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Opposition attacks Gillard over tax announcem -

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The Federal Opposition has labelled Julia Gillard a 'wimp' for waiting until Parliament's winter
break to announce details about the carbon tax.

Transcript

ALI MOORE, PRESENTER: The carbon tax's date with destiny has intensified the Opposition's attacks
on the Government.

It's labelled the Gillard Government "wimpy" for waiting until Parliament's winter break and says
the weekend's unveiling of the tax is Sunday too far away.

The ABC has been told that 70% of households affected by the new tax will be fully compensated.

Political correspondent Tom Iggulden reports from Canberra.

TOM IGGULDEN, POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT: Five days to go and the tension's almost killing them.

BARBANBY JOYCE, NATIONALS SENATOR: This is not fair. We cannot go on like this Australia.

TOM IGGULDEN: But the waiting game is over for Tony Windsor, who's indicated at last he will likely
support the carbon tax.

TONY WINDSOR, INDEPENDENT MP: Something that I think I will be able to look back on and be very
proud of.

TOM IGGULDEN: With his support, the tax is almost a certainty to get through, but he's not telling
voters what's in store before the big announcement.

TONY WINDSOR: I think they will be reasonably happy and so they should be. I think they've got to
look beyond the sort of day-to-day rubbish that they've been dealt up with over months now.

BARNABY JOYCE: Sunday is going to be a happy day. It's going to be "McTony Windsor Happy Day".
We'll have a new tax. Well, after McHappy Tony Windsor Sunday tax day, that is the time where
they're going to realise they've been swindled out of their money.

TOM IGGULDEN: But it's not just the independents; it's a rainbow coalition that's brought the tax
to this stage, with the Greens on the edge of the spectrum.

CHRISTINE MILNE, GREENS SENATOR: It's been tough. Of course we haven't got everything that we want
or that you want. But what we have got is an outcome.

TOM IGGULDEN: Julia Gillard's now telling caucus members to get out and sell that outcome to their
electorates, but not to expect a sudden rebound in the polls.

The ABC's been told 70 per cent of households will be fully compensated for the increased cost of
living associated with the tax.

Based on past government proclamations, that leaves another 20 per cent partially compensated.

But an announcement that some fuel-users will pay the tax and others won't has given Tony Abbott
fresh legs for his attack on the government.

TONY ABBOTT, OPPOSITION LEADER: So you might not pay the carbon tax on those ones but you will pay
the carbon tax on all those ones.

ANTHONY ALBANESE, MINISTER FOR INFRASTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORT: All division and no vision! The
stuntman of Australian politics.

TOM IGGULDEN: The stunts continued in Parliament, with the Opposition asking questions it knew the
Government couldn't answer before Sunday's uncloaking of the tax's details.

HARRY JENKINS, SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE: There is a certain inevitability about this and the leader of
the Nationals has the call.

WARREN TRUSS, SHADOW TRANSPORT MINISTER: My question is directed to the Minister for Transport.

LOWER HOUSE: Yay! Let's see if you can answer it.

WARREN TRUSS: Since he's so eager to get the question, let's hope he will be eager to answer it as
well.

ANTHONY ALBANESE: I've waited for than two years for a question from the shadow minister, and I say
to him, he can wait five more sleeps for an answer.

JOE HOCKEY, SHADOW TREASURER: He said "Wait five days"! Oh what a coward we have at the dispatch
box too. What a wimp!

TOM IGGULDEN: But as they say, it's now all over, bar the shouting. Tony Abbott moved a motion to
have Parliament recalled next week so he can give the government a working-over on the details of
the carbon tax.

It failed, and so the government's got five weeks to hit the streets on the sales pitch of its
life. As the Prime Minister put it today, she will be wearing out the leather on her shoes.