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ABC News Breakfast -

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(generated from captions) This Program Is Captioned Live. The communications Minister brushes

off criticism about a

billion-dollar cost blow-out in

the NBN. This is about putting

in place the infrastructure

this country needs for the next

30, 40, 50 years. A city

submerged. At least 20 people

dead as floodwaters devastate

the Philippines capital. The

desperate search for three New

Zealand rock climbers who fell

into the sea. And an easy

cruise to another gold medal

for Australia's sailors. Good

morning. It's Thursday, 9

August. I'm Michael Rowland. I'm Karina Carvalho.

The top story on ABC News Breakfast - the Federal Opposition says it's a failure

but the Government says the

national broadband network is a

visionary proikt that's still

on track. It's been confirmed

that the NBN will cost more and

take longer to complete than

expected. The estimated price

of building the network has

risen by near ly $1.5 billion.

The Opposition says there are

no excuses for the blow-out but

the Government insists the

revised band shows the project

will deliver broadband for all

Australians and eventually pay

its own way. Political

joins frams Parliament House. correspondent Melissa Clarke

Good morning. The Government

was quick to defend the project

yesterday? They certainly

were. They're saying even

though there has been a rise in

the total cost and building of

national broadband network the construction of the

that's seen it go from 36

billion to 37.5 billion, a 4%

increase, they say it's not

much in the scheme of things

and the fact the construction

is now six months behind

deadline, Stephen Conroy, the communications Ministererse

gask two reasons for why this

is, one is because of the

building techniques they use

and to do with a policy change

that's pushed that back a bit

but he says largely the delay

is because of the time it has

taken to strike a deal with

Telstra about phasing out the

old copper network. Here he is

explaining it on Lateline last

night. The Telstra deal took 9

months longer than we forecast

for a start date. That was a

perfectly reasonable debate.

Telstra wourt to maximise the

position for their shareholders

and Mike Quigley and the NBN

team wanted to get value for

money for the taxpayers. When

we started, it was nine months

later. If you look at the

roll-out schedule since then,

we're pretty pluch on

schedule. The Opposition

remains unconvinced the project

is value for money? The

Opposition is saying with the

toit total cost going up and

operating costs have gone up,

they say it's still not value

for money even though the

Government is saying it's still

on track to have three-quarters

of a million customers

connected by the end of the

year and 12 million premises

connected by 2021 when the

project is expected to be

completed. The Opposition say

there are still too many issues

with the program and with the

roll-out and the Opposition's

communication spokesman Malcolm

Turnbull is still very scathing

in his assessment. They're

asking us to believe the NBN

Co, this arthritic snail that's creeping across the

telecommunications landscape,

is suddenly going to turn into

an Olympic sprinter. There have

been some important policy

changes to the project as well,

haven't there, Melissa? One

important thing we now have with the national broadband

network as it's being rolled

out is now when the cables

start coming near your home or

business premises, you will be

connected and you'll have to

ask if you don't want to be

connected. In the past, the NBN

Co has had to seek your

agreement to be connected up to

the new network. That's now

being reversed somewhat in that

the starting position will be

that each house and premises

will be connected up unless you

actively choose not to. So that

does add to the cost because

you're likely to see more homes

and businesses connected but

the Government is saying in the

long-term it's a better-off

position because ultimately

every one will need to be

connected once the copper connected once the

network is phased out in its entirety. Melissa Clarke in

for now and here's Michael with Canberra, we'll leave it there

the rest of the day's news.

Good morning. At least 20

people have died in the floods

in the Philippines. Much of the

capital Manila remains

underwater as torrential rain

continues to soak the region.

More than 1 million people have

been affected by the deluge.

The search resumes in New

Zealand for three people

missing in rough seas after a

climbing accident. There are

grave fears for two students

who fell from a sea cliff in new Plymouth and an instructor

who dived in to rescue them.

The rest of a rock climbing

group from a local high school

were winched to safety. The FBI

says the gunman who shot six

people dead at a Sikh temple in

win win apparently killed

himself. The police shot him in

the stomach but the fatal shot

to the head was self-inflicted. Egyptian forces have report

lade killed 20 Islamic

militants in a retaliation

attack following the death of

16 guards on Sunday. Egypt's

President has vowed to restore

security in Sinai with the

borders of Egypt, Israel and

Gaza meet. And in the end it

was more like a victory lap

than a final race. Sailors

Nathan Outteridge and Iain

Jensen have cruised to a gold

medal in the 49 stiff class.

The pair had already sciered

the top spot 48 hours earlier

after dominating that event.

Australia has consequently

moved to 11th place on the

medal tally with five gold, 12

silver and 9 bronze medals.

Let's take a quick look at

finance:

situation in the Philippines Let's get more on the

with 20 people have died in

fierce flooding. More than half

of the capital Manila is

underwater. Al-Jazeera's Margo

Ortegas reports. Traffic

through this usually busy

street in Manila isn't what it

used to be. This family hasn't

been able to open their canteen

for days now and the rain

hasn't let up. In 30 years

here, this is the worst

flooding I've seen. It came

into my home which is elevated

from the road. These monsoon

rains came after a tropical

storm swept through the

northern Philippines last week.

Damsz have spilled and rivers

over flowed, flooding 80% of

Manila. More than 1 million

people have been displaced with

hundreds stranded on rooftops

for hours awaiting rescue. More

than 80,000 people are now

living in evacuation centres

like this within, warnings to

evacuate their homes were

issued as early as Sunday

evening and the government says

it was as prepared as it

possibly could be. The one

lesson they say they've learned

here now is that there's only so

so much that can be done to

protect against the weather.

Which is where volunteer groups

like the Angel Brigade come in.

There are many like them

composed of ordinary citizens

who have come together to do

what they can to help the most

afeblingteded. They're even

mindful to use bio degradable

bags and their assistance, they

say, isn't meant to be seen as

a reflection of Government

inadequacy. In a society, I

think that tends to depend on

other people too much and we've

decided to do what we can. Even

the President of the Philippines has acknowledged

the need for help but aid alone

will not solve these people'

problems. She says it's hard,

we flee and we return home then

when it rains and floodwaters

come we flee again and then we

return home. Our lives are very

tiring, says says, but we have

no other choice. It's what many

Filipinos are calling the new

normal and Manila is an

over-populated city paying the

price of poor urban planning

and the extreme weather link ed

to global warming. Egypt's new

President is facing his first

security crisis. He's ordered

the country's armed forces into

action after Islamic militants attacked police near the border

with Israel. Mohammed Mursi

has also fired his intelligence

chief. Egypt's second field

army moved in. The President

had said he would reimpose full

control in Sinai. It's been

increasingly lawless since the

Egyptian revolution last year.

By daylight the army claimed it

had killed 20. All of them it

called terrorists. Sinai's

demilitarised under the terms

of the Israel-Egypt peace

treaty. Israel had to agree to

the do-Dployment of the army

and Air Force in the area, an

answer to Sunday's attack which

killed 16 Egyptian border

guards and broke through the

border wire into Israel. Using

a hijacked armoured vehicle

destroyed by an Israeli jet.

Sunday's attack seems to have

been gejihadists. Sinai's

lawlessness has made it into a

refuge and recruiting ground

and extremists who worry the

Egyptians as much as the

Israelis. The jihadests are a

direct challenge to Egypt's

President and the head of the

army. The violence also makes

it harder to keep Gaza

relatively calm which is an

objective for both the

President and his Palestinian

allies who run Gaza. Local

people want action. At Egyptian

soldiers' funerals there were protests against Morsi's Muslim

Brotherhood Government. On top

of economic failure and

sectarian violence as well as a

power struggle with the army

about who runs the country,

this is a problem. The area in

Sinai has become yet another

Middle East flashpoint. It's a

hotbed of smuggling through the

tunnels into Palestinian Gaza.

Violence here could threaten

the peace treaty between Israel

and Egypt. That's why the

Israelis have told the egings

to put their own house in order

rather than taking action

themselves. Sinai is a poor

region with independent-minded

Bedouin tribes, always

nudemrekted by Cairo. Egypt's

huge problems, the Government's

inexperience and its difficult relations with the military

make it even harder to control

what seems to be a growing

insurgency. Let's take a look

at the front pages of the major newspapers. The 'Canberra Times' shows Sally Pearson and

Anna Meares celebrating their

gold medal wins after coming under intense pressure to

perform. In fact you'll see

something of a theme on all of

our front pages this morning

because the 'Herald Sun'

reports Pearson and Meares are

the pride of the nation after

both winning gold in London.

The 'Advertiser' says the

golden girls have reinvigorated

Australia's Olympic campaign.

The 'Daily Telegraph' reports

Sally Pearson has become our

first Olympic hurdles champion

in more than 40 years. In the

mercury, the gold medal winning

pair go one better in London,

adding gold to their silver

medal wins in Beijing. The 'Courier-Mail' reports on Meares and Pearson conquering

the world. 'The Australian'

reports tax reform will be on

the agenda next week when the Federal Government reveals

plans to cut the corporate tax

rate to 28%. The 'Financial

Review' says the slow roll-out of the national broadband

network could allow the

Coalition to scale back the

costly project if it wins

Government at the next election. 'The Age' reports the

cost of the NBN has blown out

by $3 billion due to higher

Labor costs and a longer than

expected network footprint. In

the Western Australian, a Corruption and Crime Commission

report cleared the Police

Commissioner of wrongdoing

after allegations of inappropriate credit card use surfaced. The Northern

Territory News says a man's

parnish face an agonising wait

to find out how their son

died. We have the update from

the Federal Government, the national broadband network, the

much-touted NBN, is going to

take slightly longer and cost

sloitedly more to build. The

question we want to ask you is

all this going to be peripheral

in the enbecause do you see the

long-term benefits of the national broadband network

super fast broadband, the

ability to conduct medical

appointments online, for

teachers to use for education

purposes, do you see push ing

out what many supporters of the

NBN would argue, this static

with prices and delay s? If we

look at the number of people

connected to the NBN and using

it, the numbers are 15,000 at

the moment. In the 2010

forecast, that number was

expected to be 150,000 by this

point. If we look at the 2010 forecast for the numbers of

people using the network by

June next year, that was

supposed to be 419,000, now the

Government is saying 92,000. We

want to know your experience

and whether in fact you are

using the NBN, whether you will

use it once your area is connected. You can send emails to: Let's see how the national

weather's shaping up this

Thursday. The top stories on ABC News

Breakfast - the Government says

the NBN is still on track to

deliver broadband to all

Australians despite taking

longer and costing more than expected. The Opposition says a

$1.5 billion cost blow-out and 6-month delay shows the project

is failing. At least 20 people

have now died in floods in the

Philippines, much of the

capital Manila remains

underwater as torrential rain

continues to fall. And samers

Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen have cruised to an

Olympic gold medal at Weymouth.

The pair had already secured

the top spot 48 hours earlier

after dominating their event. Tourism operators in Far North

Queensland say things are

looking brighter after several

lean years. The areas hardest

hit by Cyclone Yasi are still a

long way from recovery but

centres like Cairns are

enjoying the best holiday season since the global

financial crisis. Brad Ryan

reports. It's the natural

beauty that makes Far North

Queensland such a popular

destination for tourists. The

Environment Minister was in the

rainforest promising a new

marketing approach to encourage

people to stay longer. No

country, no matter how much it

wanted to invest in tourism

sites, could actually create

something like the wet

tropics. Global economic

turmoil and the high Australian

Dollar have been blamed for

dramatic falls in visitor

numbers in recent years. A

widespread perception that

Cyclone Yasi left Cairns and

Port Douglas in ruins hasn't

helped either but many

operators have enjoyed a

roaring trade in recent

months. The best it's been

since the world financial

crisis. We are seeing some

real growth with respect to the

domestic visitation. Optimism

with regards to international.

That optimism's been fuelled

for plans for flights between

Cairns and China starting in

October. We've got an

opportunity of injecting

another near 1,000 visitors a

week into our community. And a

total solar eclipse in November is promising to be one of the

region's biggest ever tourism

events. We are expecting

between 30,000 to 60,000

visitors to the region. The

small to medium resorts are

pretty much booked out and the

larger resorts are reporting

very strong bookings. It all

helps as the region's industry

aims to lift annual tourism

spending by a billion dollars

by 2015. Looks absolutely

fantastic there. A new survey

has found Australian exporters

are coping well despite the

high dollar and carbon tax.

The DHL export barometer found

confidence has bounced back

after a significant dip last

year and the survey says half

of the exporters expect a

profitable year ahead. Let's

take a look at the markets and

it was a quiet night:

Just before the sport

headlines we have the annual

result said of news corporation

just hitting the screens on

Wall Street. Another hefty

profit reported by Rupert

Murdoch's global media empire

operating income up 13% to 5.6 billion but a quick read

through what is still a very

long report shows a very

interesting figure. 224 million

dollars has been set aside to describe what the company

describes as costs of the ongoing investigation into

initiating the closure of the

'News of the World', shorthand for the phone hacking

investigation, that 200 million

dollars likely to be set aside

at least for the start of

damages pay-outs expected for

the victims of phone hacking in

the years ahead. We'll look in

detail at the Newscorp report

later in the program. To sport

now and Paul Kennedy joins us.

Another gold medal. Yes, we'll

go straight to England now and

our reporter Amanda Shalala is

standing by at Olympic Park to

tell uBs the sailing and

Weymouth is a place we know

well now and it seems like it's

got more good news, maybe some

more good news on the way too.

Good morning. Good morning.

Nathan Outteridge and Iain

Jensen's gold medal journey

didn't start in Weymouth, it

actually started in Wonji

Wonji, a little town on the NSW

Central Coast. The two grew up

down the road from each other

and now all these years later

they're sharing an Olympic gold

medal together in the 49er

class. All they needed to do in

today's final medal race was

essentially compete and make an

effort to finish. They finished

fourth to claim that gold

medal. They received the medals

now, hanging around their

necks. They're very proud and

Nathan Outteridge says it was a

strange race but ultimately one

that was very rewarding. We'd

already won. We were enjoying

the moment. It was good fun. It

was probably stressful for

everyone else trying to win the

bronze medal. We were trying to

keep out of everyone's way. A

shame it wasn't that windy. It

was a built of a stressful race because it wasn't windy.

What's the chances of us winning more medals at

Weymouth? Page and Belcher are

2 of the sailors hoping to get

some? That in the 470 class

and they're doing well. People

probably haven't heard about

the women's Elliott, the

women's crew is into the

semifinals. Next up the Aussies

face Finland in the semis and

if they win that they'll be

guaranteed a medal and maybe

could go all the way to gold.

There's certainly something in

the water at Weymouth for

Australian sailors. Let's dip

into the facility behind you

there with the track and field

and Steve Hooker looked quite

comfortable, although we only

saw about 10 seconds of him

last night in the pole vault

qualifying. There were some

concerns over Steve Hooker

earlier in the year when he

admit heed had a case of the

yips and a crisis of

confidence. He only had to make

one jump 5.5m and that was

enough to see him through to

the final. It was a bit of a curious qualification though because there are usually 12

men that go through to a final

in the pole vault. Officials

have decided to let 14 men through after all the athletes came together and said, "We

don't want to have to jump

again. We've all cleared this

height. Let us 33," so they

have been allowed to compete

and that will be in a couple of

days' time. Athletics Australia

head coach Eric Hollingsworth

says there are other medal

chance toosz look out for

de-Bicides Steve Hooker For us in track and field we're only

halfway through the program so

it's not time for reflection

really, it's time for

continuing our performance.

We're where we want to be

halfway through the meet. We've

got two medals so far and

obviously Steve jumped really

well today in qualifying so

goes in a couple of days and we

hope together for medal and

we've got three great walkers,

Jarred Banister in the javelin

and we'll end up with a 4x4 who

are a medal contention as well.

There's still a lot of work to

do. What can you tell us about

the BMX? Is Australia has a couple of stand-out performers

in that sport? Australia's

female time trial world

champion Caroline Buchanan has

qualified fast frs the

semifinals of the women's BMX

event, looking in very good

shape. She is one of the

favourites to take gold. Lauren

Reynolds from Australia is

through to the semis. Men have

quarterfinals before the semis

because there are more

competitors. Sam Willoughby

who's Australia's world chomp

in the men's event is through

along with two other Aussies.

Looking good for the

Australians. Watch out for the

final stage on Friday. We're

really a good chance of picking

up more medals. And Amanda,

just want to touch on the

events that don't include any

Aussies but plenty of people

are waiting to see. Who will

been the men's 200m final? The

semis have been run and the

women's 200m final has been run

and Veronica Campbell Brown

wasn't able to do it? No, and

Shelly Anne Fraser Price wasn't

able to do the double either.

It was Alan Felix from the

United States who won gold and

it a wonderful story. She was

second in Athens, second in

Beijing, she has come back

again in London and this time

she has claimed the ultimate

Olympic gold. In the men's 200m

semis, Usain Bolt has eased

through, the third-fastest

qualifier for the semis behind

his countryman Yohan Blake but Bolt just eased through and he

said it he can do the

double-double of winning the

100 and 200 at two consiccative

Olympics he'll consider

thimself a legend and I think

the consensus would be he is a

legend if he does do

that. Aries Merit has just won

the 110m hurdles and I just wanted to get your thoughts on

the water polo, the Australian

men played Serbia, it was a big

mountain to climb and they

almost did it, playing

exceptionally well? I was out at this scmach the Australians

played so well. They really

gave it to the Serbians who are

so far undefeated at this

tournament. The Sharks led at

every change but the Serbians

just stepped it up physically

and in terms of skill in that

final quarter they scored six

unanswered goals to beat the

Australians by three. The

Sharks will now play for a

place and hope to equal their

best ever finish of fifth

placing. And well done to them.

Thanks very much, Amanda

Shalala in London. And just

keeping photo of Craig

Mottram's performance yesterday

and Colis Birmingham, both in

the 5,000m. Didn't get through

to the next stage of the event

but Craig Mottram said maybe he

might want to try and run a

marathon now and might run a

marathon in Rio. He's found a

little bit of peace of mind in

the last couple of years in

running. He went through a

tough time and now he's quite

happy with himself and didn't

look too shattered by the

5,000m result. He went hard and

gave it his best but competing

in the long distance event is

very difficult. Another big challenge for the Australians

coming up with the Boomers

going up against the Dream

Team. That's right. Nothing to worry about there, is there?

No, well, it's not unheard of

for America to lose a match. It

has happened before. It won't

happen this time but it will be

great for Australian to compete

against that team. Going in,

the big debate was whether this

team was as good as 1992 so

that's how good this team is.

And also whether in fact the

Dream Team would compete after

this Olympics. Yes, we'll wait

and see but I think they will.

I think it's the biggest ticket

in town really. All the other athletes want to go and watch

them. They are had rock stars

of the Olympics. Some sports I

don't think have made that jump

from being a professional era

sport in the Olympics at the

moment. I don't think tennis

works that well but I think

basketball works really well

and it's one advancement the

Olympics has made. Stay for a

moment, PK, because in the

United States, political

advertising has become

something of a sport. It's a

presidential campaign dominated

by negative ads, more so than

any campaign I can remember. Here's the latest rather

amusing from a Democrat leaning

political group. Do you have

something to hide? Well, yeah. Jump in.

#

Hi, Romney! Hi, miss. Do

you have something to hide?

Well, yeah. Jump in.

# I'm a Romney girl

# In a Romney world

# Life is taxless

# It's fantastic

# Silver tip your hair

# Tax cuts everywhere #

I'm Mitt Romney, let's go party.

# I'm a Romney girl in a Romney world

# He's so plastic, it's fantastic

# Silver tip your hair

# Tax shelters everywhere

# Bane is his creation

# He's a boss millionaire with accounts everywhere

# He'll disclose all the dough

that he's banking #

# You can't see, we hate

transparency

# If you knew we'd be screwed # Spanky-spanky #

# He is rich, you are poor

# If he wins you're uninsured

# I'm a Romney girl

# In a Romney world

# Life is taxless... I'm a

Romney girl. What do you

reckon? I reckon that's a

vote-winner for Romney. Most

people are going to go, "Yeah,

he looks fun." I don't know

what I'd be concerned about,

being accuse cheded of having

hidden Swiss bank accounts or

being accused of silver tipping

his hair. Thanks for that.

I'll listen to that music in my

head all morning now. That

Barbie Girl song, once it's in your head it doesn't go away

for a while. We will have more

on that later, as we will on

the Olympics. Thank you. It's

still in my ear. Get out! Stop.

Paul Higgins is here with the

weather now. Thank you and

good morning to you. Clear

skies again across the north

today. Not much happening in the southwest but in the

southeast a cold 41 is sweeping

through bringing a burst of

cold air which shows up as

speckled cloud. That unstable

southwesterly wind going to

trigger showers and snow down

to low levels today. In

Queensland it's all about the

sunshine. Apart from high cloud

over the far south and possible

showers on the northeast

tropical coast, Brisbane should

be mostly sunny today. This program is not subtitled You're watching ABC News Breakfast. It's great to have

your company this morning.

Still to come, RN's Jonathan

Green joins us to look at the

Thursday morning newspapers.

We'll speak to the boss of the national broadband network,

Mike Quigley, on those extra

billions he needs to finish the

job. And we'll look at an

important survey of 700 export businesses. Has confidence

indeed bounced back after the

global financial crisis? We'll

find out but first here's the

news with Carina. Leading the

news this morning - the Federal

Opposition says it's a failure

but the Government says the

national broadband network is a

visionary project that's still

on track. It's been confirmed

the NBN will cost more and take

longer to complete than

expected. The estimated price

of building the network has

risen by nearly $1.5

billion. At least 20 people

have now died in floods in the Philippines. Much of the

capital Manila remains

underwater as torrential rain

continues to fall. The search

resumes in New Zealand this

morning for three people

missing in rough seas after a

climbing accident. There are

grave fears for two students

who fell from a sea cliff in

new Plymouth and an instructor

who dived in to rescue them.

The rest of the rock climbing

group from a local high school

were winched to safety. The FBI

says the gunman who shot six

people dead at a Sikh temple in

Wisconsin apparently kill ed

himself. It had been thought police shot and killed Wade

Michael Page. Authorities now

say police shot him in the

stomach but the fatal shot to

the head was self-inflicted.

Sailors Nathan Outteridge and

Iain Jensen have cruised to a

gold medal in the 49er skiff

class. The pair had already

secured the top spot 48 hours

earlier after dominating the

event. Let's get more on our

top story. It's been confirmed

the NBN will cost more and take

longer to complete than earlier

expected. Stephen Conroy says

reaching a deal with Telstra

delayed the roll-out. The

Telstra deal took 9 months

longer than we forecast for a

start date. That was a

perfectly reasonable debate.

Telstra were out to maximise

the position for their holders

and Mike Quigley and the NBN

team wanted to get value for

money for taxpayers. When we

started, it was nine months

later. If you look at the

actual roll-out schedule since

then, we're pretty much on

schedule so the delays due to

the Telstra deal - we have been

saying this for over a year, in

termers of the construction

forecasts, we said forecasts, we said back in

February - and murp said, "I'm

going to hold you to this," we

said 758,000 homes under

construction or completed by December this year and we are

on target to meet that. OK but

we'll go into the details in a

moment but any sort of delay

bumps you up against the

effective deadline of the end

of next year which is when an

election will be held and the

Coalition is basically

threatening to scrap the

network or at least freeze it

in place so you could end up

with a certain part of the

country with the NBN and the

rest of the country with no NBN so from your point of view any

delay could be disastrous for

the network. That is what I

meant. The NBN has never been

about one election. We said

from the day we announced it,

this is a 9 to 10-year build.

This is about putting in place the infrastructure the country needs for the next 30, 40, 50

years. This was never going to

be built in a way that could be

used as an election carrot,

this is being built over 10 years. We said that from day

one and we are on target,

despite that 9-month delay, NBN

Co will still deliver a

completion date only six months

after the originally announced

completion date. We're asking

your views on whether the NBN

is still worth it despite the

cost blow-outs and delays in

the roll-out of the network. "I

work in IT every day and I'm

waiting for things to download.

NBN is needed and will be worth

it." Keep the views coming into

us.

At least 20 people have now

died in flootedz in the

Philippines. Much of the

capital Manila remains

underwater as torrential rain

continues to soak the region.

The aid agency World Vision is

preparing relief for tens of

thousands of people and the

organisation's spokeswoman

joins us from Manila now. Good

morning. How serious is the

situation on the ground there?

Right now it's very challenging

because for the last 72 hours

we experienced this torrential

rain and the flooding is from 3

feet to 6 feet and our relief

assessment team who were

deployed last night have

difficulty accessing some of

the areas but they were able to

visit evacuation centres.

People in the evacuation

centres are cramped and need

food, clothing, water and

medicine. How serious a

medical issue is it? Are we

seeing any water-borne

diseases, for instance,

breaking snout In terms of

health conditions, they need

medicines for cough and colds

especially also for spirosis

medicine. We would like to

inform you that children are

the most vulnerable in terms of

their condition in cramped

evacuation centres. There are

obviously tens of thousands of

people potentially, if not

already homeless there, are there enough relief shelters

for these people to go to to

escape the flooding? Actually,

90% of Manila is flooded. There

are evacuation centres they can

go to but not all the people go

to evacuation centres. Some of

the people decided to stay in

their homes even though it's

flooded and they stayed on top

of the roof especially the male

members of the family. Those

were in evacuation centres is

the children, women and elderly

people in their families. What

sort of extra help do

organisations like yours need

to help deal with what is going

to be a fairly extensive relief

operation on the ground there?

We are working closely with the

Government because transport is

a basic issue because villagers

are still underwater, 3 feet to

6 feet underwater. Woo are mobilising truck those that

we'll be able to we'll be able to distribute

today in the evacuation centres

and we are providing food and

nonfood items in the evacuation

centre s we are prioritising

those areas that are heavily

damaged like Manila but we will

be responding to 11 cities in

metro Manila and to 10,000

families equivalent to 50,000

individual those we need more

help, more assistance from the different sectors of the

society like volunteers,

Government, corporations,

donors and sponsors so that

we'll be able to provide relief

assistance to 10,000

families. Our thoughts are with

all of those caught up in the

floods and on the ground. Thank

you for the update. Let's

update you now on news from

overseas and the Syrian army's

ramping up its offensive in the

crucial battle for Aleppo.

Images emerging from the city

show buildings reduced to

rubble by heavy weapons. There

are conflicting reports that

the army has taken control of

the city's main battlefields.

Rebel activists claim they've

launched a successful counterattack after receiving

further reinforcements. A

Muslim sect in Russia has been

charged with cruelty to

children for imprisoning them

underground. Police found 27

children and 38 adults living

in dark unheated catacombs dug

beneath the home of the sex

leader. Some of the children

had never seen the light of

day. The children have been

freed and their parents charged

with child abuse. A Thai court

has sentenced two men convicted

of killing an Australian travel

agent in Phuket to life in

prison. The men avoided the

death penalty because they

cooperated with police and

pleaded guilty. And Amnesty

International has released

satellite images they claim

showed the increased use of

heavy weaponry in and around

the Syrian city of Aleppo.

There we see an aerial shot

taken on the out skirts of

Aleppo. They reveal more than

600 craters that Amnesty says were likely created by

bombs. Some of the creators

were very close to residential

homes. Amnesty wants to point

out they will document any

attacks against civilians so

that those who are responsible

can be held to account. It's a

pitch battle continuing for Aleppo. A very strategic city.

Syria's largest, but it's

strategic because it is close

to the Turkish border and the

rebels have long sought to

control Aleppo because they

know if they control Aleppo

those routes are open to get

arms and other assistance from

Turkey and other countries

seeking to help the rebel cause

as the international effort to

force Assad from power

continues apace. To another

story being watched closely by

the Chinese gi.. the wife of

ousted Chinese politician Bojei

Li will go on trial today.

Stephen McDonnell previews the

case. At this courtroom in south-eastern China, there will

be hearing later today of enormous social and political

consequences. The wife of BoxeiLi, disgraced politician,

is being charged with murder.

She's said to have poisoned a British businessman Neil

Haywood, who was a close

associate of the family. We

don't know a lot about what's

going to happen today but I'll

take you through it from the

beginning of how we got to this

point. Li was in charge of this

mega city in the west of the

country. His police chief at

one point bOmented from the

city and - bolted from the city

and went to the US consulate

offering to give the Americans

information. This information

was said to have been relating

to a murder that Li's wife had

murdered this British

businessman. Now we're still

not clear what the motive is

said to have been because

really all of this has been

shrouded in secrecy but either

way, Li is then subsequently

dismissed from all his

political positions. Fast

forward to today and the

hearing is actually on where

his wife will be facing a judge

who'll be looking at the

question of whether or not she

really did murder Neil Haywood.

What's not going to happen

today? We're not going to be

allowed in. I can't imagine

they'll let the press anywhere

near the hearing. The lawyers

are not going to speak to us

and the British diplomats who

have been allowed in to listen

to this, I might be wrong but I

don't think they're going to

speak to us about what's going

on so there's going to be a

fair bit of guessing about

what's taking place in the

courtroom. What we do know is

there are a few things - the

wire service is closely linked

to the Government here, in fact

if Shinwa says something it's

what the Government says and

according to Shinhua, the

accused has offered a partial

defence because she's said to

have been acting as a way

offect forring her son. This

might be a way of building up

an excuse for not giving her the death penalty because order

nyrled you'll expect an

ordinary Chinese person faced

with murder charges not only to

go down but also to face the

death penalty. The other thing

they've said is the evidence

against her is irrefutable.

That not only means she's

probably going to lose but it

also suggests that she may have

already pleaded guilty. China

correspondent Stephen

McDonnell. Well, the British

actor Bob Hoskins has been

diagnosed with Parkinsons

disease. He's retiring after a

career spanning four

decades. Hoskins rose to fame

in British gangster films and

went on to become a major

Hollywood star. He's released a

statement thanking fans for a wonderful career and also

asking for privacy as he

battles his condition. He's

just 69. I know and it's

really tragic. I know

Alzheimer's is a problem that affects all age groups but has

a dominance in the older demographics. Our thoughts are

with him as well. Was heent a

fantastic actor. He played the

gangster, the serious thug

rolerary well over the years. You're watching ABC News

Breakfast. The top stories -

the Government says the NBN is

still on track to deliver

broadband to all Australians

despite taking longer and

costing more than expected. The

Opposition says a $1.5 billion

cost blow-out and a 6-month

delay shows the project is

failing. At least 20 people

have now died in the floods in

the Philippines. Much of the

capital Manila remains

underwater as torrential rain

continues to fall. Sailors Nathan Outteridge and Iain

Jensen have cruised to an

Olympic gold medal at Weymouth.

The pair had already secured

the top spot 48 hours earlier

after dominating the event.

We're joined by Jonathan green

for a look at the newspapers.

We're going to take a look at

Australia's golden girls from

yesterday but a slightly

different take? There's a bit

of it about as you would

expect. Apparently Sally

Pearson won the hurdles. Who

knew. This is an interesting

thing with newspapers where their rart a complete disadvantage in this sort of

event. This was all yesterday

- More than 24 hours ago.

Suddenly it's on the front of

every paper. Anyway, it's also

on page 14 of the 'Financial Review', the inevitable story

about how rich Sally Pearson

may now become. Apparently

three times her value what it

was before the hurdle win and

she's going to make more money

than Meares more because

athletics is a broader appeal

apparently. That's just

incredible when you look at the

popularity of the sports, isn't

it? That's true. They make the

point with Anna Meares that

cycling is of course incredibly

popular and she may be able to

ride the crest of that wave,

perhaps less so than Cadel

Evans who was the Tour De France winner. There's France winner. There's a divide

here between people who ride on

a road and people who ride on a

track but perhaps her track

victory may be more female

friendly than the obvious

machismo of the tour. Qantas

for one has been quick to leap

on Sally Pearson's victory. In

a lot of newspapers this

morning there are big ads, "Our

Sally," with the Qantas logo

displayed prominently. While

they don't have to pay for it? That's right. On the other

hand, a certain bank backed

James Magnussen heavily. The

major bank starting with C. Big

campaign before the Olympics,

investing lot of marketing.

It's a very tricky course for

companies to follow. Perhaps best to wait about till the

results are in. But they're

snapped up by then. That's the

problem. There's going to be a

lot of snapping up for Sally

Pearson. I think that's the

conclusion of the marketers who've

who've been surveyed. Go her.

And is it something to be said

about women as well, that they

get treated differently in

sport and maybe don't earn as

much as the men? I suspect

that may well be likely. I

don't the-V the figures on that

but you would think given the

way that women's sports are

funded, the profile in the off

season they attract that that

would follow, although we've

had big heroes in the past.

Thorpie is one. Well, Shane Gould. Depends who wins, I

think is the thing. They cross

the genders. Let's go to the

'Financial Review' which delves

into the cartoons- Quickly, I

just thought we had to see this

wonderful David Rowe who has

taken a hurdling theme to the

political situation. I love that Kevin Rudd is still lingering in the background.

He's got the number 13 on his

chest. How tempted would Julia

Gillard be to accidentally knock over the first

hurdle. Tony Abbott, the first

and last hurdle. And Julia

Gillard ready to jump in. And

I love it's called the Polly

limpics. Dare to dream. Isn't

it wonderful. There's an

emerging consensus here, Barry Jones, former Minister in a

Labor Government, the ALP

President grandee and

pick-a-box champion, let's not

forget, here we go, our stupid

discussion. The dumbing down of

our discourse is Barry's text

and he makes a really powerful

argument in a speech he gave

over night and says we're not

doing ourselves any favour,

that managerialism has overtaken our political

process. It's become

infantalised, deformed,

anti-intellectual. He makes an

interest ing comparison in his

speech back to 1860 when

Abraham Lincoln delivered an

incredibly complex argument in

a speech about slavery which

was reported in full, broadly

discussed through primitive

media mechanisms. He makes the

contrast with now where our

media mechanism is inkrybleed

sophisticated and yet the

message is astoundingly dumb.

What have we What have we gained between

1860 and now? Not much, is

Barry's argument. That's not

necessarily the media's

failing. He says the media is

significantly to blame in this.

We have this amazing resource

at our fingertips. It is what

we do with it that's at

question. It's not that any

particular part of the equation

is to blame but for combination

lowers the tone. Of PR

machines, spin might sayers and

the media. And the politicians

who have changed had game of

politics something away from ideas and more towards

individuals. 140 characters or

less. It's throughout. Tweet

away. He also mentions the

manic polling is. It the media obsess would the polling more

so than the politician s? The

game of politics has been so

refined that you can manage so

you don't do anything

extravagant after your first

six months because that's going

to poll poorly and perhaps

affect your popularity so for

the bulk of your term in

politics you do nothing and

manage your survival and that

of course is the death of ideas and new thought and

policy. Let's move on to 'The

Australian' and the story about

the diggers. Yes indeed. This

is Peter Leahy, the former head

of army. There's a bit of

kerfuffle going on in Defence.

Thrrds a new white paper coming

up in 2013. The defence

Minister is giving a major

speech today at the loey

institute, there's a bit of

positioning going on, I think.

Mr Lea hrge y is saying cuts is

getting to the point where

diggers lives are at risk. There's a sense from the Defence Minister that the high

expectations are that 2009

white pape going to be rolled

over into the 2013 white paper

and the big expect eggs there

are about big equipment

purchases, submarines and the

like. That combined with cuts

to the Budget, there's this

consensus view emerging, says

the former head of army, is

starting to undermine the

operational effectiveness of

our forces. The 'Herald Sun'.

Andrew Bolt has waded into the

public debate this morning.

This is the power kerfuffle

that Julia Gillard went out

with yesterday saying that

perhaps the issue with power

costs is the infrastructure and

the argument here is around air

conditioning basically. Just

stop and if our viewkers see

that before we go on, Jonathan.

Just have a look at that first

part. How many dead pensioners does Julia Gillard Julia

Gillard need to save her

useless carbon tax? Debate and

discuss. Andrew nuances the

argument to his last paragraph

which says how many pensioners

must fry so, it's not only a sophisticated turn of argument

but a good headline. What were

we saying about the

dumbing-down of debate? Its-F

we don't want to pay the high

power bills perhaps we need to

smkt some uncertainty in

supply. That, argues Andrew,

will result in dead pensioners

on hot days. What you could say

counter to that is maybe the

bulk of people who insist on

using air conditioning on a hot

day could perhaps moderate that

demand that might save some

pensioners. The debate seems to

be going towards there's the

sense we all of-V of the things

we need to keep ourselves

comfortable is creating a

pretty high demand on a very

expensive demand as well. Let's

move on to the story in the age

that you're quite amused about

on Twitter yesterday. Yes, the

intern from Melbourne

University journalism who went

to the 'Herald Sun' and

discovered a nest of

heteronormity transphobic white people. Het row what?

Heteronormative was one of the

expressions used in the article

the intern wrote for university

paper anonymously but the

intern was outed overnight. The

'Herald Sun' went on the front foot. 'The Age' has written

about it with some amusement.

I thought one of the most

interesting things was this was

her second internship at the

paper so he she went back. I

was so appalled by what I

discovered the first time round

I had to go back to confirm my

findings. Nick Leahy from 'The

Australian' said she went to

work for a tabloid newspaper

and discovered, shock horror,

she was surrounded by tabloid

journalists. I think it will

be viewed with some

skepticism. I'm not sure her

employment prospects are

looking good. Not at the

'Herald Sun', no. Jonathan

Green, thank you. Well, this is

a story you've been keen on

this morning and it's a thief

with a sweet tooth who's been

caught on security camera in

Colorado. The intruder waited

until the Rocky Mountain

Chocolate Shop was closed

before forcing open the door.

Now, one helping apparently

wasn't enough for the big guy.

He came back a second time and

apparently big bad bear was

most partial to peanut butter

cups and appropriately

chocolate-covered cookie bear

biscuits. Police not

surprisingly won't be pressing

any charges. What do you give a

bear that comes into your candy

shop? The whole shop.

Absolutely anything he

wants. Paul Kennedy, a noted

sweet tooth here on the couch.

I thought it sounded eerily

similar to the plot from the

original blinky bill. Imagine

if there was CCTV back in

blinky bill's day. They

wouldn't have been able to have

the rest of the story. They

would have snatched him. A

couple of good find this

morning in the first a hour of

the show. To sailing and

Australia has won another gold

medal. Nathan Outteridge and

Iain Jensen won in the sailing

in the 49er class and so that's

another gold medal for

Australia in the sailing and

there is maybe another one on

the way and Mary Gearin is down

there at lovely Weymouth and

filed this report on Australia's sailing success. I'm at Weymouth on the

south coast of England for what

turned out to be the most

predictable gold of Australia's

Games, that was for the sailors

in the 49 class. Nathan

Outteridge and Iain Jensen, the

duo from lake Macquarie, all

they had to do in the medal

race was turn up and cross the start

start line. Threats hear from

them now. It was a bit

strange. We'd already won and

we urjust enjoying the moment

and it was actually really good

fun. It was probably really

stressful for everyone else

trying to win bronze and we

were trying to keep out of

everyone's way as much as we

could. A shame it wasn't that

windy. It was a stressful race

because it wasn't that windy.

Had to make good tactical

decision. It was fun once we

finished. We both learned to

sail at Wonji sailing club on

lake Macquarie. Ian was a few

years younger than me and his

older brother was a few years

older than me. A lot of the

families we grew up sailing

with have come to watch us

sail. It's been a special week

for us. As we got old weir start racing against each other

more, did a few events together

and worked out we and worked out we sailed well

together. It's just great that

after the last Olympics we were

able to team up and we've

almost been unstoppable since

then. We're on a good thing

and we work well together and

our coach is unreal and the

whole week he's been going,

"Look after the equipment

because we night need that

again in 4 years," and things

like that. We'll be definitely

looking to go into the Games

together. And just a brief

one, Steve Hooker got through

to the final of the pole vault

last night so lot of people

would have seen that. 14 people

went through. We'll have more

results on all the winners from

overnight a little later in the program. Good to see 93 sign

of the yips for Steve Hooker.

He looks focused. He is

looking very good. Paul is here

with twhyrt now. Good morning.

Most of the weather action is

in the southeast today with a

cold and unstable southwesterly

wind in the wake of a cold

front bringing showers and snow

to low levels.

This Program Is

Captioned Live. The

communications Minister brushes

off criticism about a

billion-dollar cost blow-out in

the NBN. This is about putting

in place the infrastructure

this country needs for the next

30, 40, 50 years. A city

submerged. At least 20 people

dead as floodwaters devastate

the Philippines capital. The

desperate search for three New

Zealand rock climbers who fell

into the sea. And an easy cruise to another gold medal

for Australia's sailors. Good

morning. You're watching ABC

News Breakfast on Thursday, 9

August. I'm Karina Carvalho.

Shortly, we'll be talking to

the man in charge of the

national broadband network,

Mike Quigley, about

cost-blow-outs and delays. And

have Romney rop's detractors

gone too far? I'm Mitt Romney, let's go party.

# I'm a Romney girl in a Romney world

# He's so plastic, it's fantastic

# Silver tip your hair

# Tax shelters everywhere

# Bane is his creation #

That song is going to be stuck

in your head all day. This new

attack ad by a liberal think

tank is causing a stir in the

United States. We'll take a

closer look at it later in the

program. Good morning. The

Federal Opposition says it's a

failure but the Government says

the national broadband network

is a visionary project that is still on track. It's been

confirmed the NBN will cost more and take longer to

complete than expected. The

estimated price of building the

neptwork has risen by nearly

1.5 billion dollars. At least

20 people have now died in those floods in the