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Irish writer Enright takes Booker prize -

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TONY EASTLEY: A 45-year-old Irish writer has won the prestigious Man Booker prize for fiction with
her bleak saga of a large Irish family.

Anne Enright says she wrote her book "The Gathering" because she didn't quite understand what a
family is and the best way to find out was to bring a range of characters to life.

In doing so she covers the risqué subjects of sexual abuse, alcoholism, guilt, shame and suspicion
- all ingredients of the classic Irish novel.

In a recent BBC interview Anne Enright canvassed what it would be like to win the big literary
prize as well as giving a few clues on her writing style and motivation.

ANNE ENRIGHT: The book is the full Irish. It is as in the breakfast. I have has black and white
pudding and bacon rashes and sausages.

INTERVIEWER: Why?

ANNE ENRIGHT: I know that I can take an overdone subject and I know that I can approach it somehow
fresh because one of the things that I admire in other writers is their angle of approach, you
know.

It's where you come in from, it's where you start so I'm not a straight writer. So I know I'm not
going to write a straight book even if the subject is an ordinary one.

When people pick up a book, they may want something happy, that will cheer them up and in that case
they shouldn't really pick up my book but if they want something the equivalent of the Hollywood
weepie, you know, I do love crying at films so it is the intellectual equivalent of that pleasure.
Whatever it is.

I do think it would be very strange to win because every writer has a fantasy of winning the Booker
prize and then to actually, which is mad, that's mad OK. So to actually have your madness confirmed
by the world, I don't think it would make you sane but it would be a very interesting thing to
happen.

TONY EASTLEY: Winner of the Man Booker prize for fiction, Anne Enright.