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Ocker films celebrated in Melbourne -

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Ocker films celebrated in Melbourne

Broadcast: 25/07/2008

Reporter: Josie Taylor

They are the Australian films that some would rather forget, but tonight they have been remembered
with great affection at the Melbourne International Film Festival. The 'Ozploitation' movies of the
70s and 80s have been celebrated in the festival's opening film, a new documentary called 'Not
Quite Hollywood'.

Transcript

VIRGINIA TRIOLI, PRESENTER: They're the Australian films that some would rather forget, but tonight
they're being remembered with great affection at the Melbourne International Film Festival.

The Aus-ploitation movies of the '70s and '80s are unapologetically crass and full of ocker energy
and they've just been celebrated in the festival's opening film, a new documentary called Not Quite
Hollywood.

In Melbourne, Josie Taylor reports.

JOSIE TAYLOR, REPORTER: Setting the world on fire. Australian film stars and the local industry are
highly regarded internationally.

But the films Australia used to sell to the world had a different flavour.

GEOFFREY RUSH, ACTOR: We've forgotten that there are hundreds of other films that were dirtier and
nastier and crazier.

JOSIE TAYLOR: In 1970s and '80s, the Australian film industry churned out scores of commercial
films from action, to soft porn, to the ridiculous.

MARK HARTLEY, DIRECTOR: These films were criticised in Australia for being American films, but
people overseas could see something distinctly Australian about them. They knew that there was
something different about the way we shot our cars and about the way we put the landscape and the
bush on screen, which, I think we took very much for granted here.

JOSIE TAYLOR: 10 years ago, Australian director Mark Hartley started work on a documentary about
the films he loves.

MARK HARTLEY: There were no rules. So people just, if they wanted to have a car chase that ended
with a car smashing through a house, they just went out and filmed it. And, I think John Seal says
in the doco, if people got knocked down by a car, you would run over to them, give them a VB and
say, "You alright, mate? Next time we do it, stay a little bit further away from the car." So, I
think there's an energy to these films that possibly isn't there in the films that we make today.

JOSIE TAYLOR: The former music video director struggled to get funding for the film until a
high-powered intervention from Quentin Tarantino.

MARK HARTLEY: I got an email back saying, "Quentin has read your notes from cover to cover and he's
happy to do whatever you need him to do to help you get the project up. Come over and do whatever
you wanna do."

QUENTIN TARANTINO, FILM DIRECTOR: I didn't know they were Aussie genre films until I bought my
ticket and they opened their mouths.

JOSIE TAYLOR: The films might not suit all tastes, but Mark Hartley says there's no need for
embarrassment either.

MARK HARTLEY: One thing that was really important with the doco was to let people view this content
through a '70s mindset rather than a 2008 mindset. 'Cause if you look at it from today's standards,
then possibly everything is offensive in the documentary. But back then, it was

a very different time. Some of the films are not the greatest films of all time and possibly some
of the worst films of all time, but there are reasons to appreciate them in some way.

SANDY GEORGE, FILM JOURNALIST, SCREEN INTERNATIONAL: It's a really good reminder of that diversity
at a time when the whole financing and structure of the industry is sort of under the microscope.
We've just had three government agencies abolished and a new government agency set up from July 1,
and so everybody is looking at the film industry now: what we're making, how we're financing it,
whether it travels, whether Australian audiences want other sorts of cinema. It's a really great
time to look at a film like this and 'cause it helps us to focus our minds on what sort of industry
we want.

JOSIE TAYLOR: Not Quite Hollywood is released nationally next month.

Josie Taylor, Lateline.

VIRGINIA TRIOLI: Well, it's not Picnic at Hanging Rock.