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Palin tests the waters in Pennsylvania -

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Palin tests the waters in Pennsylvania

Broadcast: 29/10/2008

Reporter: Mark Simkin

With the US election campaign now in its final stretch, the two candidates have been going head to
head in the battle-ground states, the ones that can make or break the election. Tonight, Barack
Obama will make a prime time television pitch to voters while Sarah Palin campaigned with John
McCain today in Pennsylvania.

Transcript

TONY JONES, PRESENTER: In the United States tonight, voters will see the clearest demonstration yet
of the enormous financial bounty Barack Obama's fundraisers have delivered to the Democrat
presidential hopeful.

He's paid for a full half hour on prime time television across the country, hoping that Barack
Obama, the TV special, will turn undecided voters.

Trumped in the campaign funding stakes, Republican candidate John McCain was on the hustling in one
of the most crucial States, Pennsylvania.

But as our North America correspondent Mark Simkin reports from the small town of Shippensburg,
it's his running mate Sarah Palin who is getting most of the attention on and off the stage.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER: Read my lipstick.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 2: That's right.

MARK SIMKIN, REPORTER: These are the true believers, Republicans who are willing to queue for five
hours in bitterly cold conditions.

They love their God, their guns and the woman who embraces both of those things, Sarah Palin.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 3: Everything she's done she's excelled at, whether it be in school, as a
beauty queen, as a PTA member, as the mayor of Wasilla.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 2: We are a Christian nation and we deserve to save our Christian heritage and
our constitution, and that's why I am here today.

ANNOUNCER: Governor Sarah Palin!

MARK SIMKIN: The Alaskan is obviously a huge hit with this crowd, but she's struggling to extend
her appeal beyond the Republican base.

SARAH PALIN, REPUBLICAN VICE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: So, Pennsylvania, will you hire us? Will you
send us to Washington to shake and clean things up? Good!

MARK SIMKIN: Pennsylvania is a crucial battle ground and the Republicans are relying on its small
towns, places where change isn't always welcome and Barack Obama certainly isn't.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 4: I think he's a terrorist, I think he's a Muslim, I think he ought to be
gone.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 5: I am with him, yeah!

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 6: Just look what he took his oath and obligation on. He took it on the Koran.
What's that tell you? He's not an American.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 7: I believe that his true underlying purpose, one of them, is to get the arms
out of American citizens, because then we're an easy target and easy prey for people to come in and
take over.

REPUBLICAN SUPPORTER 8: I mean, dear God, how can we even think of voting for someone that will
allow us to kill our children, our unborn babies?

MARK SIMKIN: For the record, Barack Obama is a Christian, and he does have a lot of support in
Pennsylvania. The Democrat tried to convince the undecided voters over the phone -

BARACK OBAMA, DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: We're going to mark you down as a leaning Obama.

MARK SIMKIN: And rallied his supporters in appalling conditions.

BARACK OBAMA: If we see this kind of dedication on Election Day there is no way that we're not
going to bring change to America.

MARK SIMKIN: Barack Obama is well ahead in the polls, but John McCain and Sarah Palin say they're
going to fool all the pundits.

MARK SIMKIN: Pennsylvania is the only big state won by the Democrats in 2004 that the Republicans
think they can snatch in 2008. In all other battle fields the McCain-Palin ticket is on the
defensive, struggling to stop Republican states turning Democratic.

Increasingly a national election is being fought in just three States: Florida, Ohio and
Pennsylvania.

Mark Simkin, Lateline.