Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant the accuracy of closed captions. These are derived automatically from the broadcaster's signal.
Japan - Generation Z -

View in ParlViewView other Segments

(generated from captions) lead will not dare contemplate.

And finally tonight to Japan where

reporter Eric Campbell ventured

reporter Eric Campbell ventured into the bizarre world of Tokyo's youth

sub cultures. As the first

generation born after Japan's

economic miracle, generation Z, as

it is known, has rejected the

traditional values of its parents

and opted instead for a society of

its own invention. BAND MUSIC

It's3am in the centre of Tokyo and

the night is just getting started.

Kiyomi Hirayama has come to see her

favourite bands - Despair,

euthanasia and Death Wish. Most

nights she works as a bar hostess,

being paid to flirt with drunken

businessmen she finds disgusting.

Tonight, she's escaping to the dark side.

Kiyomi still lives at home, but

Kiyomi still lives at home, but says she hates her father. Her real

family only comes out after

midnight. Its name is Goth-Lolita.

Goth-Lolita is one of Japan's

biggest youth trends, combining the

black nihilism of gothic with baby

doll sexuality. Gosurol as they

express themselves, dress?

Outlandish costumes. More radical

followers practise self-mutilation.

Rika Kayama is a professor and

psychologist who counsels disturbed youths.

On one level, Goth-Lolita is just

one more fashion for bored Tokyo

youths. There's a myriad of

sub-groups, so many that they are

becoming almost mainstream. Young

Japanese have long immersed

themselves in groups and trends

themselves in groups and trends with an almost tribal zeal. But today

it's driven by far more than

it's driven by far more than fashion or temporary rebellion. Many people

simply can't relate to the core

values that define post-war Japan.

Career, corporate loyalty,

self-sacrifice, marriage and family.

Unlike their parents, they've grown

up with little expectation of

lifetime employment or prosperity.

In the early '9 07s Japan's bubble

economy burst and it has stagnated

ever since. Now, around one in five

people aged 15-25 is out of school

and out of work. The promise that

hard study and unquestioning

hard study and unquestioning loyalty will bring rewards has turned increasingly hollow.

Unable to cope with the real world,

many young Japanese are retreating

to an imaginery one.

Hond hond hond has never had a

girlfriend and has no desire for a

real wife. He has a virtual family

and he keeps them in his laptop.

Toru is known as an Ataku, an

extreme form of the western geek.

extreme form of the western geek. He has a virtual sister, a virtual pet

and even a virtual maid.

Toru would not let us come to his

one-bedroom flat, saying it was too

full of computer and video

full of computer and video equipment to sit down. Instead, he invited us

to this Alice in Wonderland-themed

cafe, part of a chain that's become

popular with Otaku. The waitresses

who dress as Alice are the only

who dress as Alice are the only real women he sees. He believes all

women he sees. He believes all women want today is money.

Like millions of lonely young men,

he spends his days peruse

he spends his days perusing Manga

and Anime, Japan's popular, often

sexual and frequently violent

cartoon art. Toru has become a hero

to fellow Otaku, after writing a

become arguing that this world is

better than reality.

There's still an expectation that

young people will strive to work

young people will strive to work for big corporations. But ever since

big corporations. But ever since the boom days ended, the idea of being

boom days ended, the idea of being a life-long salary man has been

life-long salary man has been losing its appeal. Too much pressure, too

much competition, too little reward.

No. Aomitsu is known as a neat,

meaning not in employment,

meaning not in employment, education or training. He found he simply

couldn't take the pressure of

Japan's intensive education system.

He dropped out of school and when

He dropped out of school and when he finally went to university, left

after just one day. He hasn't

after just one day. He hasn't looked for work in almost three years.

There are thought to be around 700, 700,000 neats

There are thought to be around 700,000 NEETs in Japan and the

number is growing fast.

Naomitsu's parents have new sent

him to a government-assisted boot

camp to learn to work. Today he's

being taught how to make a coffee.

The daunting rejijty of Japan's

workplace has interbeen blamed for

stymying the economic recovery. But

it's now being challenged by yet

another sub-group. To a western

outsider, it looks like the most

normal of all. In Japan, they had

normal of all. In Japan, they had to invent a word for it.

Tadayuki is a freeter, meaning

freelancer. He's one of about 4

million Japanese who now work

part-time or move from job to job.

part-time or move from job to job. A few years ago he decided he'd had

enough of working for a company

enough of working for a company when all he really wanted was to play

samba on his drums.

It'sa phenomenon that began after

the bubble burst and some corporate

leaders have viewed its rise with

leaders have viewed its rise with as much horror than they have the

NEETs, but not everyone. Yasayuki

Nambu is a close friend of Prime

Minister Junichiro Koizumi and runs

one of Tokyo's biggest recruitment companies.

To help freeters do that he's built

a joint hydroponic farm under his

corporate headquarters in the

corporate headquarters in the centre of Tokyo. It challenges one of the

economy's core institutions.

And Tadayuki is one of the most

enthusiastic trainees, learning

boutique farming during the week.

boutique farming during the week...and retreating to a rented

paddy field on weekends where he

paddy field on weekends where he can grow enough to live and play his drums.

Japan is at a turning point,

struggling to recover its momentum

while Generation Z struggles to

while Generation Z struggles to find its place in a world it's found

wanting. Not everyone is succeeding.

But many see hope in the fact that

at least they're trying something different.

How Japan meets these challenges

could decide the country's future.

The turmoil of its post-bubble

The turmoil of its post-bubble youth may just be the darkness before CHEERING