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A Current Affair -

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9 in Perisher Fine in Cooma and 18 day
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evening. From us all, goodnight.
This program is captioned live.

This program is captioned live. Hello and welcome to A Current Affair. I'm Tracy Grimshaw. First tonight - driving under the influence used to mean alcohol. But as you're about to see in our exclusive police videos, drugs - some of them over-the-counter - are the new danger. These mums and dads can barely walk, let alone drive a carment

Opiates, methadone, cannabis... Stand up. Stand up.

This is the evidence that speaks for itself. Of the kind of drivers you share our roads with. Who can barely stand, let alone drive. Who are pumped up on so many illegal and prescription drugs, in some cases, they can barely talk. These are the police videos of Aussie drivers who've been roadside-tested for drugs, and are then asked to undergo physical-impairment tests.

All this driver has to do is walk a straight line.

He's having real trouble just staying upright, but wants to continue the test.

But he can't, because he's under the influence of amphetamines and prescription drugs. It costs him his licence for 12 months, and an $850 fine.

This driver is 45 years of age but, under the influence of amphetamines, he can barely keep still long enough to listen to what's being asked.

Which is the least of his problems, because this night of bravado ends up costing him not just his licence, but aning aerated -- aggregate fine of $4, fire00. -- $4,500. This woman is 56 years of age. She's taken benzodiazepines - a prescription drug - and she's clearly nowhere near capable of driving.

She's asked to walk heel to toe along the black line. Instead, she straddles a foot either side of it, and even then loses her balance over and over. It's an epic fail, but she won't give in.

Finally, the officers have seen and heard enough. As for the driver... I'd rather go to bed.She eventually woke up to a 12-month licence suspension and $200 fine. These people are high-risk, predominantly people with drug- dependency issues.Inspector Martin Boorman is head of Victoria's drug and alcohol traffic unit which, on average, detects a staggering 30 drug-affected drivers every single week.They're either involved in collisions, or their driving so-so bad that members of the public ring in and tell us about it, or our patrol vehicles detect them. If their behaviour is in consistent with the alcohol level that we find, we then require them to come with us to a police station or another location and undergo a drug- impairment assessment.Many of the drivers in these videos had take an cocktail of drugs, but all of them had one in common - benzodiazepines. Now, they're legally prescribed to treat anxiety or, as a muscle relaxant. But taken to excess or without a script, and as you can see, the results are potentially lethal on our roads, even if they're not mixed with any other drug.

This driver is also on amfete mnds, or speed, and methadone. -- amphetamines, or speed, and methadone. It's a struggle for him to even get upright.

Sometimes, police officers need the patience of a saint.

He couldn't, costing him a 2-year loss of licence, a community-based order, and 150 hours of community service.

Simple instructions are hard when you're high.

He only stops when he's about to hit the camera, then turns around...

Maybe he's walking home - because, after testing positive to amphetamines, this bloke's about to lose his licence and cop a $3,000 fine. Others don't know when to quit.

No surprise, he's a spectacular failure. As is this 34-year-old who's got a much brighter future walking tight ropes than he does behind the wheel.

Or how about this man, who should probably thank police for catching him - in more ways than one.

A good lawyer might not go astray either, because it'll be hard to convince a judge that any of these people should have the right to drive on our roads in this kind of state.It's as dangerous as it can get. It's like a loaded gun. It's just waiting to go off.

Hard to believe they even found the car, isn't it? It's terrible to watch. We would like to hear your thoughts on that story. Head to our Facebook page or Twitter. Coming up - the interest-free loans helping families get ahead.It keeps you out of the hands of payday lenders, it stops you using 18% or 21% credit-card advances. That's got to be good. Now to the smooth-talking conman who swindled his way into the hearts and bank accounts of unsuspecting women. Daniel Casset even faked the death of a family member just to get a buck. I've worked it out to about $42,000. We agreed on $25,000. And to this date, I've received about $100. Don't they deserve their money back?They'll get it some day. Maybe deep down inside, I knew I was being scammed, but didn't want to believe it.Is there a date, an idea? Can we give them some kind of assurance?Um, don't know. Just need time.I'm not silly enough to think that I'd be the only one.I don't think he actually cares. And he's threatened me that, if I get nasty, I'll get nothing.A lifetime of lies is about to catch up with this laid-back love rat.I'm Charles Croucher from A Current Affair. I'm here to ask you about some of the women you owe money to. It's a private matter.Any chance of them getting their money?Yeah, they will in time.They said they've heard that from you before. Is that the case?They'll get it in time."In time" - two words that are all too familiar for Sascha Meehan, who first met Daniel Casset in 2006.He just seemed like one of the boys at the pub. Came across as, you know, friendly, chatty. Yeah, just a normal, everyday guy.As soon as they started going out, the request for money began.You know, "My son wants an Xbox, I've promised him. My daughter's sick." Always playing on the guilt to get me to lend money.And it just wasn't a couple of dollars here and there.He told me that his sister died and he needed shoes for a funeral. I was at work at the time. It's like, "I can't just run to the bank. But what am I going to wear to the funeral? Thongs?" It was constant badgering.Do you know the current state of his sister?She's alive, which he put in an email to me about three weeks ago - that she never died, he was probably drunk or joking.Isn't it time you gave it back to them?I'm in contact with them all the time, mate.The last time I spoke to him would have been May, 2010. That was via email. He mentioned that, you know, he still had every intention of paying the money back, and haven't heard from him since.Charlene Abbott met Mr Casset online.His wife, or ex- wife, apparently, at the time, was not going to let him see his kids if he didn't pay her any money, so of course, me being the willing volunteer, lent him some money, and then it just snowballed from there. The short relationship left her financially ruined.I had to sell my car and, yeah, my Mum and I had to sell our house. There was a lot of stuff that was - that, yeah, he made our life very difficult. Despite declaring himself bankrupt in 2009 with debts more than $150,000, dodgy Daniel has continued living a very lavish life. This video shows his wedding in 2010, on a tropical beach in Thailand.

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My wedding?Yeah. In Thailand.I didn't pay for it.How can you get over there with money still owing, mate?I was fuming at the point - "If you want to get married, that's fine. I have no emotional attachment to him." Surely a registry office will do it for $80 to $100. I can't afford to go over seas and get married. Why should he?Is there a date, is there an idea? Can we give them some kind of assurance?Um, don't know. Just need time.A month, two months? Just in time. It's gonna happen, mate. I'm not running from it, mate. Running away from every obligation in his life. He can't support his own kids, so he gets other people to do it for him.Alright, mate. No worrieser.What's the plan? There'll be a plan. I'm in contact with them.The money you said was coming last year?It's coming. When you're a gambler, mate, what do you do?Daniel Casset's gambling habits haven't just got him in trouble with women, but also with football clubs. He's one to the of the few players good enough to be paid at an amateur level. We spoke to several clubs who paid Casset up front, only to have him walk out in mid-season, or in some cases not show up at all. One game he wasn't going to miss was the legends game. Look for this man. He's dying to kick his 7,000th goal.There's Casset!He even kicked the winning goal. But the publicity that went with the match infuriated some of his victims.I thought, just to rub it in so many people's faces. He changed his phone number after that game, 'cause prior to that I had his number. After that game played, his number was disconnected.You can't keep running from it, can you?I'm not running.You appear to be.What can I say, mate?It's not say - more giving it to too them. Sascha, the obvious question deis, why did you keep paying him the money?There was part of me that kept lending because, I thought, if I didn't, I'd get nothing back. There were alarm bells ringing, but then it got to the point where it was asking for money for tools for a job, so that he could start working. I figured that, you know, if he starts working, then he can start paying some money back.Can we tell them at least it's going to be soon?I'm sure they're going to see on TV.A month, a week? Whenever. Be good, mate.Thanks, Danny.

Both women in that story decided to speak as a warning to others. If you're in a similar situation and feel we could help, please send us an email or give us a call. Hundreds of homicides right around the country are unsolved, and for nearly every so-called "cold case", there's a grieving family. Now, there's new hope in the form of dedicated squads set to reopen the files.

I could be wrong, but I think it's somebody that followed her around the club scene, because she was so beautiful. It could be a crazy guy out there, and maybe that's what happened. I don't know.When you lose a loved one, you want to know why you lost that loved one.A young woman in her apartment, alone, with an 11-week-old baby. She was confronted with an offender who forced his way in. This is something that appeared to be quite planned and premeditated.Nearly 40 years ago, inside this unit block in Beachside, Sydney, a young mum, Lynette White, was murdered. It was an horrific crime that got a lot of mass media coverage at the time, but it was never solved. Now, the case has been reopened, and the police - and Lynette White's relatives - are hoping for a breakthrough. What would it mean to you?I'd finally be able to get this out of my head. When suspects' names are brought up or whatever, those names go around in my head. This would mean a hell of a lot to myself and my family, yeah.June 8, 1973 - Paul White was away at work. Wife Lynette and their newborn were alone in their home unit. When Paul came home that night, she was dead. Police believe the intruder conned her into unbolting the door, forced his way in, then savagely attacked her. Their baby was unharmed.I've always thought that it's somebody we either know or somebody who was stalking her.Her murdser one of nearly 400 in NSW alone that hasn't been solved. But they could be.We never close the books on those cases. Even if we don't have the evidence at the time, we're always anticipating and hopeful for new information to come forward. Detective chief inspector John Lehmann of the Unsolved Homicide team believes the same killer may also have murdered 20-year-old Maria Smith less than a year later. Now, she was a newlywed who lived 3km from Lynette, and the similarities in the crimes are striking.And also another serious sexual assault that occurred in Coogee in 1972. We believe that there are very similar circumstances to that crime, and the two murder scenes.That's one of the reasons Lynette's case has been reopened after 40 years - solving her murder would solve a number of awful crimes. An identikit of a suspect was made at the time, and detectives are meticulously going through their evidence.We're looking at a number of people actively. We have some suspects identified. Whilst we're doing that, there's always the chance that we might solve them. Murderer Darren Smith - the day the law finally caught up up with him. They'll solve two or three cold- case murders a year. And their counterparts in Victoria, Queensland and WA are also chipping away. On their side - new advances in DNA analysis, ballistics, and fingerprints.16 years after he bashed 20-year-old Russell Lyons to death, Smith is finally being sentenced.Russell Lyons was murdered for his sneakers in 1995. Last year, Lehmann's team solved the case, and his killer was convicted - largely because of DNA evidence he left on his own shoes near the scene of the crime.34- year-old mother of three was found dumped that site of a secluded road in Minchinbury on Saturday morning...Another success last year - the murder 17 years ago of sex worker Donna Hicks. Convicted killer Bandali Debs already serving three life terms - he was give an fourth. But there's also a non- scientific factor working for detectives, and that is time itself. The problem is, for us, as we know that there are people out there who have information who have been maybe intimidated or something of that nature in the past who are no longer in those circumstances - if they came forward, they would change our lives.Howard Brown of victims-of-crime group VOCAL knows scores of families patiently waiting for the tiniest fragment of memory from a bystander oh a change of heart from someone who knows something - to bring closure and justice.What we really want to know is why a loved one died. Secondly, and probably more importantly - is the person who is responsible for our loved one's death - are they still out there doing this to other families?I don't care if he's dead or alive. I'd just love to know who it is.It is very satisfying when we can knock on someone's door that have thought they've gotten away with a murder from 20 years ago, look at the expression on their face when they're there to tell them, finally, that they're under arrest for murder.That would please me no end. That would be great. The families never give up, do they? If you have any information you may think help police:

When we come back - the no-interest loans helping Aussie families break the debt cycle. This program is not captioned.

Tomorrow - the kids teaching grown- ups how to cook. And there's a $30,000 jackpot in Down Down Friday.

And there's a $30,000 jackpot in
Down Down Friday. Welcome back. As more Australian families struggle to make ends meet, our reliance on credit cards and loan sharks has increased significantly. But a growing group of lenders want to put an end to that - they're happy to loan you their cash, with no interest attached. You need these things in life to cope - you need a washing machine, a fridge, a car.I was afraid to go into loans that are offered by large companies.An interest-free loan, without any nasty surprises. It keeps you out of the hands of payday lenders.The no-interest loan scheme, or NILS, as it's often referred to, started more than three decades ago by Good Shepherd Finance. Its aim was to help struggling low-income families. Now, 220 institutions have adopted the scheme, including some of the big banks. NAB has provided $23 million to roll out the NILS scheme across the country.I had a $1,000 loan, and I pay $10 a week on it. That got paid off within no time.That $1,000 home thanks to Anglicare helped single mum of two Gail Tucker purchase a brand-new washing machine.They were great loans, because they were small repayments with no interest. It was a direct debit from my account, so it was quite easy and affordable.After successfully paying off her first NILS loan, Gail scored a job as a chef for Meals on Wheels. She then needed her own set of wheels to get to work, so she took up another no- interest loan to cover it.I don't think I could have kept going and had the energy if I didn't have that car, if I didn't have those clothes washed on time. I'd have to be at home hand-washing them! Here's how the scheme works - a lendker provide up to $2,000 for a family in need. The family then has between 12 and 18 months to pay it back. Once paid backen to another family so the cycle can continue. It really is for essential etimes. You need to be on a pension, you need to be a welfare recipient, and you need to have a very special purpose.If you can prove that, then finance guru Paul Clitheroe says these no-interest loans are the most responsible option.It's an interest-free loan. It keeps you out of the hands of payday lenders. It stops you using 18% or 21% credit-card advances. That's got to be good.Anglicare has a pot of about 130,000 we're able to give out to clients. We normally have around 280 clients that are approved each your.Teresa Clarke is the program manager of NILS for Anglicare Sydney. She says most of their clientele are struggling single mothers.They're people living on a very limited amount of income. Coping tie Day to day, but when a emergency situation comes up, they don't have that discretionary income to help with those repayments or to find another option.Living on about $860 a fortnight, I don't really have much flexibility to neither save nor repay any credit cards.Karsha is one such mum. Along with caring for her two young boys, Alexander and Wills, she runs community cooking classes - all while finishing off her education degree.Perhaps some organisations would be, you know, willing to give a single mum in my situation - a credit card might be worth $500. But I don't know if I would be confident enough to take on that responsibility.Karsha has successfully paid off three no- interest loans. Paul Clitheroe says she's now eligible for a new savings scheme, called Saver Plus. Really what this whole program is trying to do - it's trying to help people in desperate trouble, allow them to access essential items, and then, once the loan is paid back, to allow them to continue saving, with a bonus for saving.It's made my life a lot easier. Our website has more information on that story.

Our website has more information on
that story. After the break - pensioners at war with their grumpy neighbour. Don't you stand in front of my door, pal! You're outta line and you know it!I'm just trying

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We're all dancing here in the studio to 'Gangnam Style'. Tomorrow night - elderly residents unite against a neighbourhood bully. VOICEOVER: The grumpy old man bullying retired neighbours.Don't you stand in front of my door, pal! You're out of life, and you know it. Abuse.Threats. Whroofrpblgts does he think he is?Now, the street of seniors is fighting back. That report tomorrow night, only on A Current Affair. Thanks for your company. Goodnight. Supertext captions by Red Bee Media - www.redbeemedia.com.au.

This program is not captioned. This program is captioned live.

This program is captioned live.
VOICEOVER: Tonight on Big Brother. Big Brother! VOICEOVER: Noisy tourists join the unwelcome guest list. How much more can the housemates bear? This seat's too soft. VOICEOVER: Time running out for Benjamin to win a night in the captain's quarters. I will not be upset if I don't get to go. I will be furious! VOICEOVER: What has Zoe said to off set Layla. I would never think anything like that, let alone say it. VOICEOVER: And fish bingo with Surly. I'm excited. I love bingo, I love it! VOICEOVER: This week's task is unwelcome guests but there's a welcome sight in the backyard this morning. Oh, no. You didn't get one? Voice voice among the surprise visitors to the house is the postman. Each housemate has their own letterbox but they have no idea what they might get. No letter. What does yours say? "This entitled you free entry to the temple. "Ygs VOICEOVER: Sam has been sent an invitation for two to a new room in the house to be revealed later. Another ticket holder. VOICEOVER: The temple is a new age retreat where housemates can get in touch with their spirituality. What did you get? Good, good. What is it? I have to gather you all together before I read it. VOICEOVER: Zoe's mail isn't so good - a clean-up order from Big Brother council. "Congratulations, Zoe. You have won a bathroom work order to hand to a fellow housemate of your choice." VOICEOVER: The bathroom is a health hazard and she has to pick someone to clean it. Michael, I would like you to clean the bathroom. I would like nothing better! Yeah! Thank you, Mike. That's alright. Go away. Towel! -- go away, towel!

How did you sleep last night? I slept like I was in a coma. ... Hello, Mr Drain. I have come to clean you. I am imperve use to filt because I am a filt fizz -- wizard myself. Michael is an angel. I find Michael so attractive. Do ya? Oh, my God, I have never been so attracted to someone instantly? Why? You were instantly attracted? Yep. Really? Now, woin der what sort of goodies I can -- now, I wonder what sort of goodies ki get from you? Oh s that a bird fete? I have hooked one so many redheads. I'll hook up with them, and - you know, and I saw him and I was like, "Mmm." Mmm. Be gone! Filth! When we got to know each other really well in third, fourth, week. Yeah, I remember. And you didn't get on early. And third, fourth week I really loved him and fell in love with him. Cutey.

Oh, it's another nice day. Not too hot. It was really hot before. I think the cloud came over. VOICEOVER: Another nice day and so far no unwelcome guest that is are proving more and more difficult to ignore.

This seat's too soft. This one's quite firm. This one's just right.