taking sides. Last month
they brought down used their overwhelming military superiority to push his supporters and the Brotherhood off the streets. Does the scale of today's mounting death toll risk tipping Egypt towards civil war? Egypt's Government denies using excessive force. The Government salutes Government salutes the efforts of the security services for imposing order and clearing the gatherings at Nahda Square and Raada al-Awiyda mosque. These forces are using the ut most self-restraint and highest degree of professionalism in the operation to clear the sit-in.But as violence spreads, this is alrix Andrea, Egypt's vice president, Mohammed El Baradei, has resigned, a serious blow to the interim Government. What happens in Egypt matters far beyond the country's borders, months, possibly years, of dangerous instability in Egypt and the wider region could be the outcome. A little earlier I spoke with the Egypt independent newspaper editor Lena, who says it's calmer in Cairo now but there could well be more violence over coming days. We all hope for things to calm down in the next weeks. We hope that people will just - from different political groups will just decide that so much violence is not worth any cause at this point, however, it's hard to expect after all what's happen today, for things to calm down. There is a political group that feels completely dismissed and that has been embittered throughout this whole experience and there is use of more violence against them and we can only expect them to want to retaliate in different ways so I'm expecting more violence in Cairo and outside of Cairo to unfold of course in the coming days and etthat poses a huge Government
responsibility on the Government to find political ways and not just security tactic s with this development.Is it clear that there were protesters firing on police as well as police firing on protesters? Yeah, there has been reported use of arms and heavy arms also from the side of of the protesters. You cannot talk about an exclusive use of violence on both sides. The protesters in the square are in a position where they would attack the policemen at a certain time when they would run out of ammunition and this is not something that would happen on the police end. There was violence on the part of the protesters but it's nothing close to the - what the police could do basically because the whole operation was orchestrated by the military and right now we are realising more and more how much the military is the strongest institution in this country and how it is actually sitting beyond any form of accountability and we didn't have to wait until this massacre to happen. The military engaged in extreme use of violence in the past following Mubarak's ousting and there is no instance where they were held account able. There were no cases against any of the generals running the country back then. One of the newspaper editors in Cairo talking about the terrible carnage on the streets over the last 24 hours or so. In the last half-hour or so we had a bit of an incident with transmission where we went to black for a couple of minutes. Before our coverage cut out, we were bringing you a story about the NSW Treasurer, Mike Baird, million from
who says the State has lost $90 million from the issue of mining exploration licences examined by the Independent Commission Against Corruption. Mr Baird revealed the figure at a Budget estimates hearing this morning. NSW State political reporter Brigid Glanville was at the hearing and I spoke to her a short time ago. Mike Baird told the hearing that he asked Treasury and the department of resources and energy to look at the ICAC and to look at the economic cost of the ICAC and the hearings and in particular those mining leases Mount Penny and Doyles Creek that we've heard so much about that were granted by Ian McDonald. Last month the ICAC handed down its findings and found that Ian McDonald and Eddie Obeid engaged in corrupt conduct. The ICAC hasn't handed down its findings into the Doyles Creek but the Treasurer said that the nature of these deals that they were done corruptly cost the State $90 million and that was mainly in fees. He then said the State had lost a lot more money in royalties that the State hasn't seen. This Mike Baird in the hearings this morning. I can't believe the size. I can't believe the culture that allowed that to happen and ultimately I guess my deep disappointment in this, Mr Chair, is that the Opposition, who were obviously there and part of the culture that oversaw, giving away $90 million. State's resources for nothing. I am yet to million. $90 million of the
State's resources I am yet to hear an apology State's resources for nothing. I am yet to hear an apology and ultimately that's I am yet to hear an ultimately that's what I'd like
to hear. I'd I am yet to hear an apology and
ultimately that's to hear. I'd like to hear an apology to apology for what went on and for the loss of those resources to the State.Can you go into any more details for us about how the money has been lost? You mentioned in royalties. Is that because the mine's not going tee gO - not going to go ahead because of the corruption and the State is not going to get the money from the royalty s? Yes, the mines are not operating so in the last three years the State hasn't received the royalties would have. Mike Baird says the $90 million are from the fees and negotiations the State would have got if the deals had been put out to tender properly and he said they haven't even done the costings of what the State could have then received through royalties. He said that's around $50 million onon top of the 90 million. He said the ICAC hearings themselves have cost the Government around $2 million. He said it's shameful. He said that money, that $90 million, could have built seven schools or paid for 900 new teachers and of course the ICAC heard, Joe, that the Obeid family made $30 million from the Mount Penny licence and it stood to make another $100 million and he said he was shocked when the Treasury came back with that report. We haven't heard from the Opposition on this today.Brigid Glanville outside State Parliament in Sydney, thanks for mention once again we're waiting for the Prime Minister Kevin Rudd to front a media conference. He's been at the Robertson barracks in Darwin earlier today. We're expecting he'll step up shortly. It's apparently at the Darwin cenotaph. The Prime Minister, a media conference in Darwin. Expecting that shortly. The Government says its Papua New Guinea solution is beginning to have an impact on asylum seekers. The Immigration Minister, Tony Burke - actually looks like the Prime Minister is just Tube start that media conference. I'll just mention that we're expecting he's going to be going to the Argyle dam a little later today. That's just over the border in WA near Kununurra and you can see the member for Eden Monaro, Mike Kelly, is there with him along with Warren Snowdon, one of his Ministers.

Good to be here with Luke Gosling, our candidate for Solomon, and of course Warren Snowdon, our long-standing member for Lingiari. Does a few other things in the Government as well, and Mike Kelly, who is our Minister for Defence Materiale and it's an important part of Australia's overall military establishment here in the Northern Territory. Given that our economy sin transition because of the end of the China mining boom, we are building Australia's future through investing in new industries and creating the new jobs of the future, whereas what we seem to get from Mr Abbott is cut , cut and cut to the bone. It's not just in one area, it's in many areas. When I look, for example, at basic question of building the schools of the future, we're out there with the Better Schools plan investing $15 billion in to the schools of the future but with Mr Abbott he'll be cutting billions of dollars out of those schools of the future and cutting the school kids' bonus. We're in the business of investing and building the nation's future health and hospital system yet what we see from Mr Abbott is not just the billion dollars he's cut in the past when Health Minister but a stated policy now of cutting Medicare locals across the country delivering front-line services to Australian families. We're in the business of building our industries by supporting them with a national broadband network whereas Mr Abbott has said he would cut the broadband network to pieces and on top of that, just rely upon a clapped-out old copper network which frankly is just not going to do the job. We also believe in building the fairest possible workplaces in the future. Under the Fair Work Act. With Mr Abbott, when he talks about changing the Fair Work Act, people are concerned about what cuts will come to penalty rates over time and basic conditions. So we're in the business of building the nation's future. Mr Abbott, across the board actually, is just talking about cuts, cuts and more cuts. Today I'm talking about how we build Australia's economic future here in the Northern Territory and here right across our vast continent of Northern Australia. Bidding Australia's economic future must have a strong, a very strong Northern Australia as well and within that the strongest possible Northern Territory and today I'm announcing Australia's new northern plan for the future of Northern Australia. We are going to base this on three pillars. Pillar number one, we intend to establish a northern special economic zone focused on the Territory. This will include introducing tax incentives with the object of reducing the corporate tax for Northern Territory-based companies within five years, simplifying investment rules to make it easier for projects to be landed here in the Territory and, three, stream-lining regulation and assessment of major projects so projects can get going as soon as possible. There are constitutional Northern Territory
reasons why we begin this Northern Territory special economic zeen here in the Northern Territory and that is, under our constitution is $is a dispute about whether you can have different tax rates between the states. Not so for the Territory and that's why we intend to begin here. My personal object frve the Territory, given its unique remoteness s that it would be great to have a company tax rate here about one-third lower than that of the rest of the country for NT-based businesses. We of course would conswlt the Northern Territory Government and with the business community and, if
returned, we would then finalise and announce a detailed implementation plan in 2014. My objective would be to get it agreed with all the local partners so that we have a new rate in hand for new businesses planning their future investment decisions to kick in by 2018. Pillar number two is expansion of the Ord irrigation scheme into stage 3. This designed to open up 14,000 hectares in the Knox Plains and Keep River areas of the Territory and we would do this in partnership with the Northern Territory Government who need some additional $10 million in support to deal with native title negotiation s in order to secure the land for this purpose in the future and this would unleash an enormous amount of agricultural land for the future and the economists tell us $150 million worth of agricultural production from sugar-based crops and elsewhere. This is about investing in a huge new project for Australia, the future of agribusiness and on top of that you are looking at the expansion of the Ord irrigation area by one-third over its current size. Number three, pillar number three, 20-year plans
growth plans, strategic growth plans for both Darwin and North Queensland. Infrastructure Australia would do this week in partnership with the Queensland and Northern Territory
Governments and local councils to deliver the infrastructure which Northern Australia and these centres needs in the future. It's based in part on the successful 50-year supply chain model developed for the Mount Isa to Townsville economic development zone. The Darwin plan will focus on LNG and mining development, agribusiness, engineering and other services and capitalising of course on the national broadband network. For Townsville, the plan would focus on transport networks and port proximity to resource and agricultural developments, education, Defence and proximity to tropical markets, Defence of course is also key here in the Territory and in Darwin. In Cairns we'll focus on tourism, in particular large new arrivals of Chinese tourists that I referred to only yesterday in Cairns, related hospitality services, industries, agribusiness, Defence again and engineering and medical services. In Mackay presented
we'll focus on opportunities presented by its proximity to the Bowen and fantastic Galilee basins and the great future mining potential they hold, the mining services industry, sugar and milling, transport and logistics networks and the national broadband network opportunities for the future. We'll have more to say about more elements of our northern economic plan for the more elements of our economic plan for the future.
Let me economic plan for Let me put it in Let me put it in pretty simple terms - what we need is the national imagination terms - what national imagination to harness the enormous agricultural potential of Northern Australia to build the new food export industries to turbo charge our economy in the future. We will harness the bountiful supply of north
water available here in the north to drive the production of these new food industries for export and create new jobs and, through this special economic zone, we will also create the tax and other incentives necessary to build the new industries for Northern Australia for the future. Our logic is simple - we need a national imagination to grasp the economic potential that Northern Australia holds not just for itself but our entire vast continent and beyond that imagination, having core concrete plans to make it work, here a special economic zone, in the Ord, expanding the area by a third, in North Queensland, strategic growth plans for the next 20 years and more to be said on those things later. We're in the business of building the country up. Unfortunately, our opponents seem to be more focused on cuts, cuts and cuts to the bone. Lerted take a look at what would happen here locally in the electorate of Solomon. We're in the business of building up Darwin's economic development and jobs yet what we have seen from the other side is a decision to cut the national broadband network's roll-out here in Darwin which would turbo charge our businesses for the future. We build the national broadband network for opponents would simply cut the network down. We are building the local schools here in the Northern Territory but because the Liberal National Party Government here and the skepticism of Mr Abbott's Government, we would see instead a cut of some $375 million which would otherwise go to our schools here in the Northern Territory under the Better Schools plan and on top of that, a cut Mr Abbott would deliver to the thousands of territory families who are currently receiving had school kids' bonus. Up here in the Territory, we have invested and are investing some $2.02 billion in the health and hospital infrastructure of Darwin and the Territory from out
when the Government was elected out to 2017. This is a huge investment and we've seen it at royal Darwin and elsewhere as well. And part of that investment has been Medicare local services delivering front-line services with 60 staff out there doing the work face to face with patients in the community and what's Mr Abbott's plan to cut Medicare locals across the country and to cut them here as well. As I said, we're in the business of building the jobs of the future. Mr Abbott has said he's going to cut 12,000 jobs in the future, public service. I'll just remind folks that up here in Darwin there are about 7,000 public servants and if you want