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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) Diplomatic stand-off -

Ecuador grants political asylum

to Julian Assange but Britain

says no way. The British

authorities are under a binding

obligation to extradite him to

Sweden. We must carry out that obligation and of course we

fully intend to do so. This

Program is Captioned Live. South African police open

fire on striking miners,

killing at least seven. Calls

for a crackdown on door-to-door

sellers to prey on the vulnerable. We are very

concerned about this and we now

have a two-pronged strategy to

do all we can to stamp out this

unfortunate behaviour. And a scientific breakthrough brings

the male contraceptive pill one

step closer. Good morning, it's

Friday, 17th August. I'm

Michael Rowland And I'm Karina

Carvalho. The top story on ABC

News Breakfast - the diplomatic

stand-off over Julian Assange

is becoming even more tense. Ecuador has now granted asylum

to the WikiLeaks founder, but

Britain say it is will not give

him safe passage. Foreign

Secretary William Hague says

Britain is legally obligated to

to face sex crime extradite Mr Assange to Sweden

allegations. Mr Assange says

being granted asylum is a significant victory but he is

warning his supporters the

situation will become more

stressful. We can take you now

to London where you can see the

outside of the Ecuadorian

Embassy. There is a police

presence there. They've been

there for many hours now since

the Ecuadorian Foreign Minister

made that announcement

yesterday morning, held that

press conference very early

Australian time yesterday

morning. The Ecuadorian

Government was looking to grant

Julian Assange asylum, but it was concerned about threats

from the British. You can hear

in the background the small but

obviously very vocal group of

pro-Assange protesters outside

the embassy. No sign yet of

British police seeking to go

inside the embassy and seek to

remove Julian Assange. This

diplomatic stand-off could

potentially last weeks, if not correspondent Philip Williams months. Our Europe

has just come back from the

embassy. He joins us live now.

Good morning. Where do we go

from here? That is the big

question because we did have

that stand-off. We have on one

side Ecuador saying they have

granted this immunity, this

asylum and they want him to be

given safe passage out of

Britain to Ecuador. On the

British side, they say, "We're

bound by the laws, the European

laws and British laws. We've

been through the courts here

with Mr Assange," and they have

deemed that through all of

these courts after peel, that,

yes, he must be extradited to

Sweden to face these charges

and they are the laws that they

are going to look at, not the

Ecuadorian situation So, as it

stands right here, right now,

we have him stuck in the

embassy, as he has been for a

couple of months. If he steps

outside he will be arrested and

there is no circuit breaker

that's obvious here and of

course overhanging all of it is

the possible threat of the British enacting rather obscure

legislation from the 1980s that

would allow them to actually

remove the diplomatic cover for

the embassy and move in and

arrest Julian Assange. That

would be an extreme measure,

but it's the implicit threat

hanging over all. But of course

William Hague, who is the

Foreign Secretary, the British

Foreign Secretary has made it

very clear that his hands are

tied, and that the law, as it

stands in Britain, must be

obeyed sna. We are disappointed by the statement

by Ecuador's Foreign Minister

today that Ecuador has offered political asylum to Julian

Assange. Under our law, with Mr

Assange having exhausted all

options of appeal, the British

authorities are under a binding

obligation to extradite him to

Sweden. We must carry out that

obligation and, of course, we

fully intend to do so. The

Ecuadorian Government's

decision this afternoon does

not change that in any way, nor

does it change the current

circumstances in any way. We

remain committed to a

diplomatic solution that allows

us to carry out our obligations

as a nation under the

Extradition Act. It's important to understand that this is not about Mr

about Mr Assange's activities

at WikiLeaks or the attitude of the United States of America.

Is he wanted in Sweden to

answer allegations of serious

sexual offences. At the same

time, Phil, there has been

plenty of pointed criticism from Ecuador over the British Government's stance here? Yes,

they have said that they have

been the victims of bullying tactics by the British. That

threat of effectively of what

they see as an invasion of

their diplomatic immunity, and

they've reacted very strongly

about that. They said the British have been quite

hypocritical, pointing to the

invasion of the British embassy

in Iran in 2011 and the

objections the British had to

that, and then saying well

they're about to be - they're

prepared to do the same here,

to the Ecuadorian Embassy here

in London, so very bad blood

and a serious rift between two

countries that otherwise got on pretty well before that. That's

the diplomatic side, of course.

The legal side, of course s now

being argued and there are two

sides of this, particularly in

Sweden where the Swedish

prosecutors are very

disappointed by this decision.

They say it has no effect on

the actual charges or the

extradition order, and that

that extradition should go ahead. However, Swedish lawyer

who represents Mr Assange Per Samuelson had this to say about

his client. Well, this means

he has been granted political

asylum and that means that

arrest warrant from Sweden can

no longer be affected by Great

Britain and in its turn it

means that the Swedish

prosecutor u in my opinion, must change her attitude

must change her attitude and

immediately go to London and

interrogate Julian Assange at

the embassy of Ecuador, which I

have requested her to do, as

late as two weeks ago, but she

declined to do that. But now

the situation is new again. Mr

Assange's Swedish lawyer. We Assange's Swedish

will find out where this is

going hopefully in the next few

hours. Philip Williams, thank

you. Now here is Karina with

the rest of the morning's news At least seven people have

been killed during fierce

clashes between police and striking miners in South

Africa. Witnesses say police

opened fire after miners

carrying weapons defied an

order to disperse. The platinum

mine has been at the centre of

a violent turf war between

rival unions for the past week.

10 people have died since

tensions boiled over. A Black

Hawke helicopter has crashed in Afghanistan killing four

American soldiers. Taliban

rebels claimed they shot down

the helicopter, but a NATO

spokesman says the cause of the crash is still being

crash is still being investigate. After days of

passionate debate, legislation to reinstate offshore

processing has been passed in

both houses of Parliament. The

Greens were the only party to

vote against it in the Senate.

They failed to win an amendment

placing time limits on offshore detention. The Government has

already despatched a team to

begin setting up temporary

processing centres on man processing centres on man new

and - on Nauru and Manus

and - on Nauru and Manus Island. A birth control pill

for men could be one step close

tore reality. An American

scientist has discovered a

compound which produced fewer

sperm in mice, but it did not

affect their sex drive T could

lead the first reversible

contraceptive since the

invention of the condom. The consumer watchdog is calling

for a crackdown on door-to-door

sellers who prey on the elderly

and vulnerable. The ACCC says

1.3 million sales were made on doorsteps each year. On average, households are

doorknocked eight times a year.

A parliamentary inquiry will

consider the introduction of a do-not-knock register. The Federal Government is very

concerned about the

overprescription of powerful

drugs to dementia patients in

nursing homes. Some aged care

experts have told the ABC that

the practice has led to the

premature deaths of hundreds if

not thousands of elderly people. Minister Mark Butler

has called for an investigation. To finance:

Let's get more on the deadly

clashes in South Africa now. At

least seven people were killed

when police confronted striking

miners. The BBC's Milton Nkosi

filed this report and a

warning, there are some grarfg

scenes. The South African

police opened fire on some of

the striking mine workers

outside the mine. Several

bodies were seen lying on the

ground. GUNFIRE.

The miners, some of whom were carrying machetes and spears,

were demanding a salary

increase from the mine

management. He loen man is the

third largest platinum producer in the world. Police officers

say talks with the leaders say talks with the leaders of the radical Association of Mine

workers and Construction Union

had failed. Violence earlier in

the week had left 10 people

dead, including two policemen.

The mine union leaders denied

instigating the violence. If we

manage to engage management at

Lone man for two years, why

should now we start be labelled

as the union that is

instigating violence at the mine? The South African

Government has condemned the

latest violence and have urged

the law enforcement agencies to

apprehend those responsible for

the carnage. Mine union leaders

and the police are talking to

the miners with the hope to

stop this violence from flaring

up again. We can go to Canberra

now where after days of debate,

legislation to reinstate offshore processing has passed

through both houses of

Parliament. Our political correspondent Melissa Clarke joins us from Parliament House.

Good morning, it was a pretty

late night for the Senate? It

certainly was. The Government

hoped this bill would be passed

through the Senate in the

afternoon, but it didn't happen

until late in the evening. The

debate finally wrapped up and

the amend ment s put forward,

none of those got through, they

only had the support of the

Greens and that's obviously not

enough to getn it in place, so

then Labor and the Coalition

and the Independents voted for

this bill which means it's now

through both houses of the

Parliament. But it was a pretty

passionate debate and we did

have the Greens, although they

weren't successful in getting

their amendments up, they were

successful in probing the

Government and exposing that

there are a lot of unanswered

questions still that this

legislation doesn't cover.

There is no indication as to what sort of facilities asylum

seekers will have available to

them when they are being

processed on Nauru and Manus

Island, that it isn't clear

what the criteria is for exemptions for vulnerable

people that the Immigration

Minister has at his discretion,

and things like the Houston

panel recommended like

guaranteeing access to health

and education services, that's

not in this. So they're not

hopeful of getting any of them

addressed. Getting the

Government support for the

expert panel's package that this will at least stop the flow of boats coming to

Australia? And they're certainly pushing that message

very strongly. This isn't just about convincing the domestic

audience that the Government

has got on top of this issue,

it's also about convincing

asylum seeker whose are

currently in Indonesia and

Malaysia that there is now a

much tougher regime in place

and to discourage them from

getting on boats to try to take

that journey. That that has

caused somedy quiet and

discomfort even within the

Labor benches. Some of the

senators last night were

expressing their discomfort and

saying that these kind of

suggestions doesn't sit well

with them or necessarily with

Labor values, but nonetheless a recognition in supporting it,

that they believe this is the

best way to try to stop people

from risking their lives at sea, so the Government making

that message, trying to be

heard as loudly as possible

across the water to Indonesia

and Malaysia, and trying to get that message to asylum

seekers. With that asylum seeker legislation through the

Parliament, the Opposition

Leader Tony Abbott moved

quickly to pivot the debate back towards the carbon tax,

but as he found out in Parliament yesterday, it's not

necessarily an easy path for

him? It's something that the

Coalition has been doing all

week, even on the first day

back in Parliament with a

Question Time even though the

asylum seeker issue was the No.

1 item on the agenda, was

getting all at tntion in a

political sense and both in the

news media sense as well, Tony Abbott and the Coalition still

came and asked all of came and asked all of their questions in Question Time

about carbon tax and that's a

theme he has continued all week

in this resumption of

Parliament after this six-week

long winter break. It is a

focus on the carbon tax,

accusing the Government of a

breaking of a promise. It's

clearly the way the Coalition

thinks it's still their strongest argument against the

Government, but it certainly

came back to bite him yesterday

with one of the Independents,

Tony Windsor, losing his patience and taking the

opportunity during the

hurly-burly of debate to remind

Tony Abbott that Tony Abbott

had been willing to do anything

to form government, including

selling his arse, as he puts

it. Was apparently the phrase

used in negotiations for

power-sharing, so it's Tony

Windsor reminding Tony Abbott

that during the time of forming government, negotiations are made, and in this case

negotiations about the carbon

tax and carbon pricing with

what was eventually the Labor

minor Government, so Tony Abbott finding the going perhaps a little tougher than

he might have expected earlier

this week. A very colourful

piece of political theatre,

thank you. Very delicately put

by Melissa as well. Very

delicate ly put. To the

country's newspapers, from the

'Financial Review', Treasury

warned the tax revenue bubble

has burst and deep cuts may be

needed to fund Labor's big-ticket spending

promises. 'The Australian' says

South Australia's dumped Labor

Premier Mike Rann will be given

a plum diplomatic posting to

London as thanks for services

to the party The transatlantic

tussle over Australia's most

famous asylum seeker leads the

'Herald Sun'. The National

Australia Bank pro prosed a

rescue plan for Tony Mokbel's

business empire following the

drug baron's arrest in 2001,

reports 'The Age' In a sign

that things may be going

downhill for Nathan tinkler,

the 'Sydney Morning Herald' reveals the entrepreneur

recently tried to off-load his

massive racing and breeding empire. Queensland's Treasurer

tells the 'Courier-Mail' to

expect big hikes in business

tax when he delivers his first

State Budget next month. The

'Daily Telegraph' reports on

the wig-wearing thug who

demanded ah rears from the

widow of slain businessman

Michael McGurk. Prison guards

in the ACT will take a planned

needle exchange program for

inmates to the IR tribunal,

that story from the 'Canberra Times' Adelaide's 'Advertiser'

rips into the State's

drink-drivers including a hard

core group of repeat offenders

caught six or more times over

the past decade. The 'Mercury'

says Tasmanians are set to

enjoy cheaper power after the

Greens back a Labor plan to

open up the energy market. And

just a week out from the

Territory election, an adviser

to the Chief Minister has been

stood down, as the squabble

with the NT news claims its

first scalp. These are the top

stories on ABC News Breakfast

this morning - WikiLeaks

founder Julian Assange remains

stranded in the Ecuadorian ex

Bassey in London after being

granted asylum. Britain say it

is will not grant him safe

passage to Ecuador because it's

legally obl galted to extradite

him to Sweden At least seven

people have been killed during

fierce clashes with police and

striking miners in South

Africa. Witnesses say police

hoped fire after miners

carrying weapons defied an

order to disperse. And the consumer watchdog is calling

for a crackdown on door-to-door

sellers who prey on the elderly

and vulnerable. The ACCC wants

to introduce a "do not knock"

registers to force sellers to

keep away from unwilling

customers. There were

contrasting fortunes for two

financial service giants

yesterday. As the AMP reported

a strong rise in first-half

earnings, profits in the afnlt

SX slipped. More from Neal

Woolrich. It wasn't so much a

tale of two halves for the ASX

but a reasonable first quarter

followed by nine dreadful

months In the first half,

revenue growth of 2.8%

translated into earnings growth

of 2.9%. In the second half, we

saw much softer conditions with

revenues down 5.1% and consequently earnings down

8.6%. All that meant a near 4%

fall in the ASX's full-year

profit and a 3% fall in

underlying earnings after $7

million in relocation costs

were stripped out. Profits were

down in the three of the ASX's

six divisions. Share tradings,

listings and information

services as a slump in activity

took hold. It's actually quite

a good result given the very

difficult market environment we face particularly in the second half. However, the new

financial year isn't looking

much better. July was the worst

trading month since 2005

excludeing each

January. Definitely for the ASX

it will be a tough trading

environment, unless we see a

pretty strong recovery in

equity markets and a return in

investor confidence. To add to

its woes, the ASX is concerned

about the rise of off-market

transactions which made up

between 14 and 43% of all

Australian share trading in the

first half.Le Ma funky Cooper

is urging regulators to do a

careful cost benefit analysis

before any further reforms

which might the aid the rise of

dark pawns Commercial terms

aren't known, it doesn't have

ASIC oversight.

The increase in dark pool

transactions is hurting and that fragmentation of the

market, that sector of the

market is a concern going

forward. AMP's boss Craig Dunn

had more reason to smile after

presiding over a strong

increase in profit over the half-year.

half-year. AMP cut costs by

half. There is no doubt that

the merger has substantially

strengthened and improved our

comp petition tiff position

and we see that coming through the results.

The big plus for AMP is its

drive to crack the self-managed superannuation fund sector.

This is one of the biggest and

fastest growing sector of the Australian superannuation

pool. The contrasting profit

results of the two companies

were reflected in their share

prices with AMP rising 4% and

ASX falling a third of 1%,

however, both are languishing

around half the price they were before the global financial

crisis hit and are

underperforming the local

market over those five years as

well. To other finance news and

FaceBook stocks plunge to a new

low after a ban expired.

FaceBook shares fell around $20

in early trading, well down

from the original $38 a share In May, the social

networking site had one of the most anticipated initial public

stock offerings in history, but

concerns about valuation and

growth prospects have caused

the share price to

tumble. Authorities in the United States want to question

seven banks over the

manipulation of the LIBOR

interbank lending rate. Attorneys-general in New York

and Connecticut have subpoenaed

the banks which slug HSBC,

JPMorgan and Barclays. Last

month British authorities fined

Barclays more than $350 million

for rigging the LIBOR rate. It

was a positive night on the

markets:

Doorknockers - I hate them I

live in an apartment, so I

escape them. So you're immune.

I've just noticed even in the

last six months there has been

a big increase of the people

knocking on my door, usually

around the hours of 4 to 6

selling everything from power

company - signing up to new

power companies, we had Fairfax

selling subscriptions to 'The

Age' not too long ago, all

sorts of people selling all

sorts of things, so much so

that the ACCC is now promising

to crack down on unkrup lows door-to-door sellers who seek

to prey on the vulnerable. It

is even suggesting that this

should be widely applauded.

There you see a "do not knock"

register which would encourage

potential hawkers to turn away from people's doors They're

saying that householders are

doorknocked on average 8 times

a year and $1.3 million sales are made by door-to-door

sellers, but I don't know if

you've ever experienced this,

but the student selling their artwork. I haven't got that

yet Yes, they tend to move

around a lot. I'm sure it's

coming We want you to tell us

about your experiences with

door-to-door sellers. You might

in fact have had a good one. Contact us:

Gloing Let's go to sport now

and Paul Kennedy joins us. Good

morning Good morning. What

about the little girl down the

street who comes to sell her

chocolates for the school

fate? That's fine. Will that be

outlawed? No, I despatched my

daughter a little while

ago What happen fs they get fined. That's a very good

point. What about if you have a

sticker on your door that says

no door-knocking except for a

disclaimer, doesn't that

reflect poorly on you, people

looking at you as a snob? No,

you want to protect your

private time. You don't want to be disrupted.

Isn't it like a no junk mail

sign on your post backs. I

think those people are snob by,

too. Oh, really. I've got one

of these. Do you think I'm a

snob. . We'll take it outside

later, mate. Let's defuse this.

St Kilda will be without Nick Riewoldt for tonight's important match against Geelong. There is Riewoldt

suffering that knee injury

against Melbourne last weekend.

The club was hopeful that he might play for this match

against the Cats, but that's no

good, and despite some

improvement, he still may miss

the rest of the year, but

that's better than what it

looked at that stage last week

because it looked because it looked very structural. And Melbourne's

Liam Jurrah's troubled season

has come to an end. He has

played just one game this year

after a series of injuries and court

court appearances over an

assault charge and Jurrah has

told the club he wants to spend

the rest of the season with his

family in South Australia.

Cricket aution has named the

squads for men's and women's

Twenty20 Cups in Sri Lanka

starting in September and the

teams will be led by Tasmania's

George Bailey and Queenslander

Jodie Fields. John Hayes Bell reports. The selection chairman

might not have been expecting

to be quizzed on Jamaican sprinters. John Inverarity admitted Usain Bolt would come

with benefits. He would

certainly be a drawcard. I

would be hesitant to run two if

he hit one just wide of him to

the boundary. I could imagine he could throw very well, too,

but I think we've got to be

careful that it just doesn't become a novelty event. The

Australian Twenty20 skipper

also has concerns for the local

credibility. Absolutely get product's

them around, but I can't see

any value in them keeping a

proper cricketer out of the

team. The 15-player World Cup

squad includes three front line

spinners - Xavier Doherty,

41-year-old Brad Hogg and uncapped Victorian Glenn

Maxwell. I think we've got a really great blend of

experience, young players,

explosive players, a really

good Twenty20 balanced

squad. The men are ranked a

lowly 9th in the world. The

Southern Star also aim to defend their crown. The two final also be played as a

double-header in Columbo on

October 7th. Now, let's look at

the Wallabies match against the

All Blacks on Saturday night

and the All Blacks arrived at

the airport yesterday and even arriving at the airport they

looked menacing. Sonny Bill

Williams is waiting for a bit

of treatment from the crowd,

maybe. Of course, he will come

back and play for the

rooststers next year, but in

the meantime he is an ya'all

Black and will be in the

centres with Ma'a Nonu and the

Wallabies have a big nob ahead

of them. We will hear from the

coaches Stortly, but we want to

hear from Adam Ashley Cooper

who is two tries short of the

record, but he says he is not

interested in that record. As much as you like to score

tries, it's important that you

go out there and perform your

role first. If you do that and

obviously have the influence on

might have the opportunity to the blokes around you, you

cross the line, but until that

happens I have to if he cuss on

my role and do it well.

Looking at their selections

they've gone with a fairly

experienced pack and so from

what how I see it, it looks

like they will be keen to scrummage out, there but I

think it always comes down to a

few scrums you've seen in

recent years that it's - a few scrums have gone either way for

us. I think for us, we're

pretty excited about it. As a

front-rower, we love

scrummaging and packing against

the best in the business, so

we're up for the challenge. And

Michael, that's all your sport

mail for this morning. No junk

involved there Never any junk from you. Thanks, Paul. Thanks. ABC News

Breakfast can be watched live

on the web.

Just visit the main site at

abc.net.au/news and you will

find a link to News 24 which is

streamed live every day Vanessa

is here with the weather now.

Good morning, Vanessa. Good

morning. Not the best news with

you are in the south-east, lots

of rain and cloud, but very

cold weather as we head into

the weekend. A low pressure

system is tracking over

Victoria and into New South

Wales, this is drawing a pool

of cold air and moisture from

the Southern Ocean and by

tonight that will reach as high

as the New South Wales

Tablelands, turning rain into

snow and falling around 1,200m.

Today ski resorts are looking

at around 15-30cm and a further

5-15 tomorrow. Tomorrow that

low will move across the Tasman

Sea, and so from Sea, and so from Sunday condition also be perfect on the

the slopes. Around the States today:

This program is not subtitled

The heavier rainfalls will

be up in the north-west. Could

see around 25mm. temperatures

are cold:

. You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. Still to come on the

program - inside PR chief and

former editor of 'The Age' Mike

Smith joins us for the morning

paper review. What's next for

Assange? We'll ask international law expert Don

Rothwell if he is likely to

make it to Ecuador. And it's

David versus Goliath at the

supermarkets - are wool.

Woolworths and Coles killing

off the Independents off the Independents with

Masters grocers calling for a

fairer go. First here is the

news with Michael Leading the

news this morning the

diplomatic stand-off over

Julian Assange becoming even

more teps. Ecuador has now

granted asylum to the WikiLeaks

founder, but Britain say it is

won't give him safe passage.

Foreign Secretary William Hague

says Britain is legally

obligated to ex-dra tight Mr

Assange to Sweden to face sex

crime allegations. At least

seven people have been kill ed

at a striking mine in South

Africa. Witnesses say police

opened fire after miners carrying weapons defied an

order to disperse. The Marikana

platinum mine north of

Johannesburg has been at the

centre of a violent turf war

between rival unions for the

past week. A NATO spokesman

says the cause of a helicopter

crash in Afghanistan is still

being investigated. After days

of passionate debate

legislation to reinstate offshore processing has been

passed in both houses of Parliament. The Greens were the

only party to vote against it

in the Senate. They failed to

win an amendment placing limits

on offshore detention. A birth

control pill for men could be

one step closer to reality.

American scientists have

discovered a compound that may

offer the first effective

hormone-free treatment. When

mice were given the compound,

they produced fewer sperm, but

it didn't affect their sex drive. Ecuador may have

officially granted asylum to Julian Assange but he still has

to work out a way of getting

there. The WikiLeaks founder is

currently stranded in Ecuador's

embassy in London as he avoids

British authorities and

extradition to Sweden. From

outside the Assange hideout, here is Europe correspondent

Philip Williams. This is the

news that those supporters of

Julian Assange who had gathered

here in quite substantial

numbers here had hoped to hear.

The whole hear is filled with

media, with his supporters and

police. Earlier there were

arrests when they tried to

clear them away from the front

of the embassy, but, yes, it

does appear now that he will be granted the sanctuary that he

had hoped, but that's in

another country, that's in

Ecuador. He is here, and the

question remains that it

doesn't really matter

theoretically what is done in

theoretically what is done in

keto. To actually get him there

is virtually impossible,

because the most he steps

outside these embassy doors he

will be arrested. The Foreign

Minister is highly critical of

the British Government, citing

the invasion of the British

Embassy in at the rain in 2011

saying, "Well, they're prepared

to do the same thing right here

behind me to get Julian Assange

out of here." So we still have

an impasse. We have the result

that perhaps was expected

because there is a great deal

of antagonism now between these

two governments, about you in

practical terms, Julian Assange

remains behind me and with no

real way out to get to Ecuador

and so in effect the impasse remains. Europe correspondent

Philip Williams outside the

Ecuadorian Embassy. Well,

Britain has moved swiftly to

defend its position and its

handling of this situation .

Let's hear from the British Foreign Secretary William Hague.

We're disappointed by the

statement by Ecuador's Foreign

Minister today that Ecuador has

offered political asylum to

Julian Assange. Under our law,

with Mr Assange having

exhausted all options after

peel, the British authorities

are under a binding obligation

to extradite him to Sweden. We

must carry out that obligation

and of course we fully and of course we fully intend

to do so. The Ecuadorian

Government's decision this

afternoon does not change that

in any way, nor does it change

the current circumstances in

any way. We remain committed to a diplomatic solution that

allows us to carry out our

obligations as a nation under

the Extradition Act. It's

important to understand that

this is not about Mr Assange's

activities at WikiLeaks or the

attitude of the United States

of America. He is wanted in

Sweden to answer allegations of

serious sexual offences. That's the British Foreign Secretary

William Hague. Well, let's get

more now on the violent clashes

between police and striking

miners in South Africa. We're

now joined by Africa

correspondent Ginny Stein from

Johannesburg. Just take us

through what's prompted these

clashes? Look, it's been going on for

on for the past week that we've

seen violence played out in

that area. When I went out

there this morning it was

before the police arrived en

masse and when we're talking

about en masse, it's more than

3,000 police ringed the area

where the miners were. We have

seen in the past little while a

dispute over wages, low-paid

miners wanting more money, and

two unions competing to

represent the workers. So there

has been a clash at a high

level and unexpected or - level and unexpected or - well,

desires not met on the part of

the miners. So, with the

clashes today, the police

warned before they came out

that this had Wen. There were

10 deaths during the week, a security guard, policeman and

mine workers had all been

killed so it was heading toward

a showdown today and that's

exactly what happened. We can

see there water tanks being

brought in and the heavy police

presence. Those are the

pictures that we're running.

Just take us through the latest

figures on the death

toll? Police aren't giving

absolute figures just yet, but

we dough know it could be as

high as 20, it could go even

higher than that. It is the

middle of the night effectively

now and there is no way to

check any further in that area,

but police have not said how

many. They have said that there

are a number of people in

hospital who have very serious

injuries. We did see ambulances

taking people away. We saw

bodies being taken away, but we're not sure of the total

death toll as yet. Ginny, how has the South African Government responded? The

response has been one saying

that - of dismay that this is

taking place, but that it was a

hard line that went into it.

There had been so many deaths,

so many murders in the lead-up

to this. This was a heavily

armed population of protesters

who had gathered there, who had

refused to give up weapons, so

the government, its position

going into this was one very much of a hardline

approach. Ginny, is there any

sense that this situation will

be resolved soon? Resolved in

the sense that there is quiet

tonight, but not resolved in

the sense that it's going away

anywhere soon. The workers

still have their grievances

on-the-table and violence may

not necessarily bring a result.

It may stop things for the

moment, but it doesn't put an

end to things. Ginny Stein in

Johannesburg, thanks for your time The consumer watchdog

wants to crack down on

unscrupulous door-to-door

sellers. On average, households

are doorknocked eight times a

year. A parliamentary inquiry

will consider the introduction

of a "do not knock" register.

The ACCC chairman Rob Sym says

the elderly and those who do

not speak English are

particularly vulnerable What we

found is that door-to-door

selling is quite prominent. 1.3

million sales made. The average

home in Australia gets

doorknocked 8 times a year, but the disturbing thing was the

number of times that we found that people weren't following

the rules set out in the ACL

for unsolicited selling like

when you call and identifying

yourself, secondly that people

were misleading consumers about exactly why they were knocking

on their door, and most

disturbingly we found that

people were singling out the

door-to-door sellers were

singling out vulnerable

consumers. This accords

completely with our own

findings we've had in other spheres, particularly in the

energy sector where we do a lot

of work with the energy

Ombudsman and we have found

extremely bad behaviour and

we've had industry on notice

about this for some time.

They're vulnerable because

they're elderly, non-English

speaking background, they're

vulnerable in that way. Of course they're more likely to

be home, so they get confused and sometimes they get told

quite misleading things. In

energy, for example, we've had

customers told that their company has just been sold and

so their contract will expire,

so unless they want to avoid their electricity their electricity getting

turned off, they better sign

up, stories like that, that

really give people - people

feel they've got no choice but

to sign up. We've also had

cases outside the electricity

sector, a very high pressure

selling tactics, sellers not

wanting to leave the home until

they make the sale. We take very

very seriously this sort of

behaviour against vulnerable

consumers, and, as I say, we

are going to do all we can to make sure it's stamped out. ACCC chairman Rob Sims

there. We've been asking for

your thoughts on this and we've

had so many responses already,

quite staggering. Amazing. Chuck boat

on Twitter says, "Not a fan of

doorknockers who try to sell me

cable television even though I

already have it." That's a

very good point. Col has

tweeted, "It's surprising how

effective a deterrent a effective a deterrent a couple

of big dogs are. I don't get

bothered by doorknockers at

all." Monty says they can't

get the "do not call register

to work. Best of luck." That

is so true. We still get calls

from canvassers at completely inappropriate hours selling

stuff. We tell them we've on

the do not call register, and they don't seem to be

bothered. We want to know your

thoughts on this. Contact us:

Now p it's all happens on

the floor of the House of Representatives yesterday.

Independent MP Tony Windsor

launched a furious attack on the Opposition Leader in

Federal Parliament. He claims

Tony Abbott would have been

willing to do almost anything, including introducing a carbon

tax to win the Independents'

support after the last

election. The decision to do

something about climate change,

whether it be through an

emissions trading scheme or a

carbon pricing arrangement,

about you to put a price on

carbon, was a condition of the

formation of government. Now, the Leader of the Opposition knows that very well because on

a number of occasions he

actually begged for the job,

begged for the job. You've

never denied it, Tony. You've

never denied t Tony and you

won't. He begged for the job

and he made the point not only

to me but to others that were

in that negotiating period that

he would do anything to get

that job, anything to get that

job. And you would... (Members

heckling) And you would well

remember and your colleagues

should be aware that the only

Cotter sal that you put on that

is, "I will do anything, Tony

to get this job. The only thing

I wouldn't do is sell my arse."

Very strong words indeed. Not

the first time Tony Windsor has

made that allegation about

those very intense negotiations

after the election, but what

struck many was the sheer

ferocity with which he made

those comments to the floor of

Parliament yesterday. Tony

Abbott has said meanwhile that

he never was prepared to contemplate a carbon tax. This

is what he said on network TV

this morning. The interesting

thing here is that Tony Windsor

has changed his story. Back in

October 2010 he said that I

didn't want it enough. Now he

says that I wanted it too much, but self-evidently one thing I

wasn't prepared to do was to

put in a carbon tax. I wasn't

prepared to breach a

pre-election commitment which

the Prime Minister

self-evidently was. Tony Abbott

and Tony Windsor - it's a he

said-he said situation. You are watching ABC News Breakfast.

These are the top stories:

WikiLeaks founder Julian

Assange remains stranded in the

Ecuadorian Embassy in London

after being granted asylum. Mr

Pp p At least seven people have

been killed during fierce clashes between police and striking miners in South Africa. Witnesses say police

opened fire after miners

carrying weapons defied an

order to disperse. The consumer

watchdog is calling for a

crackdown on door-to-door

sellers who prey on the elderly

and vulnerable. The ACCC wants

to introduce a do-not-knock

register to force sellers away

from unwilling customers. Those

comments keep coming in on

doorknocking. " Yes, please, I

would especially like religious

outfits to stop doorknocking.

Complete nuisance. Mind you, I

live in the Blue Mountains and

it is a 10km climb to my front

door, so these people are

punished before they get to my

door." Very good point That's

a quite significant deterrent

there. Yes, get a house on a

steep hill and own two big dogs

and you're fine That sounds

like a plan. For a look at the

national newspapers this

morning we're joined by former

'The Age' newspaper editor and chief executive of inside PR

Mike Smith. Good morning.? Good morning. Good Good morning. Good morning. It

almost seems like the London

Olympics were a long time ago

and a distant memory, but the

first time we've seen you since

they ended.

Yes, I was lucky enough to be

in London and I was there

during one of London's finest hours. London is sparkling,

happy, proud, it's efficient.

They've really pulled off the

Games in a big way, and the

London papers are joyous in

quoting Australian newspapers

and Cornes saying it was better

than Sydney, but they really

did a great job. And while you

were there, you were struck by

a particular story in a particular story in the Telegraph involve Sebastian

Coe, the leader er of the Games

over there? Yes, one of the

nicest stories of the Games. A

huge part of the success of the

Games waa the volunteers, just

like it was in Sydney and

London unashamedly admits that

it stolen the volunteer concept

from Sydney and built on it and

improved on it. Seb Coe who was

the Games chief organiser, one night last week, the night

after Britain's biggest night

in athletics, three gold

medals, he jumped on a Tube

train and he saw a volunteer on

the Tube train and went up to

him and said, "Thank you for

helping. This is a really great

part of the Games." And the volunteer turned to Lord Coe

and said, "No, I want to thank

you." That volunteer was a

doctor who worked in London on

the night of the terrorist

attack which happened seven

years ago, the night after the

London Games were awarded by

the IOC to London, and that

incident coloured Britain's

attitude to the Games for

years, but this volunteer stood

up to Lord Coe and said, "I

want to thank you because I've

now got closure. I've seen the

worst of mankind and I've seen

the best of mankind and now

it's equalised and I feel happy

and fulfilled." Amazing

coincidence What a marvellous Olympic story.

Fantastic. And you have some

pictures as well? Yes, look, I

couldn't resist doing my first

restaurant review when I was in

London. I spent 25 years in

newspapers and never wrote a

restaurant review and regretted

it, but I couldn't resist in

London because in London there

was a special dining vant by

the restaurant that has been

voted the best in the world for

the last two years, the Copenhagen-based Noma restaurant. Renee restaurant. Renee Redzeppi His

place is closed for renovations

this month so he took up a

pop-up resident in a ballroom

at Claridges, As one does It

was the hottest ticket in town

after the beach volleyball. They opened it up for

expressions of interest and got

11,000 expressions of interest.

When they opened it up for real books, they sold out in less

than three hours. Weren't too

many antsy diners. Noma

specialises in forage food,

food which you dig up and we

were given a map about where

everything had come from, where

everything had been dug up

from. They introduced us to the

meal with small meal with small terracotta

pot-plant, everything edible

except for the terracotta, even

the soil. And but that didn't prepare us for the next course

which was live ants. Live

what? Live ants, imported from

Jetlan where there is an ant

farmer who puts a glass straw

into the ground and sucks them

up. What's the taste, what's

the texture? Well, I spoke to

the chef and he said it has the

same chemical compounds and

taste as lemongrass. Right And

they serve them on the lettuce

leaves and they put them in

quick sand to stop them getting

away. It's the world's most

expensive quick sand, a little

dollop of double-clotted cream

from Cornwall to stop them

getting away. Lemongrass - I

think I tasted lemongrass in

the same way you taste black

berry and apricot when your

waiter tells you it's in the

wine. What was it like Ants

are taking off. I didn't pick

this up from the res strabt,

but this was from... An ant

lollipops This was from one of

the upmarket food stop shops.

Ants are taking off.

How would your kids go if

they were given one of those? They would probably have

a go Oh, really It looks like

something out of one of my

grandkids 'sandpit. I know I

didn't can't mention brand

names on the ABC but I did have

to ache an ant acid after

that. Yes, often do after

meals like that. And now to the

story in 'The Age' The big

story is that of Julian Assange

and you're covering that

comprehensively this morn pg. A

couple of good gotcha stories

of the 'The Age' has a story

that while Australia has been

basking in the international

accolades of stopping big tobacco and winning the High

Court case for plab packaging,

it turns out that Australia's

taxpayer-funded Future Fund has

been investing in tobacco

companies for years. The

problem is they're returning

15, 16%, much better than the average.

And their share prices have

gone up huge amounts in the

last year and haven't really

been affected about I this High

Court decision Yes t did dip a

little yesterday, about tu will

be interesting to find out what

the story is. The other big

story is that drugs boss Tony

Mokbel, it has been discovered

in court documents, his empire

has been underwritten by loans

from the National Australia

Bank who was vouching for him

after being arrested on some charges. We're not quite sure

whether the NAB knew he had con

visions but he built his empire

based on loans from big banks

and put $10 million of

deposits, mostly cash, Gives a

new term to the definition "bad

debt." How reckon do you think

the NAB spinners would have

been busy yesterday They will

be busy for a while on that

one! Turning to another story

from the 'Herald Sun'? Yes,

I've been reading this story

for nearly 40 years, a male

pill on the horizon. In fact, I

think I may have written the

first one in 1975 when first one in 1975 when a

Melbourne husband-and-wife team

fed a mix of vitamins to

patients and found that it had

a contraceptive effect on males. The problem was their trials were halted after it was found they aren't got

regulatory approval. But around

the world they have been

working on a male pill for a

long time and two problems -

one, it has the opposite effect

of a performance-enhancing drug

and, two, will women believe it

when men say they're on the

pill? Well, it's not even

that, it's will men remember to

even take it? Yes, that's a

good point. Exactly. This

technique that they've

announced yesterday, apparently

it stops the sperm swimming

without affecting the sex

drive. Yes, of mice, but how do

you detect the sex drive in

mice, though? Well, apparently

their re-product tiff systems

are quite similar, work in a

very similar way. They seem very different to me.

(Laughs?. ( Some men can be

rats, of course, in more ways

than one Oh, that was a good

one. But it seems as though

it's still a long way off. At

least a few years. Every time

one of these stories comes up

it's a few years before it's

ready for market and it has got

to go through a lot of human

trials and who knows what

hurdle it is will

encounter. What will you do

with your ant lollipop, keep it

as a souvenir? I think I will

keep it as a souvenir. It got

through Customs. I think if

anybody sucked that, there may

be a quarantine issue. Ly have

a go. Be my guest. Get into

the lemongrass. Dew want

to... New York I won't eat it.

Thrang you very much and we

promise to give it back to

you. Thank you. Would you eat that? No. No? Only if I was drinking. Good point. I don't

do much drinking these

days. I'm pretty sure that

wouldn't be the first thing you

would reach for if you were

drinking. New York only as a

dare. Shall we take a look at

the sport? Yes. Nick Riewoldt

won't be playing tonight,

injuring his knee last week.

There were concerns he might

miss a full year and this week

they thought he might get back

in time for the Geelong match.

It won't happen, but the Saints

will have to play at their very

best to beat the Cats and keep

their season alive. At

Melbourne, Liam Jurrah's

troubled season has come to an

end. He has told the club he

wants to go back to South

Australia and then take a short

break and then resume for next

season. He has had a terrible

time of it this year and also

that's on the field and that's on the field and also spent time in the courts as

well with an assault charge to

face . The All Blacks are in

town for the Bledisloe Cup on

Saturday night. The Wallabies

say that they're not fearful of

the All Blacks, just very respectful and Sonny Bill

Williams getting a lot of press

this week. It's the coaches who

have had a bit to say as well.

We might talk about that in the

next half-hour, but very

briefly Sally Pearson will come

home this weekend. She had

determined after the Olympics

to go and finish the

professional season. She was

going to be the big star at the Stockholm Diamond League meet

at the week end, but she has

put the kybosh on that and she

is coming home. Good on

her Good on her, indeed. Thanks, Paul. Vanl with the

weather now. Heavy snow falls

and potentially damaging south

westerly winds. By Sunday the

low will shift towards New

Zealand, allowing a high pressure system into the

south-east. That same high has cleared the dies in Western

Australia - well, most of them

anyway. It has cleared most of

the rain away as it tracks over

South Australia. In Queensland

today:

Diplomatic stand-off -

Ecuador grants asylum to Julian

Assange but Britain says no way. The British authorities

are under a binding obligation

to extradite him to Sweden. We

must carry out that obligation

and of course we fully intend

to do so. This Program is

Captioned Live.

South African police open

fire on striking miners,

killing at least seven. Calls

for a crackdown on door-to-door

sellers who prey on the

vulnerable. We are very

concerned about this and we now

have a two-pronged strategy to

try and do all we can to stamp

out this unfortunate

behaviour. And a scientific

breakthrough brings the male

contraceptive pill one step closer. . Good morning you're watching ABC News Breakfast on

Friday, 17th August. I'm Karina

Carvalho. Coming up shortly,

what next for Julian Assange?

We'll be asking international

law expert Professor Don

Rothwell if the WikiLeaks

founder can avoid extradition

to Sweden. And searching for

the elusive platypus. Well, I

can't promise to urn up a

platypus on cue. It has

happened a couple of tiles.

I've been telling people, "You

won't see' platypus," and one

turns up, but we haven't

trained them well enough

yet. Our reporter Allison jes

was out with one platypus

watcher. Did she capture one?

You will have to watch. I want

to know what her bill was. The

diplomatic stand-off over

Julian Assange has become even

more tense. Ecuador has granted

political asylum to the WikiLeaks founder but WikiLeaks founder but Britain

say it is won't give him safe

passage out of the country.

William Hague says Britain is

bind to extradite him to

Sweden. Witnesses say police

opened fire after miners in

South Africa carrying weapons

defied orders to disperse. The

Marikana platinum mine has been

the place for tontions over the

past week. A Black hawk

helicopter has crashed in

Afghanistan killing civilians

and Americans. A NATO spokesman

says the cause of the crash is

still being investigated. After

days of passionate debate,

legislation to reinstate

offshore processing has been

passed through both houses of

Parliament. The Greens were the

only party to vote against it

in the Senate. They failed to

win an amendment placing time

limits on offshore detention.

The Government has already

despatched a team to begin

setting up temporary p