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Blair faces backbench revolt -

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(generated from captions) Well, the Prime Minister's ally in the so-called war on terror, the British Prime Minister Tony Blair, is facing a backbench revolt over his plans to toughen up UK anti-terror legislation. And rather than face a defeat in the Commons over new detention provisions, the Government has chosen to withdraw the bill and start new negotiations. From London, Europe correspondent Jane Hutcheon reports.

The first item of debate on the

British terror laws almost ended in

defeat. The ayes to the right 299,

the nos to the left 300. It was the

narrowest of majorities, to one

element of the bill creating a new

offence of glorifying terrorism.

offence of glorifying terrorism. 33 Labour rebels joined Opposition MPs

who said the provisions would

criminalise the innocent. There little appetite then to

criminalise the innocent. There was little appetite then to approve the

most divisive issue in the

counter-terrorism plan - extending

detention without trial to a period

of 90 days. We're talking about

people being locked up all day and

potentially repeatedly interviewed

for a very long time before they

for a very long time before they get released without charge because

somebody finally realises they've

arrested and man of a similar name

or they've been misled. Rather than

face defeat, Home Secretary Charles

Clarke delayed the vote. In the

aftermath of 7 July, British police

say they want more time to gather

evidence against terrorist suspects

who have global links and use

technology to hide their methods.

I do regard the police case as

persuasive. I think it's the right

case but I also have to acknowledge

because it's a fact there are

because it's a fact there are strong reservations which many people have

expressed. He'll have to reach a

deal with most opponents in

all-party talks. If there's going

all-party talks. If there's going to be any chance of this bill getting

through the commons next week it

will have to change fundamentally

and any ideas that a bill with 90

days, 40 days or 30 days could get

through, is wrong. Until now the

Blair Government said repeatedly it

wouldn't back down on this

wouldn't back down on this important legislation. Now embarrassingly,

it's had to do exactly that. And

it's had to do exactly that. And it came on a day when the PM had to

accept the resignation of one of

accept the resignation of one of his closest allies in Cabinet, David

Blunkett admitted to breaking the

ministerial code of conduct on

accepting a company directorship

without approval. The Conservative

Party didn't waste a minute.

This week marks the beginning of

This week marks the beginning of the final chapter of his administration.

For how long will this country

For how long will this country have to put up with this lame duck PM in

office, but not in power? It was

office, but not in power? It was one of Tony Blair's grimmest days since