Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Disclaimer: The Parliamentary Library does not warrant or accept liability for the accuracy or usefulness of the transcripts. These are copied directly from the broadcaster's website.
Key Karzai adviser assassinated -

View in ParlViewView other Segments

A senior adviser to Afghan President, Hamid Karzai has been murdered along with a member of
Parliament. Jan Mohammad Khan, the former governor of southern Uruzgan province, where Australian
forces are stationed, was a key ally of the President.

TONY EASTLEY: A senior adviser to Afghan President, Hamid Karzai has been murdered along with a
member of Parliament.

Jan Mohammad Khan, the former governor of southern Uruzgan province, where Australian forces are
stationed, was a key ally of the President.

Afghanistan correspondent, Sally Sara is in Kabul.

Sally, good morning. Where and when did this attack occur?

SALLY SARA: Well, this attack occurred at the Kabul home of Jan Mohammad Khan which is near the
parliament district in the capital. The reports from police are saying that several insurgents
stormed his compound. It has taken quite a while for police to try and regain control of that area.
Power was cut and they were trying to ensure that there weren't more gunmen at the scene.

The gunmen got inside and shot Jan Mohammad Khan and also a member of Parliament from Uruzgan
province, Mohammad Hashem Watanwal. He was also killed in the attack. He was staying at Mr Khan's
house here in Kabul and became caught up in this latest violence.

TONY EASTLEY: Sally, who was responsible for the attack and were the gunmen captured or killed?

SALLY SARA: Police believe that it was insurgents. They are still trying to establish exactly what
happened. There were a couple more bodies at the scene but as I say they are still not clear if
there were more insurgents involved. It has taken them quite a while to try and clear the scene.

This all unfolded at about 8pm on Sunday night and security forces rushed to the scene. They have
tried now to seal it off and now to unravel exactly the details of this event.

TONY EASTLEY: So in terms, when we talk about insurgents, it is likely to be the Taliban, is it?

SALLY SARA: Ah, it is but there are complicated problems of initially sometimes several groups
including the Taliban will claim responsibility for events like this one and it takes a little bit
of time to work out whether that was the case or not.

TONY EASTLEY: Sally, it is less than a week since the killing of the President's half-brother. Is
this a sign of a new campaign to target those close to the President?

SALLY SARA: Well, Tony every day there is a tally of all kinds of different violent attacks across
the country but sometimes the big headline attacks seem to go in waves.

You will remember about six weeks ago, the Taliban were pushing with spectacular attacks and they
got a suicide bomber into the Department of Defence. They broke out hundreds of prisoners from the
main jail in the southern city of Kandahar; they shot the police chief in Kandahar as well.

Now in the past week they have killed Ahmed Wali Karzai who was the President's brother and now
this latest attack. The death of the President's brother affected president Karzai very deeply and
very personally.

So certainly he has been exposed to some of the feelings of shock and grief that many Afghans
endured and it is has been interesting that there has been a sentiment amongst some people in
Kabul, while there has been sorrow at these attacks, there has also been a feeling that the
President is finally being exposed to the same kind of feelings that many Afghans are enduring of
losing people who are close to them in their families and in professional circles as well.

So the insurgents have certainly hit very, very close to the President this time, with a powerful
and trusted aide and friend.

TONY EASTLEY: In Kabul, our correspondent Sally Sara.