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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) Another boat is intercepted

as MPs prepare to reinstate

offshore processing. The time

for politicking about this is

at an end. The time for action

is here. This Program is

Captioned Live. WikiLeaks

founder Julian Assange close to being offered asylum in Ecuador. Judgment day - the

High Court to rule on the

Federal Government's plain

packaging laws. And dozens

killed in a wave of suicide

bombings in Afghanistan. Good

morning, it's Wednesday, 15th August. I'm Michael

Rowland. And I'm Karina

Carvalho. The top story on

brake brake - the Government is

hoping that legislation to revive offshore processing of

asylum seeker also be passed

today. MPs will continue

debating the amendments after a

marathon session last

night. Meanwhile, the Navy has

intercepted what could be the

first boat to be processed on

Nauru or Manus eye lands. About

70 asylum seekers have been pigged up east of Ashmore

Island. The Government say s

any will be processed offshore

once this legislation is

passed. Good morning, Melissa

claek. When will the

legislation be passed? The

Government is hoping by the end

of today, but at the moment it's looking a little

optimistic, because the

Coalition is taking every

opportunity it has to rub in

the Government's face that it

has done something of a backflip. The Government would

like to limit the number of speaks and get this through by

today but the Coalition is

making sure that any of its MPs

that want to speak on this

issue can, and at the moment

we're looking at something like

40 to have their say. Plenty more to speak today and those

speaker lists often change

throughout the day. There is

amendment frts Coalition, the

Greens are likely to try to put

up amendment,s so it means the

Government will push hard if it wants to get this through by

the end of today. And

meanwhile, a lot of discussion

on just how long asylum seekers will stay on Nauru? Yes, and this no-advantage test, the

idea that people have to wait

on Nauru or Manus Island for

the same amount of time as if

they were in a third country or

if this he had stayed in

Indonesia because that has

raised the prospect of people

being held potentially for

years, and advocates the likes

of Patrick McGorry has concerned. He told Lateline he

would like it see a guarantee,

a maximum amount of time that

people could be held for as a

way of giving people hope that

there is an end to this in

Lateline last night. sight. This is him speaking to

To make sure the environment

is much more positive. I think

a key recommendation is to have

a rolled gold guarantee on the

maximum duration of detention,

and I think the Coalition in

the past has actually supported

that, that upper limit on

length of detention, so surely

that's a possible point of agreement between the

Government and the Coalition to

protect mental health. Patrick

McGorry there, being

optimistic, hoping for some

consensus politically about an

upper limit, but that may be a

little too optimistic because

the Opposition is making clear that not only are they happy

with the idea of a no-advantage

test, they are prepared to see

asylum seekers stay even longer

on Nauru or Manus Island or

another place where they would

be processed offshore. Here is

Scott Morrison speaking to '7:30' on the same issue.

Understand, a no-advantage

principle which we support but

we've gone further than that in

the past to a disadvantage

principle means that those who

are waiting in places around

the world get first call, and

if you do plan to come to

Australia by boat under this

policy, then you will go to

Nauru where you are visa ed and

you are not in a detention centre, you are in a processing

island and that's where you centre, you can move around the

will be. Scott Morrison there.

Melissa, this debate over

asylum seekers stops thankfully

in the eyes of many for at

least a couple of hours this

morning when both the Prime

Minister and the Opposition

Leader welcome home the

Australian Olympians. Yes, a

bit of a flashback. If you

thought the Olympics were over,

with Australia's Olympic team not yet, still the celebrations

touching back down at Sydney

Airport this morning where of course both the Prime Minister

and Opposition Leader will take

the opportunity to be seen

alongside some gold, silver and

bronze medals, not

surprisingly, so a little bit

of light respite before the battle resumes in Parliament

this morning disglx indeed.

Melissa Clarke, we will get

back to you later on. ABC News

Breakfast will also be at the

airport to usher in those

Olympians. We will be having

live coverage of their arrival

in about two hours' time. But

first here is the rest of the

day's news with Karina. Britain's 'Guardian' newspaper says officials have

confirmed that Julian Assange's

request has been granted to

have asylum in Ecuador on

humanitarian grounds. He is

trying to avoid extradition to

questioning about sexual Sweden where he is wanted for

assault allegations. Tobacco

companies are waiting on the

results today of a High Court

challenge over plain packaging

laws N December, Australia will

become the first country to ban

all logos, branding and text

from cigarette packets. Tobacco companies have argued that the

law is unconstitutional because

it removes their right to brand

a legal product. The Attorney-General Nicola Roxon

says the law is designed to protect lives, not

profits. Suicide bombers have

killed dozens of people and

injured many more in a wave of

attacks in Afghanistan. The

first was in a busy marketplace

in the south-west of the

country where 30 people were

killed. Shortly after 12 people

died when more explosions then

ripped through a shopping

district in the north. Many of

the victims were shopping for

celebrations to mark the end of

the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Syria's former Prime

appearance since defecting to Minister has made his first

Jordan last week. Riad Hijab

says the Assad regime now

controls 30% of the country. He

says the Syrian Government is

collapsing morally, financially

and militarily, and he has

called on officials and

military leaders to follow his

lead and join the revolution.

The UN now estimates that more

than 200,000 refugees have fled

Syria. Another aftershock has

caused panic in Iran just days

after two powerful earthquakes

killed more than 300 people. Meanwhile, rescuers have pulled

two survivors from the rubble

of their home north of Tabriz.

The pair are reported to be in

good health. Thousands of good health. Thousands of quake

victims in makeshift camps as

hospitals struggle to cope with

the injured. A man has been injured following another

shooting in Sydney. Officers

closed off a street in Bankstown last night after

witnesses reported hearing

gunshots. A short time later a 23-year-old man turned up at a

nearby hospital with a bullet

wound to his leg. Police are

continuing their

investigation. Let's take a

quick look at finance:

Let's get more now on the

High Court's decision due this

morning on whether Australia

can go ahead with the world's

first plain packaging laws for cigarettes. Big tobacco

companies are arguing the come

pults ri olive green boxes

breach trademark rules and are

unconstitutional. Kerrin Binnie

reports. Smoking kills. 15 to

you people die each year from

smoking-related illnesses. The

Federal Government wants to

reduce that and in April 2010

announced it would force

cigarettes into plain packages.

Parliament passed the

legislation last year with

bipartisan support. And about

with the introduction of these

plain packaging it will be plainly obvious for everybody

to see the harm that can be

caused from smoking. The dull

packages are supposed to reduce

at tract tiffness and highlight

the dangers of smoking. Like

any other company with a

well-known brands that have invested billions of dollars

in, we will be pursuing that

legal action. They launched a

legal challenge in December.

The case was heard by the Full

Bench of the High Court in

April. British American

Tobacco, Phillip Morris,

Imperial Tobacco and Japan

Tobacco say the laws are

unconstitutional. You may unconstitutional. You may not

have sympathy for us, but the

principles are the same, you can't just take people's

properties. Snoot properties. Snoot tobacco

companies are trying to protect

their profits, that's their

business. We're trying to

protect people's lives. The

Attorney-General is banking on a win

We are very confident that we

have taken careful advice that

we have a strong case. The High

Court will hand down its

decision this morning. The

plain packaging laws are

schedule to take effect in

December. It's not just the

Federal Government awaiting the outcome. Several other

companies are keeping a close

eye on the case, contemplating

a ban of their own. And ABC

News 24 will be live at the

High Court at 10:30 eastern

time this morning for that

judgment said which will have

implications not just on

Australia, but tobacco

companies worldwide. Yes, it

will, and even India is looking

at what happens in Australia to

see whether they will see whether they will introduce similar laws there because, of course, in developing

countries, in big populated

countries like Indonesia and

India smoking rates continue to

rise. We will be discussing the

issue further as well on this

program this morning. Health

expert Rob Moodie joins us to

argue the yes case as to why

cigarettes should be plain

packaged. To South Australia now where that State's

Opposition Leader is fending

off talk that she's about to

lose her job Isobel Redmond

says she's confident she has

the full support of her MPs and

is determined to lead the

Liberal Party to the next

election. She immediately took

aim at media speculation Not

one member has named one men of

the parliamentary team that is

trying to pull a spill against

me. Her media adviser Nick

Nolan, but Ms Redmond refused to comment

to comment on what she said was

an internal matter. Ms Redmond

reserved her anger for a

journalist That was about the

outrageous allegation. That is absolutely unequivocally

untrue. And she defended her

judgment in admitting she had

considered a Senate position

and supporting a beaten

candidate in the ensuing ballot. And

ballot. And I know that there

are people here who consider

that they show a lack of

political judgment, but quite

frankly I've thought about them

considerably and I would make

exactly the same calls on those

issues again. Some have

suggested the threat could be

from outside. One person

suggested is Ian Smith, a

former Liberal staffer and now public relations

consultant According to the

only person I know who spoke to

him, the talk was not taking

over the leadership but about

running for the Liberal Party r

Liberal Party. But Mr Smith says the conversation went

further. I've been asked to consider standing for

Parliament and Po Texly down

If you would like to join

the conversation: The asylum

seeker debate will continue in Parliament today and the

Government looking to have that

legislation passed this week,

so that processing centres can

be opened on Nauru and PNG by

the middle of next

month. That's right. We will

also be exploring in-depth as

well that pending High Court

decision on plain packaging of

cigarettes. We've tossed it

around a fair bit on the show

over the last couple of years

but it is still a live as issue

as it has been, so you can

contact us on that as well:

Let's take a quick look at the weather around the country:

These are the top stories on

ABC News Breakfast - the

Government is hoping that

legislation to revive offshore

processing of asylum seeker

also be passed today.

Meanwhile, the Navy has

intercepted what could be the

first boat to be processed on

Nauru or Manus

Island. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should learn

soon if he has been granted

asylum in Ecuador. Ecuadorian

officials have reported to have

confirmeded that his request

will be accepted on humanitarian grounds. An

official statement is expected

any day now. The High Court

will today rule on a challenge

to cigarette plain packaging

due to come into force in

December. Tobacco companies

have taken the Government to

court because they say the new

laws are unconstitution al. The first person jailed under readvised anti-bikie laws in New South Wales is set to be released. Charlie Foster, a 21-year-old 21-year-old disability pensioner has had his sentence

overturned due to flaws in the

police case. Sean

Rubinsztein-Dunlop reports. For

Trisha Harrison, even a victory

in court is a mixed

blessing. It's awful. I hate

seeing him, and I can't be

where he is and look after

him. Her son, Charlie Foster,

was jailed for up to 12 months

under a new offence outlawing

communication with criminals.

The 21-year-old was an unlikely

first target of new laws aimed

at ending Sydney's bikie wars.

He was convicted of consorting

with three friends and

housemates. He was locked up in

the same cell for three days

with a person that he was

actually charged for consorting

with. The Armidale District

Court set aside his conviction

after prosecutors told the

judge police had never proven

the charge was legal. His

lawyer who has run the appeal

usually represents bikies. He has an intellectual disability,

he is on a disability pension.

Is he not involved with

organised crime or outlaw

motorcycle clubs, yet he has

been targeted. Wayne bass ki

says he is prepared to take the

fight all the way to the High

Court It is too important piece

of legislation that affects too many

many people's lives and as

we've just seen with Charlie

Foster, it won't be limited in

any sense to organisationed

crime or criminal members of

outlaw motorcycle clubs, a

piece of legislation for police

to target anybody they don't

like. Four Sydney bikies are

also fighting consorting

charges, and more than 100

people have been warned,

including here near Armidale in

the town of Tingo. Got a

criminal record, marijuana,

spoking marijuana. That's about

it. This Indigenous pig hunter

also has been intellectual

disability. He says he has been

warned for consorting with

three family friends including

his daughter's godmother at the

local servo. I pulled up and

told her about my young nephew's little baby boy

getting rushed to hospital and

then that afternoon the police

was out, beside me. The Premier is reselfing his judgment Until

such time there is an adverse

finding by the court or the

imagine stracy, I will continue

to have my confidence in the

law and its operation.

I'm confident this

legislation is being used

appropriately, yes. Charlie

Foster's mother is looking

forward to seeing him

again Probably just melt into

his arms. Just kiss him and

love him and take him home. He

will be released next month

after serving time for other offences. Three top chief

executives have executives have recently

revealed they will forego

bonuses worth millions of

dollars because their companies

simply have failed to live up

to expectations and as Andrew

Robertson reports, the

two-strikes rule has been given

much of the credit. For years company boards thought they could ignore reality and

performance when it came to

lavishing millions on

executives. The two-strikes

rule, it seems, is changing

that I think it has made public

company boards probably really

aware of how strong the feeling

is against excessive executive

remuneration. Last year , more

than 100 companies received a

first-strike of more than 25%

of votes cast against their

remuneration report. A second

strike of 25% no vote this year

will see whole boards thrown

out, which is why corporate

governance expert Martin

Laurence says directors are now

talking more directly to their shareholders but more importantly listening. What

we've seen in the last couple

of years and two-trike strikes

is part of it, is intellectual

shareholders have been a lot

more willing to tell boards

what they think of the sirgs

and boards and CEOs are been really trying to demonstrate

that they get the point. A case

in point is BlueScope Steel.

Last year it suffered a 40%

vote against a remuneration

report which included a

$700,000 bonus for a chief

executive who had provided over

a billion-dollar loss. Shareholders have found

it difficult to accept it difficult to accept some

pretty challenging targets

which were met by management on

the one hand and the poor share price and shareholder

experience on the other. This

year the company is treading wearly. There will be another billion-dollar loss, but

BlueScope is on the front foot,

already announcing there will

be no bonus for chief executive

Paul O'Malley We've been

through a very tough time. I'm

accountable for the business performance. It's the right

thing to do. It's also the

right thing to do to keep the

board in place. University of Queensland corporate governance

expert Professor Julie Walker

says no-one wants to be the

first to receive a second

strike on pay because no-one

knows how it will play

out. What happens to the

strategic plan, for example, if

there is a spill of the board?

Is everything just held in

obeyance? Who is making the

decisions under those circumstances? What will be the

share price impact of a second

strike and a spill of the

board? I can only think that it

would be bad news. Professor

Walker says concern for their reputation

reputation will also be a key

motivator driving boards to

avoid the second strike,

however, ownership matters

Martin Laurence says for some

companies that will mean

addressing a whole have rite of

issues There are some companies

where I don't think it was necessarily investor concerns

over pay that drove the strike.

It was an angry strategic

shareholder, not an institutional investor, a

strategic shareholders, and so

those are the companies I

suspect that will have the most

difficulty in avoiding a second

strike. But the mood in the

boardroom is definitely

changing as profits and share prices tumble. Neither BHP Billiton or Rio Tinto have

received a first strike, but

they've still axed their CEOs'

bonuses for this year. To other

finance stories and new figures

show the Eurozone struggling

economy shrank slightly in the

first quarter of the year. 0.3%

to in the three months to the

end of June Germany was the

only country to grow, expanded

by just 0.3 of 1%, but the

larjtsest economy is likely to

go backwards in the coming

months if decisive action isn't

taken. British bang Standard

Chartered have promised

millions of dollars. US banks

allege the bank hit 60,000

transactions with Iran over a

decade The bank admits some of

its transactions violated

sanctions but says it was

closer to $14 million. Standard has agreed to install a monitor

for at least two years. To the movements on the markets

overnight: This program is not subtitled

To sport now and Paul

Kennedy joins us. Good morning

to you. Good morning The

Olympics are over and our eyes start turning to rugby

again. Yes, this week is

Bledisloe Cup match and nice

and timely and although I'm

looking forward to it, I'm

fearing for the Wallabies.

Let's take a look at their

form. John Hayes Bell met the

coach and Berrick Barnes

yesterday and met the

training. It has been a long

build-up to the inaugural Rugby

Championship. Australia's Tests

against Scotland and Wales had

a distant memory We had one

day's preparation against

Scotland, so having three week

also be a lot more beneficial.

Whether it takes a while to get

going, that will remain to be

seen. I would much rather three

weeks to go in against the All

Blacks. Barnes is the chosen

No. 10. Quade Cooper must bide

his time after his knee injury

battles and a suspension which

ended his Super Rugby

season Keep doing what he is

doing, keep working with us. He

is like many others, it's the

way we come together as a group

that's key, and it's good that

he is back. Anthony Faingaa replaces Pat McCabe in the

centres and with Wycliffe Palu

out, Dave Dennis comes into the

starting line-up at blindside

flanker. Radike Samo and Drew

Mitchells' return from injury

will be on the bench. The coach

says the centre combination of

Chris Anonuevo and Sonny Bill

Williams could be APEC tackle

for the fans, but doesn't

concern his backs (Nonu) Yes,

interesting to see how they

apply their skills sets. There

is always a lot of talk about

individuals, but it's the way the teams come together.) The

Test will be at the Olympics

Stadium where the Wallabies

have a good history against the

All Blacks. It will be nice to

have the home ground

advantage. Now, many of the Australian athletes who

competed in the London Olympics

will return home today and I

just wanted to do a bit of a

whip around and wrap up some

other nations and what they're

up to. Valerie Adams we spoke

at length about yesterday. She

was finally belatedly awarded

the gold medal after the

Belarussian who won the gold in

shot-put was declared a cheat

for taking steroids. Here is a

small grab from Valerie Adams.

She is in Switzerland I think

the only disappointing thing

about the whole thing is not

being able to enjoy the moment,

have the national anthem being

sung in the stadium with

everybody there singing it

along with me. It means the world, it means all the hard

work that I've put in, being away from my family and friends, my country has all

paid off. Valerie Adams is continuing training and

preparing for events much like

some other athletes including

Sally Pearson, but other

athletes have returned home and

the American gold medal

winners, including the gymnasts

are doing the rounds and photo

opportunities and appearing on

talk shows and the like and

they are being celebrated as

they should. The South Korean

football team has been

recollected home. They can all

look forward because they won a

bronze medal. They can all look

forward to missing military

service. That's the reward for

those athletes. The South

African athletes, led into a

crowd - looks like a mall or

something there where there is

a good crowd has turned out to

celebrate the athletes from

South Africa, including Caster

Semenya and believe it or not,

there is a bit of controversy about Caster Semenya at the

moment. This is what she had to

say I would just like to tell

them that I would like to thank

them for all the support they

have given to me. I love them

and will continue making them

proud. I'm the world champ now.

Olympics still have four years

to come, yeah, like I say, it's

too much. Next year is the main

focus. Looking forward to the

world champs next year and Rio

beyond that, but there was some commentary that Caster Semenya

from one of the commentators

said she tried no the to

win Oh, really? That she

started off really slowly in

the 800m, came home very, very quickly and came home with the

silver medal and the commentary

was that she preferred not to

have all the fuss like this was

at the World champs. She said

that was ridiculous. Sheet got

her tactics wrong and will get

it right next time. South

Korean footballer,s a little

bit of controversy, after they

beat Japan 2-0. One of them

held up a sign over a

territorial dispute that has been

been going on for some time in

the Sea of Japan, so it was

seen as a political gesture. He

was banned by the IOC from

getting on the podium and

getting his bronze medal. They

had to see whether he missing

military service. As I said,

that's the reward for achieving

at the Olympic Games,, and

technically he is part of that.

So the IOC is investigating,

but he may miss out on military service Strait to DMZ. Thanks

Paul. ABC News Breakfast can be

watched live on the web. Just

go to abc.net.au/news and you

will find a link to ABC News 24 which is streamed live which is streamed live every

day. A high pressure system weakens over Queensland.

Another weak front will cross

the south-east today. This will

bring scattered showers,

although we will see more

significant falls of around

15mm about western Tasmania.

The next powerful frontal

system is due to affect south-east South Australia

tomorrow and on Friday morning

a low and associated front will

move over Victoria and

Tasmania. Throughout the day

that same frontal system will pass through New South Wales

and it looks like it will reach

Sydney late in the day. The low

will once again churn up large

ocean swells and strong

southerly winds. Around the

states:

You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. Still to come on the

program, we'll get an update on

the flood situation in the Philippines from a World Vision

worker who is in Manila. Tim

Wilson from the Institute of Public Affairs will be here to

review the day's newspapers,

and we'll be speaking to the

federal Independent MP Rob

Oakeshott to get his take on

the latest bid to restore

offshore processing. But first

here is the news with Michael. Thanks, Karina.

Leading the news this Leading the news this morning,

the Government is hoping that legislation to revive offshore

processing of asylum seekers

will be passed today. MPs will continue debating the

amendments after a marathon

session last night. Meanwhile,

the Navy has intercepted what

could be the first boat of

asylum seekers to be processed

on Nauru or Manus Island.

Ecuador has reportedly agreed

to offer asylum to WikiLeaks

founder Julian Assange.

Britain's 'Guardian' newspaper

says officials have confirmed

his request has been granted on

humanitarian grounds. A

WikiLeaks spokesman has told

the ABC will Assange is aware

of those developments but he is yet to receive official

confirmation. Tobacco companies

are waiting on the results

today of a High Court challenge

over plain packaging laws over plain packaging laws N December Australia became the

first company to ban all logos,

branding and text from

cigarette packets. Now tobacco

companies argue the law is

unconstitutional because it

removes their right to brand a

legal product. Suicide bombers

have killed dozen of people and

injured many more in a wave of

attacks in Afghanistan. More

explosions ripped through a

shopping district in the

north. And a man has been

injured in another shooting in

Sydney. Officers closed a

street in Bankstown last night after witnesses reported

hearing gunshots. A short time

later a 23-year-old man turned

up at a nearby hospital with a

bullet wound to his leg. A

tropical storm is threatening

to bring more misery to

flood-ravaged parts of the

Philippines. It comes less than

a week after torrential rains

flooded the capital Manila and

large parts of the island. More

than 90 people are dead and 4 million people have been

affected by the flooding. World

Vision aid worker Anthony

Valenzuela joins us now from

Manila. Good morning. Thanks

for your time. How severe is

this storm system and what are

people doing to prepare for it? Yes, thank you for having me. World Vision is also

partnering with local

government units and also the

Philippines coastguard in

trying to reach out to the

flood-stricken families here in

metro Manila and nearby

provinces. So far we have

trying to reach 10,000 families

and yesterday we have done our

best to reach families in the

area, so even despite the

oncoming typhoon pKai-tak. It

is not easy for World Vision

volunteers and workers to reach

to them as effectively as we

planned. Is it going to hit

exactly the same areas as the

storms from last week? Yes,

actually even from the low

storm that came last week,

families are still trying to

recover from the floods that

just came in that even could

reach up to neck level, so even

as they're trying to clean,

trying to prepare and still

save some of their properties

that have actually been damaged

from the last storm, so the rains that will pour in, in the

next coming hour, we hope that

it will end soon and we're

hoping it will end by Friday so

that families can pick up and

recover again, and it's not

easy for them, especially with

the floods. In some areas they

are still not flushed out, not dried out yet. Do authorities

have enough resources to help

the people in need and to

prepare for this next

typhoon? Well, the Government

does have enough resources but

I'm afraid the mobilisation is

not as fast as we would have

planned it. We still need

support when it comes to regarding relief goods and

reaching out to them with basic needs, such as food, water,

clothing, blankets, moss quit

tee nets, in that regard, we

still need support

here. Anthony Valenzuela, thank you very much for your

time Thank you. Another

aftershock has caused panic in

Iran just days after two

powerful earthquakes killed

moor than 300 people.

Meanwhile, rescuers have pulled

two survivors from the rubble

of their home in the north of

Tabriz. The pair are reportedly

in good health. Hospitaling are

struggling to cope with the

injured. UN chief Valerie Amos

has met members of the Syrian

Government in a bid to boost

aid in the country. Thee says

there are many in need of help.

We have a situation where

there is ongoing crisis three

months ago. We thought there

were about a million people who

need assistance. We're now

having to readvice that number

to 2.5 million. I think it's

important that all parties to

the conflict recognise that it is ordinary men and women who

are caught up in the middle of

this and it's important that

the fighting stops. Their

arrest has made headlines

around the world and attracted

the support of pop superstars

like Madonna and Sting A

Russian punk band called Pussy

Riot has vowed to continue its political political performances despite

the arrest and trial of three

of its singers. This report

from the BBC. The thrash guitar

punk rock that Pussy Riot sung

in Moscow's Cathedral of

Christ. A prayer of the Virgin Mary to rid Russia of Vladimir

Putin and four of the singers

have since spent five months in

prison. Defiant and determined

to fight on, those members of

Pussy Riots not behind bars

agreed to meet us, secretly

after midnight to avoid the

police. Some of them were involved in the cathedral

protest that landed their

friends in jail. Not because

they did something wrong but

just because somebody decide ed

to show us his power. But it's

not real power, it's fake

power. But despite the growing

risks to those who openly

oppose Vladimir Putin's rule,

the women vowed their campaign

against him will continue. The

government can arrest some

people, but it can't arrest the

whole idea. The three members

of the group in detention have

been on trial this month. The

judge passes sentence in the

controversial case on Friday

and they could spend two more

years in prison. International

superstars like Madonna and

Sting have spoken out in their support. When Madonna performed

in Moscow this month, she had

the band's name written across

her back. That led to the

Russian Deputy Prime Minister

insulting her on insulting her on Twitter. The

women have apologised for any

offence they caused by singing

in the cathedral, but their

protest against Vladimir Putin

and his ties to the Russian

Orthodox Church appears to have

touched a raw nerve. All the

same, their fellow band members insist that we have not seen

the last of Pussy Riot. Indeed,

we haven't. A painting by

renowned Australian artist ah

thour Boyd has sold for a

record price at an auction in

Melbourne. Bryan running Away

went under the hammer last

night and sold for $1.4 million. Stephanie Anderson reports. It's cause for

celebration Thank you very

much. Thrilled with the

result for Arthur Boyd's Bride

Running Away which has

established a new world record

price for the artist. Experts say it has great cultural

significance and tonight that

value has been recognised. It's

an incredibly seminal painting,

a key work in his pp evere and

is very confronting. It's part

of a series called Love,

Marriage and D'Ath of a Half-caste. It was a subject

that was close to the artist's

heart Ah thour Boyd was a great

humanist and as an artist he

explored the themes, the issues

that confronted human kind, and

this particular pointing is an

exemplary example of that, a

challenging theme, yet he stood

up to the challenge and tackled

it with great beauty. This

painting has been in a private

collection since 1969 and has

never before been offered for

public sale of the experts say

this auction was a

once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

One that may not be repeated

soon. The auction also featured works by other prominent

Australian artists, including

Brett Whiteley and Sidney

Nolan. A work by a colonial

artist known only as a Sydney

bird painter, also reached a

record, selling for more than

$200,000. A realing compelling,

almost angry piece of work,

that painting by Arthur Boyd of

the it was triggered by a trip

he made to Alice Springs in

1951. I will read you this very interesting quote from ah thour

Boyd, "I had prior to my trip

seen only one Aboriginal, a

chap around Melbourne who

played a gum leaf. I was quite unprepared for the Simpson Desert

Desert and seeing people living

like that. My contact with

Aborigines was not close at

all, but close enough to know that is simply wasn't right."

A strange and complex tabloid

is how it was described by

Sotheby's in the program. This

as the story mentioned one in a series of similar paintings

that have all sold for very,

very high prices when they've

been sold recently Very rare

that one of these comes up

because this particular

painting had been in a private

collection since way back in

1969, so quite a coup for it to be auctioned publicly. Yes,

some of the other ones in the sear ris have been sold

recently, I think one in August

last year for $1.2 million.

Another way in May of this year

for $1.2 million as well. So

they are certainly in

demand. From Pussy Riot to

Arthur Boyd, we have all the

artistic bases covered this

morning. These are our top

stories: The Government is

hoping that legislation to

revive offshore processing of asylum seekers will finally be

passed today. Meanwhile, the

Navy has intercepted what could

be the first boat to be

processed on Nauru or Manus

Island. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should soon

learn if he has been granted

asylum in Ecuador. Ecuadorian

officials are reported to have

confirmed that his request will

be accepted on humanitarian

grounds and an official

statement is expected any day now And the High Court will

today rule on a challenge to

cigarette plain packaging due

to come into force in December.

Tobacco companies have taken

the Government to court because

they say the new law is

unconstitutional. For a look at

the national newspaper this

morning we're joined by Tim

Wilson from the Institute of

Public Affairs. Good morning.

Thanks for being here. Good

morning. Before we say anything

else, what is going on with that shirt, Michael.

What do you mean? It's very

colourful and it has... Karina

was saying before she liked

it Different pattern inside.

Yes, she is a fan I'm not a

fan You are not. I like it I'm

happy to the lone voice on

'This Morning' morning. What

about your shirt? My shirt is a

very nice shirt. Anyway, first

up, a story about the Army

being sent in to build tents to

deal with the number of asylum

seekers comeg into the country.

The Government is spending $530

million to build tents for

enough for 2100 people while

these offshore processing

centres become operational on

Nauru and Manus Island. The

headline slightly misleading

because it says, "Army builds

boat city." Which quite ant

right because they're building

tents. But the Government is trying to change policy and

will have to deal with the

consequence and the facilities

where they do exist aren't operational from scratch. The

focal point of the conversation

is peers to be just how long

the asylum seekers will say on

Nauru. Scott Morrison on '7:30'

last night saying potentially

years, longer than the 4 or 5

years they stayed there under

the Howard Government? And this

is part of the problems with

the operation of the system

onshore as well. Because there

has been such a large number of people arriving on boats, et

cetera, people are staying

longer and longer in camps

while they are being processed

which is not good for anybody.

I don't think anybody sees that

as a desirable outcome

economically, socially. But

people will now go through the

no-advantage test because they

will have to wait for as lng as

they would if they had applied

in their country of original? That's right, and in

every regard we have to make sure people are processed as

quickly as possible, and so

people don't get advantage to

act as a deterrence. It shows

you how complicated it is. If

it means fewer drownings at

sea, it ace good option. I

think everybody would agree And

we will wait and see on that.

Do you want to sake a look at

the SMH front page? Yes, very

much of a follow-up story on the SMH and also 'The Age'.

Fair tax press in concert

today. Mohammed, an asylum

seeker based in West Java says,

"These policies won't stop us

from seeking asylum." When you

think you may die in Gap, there

are two ways as a refugee, you

stay there and die or you can

go to find a safe place to have

a better future. We are going

to Australia. We don't have another choice." So the

argument this is a deter rent

well remains to be debated but

I think taking someone who is

already on their way to

Australia, it's unlikely they

will change track now. The

interesting thing will be

whether it will stop people at

the source. So if people are

flying from Afghanistan, in the

case of Mr Carney, whether he

will change his track before starting on a pathway here in

the first place. And we've

already seen one boat

intercepted since this announcement

announcement was made. That's

true, but I don't think it will

matter until the law takes

effect. Very much in a grey area That's

area That's right. Moving onto the 'Financial Review' which

has the words of concerned global chief executives about

Australia not being a friendly

business environment? That's

right, the front page of the

financial review but also on

the front page of 'The

Australian'. Major CEOs of international corporations are

complaining that the carbon

tax, labour costs, the increase

in the rate of the dollar and

of course politics amongst the

VEO forum group - amongst the

CEO forum group is becoming a

major barrier. 41% say they're

less likely to invest in

Australia than they would a

year ago. Wraps in nicely with

the speech Ken Henry talked

about yesterday which talked of

lack of policy debate in the

country. A scathing one Yes, it

was scathing but the classic

case of someone who is no

longer in a position to do much

about it. " I was unhappy about

what was going on." In large

part, he is right. In my view

at least, public policy does

have serious problems in this

country, don't have proper

debates and one of the key

arguments he put forward is the Government and the community

don't do a very good job of

ceding discussions so when

change comes along, it's

understood why it's needed. I

would argue that the GST

campaign was argued effectively by the Howard Government. There

were problems with the tax

system, therefore we need

change. Whether you agree with

the change or not is a

debatable point. Moving onto the front page of the

'Advertiser'. This will be very

controversial not just in the

university of Adelaide, but

across the entire university

sector. The university talks

about abolishing vanity

courses. Let me guess Well, he

doesn't specify in the article, the Vice-Chancellor doesn't

specify what he considers to be

vanity courses but is he

complaining about the plethora

of programs that are set up by academics and then they are

never abolished and they're

very hard to align to gearing

people up to enter into the workforce, and often reflect

the pet projects and agendas of

university academics. I think

this Vice-Chancellor is going

to be in for a very hard day myself.

If you are going to make a statement like that, you need

to be specific about what these

vanity courses are, don't

you? Yes, I think so, but in

the copy I saw there wasn't a

list. But it does feed into the broarder idea about the purpose

of university education. Is it

to put people into the position

of being job ready or is it to

understand and transfer of

information from generations,

et cetera, et cetera. That's

true There is a lot of focus on

making people job ready, but

that just turn rs universities

into degree factories, so should we limit the number of

people going into university

and keep it to the more

specific purpose or fulfil this

broader role. Well, I will go

there. An arts degree could be

seen in the eyes of some to be

a vanity degree. But indeed

picking up on your later point on somebody who laugh fib

initialed an arts degree, it

provides a well rounded

education in stuff you

necessarily wouldn't get at

high school and education in

stuff in the outside world And

I still think it's too early to

say whether it's been

successful in Melbourne, about

you there is a liberal arts

component to every degree

program and then it extends out

from there through

specialisation, through

postgraduate education.

And that's similar to what

the University of WA is doing

as well, that everyone does the same courses in the first

couple of years and then you

specialise and go into

engineering or medicine or whatever it is after that.

Something like an arts degree

is so broad ranging and there are so many disciplines that

you can study and focus on,

that if you thought to get rid

of an arts degree completely,

that would take out so many

different aspects. Journalism

falls under that. If you look

at the practice in terms of

what people do at universities

these days, I think you will

find increasingly a large

number of people doing postgraduate qualification

because their undergraduate

degree only provides the foundation and they do end up

specialising, and I suspect the market is already responding to

this and universities are

already behind. Lindsay Tanner

is back in the news? He is.

This is quite an interesting

story. And how? His book

Sideshow was re-written last

year, an aft word component

which takes a critical stance

of Government's stance on media

regulation and basically argues

that media companies are both

within their right and right to

fight against the Finkel Stein

review and other measures to

regulate how the peed ia

operates. He says this in the

context of continuing to be

heavily critical of the media

and how it's conducted itself in national public life and

debate. Before you go, John on

Twitter writes, "Oh, a tireless

Tim Wilson is a fashion critic

this morning." Is this John

Hannah. He is a serial Twitter stalker. I'm following your

lead, Michael, just not with

the shirt. Gee, thanks, Tim. It

was great having you as a paper reviewer. Good luck in the

outside world. I'm just glad

you didn't critique my

outfit No, no, you always look

great, Karina. Shameless, absolutely shameless.

Australia's Olympic team is due

to arrive home in the next hour

or so. Our reporter David Coady

joins us from Sydney Airport.

Good morning, David. What's

been organised for the

homecoming? Karina, good morn

rg, I'm inside hangar 96 at the Qantas base at Sydney Airport.

This place is buzzing with

family and friends of athletes

who went over to London to

tomorrow peat in those two

weeks of competition. That's

all wrapped up now. Now it's

time for a welcome-home

celebration. They've had a lot

of successes although it should

be noted that it was the

Australian Olympic team's worst

result since 1992, but today is

all about welcoming them home

and to do that - well, the

Prime Minister is on hand, the

Opposition Leader is also here.

We're going to hear some

speeches from them as well as Australia's chef de mission

Nick Green a little bit later,

so they've chartered a Qantas

747 to bring the athletes back.

Now, while there were 410

Olympic athletes in the team,

about 280 of them are on that

plane. That's due to touch down

at about quarter past 7 Eastern

Standard Time. About half an

hour later, just over my

shoulder you might be able to

see the stairs there. We're

going to see some of

Australia's success stories

talk down those stairs to, I

anticipate, big cheers from the

crowds, warm embraces from all

their family and friends. David

Coady, we'll leave it there for

now and come back to you later

on Excitement mounts. To the rest of the day's headlines,

Paul joins us again and to a

different shade of green and

gold. Yes, the Wallabies

getting ready for the Bledisloe

Cup match in Sydney on Saturday

night, and the big selection

news was that Quade Cooper had

been overlooked to play at

fly-half. Berrick Barnes

retains the whole that he had

against the Welsh. Robbie Deans

said he wasn't taking into consideration Cooper's

performance against the All

Blacks in the World Cup last

year, it was purely what he has

seen this year. Cooper has had

time out due to a knee injury

and suspension as well. Anthony

Faingaa comes in and Drew

Mitchell is on the bench, good

to see. Sonny Bill Williams,

along with Nonu in the centres will be quite a difficult

double act to stop for the

Wallabies. And let's take a

look - we just heard there from

David Coady waiting to seat the

Australian athletes coming

home, and athletes have been

arriving home all over the

world from their performance at

the Olympics, and here is the

American gymnast s being

celebrated there at the one of

the iconic venues in the US,

and there is the South Korean

football team being welcomed

home after winning a bronze

medal beating Japan 2-0, and

there is the South African team

led by Caster Semenya who is

now a national icon, a silver

medallist to boot and a world

champion from a couple of years

ago. Let's hear from Caster

Semenya. I will just tell them

I would like to thank them for

all the support they have given

to me. I love them and I will

continue making them proud. I

have to consider we are the

world champs now. Olympics

still have four years to come,

yeah, so like I say it's too

much. Next year is the main

focus. Caster Semenya there. My

prediction for the homecoming

for the athletes in Sydney

there, there will be more

sporting officials and sponsors

in the one place than there has

ever been before Yes, a very

good guess as well. A good time

for them to state their case

and what will happen with their

sport in the next few year. You

like my shirt, don't you? I do.

I don't often notice your

shirts, but it looks

good Thanks, Paul. Vanessa is

here with the weather. To the

satellite image and skies are

looking fairly clear apart from

the cloud moving over the

southern coastline along with a

weak front. On shore winds

causing showers up on Queensland's northern tropical

coast. From tomorrow, a low and associated front will cross south-east Australia, giving

the south-east a wet and windy

end to the week. Sky also clear

over in the west and a high

pressure system. For Queensland

today:

Thanks, Vanessa. Coming up we'll we'll be welcoming home

Australia's Olympians, And the

battle over plain cigarette

packaging continues. There we

see the airport hangar at

Sydney where the plane will

arrive very shortly. We'll also

be hearing speeches from the

Prime Minister, the Opposition

Leader and the chef de mission

as Australia welcomes home the

successful Olympic team. ABC

News Breakfast is back after

this very short break.

Another boat is intercepted

as MPs prepare to reinstate

offshore processing. The time

for politicking about this is

at an end. The time for action

is here. This Program is Captioned

Live. WikiLeaks founder Julian

Assange close to being offered

asylum in Ecuador. Judgment day

- the High Court to rule on

cigarette plain packaging laws. And dozens are killed in

a wave of suicide bombings in

Afghanistan.

Good morning, you're watching ABC News Breakfast on

Wednesday, 15th August. I'm Karina Carvalho. The Federal

Government hopes the House of

Representatives will give the

nod to offshore processing

today. Shortly we'll be

speaking to the Independent MP

Rob Oakeshott who sparked this

latest attempt to find a

compromise. And a welcome home

for our particular team. I'm

David Coady inside hangar 96 at Sydney Airport. After much

Sunshine Coast Ces and some

disappointment, a chartered 747

full of Australian athletes

will arrive here for a

welcome-home celebration. All'

see it live on ABC News

Breakfast. And we'll bring that

to you later in the program.

First here is the news with

Michael. Good morning. MPs

return to Parliament to

continue debating legislation

to revive the offshore

processing of asylum seekers.

The Government is hoping the

amendments will be passed

today. Meanwhile, the Navy has

intercepted what could be the

first boat of asylum seekers to be processed on either Nauru or

Manus Island. Ecuador has

reportedly agreed to offer

asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. Britain's

'Guardian' newspaper says officials have confirmed that

his request has been granted on

humanitarian grounds. A

WikiLeaks spokesman says Mr

Assange is aware of the

developments but is yet to receive confirmation. Mr

Assange is trying to avoid

extradition to Sweden has been

sheltering in Ecuador's embassy

in London for nearly two months. Tobacco companies are

waiting on the results today

over a High Court challenge

over plain packaging laws. In December, Australia will become

the first country to ban all

logos , branding and texts from

cigarette pacts. Tobacco

companies argue the law is

unconstitutional because it

removes their right to brand a

legal product. Attorney-General

Nicola Roxon says the law is

designed to protect lives, not

profits. Suicide bombers have

killed dozens of people and

injured many more in a wave of

attacks in Afghanistan

overnight. The first was in a

busy marketplace in the

south-west of the country where

30 people were killed. Shortly

after 12 people died when more explosions ripped through a

shopping district in the north.

Many of the victims were shopping for celebrations to

mark the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. And a man has

been injured following another shooting in Sydney. Officer rs

closed off a street in

Bankstown last night after

witnesses reported hearing

gunshots. A short time later a

23-year-old man turned up at a

nearby hospital with a bullet

wound to his leg. Police are continuing their investigation. Let's take a

quick look at what the markets have been up to: Checking the national weather